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1.  Germ line variation in TP53 regulatory network genes associates with breast cancer survival and treatment outcome 
Germ line variation in the TP53 network genes PRKAG2, PPP2R2B, CCNG1, PIAS1 and YWHAQ was previously suggested to have an impact on drug response in vitro. Here, we investigated the effect on breast cancer survival of germ line variation in these genes in 925 Finnish breast cancer patients and further analyzed 5 SNPs in PRKAG2 (rs1029946, rs4726050, rs6464153, rs7789699) and PPP2R2B (rs10477313) for 10-year survival in breast cancer patients, interaction with TP53 R72P and MDM2-SNP309, outcome after specific adjuvant therapy, and correlation to tumor characteristics in 4701 invasive cases from four data sets. We found evidence for carriers of PRKAG2-rs1029946 and PRKAG2-rs4726050 having improved survival in the pooled data (HR 0.53, 95% CI 0.3–0.9; P = 0.023 for homozygous carriers of the rare G-allele and HR 0.85, 95% CI 0.7–0.9; P = 0.049 for carriers of the rare G allele, respectively). PRKAG2-rs4726050 showed a significant interaction with MDM2-SNP309, with PRKAG2-rs4726050 rare G-allele having a dose-dependent effect for better breast cancer survival confined only to MDM2 SNP309 rare G-allele carriers (HR 0.45, 95% CI 0.2–0.7; P = 0.001). This interaction also emerged as an independent predictor of better survival (P = 0.047). PPP2R2B-rs10477313 rare A-allele was found to predict better survival (HR 0.82, 95% CI 0.6–0.9; P = 0.018), especially after hormonal therapy (HR 0.66, 95% CI 0.5–0.9; P = 0.048). These findings warrant further studies and suggest that genetic markers in TP53 network genes such as PRKAG2 and PPP2R2B might affect prognosis and treatment outcome in breast cancer patients.
doi:10.1002/ijc.27884
PMCID: PMC4159753  PMID: 23034890
TP53; MDM2; PRKAG2; PPP2R2B; breast cancer; hormonal therapy
2.  Identification of New Genetic Susceptibility Loci for Breast Cancer Through Consideration of Gene-Environment Interactions 
Schoeps, Anja | Rudolph, Anja | Seibold, Petra | Dunning, Alison M. | Milne, Roger L. | Bojesen, Stig E. | Swerdlow, Anthony | Andrulis, Irene | Brenner, Hermann | Behrens, Sabine | Orr, Nicholas | Jones, Michael | Ashworth, Alan | Li, Jingmei | Cramp, Helen | Connley, Dan | Czene, Kamila | Darabi, Hatef | Chanock, Stephen J. | Lissowska, Jolanta | Figueroa, Jonine D. | Knight, Julia | Glendon, Gord | Mulligan, Anna M. | Dumont, Martine | Severi, Gianluca | Baglietto, Laura | Olson, Janet | Vachon, Celine | Purrington, Kristen | Moisse, Matthieu | Neven, Patrick | Wildiers, Hans | Spurdle, Amanda | Kosma, Veli-Matti | Kataja, Vesa | Hartikainen, Jaana M. | Hamann, Ute | Ko, Yon-Dschun | Dieffenbach, Aida K. | Arndt, Volker | Stegmaier, Christa | Malats, Núria | Arias Perez, JoséI. | Benítez, Javier | Flyger, Henrik | Nordestgaard, Børge G. | Truong, Théresè | Cordina-Duverger, Emilie | Menegaux, Florence | Silva, Isabel dos Santos | Fletcher, Olivia | Johnson, Nichola | Häberle, Lothar | Beckmann, Matthias W. | Ekici, Arif B. | Braaf, Linde | Atsma, Femke | van den Broek, Alexandra J. | Makalic, Enes | Schmidt, Daniel F. | Southey, Melissa C. | Cox, Angela | Simard, Jacques | Giles, Graham G. | Lambrechts, Diether | Mannermaa, Arto | Brauch, Hiltrud | Guénel, Pascal | Peto, Julian | Fasching, Peter A. | Hopper, John | Flesch-Janys, Dieter | Couch, Fergus | Chenevix-Trench, Georgia | Pharoah, Paul D. P. | Garcia-Closas, Montserrat | Schmidt, Marjanka K. | Hall, Per | Easton, Douglas F. | Chang-Claude, Jenny
Genetic epidemiology  2013;38(1):84-93.
