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1.  Validation of a Proliferation-based Expression Signature as Prognostic Marker in Early Stage Lung Adenocarcinoma 
PURPOSE
New prognostic markers to guide treatment decisions in early stage non-small cell lung cancer are necessary to improve patient outcomes. In this report, we assess the utility of a pre-defined mRNA expression signature of cell cycle progression genes (CCP score) to define 5-year risk of lung cancer related death in patients with early stage lung adenocarcinoma.
EXPERIMENTAL DESIGN
A CCP score was calculated from the mRNA expression levels of 31 proliferation genes in stage I and II tumor samples from two public microarray data sets (Director’s Consortium (DC) and GSE31210). The same gene set was tested by quantitative PCR in 381 formalin-fixed paraffin-embedded (FFPE) primary tumors. Association of the CCP score with outcome was assessed by Cox proportional hazards analysis.
RESULTS
In univariate analysis the CCP score was a strong predictor of cancer-specific survival in both the DC cohort (p=0.00014, HR 2.08, 95%CI 1.43–3.02) and GSE31210 (p=0.0010, HR 2.25, 95%CI 1.42–3.56). In multivariate analysis the CCP score remained the dominant prognostic marker in the presence of clinical variables (p=0.0022, HR 2.02, 95%CI 1.29–3.17 in DC, p=0.0026, HR 2.16, 95%CI 1.32–3.53 in GSE31210). On a quantitative PCR platform the CCP score maintained highly significant prognostic value in FFPE derived mRNA from clinical samples in both univariate (p=0.00033, HR 2.10, 95%CI 1.39–3.17) and multivariate analyses (p=0.0071, HR 1.92, 95%CI 1.18–3.10).
CONCLUSIONS
The CCP score is a significant predictor of lung cancer death in early stage lung adenocarcinoma treated with surgery and may be a valuable tool in selecting patients for adjuvant treatment.
doi:10.1158/1078-0432.CCR-13-0596
PMCID: PMC3834029  PMID: 24048333
non-small cell lung cancer; adenocarcinoma; prognosis; expression signature
2.  VEGF/VEGFR-2 upregulates EZH2 expression in lung adenocarcinoma cells and EZH2 depletion enhances the response to platinum-based and VEGFR-2–targeted therapy 
Purpose
Investigate the mechanisms of regulation and role associated with EZH2 expression in lung cancer cells.
Experimental Design
We investigated the mechanisms of EZH2 expression associated with the vascular endothelial growth factor (VEGF)/VEGF receptor 2 (VEGFR-2) pathway. Furthermore, we sought to determine the role of EZH2 in response of lung adenocarcinoma to platinum-based chemotherapy, as well as the effect of EZH2 depletion on VEGFR-2–targeted therapy in lung adenocarcinoma cell lines. Additionally, we characterized EZH2 expression in lung adenocarcinoma specimens and correlated it with patients’ clinical characteristics.
Results
In this study, we demonstrate that VEGF/VEGFR-2 activation induces expression of EZH2 through the upregulation of E2F3 and HIF-1α, and downregulated expression of miR-101. EZH2 depletion by treatment with 3-deazaneplanocin A and knockdown by siRNA decreased the expression of EZH2 and H3K27me3, increased PARP-C level, reduced cell proliferation and migration, and increased sensitivity of the cells to treatment with cisplatin and carboplatin. Additionally, high EZH2 expression was associated with poor overall survival in patients who received platinum-based adjuvant therapy, but not in patients who did not receive this therapy. Furthermore, we demonstrated for the first time that the inhibition of EZH2 greatly increased the sensitivity of lung adenocarcinoma cells to the anti-VEGFR-2 drug AZD2171.
Conclusion
Our results suggest that VEGF/VEGFR-2 pathway plays a role in regulation of EZH2 expression via E2F3, HIF-1α and miR-101. EZH2 depletion decreases the malignant potential of lung adenocarcinoma and sensitivity of the cells to both platinum-based and VEGFR-2–targeted therapy.
doi:10.1158/1078-0432.CCR-13-1916
PMCID: PMC4190586  PMID: 24850841
EZH2; NSCLC; VEGF/VEGFR-2 pathway; DZNep
3.  ETS2 mediated tumor suppressive function and MET oncogene inhibition in human non-small cell lung cancer 
PURPOSE
The ETS2 transcription factor is an evolutionarily conserved gene that is deregulated in cancer. We analyzed the transcriptome of lung adenocarcinomas and normal lung tissue by expression profiling and found that ETS2 was significantly down-regulated in adenocarcinomas. In this study, we probed the yet unknown functional role of ETS2 in lung cancer pathogenesis.
EXPERIMENTAL DESIGN
Lung adenocarcinomas (n=80) and normal lung tissues (n=30) were profiled using the Affymetrix Human Gene 1.0 ST platform. Immunohistochemical (IHC) analysis was performed to determine ETS2 protein expression in NSCLC histological tissue specimens (n=201). Patient clinical outcome, based on ETS2 IHC expression, was statistically assessed using the log-rank and Kaplan-Meier tests. RNA interference and over-expression strategies were employed to assess effects of ETS2 expression on the transcriptome and on various malignant phenotypes.
RESULTS
ETS2 expression was significantly reduced in lung adenocarcinomas compared to normal lung (p<0.001). Low ETS2 IHC expression was a significant predictor of shorter time to recurrence in NSCLC (p=0.009, HR=1.89) and adenocarcinoma (p=0.03, HR=1.86). Moreover, ETS2 was found to significantly inhibit lung cancer cell growth, migration and invasion (p<0.05), and microarray and pathways analysis revealed significant (p<0.001) activation of the HGF pathway following ETS2 knockdown. In addition, ETS2 was found to suppress MET phosphorylation and knockdown of MET expression significantly attenuated (p<0.05) cell invasion mediated by ETS2-specific siRNA. Furthermore, knockdown of ETS2 augmented HGF-induced MET phosphorylation, cell migration and invasion.
