PMCC PMCC

Search tips
Search criteria

Advanced
Results 1-2 (2)
 

Clipboard (0)
None

Select a Filter Below

Journals
Authors
more »
Year of Publication
Document Types
1.  Cocaine and HIV-1 Interplay in CNS: Cellular and Molecular Mechanisms 
Current HIV research  2012;10(5):425-428.
Although antiretrovirals are the mainstay of therapy against HIV infection, neurological complications associated with the virus continue to hamper quality of life of the infected individuals. Drugs of abuse in the infected individuals further fuel the epidemic. Epidemiological studies have demonstrated that abuse of cocaine resulted in acceleration of HIV infection and the progression of NeuroAIDS. Cocaine has not only been shown to play a crucial role in promoting virus replication, but also has diverse but often deleterious effects on various cell types of the CNS. In the neuronal system, cocaine exposure results in neuronal toxicity and also potentiates gp120-induced neurotoxicity. In the astroglia and microglia, cocaine exposure leads to up-regulation of pro-inflammatory mediators such as cytokines and chemokines. These in turn, can lead to neuroinflammation and transmission of toxic responses to the neurons. Additionally, cocaine exposure can also lead to leakiness of the blood-brain barrier that manifests as enhanced transmigraiton of leukocytes/monocytes into the CNS. Both in vitro and in vivo studies have provided valuable tools in exploring the role of cocaine in mediating HIV-associated neuropathogenesis. This review summarizes previous studies on the mechanism(s) underlying the interplay of cocaine and HIV as it relates to the CNS.
PMCID: PMC3824955  PMID: 22591366
HIV; AIDS; cocaine; Glial cell; neuron; HIV-1-associated neurocognitive disorders
2.  Methamphetamine Increases LPS-Mediated Expression of IL-8, TNF-α and IL-1β in Human Macrophages through Common Signaling Pathways 
PLoS ONE  2012;7(3):e33822.
The use of methamphetamine (MA) has increased in recent years, and is a major health concern throughout the world. The use of MA has been associated with an increased risk of acquiring HIV-1, along with an increased probability of the acquisition of various sexually transmitted infections. In order to determine the potential effects of MA exposure in the context of an infectious agent, U937 macrophages were exposed to various combinations of MA and bacterial lipopolysaccharide (LPS). Treatment with MA alone caused significant increases in the levels of TNF-α, while treatment with both MA and LPS resulted in significant increases in TNF-α, IL-1β and the chemokine IL-8. The increases in cytokine or chemokine levels seen when cells were treated with both LPS and MA were generally greater than those increases observed when cells were treated with only LPS. Treatment with chemical inhibitors demonstrated that the signal transduction pathways including NF-kB, MAPK, and PI3-Akt were involved in mediating the increased inflammatory response. As discussed in the paper, these pathways appear to be utilized by both MA and LPS, in the induction of these inflammatory mediators. Since these pathways are involved in the induction of inflammation in response to other pathogens, this suggests that MA-exacerbated inflammation may be a common feature of infectious disease in MA abusers.
doi:10.1371/journal.pone.0033822
PMCID: PMC3315580  PMID: 22479453

Results 1-2 (2)