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1.  JAK-STAT in lipid metabolism of adipocytes 
JAK-STAT  2013;2(4):e27203.
JAK-STAT signaling pathway plays an important role in the cells’ development and homeostasis. Over the past decades, the studies have identified the role of the JAK-STAT pathway in cell proliferation and apoptosis. Here, we want to discuss that whether and how the JAK-STAT pathway affects the lipid metabolism of adipose tissue. A host of cytokines and hormones can regulate lipid metabolism through activating the JAK-STAT signaling pathway. Activated STATs can regulate lipid metabolism directly by influencing the expression of enzymes. We have summarized the relevant research and articles of JAK-STAT during the recent years. Within this review, we will introduce you the recent research and highlight the unresolved problems in understanding how JAK-STAT signaling pathway contribute to the lipid metabolism in mature adipocytes and preadipocytes. Dysregulation of the JAK-STAT pathway would lead to a multiple metabolism disorders and medicines for this signaling pathway maybe become a new idea for diseases such as metabolic syndrome, especially in children.
doi:10.4161/jkst.27203
PMCID: PMC3906428  PMID: 24498541
JAK-STAT; lipid metabolism; adipocytes; preadipocytes; obesity
2.  The impact of educational status on the clinical features of major depressive disorder among Chinese women 
Journal of Affective Disorders  2012;136(3):988-992.
Background
Years of education are inversely related to the prevalence of major depressive disorder (MDD), but the relationship between the clinical features of MDD and educational status is poorly understood. We investigated this in 1970 Chinese women with recurrent MDD identified in a clinical setting.
Methods
Clinical and demographic features were obtained from 1970 Han Chinese women with DSM-IV major depression between 30 and 60 years of age across China. Analysis of linear, logistic and multiple logistic regression models were used to determine the association between educational level and clinical features of MDD.
Results
Subjects with more years of education are more likely to have MDD, with an odds ratio of 1.14 for those with more than ten years. Low educational status is not associated with an increase in the number of episodes, nor with increased rates of co-morbidity with anxiety disorders. Education impacts differentially on the symptoms of depression: lower educational attainment is associated with more biological symptoms and increased suicidal ideation and plans to commit suicide.
Limitations
Findings may not generalize to males or to other patient populations. Since the threshold for treatment seeking differs as a function of education there may an ascertainment bias in the sample.
Conclusions
The relationship between symptoms of MDD and educational status in Chinese women is unexpectedly complex. Our findings are inconsistent with the simple hypothesis from European and US reports that low levels of educational attainment increase the risk and severity of MDD.
doi:10.1016/j.jad.2011.06.046
PMCID: PMC3314924  PMID: 21824664
Major depressive disorder; Education; Socio-economic status; Symptom
3.  Gemcitabine causes minimal modulation of carboplatin-DNA monoadduct formation and repair in bladder cancer cells 
Chemical research in toxicology  2010;23(11):1653-1655.
We are developing a method to identify cellular resistance to carboplatin by using accelerator mass spectrometry to measure carboplatin-DNA adducts formed from drug microdoses (~1/100th the therapeutic dose). Such an approach would be particularly useful if it is still valid in combination chemotherapy. We examined whether the addition of gemcitabine, another chemotherapeutic drug, could influence carboplatin-DNA adduct levels. There were no substantial differences in the levels of carboplatin-DNA adducts in cells upon exposure to the carboplatin/gemcitabine combination at various doses and schedules. These data demonstrate that microdosing is feasible for characterization of carboplatin resistance when given in combination with gemcitabine.
doi:10.1021/tx1003547
PMCID: PMC2987236  PMID: 21028869
4.  Targeting canine bladder transitional cell carcinoma with a human bladder cancer-specific ligand 
Molecular Cancer  2011;10:9.
Objective
To determine if a human bladder cancer-specific peptide named PLZ4 can target canine bladder cancer cells.
Experimental Design
The binding of PLZ4 to five established canine invasive transitional cell carcinoma (TCC) cell lines and to normal canine bladder urothelial cells was determined using the whole cell binding assay and an affinitofluorescence assay. The WST-8 assay was performed to determine whether PLZ4 affected cell viability. In vivo tumor-specific homing/targeting property and biodistribution of PLZ4 was performed in a mouse xenograft model via tail vein injection and was confirmed with ex vivo imaging.
Results
PLZ4 exhibited high affinity and specific dose-dependent binding to canine bladder TCC cell lines, but not to normal canine urothelial cells. No significant changes in cell viability or proliferation were observed upon incubation with PLZ4. The in vivo and ex vivo optical imaging study showed that, when linked with the near-infrared fluorescent dye Cy5.5, PLZ4 substantially accumulated at the canine bladder cancer foci in the mouse xenograft model as compared to the control.
Conclusions and Clinical Relevance
PLZ4 can specifically bind to canine bladder cancer cells. This suggests that the preclinical studies of PLZ4 as a potential diagnostic and therapeutic agent can be performed in dogs with naturally occurring bladder cancer, and that PLZ4 can possibly be developed in the management of canine bladder cancer.
doi:10.1186/1476-4598-10-9
PMCID: PMC3040722  PMID: 21272294
5.  Interaction Between Nano-Anatase TiO2 and Liver DNA from Mice In Vivo 
Nanoscale Research Letters  2009;5(1):108-115.
Nano-TiO2 was shown to cause various toxic effects in both rats and mice; however, the molecular mechanism by which TiO2 exerts its toxicity is poorly understood. In this report, an interaction of nano-anatase TiO2 with liver DNA from ICR mice was systematically studied in vivo using ICP-MS, various spectral methods and gel electrophoresis. We found that the liver weights of the mice treated with higher amounts of nano-anatase TiO2 were significantly increased. Nano-anatase TiO2 could be accumulated in liver DNA by inserting itself into DNA base pairs or binding to DNA nucleotide that bound with three oxygen or nitrogen atoms and two phosphorous atoms of DNA with the Ti–O(N) and Ti–P bond lengths of 1.87 and 2.38 Å, respectively, and alter the conformation of DNA. And gel electrophoresis showed that higher dose of nano-anatase TiO2 could cause liver DNA cleavage in mice.
doi:10.1007/s11671-009-9451-2
PMCID: PMC2893935  PMID: 20652136
Nano-anatase TiO2; Mice; DNA; Binding information; DNA cleavage
6.  Interaction Between Nano-Anatase TiO2 and Liver DNA from Mice In Vivo 
Nanoscale Research Letters  2009;5(1):108-115.
Nano-TiO2 was shown to cause various toxic effects in both rats and mice; however, the molecular mechanism by which TiO2 exerts its toxicity is poorly understood. In this report, an interaction of nano-anatase TiO2 with liver DNA from ICR mice was systematically studied in vivo using ICP-MS, various spectral methods and gel electrophoresis. We found that the liver weights of the mice treated with higher amounts of nano-anatase TiO2 were significantly increased. Nano-anatase TiO2 could be accumulated in liver DNA by inserting itself into DNA base pairs or binding to DNA nucleotide that bound with three oxygen or nitrogen atoms and two phosphorous atoms of DNA with the Ti–O(N) and Ti–P bond lengths of 1.87 and 2.38 Å, respectively, and alter the conformation of DNA. And gel electrophoresis showed that higher dose of nano-anatase TiO2 could cause liver DNA cleavage in mice.
doi:10.1007/s11671-009-9451-2
PMCID: PMC2893935  PMID: 20652136
Nano-anatase TiO2; Mice; DNA; Binding information; DNA cleavage

Results 1-6 (6)