CONCLUSION(S)
Our findings point to a tumor suppressor role for ETS2 in human NSCLC pathogenesis through inhibition of the MET proto-oncogene.
doi:10.1158/1078-0432.CCR-13-0341
PMCID: PMC3846434  PMID: 23659968
NSCLC; ETS2; tumor suppressor; MET; HGF
4.  Characterizing the molecular spatial and temporal field of injury in early stage smoker non-small cell lung cancer patients after definitive surgery by expression profiling 
Gene expression alterations in response to cigarette smoke have been characterized in normal-appearing bronchial epithelium of healthy smokers and it has been suggested that adjacent histologically normal tissue display tumor-associated molecular abnormalities. We sought to delineate the spatial and temporal molecular lung field of injury in smoker early stage non-small cell lung cancer (NSCLC) patients (n=19) who were accrued into a surveillance clinical trial for annual follow-up and bronchoscopies within one year after definitive surgery. Bronchial brushings and biopsies were obtained from six different sites in the lung at the time of inclusion in the study and at 12, 24 and 36 months after the first time point. Affymetrix Human Gene 1.0 ST arrays were used for whole-transcript expression profiling of airways (n=391). Microarray analysis identified gene features (n=1165) that were non-uniform by site and differentially expressed between airways adjacent to tumors relative to more distant samples as well as those (n=1395) that were significantly altered with time up to three years. In addition, gene-interaction networks mediated by PI3K and ERK1/2 were modulated in adjacent compared to contralateral airways and the latter network with time. Furthermore, phosphorylated AKT and ERK1/2 immunohistochemical expression were significantly increased with time (nuclear pAKT, p=0.03; cytoplasmic pAKT, p<0.0001; pERK1/2, p=0.02) and elevated in adjacent compared to more distant airways (nuclear pAKT, p=0.04; pERK1/2, p=0.03). This study highlights spatial and temporal cancer-associated expression alterations in the molecular field of injury of early stage NSCLC patients after definitive surgery that warrant further validation in independent studies.
doi:10.1158/1940-6207.CAPR-12-0290
PMCID: PMC3774536  PMID: 23087048
Early stage NSCLC; gene expression profiling; lung airway epithelium; chemoprevention
5.  Oncogenic mutation profiling in new lung cancer and mesothelioma cell lines 
OncoTargets and therapy  2015;8:195-209.
Background
Thoracic tumor, especially lung cancer, ranks as the top cancer mortality in most parts of the world. Lung adenocarcinoma is the predominant subtype and there is increasing knowledge on therapeutic molecular targets, namely EGFR, ALK, KRAS, and ROS1, among lung cancers. Lung cancer cell lines established with known clinical characteristics and molecular profiling of oncogenic targets like ALK or KRAS could be useful tools for understanding the biology of known molecular targets as well as for drug testing and screening.
Materials and methods
Five new cancer cell lines were established from pleural fluid or biopsy tissues obtained from Chinese patients with primary lung adenocarcinomas or malignant pleural mesothelioma. They were characterized by immunohistochemistry, growth kinetics, tests for tumorigenicity, EGFR and KRAS gene mutations, ALK gene rearrangement and OncoSeq mutation profiling.
Results
These newly established lung adenocarcinoma and mesothelioma cell lines were maintained for over 100 passages and demonstrated morphological and immunohistochemical features as well as growth kinetics of tumor cell lines. One of these new cell lines bears EML4-ALK rearrangement variant 2, two lung cancer cell lines bear different KRAS mutations at codon 12, and known single nucleotide polymorphism variants were identified in these cell lines.
Discussion
Four new lung adenocarcinoma and one mesothelioma cell lines were established from patients with different clinical characteristics and oncogenic mutation profiles. These characterized cell lines and their mutation profiles will provide resources for exploration of lung cancer and mesothelioma biology with regard to the presence of known oncogenic mutations.
doi:10.2147/OTT.S71242
PMCID: PMC4303463  PMID: 25653542
lung adenocarcinomas; oncogenic mutations; EGFR; ALK; KRAS
6.  A Re-evaluation of CD22 Expression by Human Lung Cancer 
Cancer research  2014;74(1):263-271.
CD22 is a transmembrane glycoprotein expressed by mature B cells. It inhibits signal transduction by the B cell receptor and its co-receptor CD19. Recently it was reported that most human lung cancer cells and cell lines express CD22 making it an important new lung cancer therapeutic target (Can Res 72:5556, 2012). The objective of our studies was to independently validate these results with the goal of testing the efficacy of our CD22 immunotoxins on lung cancer cell lines. As determined by qRT-PCR analysis, we found that levels of CD22 mRNA in a panel of human lung cancer cell lines were 200–60,000- fold lower than those observed in the human CD22+ Burkitt’s lymphoma cells, Daudi. Using flow cytometry with a panel of CD22 monoclonal antibodies and Western blot analyses, we could not detect surface or intracellular expression of CD22 protein in a panel of lung cancer cell lines. In addition, the in vitro proliferation of the lung tumor cell lines was not affected by CD22 antibodies or our highly potent anti-CD22 immunotoxin. By contrast, CD22+ Daudi cells expressed high levels of CD22 mRNA and protein and were sensitive to our CD22 immunotoxin. Importantly, primary non-small cell lung cancers from over 250 patient specimens did not express detectable levels of CD22 protein as assessed by immunohistochemistry. We conclude that CD22 is not expressed at measurable levels on the surface of lung cancer cells and that these cells can not be killed by anti-CD22 immunotoxins.
doi:10.1158/0008-5472.CAN-13-1436
PMCID: PMC3903042  PMID: 24395821
lung cancer; CD22 expression
7.  High Expression of Folate Receptor Alpha in Lung Cancer Correlates with Adenocarcinoma Histology and EGFR Mutation 
Journal of Thoracic Oncology  2012;7(5):833-840.
Introduction
Folate receptor alpha (FRα) and reduced folate carrier-1 (RFC1) regulate uptake of folate molecules inside the cell. FRα is a potential biomarker of tumors response to antifolate chemotherapy and a target for therapy using humanized monocloncal antibody. Information on the protein expression of these receptors in non–small cell lung carcinoma (NSCLC) is limited.
Material and Methods
Expressions of FRα and RFC1 were examined by IHC in 320 surgically resected NSCLC (202 adenocarcinomas and 118 squamous cell carcinomas) tissue specimens and correlated with patients’ clinicopathologic characteristics. FOLR1 mRNA expression was examined using publicly available microarray datasets. FRα expression was correlated with thymidylate synthase (TS) and p53 expression in NSCLCs, and with EGFR and KRAS mutations in adenocarcinomas.
