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1.  Archaeal β-CASP ribonucleases of the aCPSF1 family are orthologs of the eukaryal CPSF-73 factor 
Nucleic Acids Research  2012;41(2):1091-1103.
Bacterial RNase J and eukaryal cleavage and polyadenylation specificity factor (CPSF-73) are members of the β-CASP family of ribonucleases involved in mRNA processing and degradation. Here we report an in-depth phylogenomic analysis that delineates aRNase J and archaeal CPSF (aCPSF) as distinct orthologous groups and establishes their repartition in 110 archaeal genomes. The aCPSF1 subgroup, which has been inherited vertically and is strictly conserved, is characterized by an N-terminal extension with two K homology (KH) domains and a C-terminal motif involved in dimerization of the holoenzyme. Pab-aCPSF1 (Pyrococcus abyssi homolog) has an endoribonucleolytic activity that preferentially cleaves at single-stranded CA dinucleotides and a 5′–3′ exoribonucleolytic activity that acts on 5′ monophosphate substrates. These activities are the same as described for the eukaryotic cleavage and polyadenylation factor, CPSF-73, when engaged in the CPSF complex. The N-terminal KH domains are important for endoribonucleolytic cleavage at certain specific sites and the formation of stable high molecular weight ribonucleoprotein complexes. Dimerization of Pab-aCPSF is important for exoribonucleolytic activity and RNA binding. Altogether, our results suggest that aCPSF1 performs an essential function and that an enzyme with similar activities was present in the last common ancestor of Archaea and Eukarya.
doi:10.1093/nar/gks1237
PMCID: PMC3553952  PMID: 23222134
2.  PROSITE, a protein domain database for functional characterization and annotation 
Nucleic Acids Research  2009;38(Database issue):D161-D166.
PROSITE consists of documentation entries describing protein domains, families and functional sites, as well as associated patterns and profiles to identify them. It is complemented by ProRule, a collection of rules based on profiles and patterns, which increases the discriminatory power of these profiles and patterns by providing additional information about functionally and/or structurally critical amino acids. PROSITE is largely used for the annotation of domain features of UniProtKB/Swiss-Prot entries. Among the 983 (DNA-binding) domains, repeats and zinc fingers present in Swiss-Prot (release 57.8 of 22 September 2009), 696 (∼70%) are annotated with PROSITE descriptors using information from ProRule. In order to allow better functional characterization of domains, PROSITE developments focus on subfamily specific profiles and a new profile building method giving more weight to functionally important residues. Here, we describe AMSA, an annotated multiple sequence alignment format used to build a new generation of generalized profiles, the migration of ScanProsite to Vital-IT, a cluster of 633 CPUs, and the adoption of the Distributed Annotation System (DAS) to facilitate PROSITE data integration and interchange with other sources. The latest version of PROSITE (release 20.54, of 22 September 2009) contains 1308 patterns, 863 profiles and 869 ProRules. PROSITE is accessible at: http://www.expasy.org/prosite/.
doi:10.1093/nar/gkp885
PMCID: PMC2808866  PMID: 19858104
3.  The 20 years of PROSITE 
Nucleic Acids Research  2007;36(Database issue):D245-D249.
PROSITE consists of documentation entries describing protein domains, families and functional sites, as well as associated patterns and profiles to identify them. It is complemented by ProRule, a collection of rules based on profiles and patterns, which increases the discriminatory power of profiles and patterns by providing additional information about functionally and/or structurally critical amino acids. In this article, we describe the implementation of a new method to assign a status to pattern matches, the new PROSITE web page and a new approach to improve the specificity and sensitivity of PROSITE methods. The latest version of PROSITE (release 20.19 of 11 September 2007) contains 1319 patterns, 745 profiles and 764 ProRules. Over the past 2 years, about 200 domains have been added, and now 53% of UniProtKB/Swiss-Prot entries (release 54.2 of 11 September 2007) have a PROSITE match. PROSITE is available on the web at: http://www.expasy.org/prosite/.
doi:10.1093/nar/gkm977
PMCID: PMC2238851  PMID: 18003654
4.  New developments in the InterPro database 
Nucleic Acids Research  2007;35(Database issue):D224-D228.
InterPro is an integrated resource for protein families, domains and functional sites, which integrates the following protein signature databases: PROSITE, PRINTS, ProDom, Pfam, SMART, TIGRFAMs, PIRSF, SUPERFAMILY, Gene3D and PANTHER. The latter two new member databases have been integrated since the last publication in this journal. There have been several new developments in InterPro, including an additional reading field, new database links, extensions to the web interface and additional match XML files. InterPro has always provided matches to UniProtKB proteins on the website and in the match XML file on the FTP site. Additional matches to proteins in UniParc (UniProt archive) are now available for download in the new match XML files only. The latest InterPro release (13.0) contains more than 13 000 entries, covering over 78% of all proteins in UniProtKB. The database is available for text- and sequence-based searches via a webserver (), and for download by anonymous FTP (). The InterProScan search tool is now also available via a web service at .
doi:10.1093/nar/gkl841
PMCID: PMC1899100  PMID: 17202162
5.  ScanProsite: detection of PROSITE signature matches and ProRule-associated functional and structural residues in proteins 
Nucleic Acids Research  2006;34(Web Server issue):W362-W365.
ScanProsite——is a new and improved version of the web-based tool for detecting PROSITE signature matches in protein sequences. For a number of PROSITE profiles, the tool now makes use of ProRules—context-dependent annotation templates—to detect functional and structural intra-domain residues. The detection of those features enhances the power of function prediction based on profiles. Both user-defined sequences and sequences from the UniProt Knowledgebase can be matched against custom patterns, or against PROSITE signatures. To improve response times, matches of sequences from UniProtKB against PROSITE signatures are now retrieved from a pre-computed match database. Several output modes are available including simple text views and a rich mode providing an interactive match and feature viewer with a graphical representation of results.
doi:10.1093/nar/gkl124
PMCID: PMC1538847  PMID: 16845026
6.  The PROSITE database 
Nucleic Acids Research  2005;34(Database issue):D227-D230.
The PROSITE database consists of a large collection of biologically meaningful signatures that are described as patterns or profiles. Each signature is linked to a documentation that provides useful biological information on the protein family, domain or functional site identified by the signature. The PROSITE database is now complemented by a series of rules that can give more precise information about specific residues. During the last 2 years, the documentation and the ScanProsite web pages were redesigned to add more functionalities. The latest version of PROSITE (release 19.11 of September 27, 2005) contains 1329 patterns and 552 profile entries. Over the past 2 years more than 200 domains have been added, and now 52% of UniProtKB/Swiss-Prot entries (release 48.1 of September 27, 2005) have a cross-reference to a PROSITE entry. The database is accessible at .
doi:10.1093/nar/gkj063
PMCID: PMC1347426  PMID: 16381852
7.  Recent improvements to the PROSITE database 
Nucleic Acids Research  2004;32(Database issue):D134-D137.
The PROSITE database consists of a large collection of biologically meaningful signatures that are described as patterns or profiles. Each signature is linked to documentation that provides useful biological information on the protein family, domain or functional site identified by the signature. The PROSITE web page has been redesigned and several tools have been implemented to help the user discover new conserved regions in their own proteins and to visualize domain arrangements. We also introduced the facility to search PDB with a PROSITE entry or a user’s pattern and visualize matched positions on 3D structures. The latest version of PROSITE (release 18.17 of November 30, 2003) contains 1676 entries. The database is accessible at http://www.expasy.org/prosite/.
doi:10.1093/nar/gkh044
PMCID: PMC308778  PMID: 14681377

Results 1-7 (7)