PMCC PMCC

Search tips
Search criteria

Advanced
Results 1-4 (4)
 

Clipboard (0)
None

Select a Filter Below

Journals
Year of Publication
Document Types
1.  Rosuvastatin Treatment Reduces Markers of Monocyte Activation in HIV-Infected Subjects on Antiretroviral Therapy 
Soluble CD14, a marker of monocyte activation and independent predictor of mortality in HIV disease, is reduced by rosuvastatin treatment. Monocyte tissue factor expression in HIV-infected subjects is reduced by rosuvastatin treatment, potentially reducing thrombotic risk.
Background. Statins, or 3-hydroxy-3-methylglutaryl coenzyme A (HMG-CoA) reductase inhibitors, have anti-inflammatory effects that are independent of their lipid-lowering properties. Despite suppressive antiretroviral therapy (ART), elevated levels of immune activation and inflammation often persist.
Methods. The Stopping Atherosclerosis and Treating Unhealthy Bone With Rosuvastatin in HIV (SATURN-HIV) trial is a randomized, double-blind, placebo-controlled study, designed to investigate the effects of rosuvastatin (10 mg/daily) on markers of cardiovascular disease risk in ART-treated human immunodeficiency virus (HIV)–infected subjects. A preplanned analysis was to assess changes in markers of immune activation at week 24. Subjects with low-density lipoprotein cholesterol <130 mg/dL and heightened immune activation (%CD8+CD38+HLA-DR+ ≥19%, or plasma high-sensitivity C-reactive protein ≥2 mg/L) were randomized to receive rosuvastatin or placebo. We measured plasma (soluble CD14 and CD163) and cellular markers of monocyte activation (proportions of monocyte subsets and tissue factor expression) and T-cell activation (expression of CD38, HLA-DR, and PD1).
Results. After 24 weeks of rosuvastatin, we found significant decreases in plasma levels of soluble CD14 (−13.4% vs 1.2%, P = .002) and in proportions of tissue factor–positive patrolling (CD14DimCD16+) monocytes (−38.8% vs −11.9%, P = .04) in rosuvastatin-treated vs placebo-treated subjects. These findings were independent of the lipid-lowering effect and the use of protease inhibitors. Rosuvastatin did not lead to any changes in levels of T-cell activation.
Conclusions. Rosuvastatin treatment effectively lowered markers of monocyte activation in HIV-infected subjects on antiretroviral therapy.
Clinical Trials Registration NCT01218802.
doi:10.1093/cid/cit748
PMCID: PMC3905756  PMID: 24253250
HIV-1; monocytes; tissue factor; rosuvastatin
2.  Synthetic triterpenoid induces 15-PGDH expression and suppresses inflammation-driven colon carcinogenesis 
The Journal of Clinical Investigation  2014;124(6):2472-2482.
Colitis-associated colon cancer (CAC) develops as a result of inflammation-induced epithelial transformation, which occurs in response to inflammatory cytokine-dependent downregulation of 15-hydroxyprostaglandin dehydrogenase (15-PGDH) and subsequent suppression of prostaglandin metabolism. Agents that both enhance 15-PGDH expression and suppress cyclooxygenase-2 (COX-2) production may more effectively prevent CAC. Synthetic triterpenoids are a class of small molecules that suppress COX-2 as well as inflammatory cytokine signaling. Here, we found that administration of the synthetic triterpenoid 2-cyano-3,12-dioxooleana-1,9(11)-dien-C28-methyl ester (CDDO-Me) suppresses CAC in mice. In a spontaneous, inflammation-driven intestinal neoplasia model, deletion of Smad4 specifically in T cells led to progressive production of inflammatory cytokines, including TNF-α, IFN-γ, iNOS, IL-6, IL-1β; as well as activation of STAT1 and STAT3; along with suppression of 15-PGDH expression. Oral administration of CDDO-Me to mice with SMAD4-deficient T cells increased survival and suppressed intestinal epithelial neoplasia by decreasing production of inflammatory mediators and increasing expression of 15-PGDH. Induction of 15-PGDH by CDDO-Me was dose dependent in epithelial cells and was abrogated following treatment with TGF-β signaling inhibitors in vitro. Furthermore, CDDO-Me–dependent 15-PGDH induction was not observed in Smad3–/– mice. Similarly, CDDO-Me suppressed azoxymethane plus dextran sodium sulfate–induced carcinogenesis in wild-type animals, highlighting the potential of small molecules of the triterpenoid family as effective agents for the chemoprevention of CAC in humans.
doi:10.1172/JCI69672
PMCID: PMC4089461  PMID: 24837432
3.  Spontaneous development of IL-17-producing γδ T cells in the thymus occurs via a TGFβ1-dependent mechanism1 
In naïve animals, γδ T cells are innate sources of IL-17, a potent proinflammatory cytokine mediating bacterial clearance as well as autoimmunity. However, mechanisms underlying the generation of these cells in vivo remain unclear. Here we show that TGFβ1 plays a key role in the generation of IL-17+ γδ T cells, and that it mainly occurs in the thymus particularly during the postnatal period. Interestingly, IL-17+ γδ TCR+ thymocytes were mainly CD44highCD25low cells, which seem to derive from DN4 γδ TCR+ cells that acquired CD44 and IL-17 expression. Our findings identify a novel developmental pathway during which IL-17-competent γδ T cells arise in the thymus by a TGFβ1-dependent mechanism.
doi:10.4049/jimmunol.0903539
PMCID: PMC2844788  PMID: 20061408
γδ T cells; IL-17; TGFβ
4.  Laboratory Capacity Building in Asia for Infectious Disease Research: Experiences from the South East Asia Infectious Disease Clinical Research Network (SEAICRN) 
PLoS Medicine  2010;7(4):e1000231.
Heiman Wertheim and colleagues discuss a network that aims to improve infectious disease management through integrated, collaborative clinical research in South East Asia.
doi:10.1371/journal.pmed.1000231
PMCID: PMC2850380  PMID: 20386725

Results 1-4 (4)