Results
NSCLC overexpressed FRα and RFC1. In a multivariate analysis, lung adenocarcinomas were more likely to express FRα in the cytoplasm (odds ratio [OR] = 4.39; P<0.0001) and membrane (OR = 5.34; P<0.0001) of malignant cells than squamous cell carcinomas. Tumors from never-smokers were more likely to express cytoplasmic (OR = 3.35; P<0.03) and membrane (OR = 3.60; P=0.0005) FRα than those from smokers. In adenocarcinoma, EGFR mutations correlated with higher expression of membrane FRα and FOLR1 gene expressions. High levels of FRα expression was detected in 42 NSCLC advanced metastatic tumor tissues.
Conclusions
FRα and RFC1 proteins are overexpressed in NSCLC tumor tissues. The high levels of FRα in lung adenocarcinomas may be associated to these tumors’ better responses to antifolate chemotherapy and represents a potential novel target for this tumor type.
doi:10.1097/JTO.0b013e31824de09c
PMCID: PMC3383601  PMID: 22729036
non–small cell lung carcinoma; EGFR; membrane transporter; FRα; FRC1
8.  Genes suppressed by DNA methylation in non-small cell lung cancer reveal the epigenetics of epithelial–mesenchymal transition 
BMC Genomics  2014;15(1):1079.
Background
DNA methylation is associated with aberrant gene expression in cancer, and has been shown to correlate with therapeutic response and disease prognosis in some types of cancer. We sought to investigate the biological significance of DNA methylation in lung cancer.
Results
We integrated the gene expression profiles and data of gene promoter methylation for a large panel of non-small cell lung cancer cell lines, and identified 578 candidate genes with expression levels that were inversely correlated to the degree of DNA methylation. We found these candidate genes to be differentially methylated in normal lung tissue versus non-small cell lung cancer tumors, and segregated by histologic and tumor subtypes. We used gene set enrichment analysis of the genes ranked by the degree of correlation between gene expression and DNA methylation to identify gene sets involved in cellular migration and metastasis. Our unsupervised hierarchical clustering of the candidate genes segregated cell lines according to the epithelial-to-mesenchymal transition phenotype. Genes related to the epithelial-to-mesenchymal transition, such as AXL, ESRP1, HoxB4, and SPINT1/2, were among the nearly 20% of the candidate genes that were differentially methylated between epithelial and mesenchymal cells. Greater numbers of genes were methylated in the mesenchymal cells and their expressions were upregulated by 5-azacytidine treatment. Methylation of the candidate genes was associated with erlotinib resistance in wild-type EGFR cell lines. The expression profiles of the candidate genes were associated with 8-week disease control in patients with wild-type EGFR who had unresectable non-small cell lung cancer treated with erlotinib, but not in patients treated with sorafenib.
Conclusions
Our results demonstrate that the underlying biology of genes regulated by DNA methylation may have predictive value in lung cancer that can be exploited therapeutically.
Electronic supplementary material
The online version of this article (doi:10.1186/1471-2164-15-1079) contains supplementary material, which is available to authorized users.
doi:10.1186/1471-2164-15-1079
PMCID: PMC4298954  PMID: 25486910
DNA methylation; Epithelial-mesenchymal transition; Erlotinib; Lung cancer
9.  EZH2 Protein Expression Associates With the Early Pathogenesis, Tumor Progression and Prognosis of Non-small Cell Lung Carcinoma 
Purpose
Enhancer of zeste homolog 2 (EZH2) promotes carcinogenesis by epigenetically silencing tumor suppressor genes. We studied EZH2 expression by immunohistochemistry in a large series of non-small cell lung carcinomas (NSCLC) in association with tumor characteristics and patient outcomes.
Experimental Design
EZH2 immunohistochemistry expression was analyzed in 265 normal and premalignant bronchial epithelia, 541 primary NSCLCs [221 squamous cell carcinomas (SCCs) and 320 adenocarcinomas] and 36 NSCLCs with paired brain metastases. An independent set of 91 adenocarcinomas was also examined. EZH2 expression was statistically correlated with clinico-pathological information, and EGFR/KRAS mutation status.
Results
EZH2 expression was significantly (P<0.0001) higher in SCCs compared to adenocarcinomas and in brain metastasis relative to matched primary tumors (P=0.0013). EZH2 expression was significantly (P<0.0001) elevated in bronchial preneoplastic lesions with increasing severity. In adenocarcinomas, higher EZH2 expression significantly correlated with younger age, cigarette smoking and higher TNM stage (P=0.02 to P<0.0001). Higher EZH2 expression in adenocarcinoma was associated with worse recurrence-free survival (RFS; P=0.025; HR 1.54) and overall survival (OS; P=0.0002; HR 1.96). Furthermore, lung adenocarcinomas with low EZH2 levels and high expression of the lineage-specific transcription factor, TTF-1, exhibited significantly improved RFS (P=0.009; HR 0.51) and OS (P=0.0011; HR 0.45) which was confirmed in the independent set of 91 adenocarcinomas.
Conclusion
In lung, EZH2 expression is involved in early pathogenesis of SCC and correlates with a more aggressive tumor behavior of adenocarcinoma. When EZH2 and TTF-1 expressions are considered together, they serve as a prognostic marker in patients with surgically resected lung adenocarcinomas.
doi:10.1158/1078-0432.CCR-12-3946
PMCID: PMC3890101  PMID: 24097870
EZH2; NSCLC; lung adenocarcinoma; lung squamous cell carcinoma; bronchial preneoplasia; brain metastasis; KRAS mutations; EGFR mutations
10.  Using Multiplexed Assays of Oncogenic Drivers in Lung Cancers to Select Targeted Drugs 
IMPORTANCE
Targeting oncogenic drivers (genomic alterations critical to cancer development and maintenance) has transformed the care of patients with lung adenocarcinomas. The Lung Cancer Mutation Consortium was formed to perform multiplexed assays testing adenocarcinomas of the lung for drivers in 10 genes to enable clinicians to select targeted treatments and enroll patients into clinical trials.
