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1.  InterProScan 5: genome-scale protein function classification 
Bioinformatics  2014;30(9):1236-1240.
Motivation: Robust large-scale sequence analysis is a major challenge in modern genomic science, where biologists are frequently trying to characterize many millions of sequences. Here, we describe a new Java-based architecture for the widely used protein function prediction software package InterProScan. Developments include improvements and additions to the outputs of the software and the complete reimplementation of the software framework, resulting in a flexible and stable system that is able to use both multiprocessor machines and/or conventional clusters to achieve scalable distributed data analysis. InterProScan is freely available for download from the EMBl-EBI FTP site and the open source code is hosted at Google Code.
Availability and implementation: InterProScan is distributed via FTP at ftp://ftp.ebi.ac.uk/pub/software/unix/iprscan/5/ and the source code is available from http://code.google.com/p/interproscan/.
Contact: http://www.ebi.ac.uk/support or interhelp@ebi.ac.uk or mitchell@ebi.ac.uk
doi:10.1093/bioinformatics/btu031
PMCID: PMC3998142  PMID: 24451626
2.  MyDas, an Extensible Java DAS Server 
PLoS ONE  2012;7(9):e44180.
A large number of diverse, complex, and distributed data resources are currently available in the Bioinformatics domain. The pace of discovery and the diversity of information means that centralised reference databases like UniProt and Ensembl cannot integrate all potentially relevant information sources. From a user perspective however, centralised access to all relevant information concerning a specific query is essential. The Distributed Annotation System (DAS) defines a communication protocol to exchange annotations on genomic and protein sequences; this standardisation enables clients to retrieve data from a myriad of sources, thus offering centralised access to end-users.
We introduce MyDas, a web server that facilitates the publishing of biological annotations according to the DAS specification. It deals with the common functionality requirements of making data available, while also providing an extension mechanism in order to implement the specifics of data store interaction. MyDas allows the user to define where the required information is located along with its structure, and is then responsible for the communication protocol details.
doi:10.1371/journal.pone.0044180
PMCID: PMC3441562  PMID: 23028496
4.  InterPro in 2011: new developments in the family and domain prediction database 
Nucleic Acids Research  2011;40(D1):D306-D312.
InterPro (http://www.ebi.ac.uk/interpro/) is a database that integrates diverse information about protein families, domains and functional sites, and makes it freely available to the public via Web-based interfaces and services. Central to the database are diagnostic models, known as signatures, against which protein sequences can be searched to determine their potential function. InterPro has utility in the large-scale analysis of whole genomes and meta-genomes, as well as in characterizing individual protein sequences. Herein we give an overview of new developments in the database and its associated software since 2009, including updates to database content, curation processes and Web and programmatic interfaces.
doi:10.1093/nar/gkr948
PMCID: PMC3245097  PMID: 22096229
5.  InterPro: the integrative protein signature database 
Nucleic Acids Research  2008;37(Database issue):D211-D215.
The InterPro database (http://www.ebi.ac.uk/interpro/) integrates together predictive models or ‘signatures’ representing protein domains, families and functional sites from multiple, diverse source databases: Gene3D, PANTHER, Pfam, PIRSF, PRINTS, ProDom, PROSITE, SMART, SUPERFAMILY and TIGRFAMs. Integration is performed manually and approximately half of the total ∼58 000 signatures available in the source databases belong to an InterPro entry. Recently, we have started to also display the remaining un-integrated signatures via our web interface. Other developments include the provision of non-signature data, such as structural data, in new XML files on our FTP site, as well as the inclusion of matchless UniProtKB proteins in the existing match XML files. The web interface has been extended and now links out to the ADAN predicted protein–protein interaction database and the SPICE and Dasty viewers. The latest public release (v18.0) covers 79.8% of UniProtKB (v14.1) and consists of 16 549 entries. InterPro data may be accessed either via the web address above, via web services, by downloading files by anonymous FTP or by using the InterProScan search software (http://www.ebi.ac.uk/Tools/InterProScan/).
doi:10.1093/nar/gkn785
PMCID: PMC2686546  PMID: 18940856
6.  PRIDE: new developments and new datasets 
Nucleic Acids Research  2007;36(Database issue):D878-D883.