Genes that alter disease risk only in combination with certain environmental exposures may not be detected in genetic association analysis. By using methods accounting for gene-environment (G × E) interaction, we aimed to identify novel genetic loci associated with breast cancer risk. Up to 34,475 cases and 34,786 controls of European ancestry from up to 23 studies in the Breast Cancer Association Consortium were included. Overall, 71,527 single nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs), enriched for association with breast cancer, were tested for interaction with 10 environmental risk factors using three recently proposed hybrid methods and a joint test of association and interaction. Analyses were adjusted for age, study, population stratification, and confounding factors as applicable. Three SNPs in two independent loci showed statistically significant association: SNPs rs10483028 and rs2242714 in perfect linkage disequilibrium on chromosome 21 and rs12197388 in ARID1B on chromosome 6. While rs12197388 was identified using the joint test with parity and with age at menarche (P-values = 3 × 10−07), the variants on chromosome 21 q22.12, which showed interaction with adult body mass index (BMI) in 8,891 postmenopausal women, were identified by all methods applied. SNP rs10483028 was associated with breast cancer in women with a BMI below 25 kg/m2 (OR = 1.26, 95% CI 1.15–1.38) but not in women with a BMI of 30 kg/m2 or higher (OR = 0.89, 95% CI 0.72–1.11, P for interaction = 3.2 × 10−05). Our findings confirm comparable power of the recent methods for detecting G × E interaction and the utility of using G × E interaction analyses to identify new susceptibility loci.
doi:10.1002/gepi.21771
PMCID: PMC3995140  PMID: 24248812
breast cancer risk; gene-environment interaction; polymorphisms; body mass index; case-control study
3.  EMBL Nucleotide Sequence Database: developments in 2005 
Nucleic Acids Research  2005;34(Database issue):D10-D15.
The EMBL Nucleotide Sequence Database () at the EMBL European Bioinformatics Institute, UK, offers a comprehensive set of publicly available nucleotide sequence and annotation, freely accessible to all. Maintained in collaboration with partners DDBJ and GenBank, coverage includes whole genome sequencing project data, directly submitted sequence, sequence recorded in support of patent applications and much more. The database continues to offer submission tools, data retrieval facilities and user support. In 2005, the volume of data offered has continued to grow exponentially. In addition to the newly presented data, the database encompasses a range of new data types generated by novel technologies, offers enhanced presentation and searchability of the data and has greater integration with other data resources offered at the EBI and elsewhere. In stride with these developing data types, the database has continued to develop submission and retrieval tools to maximise the information content of submitted data and to offer the simplest possible submission routes for data producers. New developments, the submission process, data retrieval and access to support are presented in this paper, along with links to sources of further information.
doi:10.1093/nar/gkj130
PMCID: PMC1347492  PMID: 16381823
4.  The EMBL Nucleotide Sequence Database 
Nucleic Acids Research  2004;32(Database issue):D27-D30.
The EMBL Nucleotide Sequence Database (http://www.ebi.ac.uk/embl/), maintained at the European Bioinformatics Institute (EBI), incorporates, organizes and distributes nucleotide sequences from public sources. The database is a part of an international collaboration with DDBJ (Japan) and GenBank (USA). Data are exchanged between the collaborating databases on a daily basis to achieve optimal synchrony. The web-based tool, Webin, is the preferred system for individual submission of nucleotide sequences, including Third Party Annotation (TPA) and alignment data. Automatic submission procedures are used for submission of data from large-scale genome sequencing centres and from the European Patent Office. Database releases are produced quarterly. The latest data collection can be accessed via FTP, email and WWW interfaces. The EBI’s Sequence Retrieval System (SRS) integrates and links the main nucleotide and protein databases as well as many other specialist molecular biology databases. For sequence similarity searching, a variety of tools (e.g. FASTA and BLAST) are available that allow external users to compare their own sequences against the data in the EMBL Nucleotide Sequence Database, the complete genomic component subsection of the database, the WGS data sets and other databases. All available resources can be accessed via the EBI home page at http://www.ebi.ac.uk.
doi:10.1093/nar/gkh120
PMCID: PMC308854  PMID: 14681351
5.  The EMBL Nucleotide Sequence Database: major new developments 
Nucleic Acids Research  2003;31(1):17-22.