OBJECTIVES
To determine the frequency of oncogenic drivers in patients with lung adenocarcinomas and to use the data to select treatments targeting the identified driver(s) and measure survival.
DESIGN, SETTING, AND PARTICIPANTS
From 2009 through 2012, 14 sites in the United States enrolled patients with metastatic lung adenocarcinomas and a performance status of 0 through 2 and tested their tumors for 10 drivers. Information was collected on patients, therapies, and survival.
INTERVENTIONS
Tumors were tested for 10 oncogenic drivers, and results were used to select matched targeted therapies.
MAIN OUTCOMES AND MEASURES
Determination of the frequency of oncogenic drivers, the proportion of patients treated with genotype-directed therapy, and survival.
RESULTS
From 2009 through 2012, tumors from 1007 patients were tested for at least 1 gene and 733 for 10 genes (patients with full genotyping). An oncogenic driver was found in 466 of 733 patients (64%). Among these 733 tumors, 182 tumors (25%) had the KRAS driver; sensitizing EGFR, 122 (17%); ALK rearrangements, 57 (8%); other EGFR, 29 (4%); 2 or more genes, 24 (3%); ERBB2 (formerly HER2), 19 (3%); BRAF, 16 (2%); PIK3CA, 6 (<1%); MET amplification, 5 (<1%); NRAS, 5 (<1%); MEK1, 1 (<1%); AKT1, 0. Results were used to select a targeted therapy or trial in 275 of 1007 patients (28%). The median survival was 3.5 years (interquartile range [IQR], 1.96-7.70) for the 260 patients with an oncogenic driver and genotype-directed therapy compared with 2.4 years (IQR, 0.88-6.20) for the 318 patients with any oncogenic driver(s) who did not receive genotype-directed therapy (propensity score–adjusted hazard ratio, 0.69 [95% CI, 0.53-0.9], P = .006).
CONCLUSIONS AND RELEVANCE
Actionable drivers were detected in 64% of lung adenocarcinomas. Multiplexed testing aided physicians in selecting therapies. Although individuals with drivers receiving a matched targeted agent lived longer, randomized trials are required to determine if targeting therapy based on oncogenic drivers improves survival.
doi:10.1001/jama.2014.3741
PMCID: PMC4163053  PMID: 24846037
11.  Robust Gene Expression Signature from Formalin-Fixed Paraffin-Embedded Samples Predicts Prognosis of Non-Small-Cell Lung Cancer Patients 
Purpose
The requirement of frozen tissues for microarray experiments limits the clinical usage of genome-wide expression profiling using microarray technology. The goal of this study is to test the feasibility of developing lung cancer prognosis gene signatures using genome-wide expression profiling of formalin-fixed paraffin-embedded (FFPE) samples, which are widely available and provide a valuable rich source for studying the association of molecular changes in cancer and associated clinical outcomes.
Experimental Design
We randomly selected 100 Non-Small-Cell lung cancer (NSCLC) FFPE samples with annotated clinical information from the UT-Lung SPORE Tissue Bank. We micro dissected tumor area from FFPE specimens, and used Affymetrix U133 plus 2.0 arrays to attain gene expression data. After strict quality control and analysis procedures, a supervised principal component analysis was used to develop a robust prognosis signature for NSCLC. Three independent published microarray data sets were used to validate the prognosis model.
Results
This study demonstrated that the robust gene signature derived from genome-wide expression profiling of FFPE samples is strongly associated with lung cancer clinical outcomes, can be used to refine the prognosis for stage I lung cancer patients and the prognostic signature is independent of clinical variables. This signature was validated in several independent studies and was refined to a 59-gene lung cancer prognosis signature.
Conclusions
We conclude that genome-wide profiling of FFPE lung cancer samples can identify a set of genes whose expression level provides prognostic information across different platforms and studies, which will allow its application in clinical settings.
doi:10.1158/1078-0432.CCR-11-0196
PMCID: PMC3166982  PMID: 21742808
Lung Cancer Prognosis; Gene Expression Signature; Formalin Fixed Paraffin Embedded Samples
12.  Increased VEGFR-2 Gene Copy Is Associated With Chemoresistance and Shorter Survival in Patients with Non-small Cell Lung Carcinoma Who Receive Adjuvant Chemotherapy 
Cancer research  2011;71(16):5512-5521.
Vascular endothelial growth factor-2 (VEGFR-2 or KDR) is a known endothelial target also expressed in NSCLC tumor cells. We investigated the association between alterations in the KDR gene and clinical outcome in patients with resected NSCLC (n=248). KDR copy number gains (CNGs), measured by quantitative PCR and fluorescence in situ hybridization, were detected in 32% of tumors and associated with significantly higher KDR protein and higher microvessel density than tumors without CNGs. KDR CNGs were also associated with significantly increased risk of death (HR=5.16; P=0.003) in patients receiving adjuvant platinum-based chemotherapy, but no differences were observed in patients not receiving adjuvant therapy. To investigate potential mechanisms for these associations we assessed NSCLC cell lines and found that KDR CNGs were significantly associated with in vitro resistance to platinum chemotherapy as well as increased levels of nuclear HIF-1α in both NSCLC tumor specimens and cell lines. Furthermore, KDR knockdown experiments using small interfering RNA reduced platinum resistance, cell migration, and HIF-1α levels in cells bearing KDR CNGs, providing evidence for direct involvement of KDR. No KDR mutations were detected in exons 7, 11 and 21 by PCR-based sequencing; however, two variant SNP genotypes were associated with favorable overall survival in adenocarcinoma patients. Our findings suggest that tumor cell KDR CNGs may promote a more malignant phenotype including increased chemoresistance, angiogenesis, and HIF-1α levels, and that KDR CNGs may be a useful biomarker for identifying patients at high risk for recurrence after adjuvant therapy, a group that may benefit from VEGFR-2 blockade.
doi:10.1158/0008-5472.CAN-10-2614
PMCID: PMC3159530  PMID: 21724587
13.  The BATTLE Trial: Personalizing Therapy for Lung Cancer 
Cancer discovery  2011;1(1):44-53.