The PRIDE (http://www.ebi.ac.uk/pride) database of protein and peptide identifications was previously described in the NAR Database Special Edition in 2006. Since this publication, the volume of public data in the PRIDE relational database has increased by more than an order of magnitude. Several significant public datasets have been added, including identifications and processed mass spectra generated by the HUPO Brain Proteome Project and the HUPO Liver Proteome Project. The PRIDE software development team has made several significant changes and additions to the user interface and tool set associated with PRIDE. The focus of these changes has been to facilitate the submission process and to improve the mechanisms by which PRIDE can be queried. The PRIDE team has developed a Microsoft Excel workbook that allows the required data to be collated in a series of relatively simple spreadsheets, with automatic generation of PRIDE XML at the end of the process. The ability to query PRIDE has been augmented by the addition of a BioMart interface allowing complex queries to be constructed. Collaboration with groups outside the EBI has been fruitful in extending PRIDE, including an approach to encode iTRAQ quantitative data in PRIDE XML.
doi:10.1093/nar/gkm1021
PMCID: PMC2238846  PMID: 18033805
7.  Broadening the horizon – level 2.5 of the HUPO-PSI format for molecular interactions 
BMC Biology  2007;5:44.
Background
Molecular interaction Information is a key resource in modern biomedical research. Publicly available data have previously been provided in a broad array of diverse formats, making access to this very difficult. The publication and wide implementation of the Human Proteome Organisation Proteomics Standards Initiative Molecular Interactions (HUPO PSI-MI) format in 2004 was a major step towards the establishment of a single, unified format by which molecular interactions should be presented, but focused purely on protein-protein interactions.
Results
The HUPO-PSI has further developed the PSI-MI XML schema to enable the description of interactions between a wider range of molecular types, for example nucleic acids, chemical entities, and molecular complexes. Extensive details about each supported molecular interaction can now be captured, including the biological role of each molecule within that interaction, detailed description of interacting domains, and the kinetic parameters of the interaction. The format is supported by data management and analysis tools and has been adopted by major interaction data providers. Additionally, a simpler, tab-delimited format MITAB2.5 has been developed for the benefit of users who require only minimal information in an easy to access configuration.
Conclusion
The PSI-MI XML2.5 and MITAB2.5 formats have been jointly developed by interaction data producers and providers from both the academic and commercial sector, and are already widely implemented and well supported by an active development community. PSI-MI XML2.5 enables the description of highly detailed molecular interaction data and facilitates data exchange between databases and users without loss of information. MITAB2.5 is a simpler format appropriate for fast Perl parsing or loading into Microsoft Excel.
doi:10.1186/1741-7007-5-44
PMCID: PMC2189715  PMID: 17925023
8.  PRIDE: a public repository of protein and peptide identifications for the proteomics community 
Nucleic Acids Research  2005;34(Database issue):D659-D663.
PRIDE, the ‘PRoteomics IDEntifications database’ () is a database of protein and peptide identifications that have been described in the scientific literature. These identifications will typically be from specific species, tissues and sub-cellular locations, perhaps under specific disease conditions. Any post-translational modifications that have been identified on individual peptides can be described. These identifications may be annotated with supporting mass spectra. At the time of writing, PRIDE includes the full set of identifications as submitted by individual laboratories participating in the HUPO Plasma Proteome Project and a profile of the human platelet proteome submitted by the University of Ghent in Belgium. By late 2005 PRIDE is expected to contain the identifications and spectra generated by the HUPO Brain Proteome Project. Proteomics laboratories are encouraged to submit their identifications and spectra to PRIDE to support their manuscript submissions to proteomics journals. Data can be submitted in PRIDE XML format if identifications are included or mzData format if the submitter is depositing mass spectra without identifications. PRIDE is a web application, so submission, searching and data retrieval can all be performed using an internet browser. PRIDE can be searched by experiment accession number, protein accession number, literature reference and sample parameters including species, tissue, sub-cellular location and disease state. Data can be retrieved as machine-readable PRIDE or mzData XML (the latter for mass spectra without identifications), or as human-readable HTML.
doi:10.1093/nar/gkj138
PMCID: PMC1347500  PMID: 16381953

Results 1-8 (8)