The EMBL Nucleotide Sequence Database (http://www.ebi.ac.uk/embl/) incorporates, organizes and distributes nucleotide sequences from all available public sources. The database is located and maintained at the European Bioinformatics Institute (EBI) near Cambridge, UK. In an international collaboration with DDBJ (Japan) and GenBank (USA), data are exchanged amongst the collaborating databases on a daily basis to achieve optimal synchronization. Webin is the preferred web-based submission system for individual submitters, while automatic procedures allow incorporation of sequence data from large-scale genome sequencing centres and from the European Patent Office (EPO). Database releases are produced quarterly. Network services allow free access to the most up-to-date data collection via FTP, Email and World Wide Web interfaces. EBI's Sequence Retrieval System (SRS) integrates and links the main nucleotide and protein databases plus many other specialized molecular biology databases. For sequence similarity searching, a variety of tools (e.g. Fasta, BLAST) are available which allow external users to compare their own sequences against the latest data in the EMBL Nucleotide Sequence Database and SWISS-PROT. All resources can be accessed via the EBI home page at http://www.ebi.ac.uk.
PMCID: PMC165468  PMID: 12519939
6.  The EMBL Nucleotide Sequence Database 
Nucleic Acids Research  2002;30(1):21-26.
The EMBL Nucleotide Sequence Database (aka EMBL-Bank; http://www.ebi.ac.uk/embl/) incorporates, organises and distributes nucleotide sequences from all available public sources. EMBL-Bank is located and maintained at the European Bioinformatics Institute (EBI) near Cambridge, UK. In an international collaboration with DDBJ (Japan) and GenBank (USA), data are exchanged amongst the collaborating databases on a daily basis. Major contributors to the EMBL database are individual scientists and genome project groups. Webin is the preferred web-based submission system for individual submitters, whilst automatic procedures allow incorporation of sequence data from large-scale genome sequencing centres and from the European Patent Office (EPO). Database releases are produced quarterly. Network services allow free access to the most up-to-date data collection via FTP, email and World Wide Web interfaces. EBI’s Sequence Retrieval System (SRS), a network browser for databanks in molecular biology, integrates and links the main nucleotide and protein databases plus many other specialized databases. For sequence similarity searching, a variety of tools (e.g. Blitz, Fasta, BLAST) are available which allow external users to compare their own sequences against the latest data in the EMBL Nucleotide Sequence Database and SWISS-PROT. All resources can be accessed via the EBI home page at http://www.ebi.ac.uk.
PMCID: PMC99098  PMID: 11752244
7.  The EMBL nucleotide sequence database 
Nucleic Acids Research  2001;29(1):17-21.
The EMBL Nucleotide Sequence Database (http://www.ebi.ac.uk/embl/) is maintained at the European Bioinformatics Institute (EBI) in an international collaboration with the DNA Data Bank of Japan (DDBJ) and GenBank at the NCBI (USA). Data is exchanged amongst the collaborating databases on a daily basis. The major contributors to the EMBL database are individual authors and genome project groups. Webin is the preferred web-based submission system for individual submitters, whilst automatic procedures allow incorporation of sequence data from large-scale genome sequencing centres and from the European Patent Office (EPO). Database releases are produced quarterly. Network services allow free access to the most up-to-date data collection via ftp, email and World Wide Web interfaces. EBI’s Sequence Retrieval System (SRS), a network browser for databanks in molecular biology, integrates and links the main nucleotide and protein databases plus many specialized databases. For sequence similarity searching a variety of tools (e.g. Blitz, Fasta, BLAST) are available which allow external users to compare their own sequences against the latest data in the EMBL Nucleotide Sequence Database and SWISS-PROT.
PMCID: PMC29766  PMID: 11125039
8.  The EMBL Nucleotide Sequence Database 
Nucleic Acids Research  2000;28(1):19-23.
The European Molecular Biology Laboratory (EMBL) Nucleotide Sequence Database (http://www.ebi.ac. uk/embl/index.html ) is maintained at the European Bioinformatics Institute (EBI) in an international collaboration with the DNA Data Bank of Japan (DDBJ) and GenBank (USA). Data is exchanged amongst the collaborative databases on a daily basis. The major contributors to the EMBL database are individual authors and genome project groups. WEBIN is the preferred web-based submission system for individual submitters, whilst automatic procedures allow incorporation of sequence data from large-scale genome sequencing centres and from the European Patent Office (EPO). Database releases are produced quarterly. Network services allow free access to the most up-to-date data collection via Internet and WWW interfaces. EBI’s Sequence Retrieval System (SRS) is a network browser for databanks in molecular biology, integrating and linking the main nucleotide and protein databases plus many specialised databases. For sequence similarity searching a variety of tools (e.g., BLITZ, FASTA, BLAST) are available which allow external users to compare their own sequences against the most currently available data in the EMBL Nucleotide Sequence Database and SWISS-PROT.
PMCID: PMC102461  PMID: 10592171

Results 1-8 (8)