Background
Lung cancer is the leading cancer cause of mortality worldwide; large-scale trials have failed to improve clinical outcomes of patients with chemorefractory non-small-cell lung cancer (NSCLC).
Methods
Following an initial equal randomization period, BATTLE adaptively randomized patients with chemorefractory NSCLC to erlotinib, vandetanib, erlotinib plus bexarotene, or sorafenib based on molecular biomarkers of NSCLC pathogenesis in fresh core needle biopsy specimens. The primary end point was disease control rate (DCR) at 8 weeks.
Results
Of 255 patients randomly assigned to erlotinib (59 patients), vandetanib (54), erlotinib plus bexarotene (37), and sorafenib (105), 244 were eligible for the DCR analysis. Pneumothorax after lung biopsy occurred in 11.5% and treatment-related toxicities grade 3–4 in 6.5% of patients. Overall results were a 46% 8-week DCR, 1.9-month median progression-free survival, 9-month median overall survival, and 35% 1-year survival. Individual markers predicting a significantly superior DCR for a treatment included: epidermal growth factor receptor (EGFR) mutation (P=0.04) for erlotinib; cyclin D1 positivity (P=0.01) or EGFR amplification (P=0.006) for erlotinib plus bexarotene; vascular endothelial growth factor receptor 2 positivity (P=0.05) for vandetanib; and absence of EGFR mutation (P=0.01) or of EGFR high polysomy (P=0.05) for sorafenib. A better 8-week DCR occurred with sorafenib versus all other regimens (64% versus 33%; P<0.001) among EGFR wild-type patients and versus all other regimens (61% versus 32%; P=0.11) among mutant-KRAS patients. The prespecified biomarker groups were less predictive than the individual biomarkers analyzed in this study.
Conclusions
The first completed biopsy-mandated study in pretreated NSCLC, BATTLE confirmed our pre-specified hypotheses regarding biomarker and targeted treatment interactions, establishing a new paradigm for personalizing therapy for patients with NSCLC. (ClinicalTrials.gov numbers, NCT00409968, NCT00411671, NCT00411632, NCT00410059, NCT00410189.)
doi:10.1158/2159-8274.CD-10-0010
PMCID: PMC4211116  PMID: 22586319
14.  HER Family Receptor Abnormalities in Lung Cancer Brain Metastases and Corresponding Primary Tumors 
Clinical Cancer Research  2009;15(15):4829-4837.
Purpose
To compare the characteristics of HER receptors and their ligands deregulation between primary tumor and corresponding brain metastases of non-small cell lung carcinoma (NSCLC).
Experimental design
Fifty five NSCLC primary tumors (PT) and corresponding brain metastases (BM) specimens were examined for the immunohistochemical expression of EGFR, phosphorylated (p)–EGFR, Her2, Her3, and p-Her3, and their ligands EGF, TGF-α, amphiregulin, epiregulin, betacellulin, heparin-binding EGFR-like growth factor, and neuregulins-1 and -2. Analysis of EGFR copy number using fluorescent in situ hybridization and mutation by PCR-based sequencing was also performed.
Results
Metastases showed significantly higher immunohistochemical expression of EGF (membrane, BM 66.0 vs. PT 48.5; P=0.027; and nucleus, BM 92.2 vs. 67.4; P=0.008), amphiregulin (nucleus, BM 53.7 vs. PT 33.7; P=0.019), p-EGFR (membrane, BM 161.5 vs. PT 76.0; P<0.0001; and cytoplasm, BM 101.5 vs. PT 55.9; P=0.014), and p-Her3 (membrane, BM 25.0 vs. PT 3.7; P=0.001) than primary tumors (PT) did. Primary tumors showed significantly higher expression of cytoplasmic TGF–α (PT 149.8 vs. BM 111.3; P=0.008) and neuregulin-1 (PT 158.5 vs. BM 122.8; P=0.006). In adenocarcinomas, a similar high frequency of EGFR copy number gain (high polysomy and amplification) was detected in primary (65%) and brain metastasis (63%) sites. However, adenocarcinoma metastases (30%) showed higher frequency of EGFR amplification than corresponding primary tumors (10%). Patients whose primary tumors showed EGFR amplification tended to develop brain metastases at an earlier time points.
Conclusions
Our findings suggest that NSCLC brain metastases have some significant differences in HER family receptors-related abnormalities from primary lung tumors.
doi:10.1158/1078-0432.CCR-08-2921
PMCID: PMC3372920  PMID: 19622585
15.  Histologic Patterns and Molecular Characteristics of Lung Adenocarcinoma Associated With Clinical Outcome 
Cancer  2011;118(11):2889-2899.
BACKGROUND
Lung adenocarcinoma is histologically heterogeneous and has 5 distinct histologic growth patterns: lepidic, acinar, papillary, micropapillary, and solid. To date, there is no consensus regarding the clinical utility of these patterns.
METHODS
The authors performed a detailed semiquantitative assessment of histologic patterns of 240 lung adenocarcinomas and determined the association with patients’ clinicopathologic features, including recurrence-free survival (RFS) and overall survival (OS) rates. In a subset of tumors, expression levels of 2 prognostic molecular markers were evaluated: thyroid transcription factor-1 (TTF-1) (n = 218) and a panel of 5 proteins (referred as the FILM signature index) (n = 185).
RESULTS
Four mutually exclusive tumor histology pattern groups were identified: 1) any solid (38%), 2) any papillary but no solid (14%), 3) lepidic and acinar but no solid or papillary (30%), and 4) acinar only (18%). Patients in group 3 had a higher RFS rate than patients in group 1 (hazard ratio [HR], 0.4510; P = .0165) and group 2 (HR, 0.4253; P = .0425). Solid pattern tumors (group 1) were associated with a lower OS rate than nonsolid pattern tumors (all stages: HR; 1.665; P = .0144; stages I and II: HR, 2.157; P = .008). In the patients who had tumors with a nonsolid pattern, high TTF-1 expression was associated significantly with higher RFS (HR, 0.994; P = .0017) and OS (HR, 0.996; P = .0276) rates in all stages, and a high FILM signature index score was associated with lower RFS and OS rates in all stages (RFS: HR, 1.343; P = .0192; OS: HR, 1.371; P = .0156) and in stages I and II (RFS: HR, 1.419; P = .0095; OS: HR, 1.315; P = .0422).
CONCLUSIONS
The presence of a solid histologic pattern was identified as a marker of unfavorable prognosis in patients with primary lung adenocarcinoma. High TTF-1 expression and low FILM signature index scores were associated with a better prognosis for patients who had tumors with a nonsolid pattern.
doi:10.1002/cncr.26584
PMCID: PMC3369269  PMID: 22020674
histologic patterns; lung adenocarcinoma; thyroid transcription factor 1; prognostic signature
16.  EGFR Abnormalities in the Pathogenesis and Progression of Lung Adenocarcinomas 
To identify the characteristics and sequence of epidermal growth factor receptor (EGFR) abnormalities relevant to the pathogenesis and progression of lung adenocarcinoma, we performed a precise mapping analysis of EGFR mutation, gene copy number and total and phosphorylated EGFR (pEGFR) protein expression for the same tissue sites. We examined normal bronchial and bronchiolar epithelium (NBE) and tumor tissues obtained from 50 formalin-fixed lung adenocarcinomas, including 24 EGFR-mutant primary tumors with nine corresponding lymph node metastases and 26 wild-type primary tumors. NBE in 12/24 (50%) mutant and 3/26 (12%) wild-type tumors harbored EGFR mutation; these NBE also showed lack of EGFR copy number increase and frequent EGFR (69%) and pEGFR (33%) overexpression. EGFR mutation and protein overexpression were more frequent in NBE sites within tumors than in NBE sites adjacent to and distant from tumors, suggesting a localized field effect. Sites with high and low EGFR copy numbers were heterogeneously distributed in six of nine primary tumors and one of eight metastases. EGFR protein overexpression was significantly higher in metastasis sites than in primary tumors. We conclude from our findings that EGFR mutations and protein overexpression are early phenomena in the pathogenesis of lung adenocarcinoma and that EGFR mutation precedes an increase in gene copy number. In EGFR-mutant adenocarcinoma metastases, the higher levels of EGFR overexpression and more homogeneously distributed high gene copy numbers suggest tumor progression. Our findings have important implications for the development of new strategies for targeted chemoprevention and therapy in lung adenocarcinoma using EGFR inhibitors.
doi:10.1158/1940-6207.CAPR-08-0032
PMCID: PMC3369271  PMID: 19138956
17.  Abnormalities of the TITF-1 lineage-specific oncogene in NSCLC: Implications in lung cancer pathogenesis and prognosis 
PURPOSE
Emerging evidence suggests that aberrant expression of oncogenes contributes to development of lung malignancy. The thyroid transcription factor 1 (TITF-1) gene functions as a lineage survival gene abnormally expressed in a significant fraction of NSCLCs, in particular lung adenocarcinomas.
EXPERIMENTAL DESIGN
To better characterize TITF-1 abnormality: patterns in NSCLC, we studied TITF-1’s gene copy number using fluorescent in situ hybridization (FISH) and quantitative PCR, as well as its protein expression by immunohistochemistry analysis in a tissue microarray comprised of surgically resected NSCLC (N=321) including 204 adenocarcinomas and 117 squamous cell carcinomas (SCCs). TITF-1 copy number and protein expression were correlated with patients’ clinicopathologic characteristics, and in a subset of adenocarcinomas with EGFR and KRAS mutation status.
RESULTS
We found that increased TITF-1 protein expression was prevalent in lung adenocarcinomas only and was significantly associated with female gender (p<0.001), never smokers (p=0.004), presence of EGFR mutations (p=0.05) and better overall survival (all stages, p=0.0478. stages I and II, p=0.002). TITF-1 copy number gain (CBG) was detected by FISH analysis in both adenocarcinomas (18.9%; high CNG, 8.3%) and SCCs (20.1%; high CNG, 3.0%), and correlated significantly with the protein product (p=0.004) and presence of KRAS mutations (p=0.008) in lung adenocarcinomas. Moreover, multivariate analysis revealed that TITF-1 copy number gain was an independent predictor of poor survival of NSCLC (p=0.039).
CONCLUSIONS
Our integrative study demonstrates that the protein versus genomic expression patterns of TITF-1 have opposing roles in lung cancer prognosis and may occur preferentially in different subsets of NSCLC patients with distinct oncogene mutations.
doi:10.1158/1078-0432.CCR-10-1412
PMCID: PMC3078948  PMID: 21257719
NSCLC; TITF-1; gene copy gain; lineage-specific oncogenes
18.  A five-gene and corresponding-protein signature for stage-I lung adenocarcinoma prognosis 
PURPOSE
Identification of effective markers for outcome is expected to improve the clinical management of non-small cell lung cancer (NSCLC). Here, we assessed in NSCLC the prognostic efficacy of genes, which we had previously found to be differentially expressed in an in vitro model of human lung carcinogenesis.
EXPERIMENTAL DESIGN
Prediction algorithms and risk-score models were applied to the expression of the genes in publicly available NSCLC expression datasets. The prognostic capacity of the immunohistochemical expression of proteins encoded by these genes was also tested using formalin-fixed paraffin-embedded (FFPE) tissue specimens from 156 lung adenocarcinomas and 79 squamous cell carcinomas (SCCs).
RESULTS
The survival of all-stages (p<0.001, HR=2.0) or stage-I (p<0.001, HR=2.84) adenocarcinoma patients that expressed the five-gene in vitro lung carcinogenesis model (FILM) signature was significantly poorer than that of patients who did not. No survival differences were observed between SCCs predicted to express or lack FILM signature. Moreover, all stages (p<0.001, HR=1.95) or stage-I (p=0.001, HR=2.6) adenocarcinoma patients predicted to be at high risk by FILM transcript exhibited significantly worse survival than patients at low risk. Furthermore, the corresponding protein signature was associated with poor survival (all stages, p<0.001, HR=3.6; stage-I, p<0.001, HR=3.5; stage-IB, p<0.001, HR=4.6) and mortality risk (all stages, p=0.001, HR=4.0; stage-I, p=0.01, HR=3.4; stage-IB, p<0.001, HR=7.2) in lung adenocarcinoma patients.
CONCLUSIONS
Our findings highlight a gene and corresponding protein signature with effective capacity for identification of stage-I lung adenocarcinoma patients with poor prognosis that are likely to benefit from adjuvant therapy.
doi:10.1158/1078-0432.CCR-10-2703
PMCID: PMC3079395  PMID: 21163870
Lung adenocarcinoma; NSCLC; gene signature; prognosis
19.  DEAR1 is a Chromosome 1p35 Tumor Suppressor and Master Regulator of TGFβ-Driven Epithelial-Mesenchymal Transition 
Cancer discovery  2013;3(10):1172-1189.
Deletion of chromosome 1p35 is a common event in epithelial malignancies. We report that DEAR1 (annotated as TRIM62) is a chromosome 1p35 tumor suppressor that undergoes mutation, copy number variation and loss of expression in human tumors. Targeted disruption in the mouse recapitulates this human tumor spectrum with both Dear1−/− and Dear1+/− mice developing primarily epithelial adenocarcinomas and lymphoma with evidence of metastasis in a subset of mice. DEAR1 loss of function in the presence of TGFβ results in failure of acinar morphogenesis, upregulation of EMT markers, anoikis resistance, migration and invasion. Furthermore, DEAR1 blocks TGFβ-SMAD3 signaling resulting in decreased nuclear phosphorylated SMAD3 by binding to and promoting the ubiquitination of SMAD3, the major effector of TGFβ-induced EMT. Moreover, DEAR1 loss increases levels of SMAD3 downstream effectors, SNAI1 and SNAI2, with genetic alteration of DEAR1/SNAI2 serving as prognostic markers of overall poor survival in an 889 invasive breast cancer cohort.
doi:10.1158/2159-8290.CD-12-0499
PMCID: PMC4107927  PMID: 23838884
DEAR1; tumor suppressor; EMT; TGFβ; Signaling; SMAD3 ubiquitination
20.  Nrf2 and Keap1 Abnormalities in Non-Small Cell Lung Carcinoma and Association with Clinicopathologic Features 
Purpose
To understand the role of Nrf2 and Keap1 in NSCLC, we studied their expression in a large series of tumors with annotated clinicopathologic data, including response to platinum-based adjuvant chemotherapy.
Experimental design
We determined the immunohistochemical expression of nuclear Nrf2 and cytoplasmic Keap1 in 304 NSCLCs and its association with patients’ clinicopathologic characteristics, and in 89 tumors from patients who received neoadjuvant (n=26) or adjuvant platinum-based chemotherapy (n=63). We evaluated NFE2L2 and KEAP1 mutations in 31 tumor specimens.
Results
We detected nuclear Nrf2 expression in 26% of NSCLCs; it was significantly more common in squamous cell carcinomas (38%) than in adenocarcinomas (18%; P<0.0001). Low or absent Keap1 expression was detected in 56% of NSCLCs; it was significantly more common in adenocarcinomas (62%) than in squamous cell carcinomas (46%; P=0.0057). In NSCLC, mutations of NFE2L2 and KEAP1 were very uncommon (2 of 29 and 1 of 31 cases, respectively). In multivariate analysis, Nrf2 expression was associated with worse overall survival (P=0.0139; HR=1.75) in NSCLC patients, and low or absent Keap1 expression was associated with worse overall survival (P=0.0181; HR=2.09) in squamous cell carcinoma. In univariate analysis, nuclear Nrf2 expression was associated with worse recurrence-free survival in squamous cell carcinoma patients who received adjuvant treatment (P=0.0410; HR=3.37).
Conclusions
Increased expression of Nrf2 and decreased expression of Keap1 are common abnormalities in NSCLC and are associated with a poor outcome. Nuclear expression of Nrf2 in malignant lung cancer cells may play a role in resistance to platinum-based treatment in squamous cell carcinoma.
doi:10.1158/1078-0432.CCR-09-3352
PMCID: PMC2920733  PMID: 20534738
Nrf2; Keap1; NSCLC
21.  A Phase I/II Study Combining Erlotinib and Dasatinib for Non-Small Cell Lung Cancer 
The Oncologist  2014;19(10):1040-1041.
Background.
EGFR and Src are frequently activated in non-small cell lung cancer (NSCLC). In preclinical models, combining EGFR and Src inhibition has additive synergistic effects. We conducted a phase I/II trial of the combination of Src inhibitor dasatinib with EGFR inhibitor erlotinib to determine the maximum tolerated dose (MTD), pharmacokinetic drug interactions, biomarkers, and efficacy in NSCLC.
Methods.
The phase I 3+3 dose-escalation study enrolled patients with solid tumors to determine the MTD. The phase II trial enrolled patients with advanced NSCLC who had undergone no previous treatments to determine progression-free survival (PFS) and response. Pharmacokinetic and tissue biomarker analyses were performed.
Results.
MTD was 150 mg of erlotinib and 70 mg of dasatinib daily based on 12 patients treated in the phase I portion. No responses were observed in phase I. The 35 NSCLC patients treated in phase II had an overall disease control rate of 59% at 6 weeks. Five patients (15%) had partial responses; all had activating EGFR mutations. Median PFS was 3.3 months. Epithelial-mesenchymal transition markers did not correlate with outcomes.
Conclusion.
The combination of erlotinib and dasatinib is safe and feasible in NSCLC. The results of this study do not support use of this combination in molecularly unselected NSCLC.
doi:10.1634/theoncologist.2014-0228
PMCID: PMC4201000  PMID: 25170013
22.  Expression of Interleukin-1 Receptor-Associated Kinase-1 (IRAK-1) in Non-Small Cell Lung Carcinoma and Preneoplastic Lesions 
Purpose
To identify the pattern of IRAK-1 protein expression in non-small cell lung carcinoma (NSCLC) and corresponding preneoplastic lesions.
Experimental Design
Archived tissue from NSCLC (adenocarcinoma and squamous cell carcinoma; n = 306) and adjacent bronchial epithelial specimens (n = 315) were analyzed for the immunohistochemical expression of IRAK-1, and the findings were correlated with patients’ clinicopathologic features. Furthermore, we investigated the correlation between IRAK-1 expression and expression of NF-κB and IL-1α in tumor specimens.
Results
NSCLC tumors demonstrated significantly higher cytoplasmic and lower nuclear IRAK-1 expression than normal epithelium. Squamous dysplasias had significantly higher cytoplasmic IRAK-1 expression that normal epithelium. In tumors, a significant positive correlation was detected between IRAK-1 expression (nuclear and cytoplasmic; P = 0.011) and IL-1α cytoplasmic expression (P < 0.0001). The correlation between the expression of the markers and patients’ clinicopathologic features varied according to tumor histologic type and sex. High IRAK-1 cytoplasmic expression correlated with worse recurrence-free survival in women with NSCLC (HR, 2.204; P = 0.033), but not in men. In adenocarcinoma, combined low level of expression of nuclear IRAK-1 and NF-κB correlated significantly with worse overall (HR, 2.485; P = 0.007) and recurrence-free (HR, 3.058; P = 0.006) survivals in stage I/II patients.
Conclusions
IRAK-1 is frequently expressed in NSCLC tissue specimens, and this expression is an early phenomenon in the sequential development of lung cancer. IRAK-1 is a novel inflammation-related marker and a potential target for lung cancer chemopreventive strategies.
doi:10.1158/1078-0432.CCR-09-0650
PMCID: PMC2811365  PMID: 20028769
lung cancer; inflammation; preneoplastic lesions; dysplasia
23.  Immunohistochemical Expression of Estrogen and Progesterone Receptors Identifies a Subset of NSCLCs and Correlates with EGFR Mutation 
Purpose
To determine the frequency of estrogen receptor α and β and progesterone receptor protein immunohistochemical expression in a large set of non–small cell lungcarcinoma (NSCLC) specimens and to compare our results with those for some of the same antibodies that have provided inconsistent results in previously published reports.
Experimental Design
Using multiple antibodies, we investigated the immunohistochemical expression of estrogen receptors α and β and progesterone receptor in 317 NSCLCs placed in tissue microarrays and correlated their expression with patients’ clinicopathologic characteristics and in adenocarcinomas with EGFR mutation status.
Results
Estrogen receptors α and β were detected in the nucleus and cytoplasm of NSCLC cells; however, the frequency of expression (nucleus, 5-36% for α and 42-56% for β; cytoplasm: <1-42% for α and 20-98% for β) varied among the different antibodies tested. Progesterone receptor was expressed in the nuclei of malignant cells in 63% of the tumors. Estrogen receptor α nuclear expression significantly correlated with adenocarcinoma histology, female gender, and history of never smoking (P = 0.0048 to <0.0001). In NSCLC, higher cytoplasmic estrogen receptor α expression significantly correlated with worse recurrence-free survival (hazard ratio, 1.77; 95% confidence interval, 1.12, 2.82; P = 0.015) in multivariate analysis. In adenocarcinomas, estrogen receptor α expression correlated with EGFR mutation (P = 0.0029 to <0.0001). Estrogen receptor β and progesterone receptor but not estrogen receptor α expressed in the normal epithelium adjacent to lung adenocarcinomas.
Conclusions
Estrogen receptor α and β expression distinguishes a subset of NSCLC that has defined clinicopathologic and genetic features. In lung adenocarcinoma, estrogen receptor α expression correlates with EGFR mutations.
doi:10.1158/1078-0432.CCR-09-0033
PMCID: PMC2893045  PMID: 19706809
24.  DeMix: deconvolution for mixed cancer transcriptomes using raw measured data 
Bioinformatics  2013;29(15):1865-1871.
Motivation: Tissue samples of tumor cells mixed with stromal cells cause underdetection of gene expression signatures associated with cancer prognosis or response to treatment. In silico dissection of mixed cell samples is essential for analyzing expression data generated in cancer studies. Currently, a systematic approach is lacking to address three challenges in computational deconvolution: (i) violation of linear addition of expression levels from multiple tissues when log-transformed microarray data are used; (ii) estimation of both tumor proportion and tumor-specific expression, when neither is known a priori; and (iii) estimation of expression profiles for individual patients.
Results: We have developed a statistical method for deconvolving mixed cancer transcriptomes, DeMix, which addresses the aforementioned issues in array-based expression data. We demonstrate the performance of our model in synthetic and real, publicly available, datasets. DeMix can be applied to ongoing biomarker-based clinical studies and to the vast expression datasets previously generated from mixed tumor and stromal cell samples.
Availability: All codes are written in C and integrated into an R function, which is available at http://odin.mdacc.tmc.edu/∼wwang7/DeMix.html.
Contact: wwang7@mdanderson.org
Supplementary information: Supplementary data are available at Bioinformatics online.
doi:10.1093/bioinformatics/btt301
PMCID: PMC3841439  PMID: 23712657
25.  Metabolic and Functional Genomic Studies Identify Deoxythymidylate Kinase as a target in LKB1 Mutant Lung Cancer 
Cancer discovery  2013;3(8):870-879.
The LKB1/STK11 tumor suppressor encodes a serine/threonine kinase which coordinates cell growth, polarity, motility, and metabolism. In non-small cell lung cancer, LKB1 is somatically inactivated in 25-30% of cases, often concurrently with activating KRAS mutation. Here, we employed an integrative approach to define novel therapeutic targets in KRAS-driven LKB1 mutant lung cancers. High-throughput RNAi screens in lung cancer cell lines from genetically engineered mouse models driven by activated KRAS with or without coincident Lkb1 deletion led to the identification of Dtymk, encoding deoxythymidylate kinase which catalyzes dTTP biosynthesis, as synthetically lethal with Lkb1 deficiency in mouse and human lung cancer lines. Global metabolite profiling demonstrated that Lkb1-null cells had striking decreases in multiple nucleotide metabolites as compared to the Lkb1-wt cells. Thus, LKB1 mutant lung cancers have deficits in nucleotide metabolism conferring hypersensitivity to DTYMK inhibition, suggesting that DTYMK is a potential therapeutic target in this aggressive subset of tumors.
doi:10.1158/2159-8290.CD-13-0015
PMCID: PMC3753578  PMID: 23715154
LKB1; KRAS; DTYMK; CHEK1; NSCLC; GEMM-derived cell line; genome wide RNAi screen; metabolic profiling

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