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1.  Genome Sequence of the Sulfate-Reducing Thermophilic Bacterium Thermodesulfovibrio yellowstonii Strain DSM 11347T (Phylum Nitrospirae) 
Genome Announcements  2015;3(1):e01489-14.
Here, we present the complete 2,003,803-bp genome of a sulfate-reducing thermophilic bacterium, Thermodesulfovibrio yellowstonii strain DSM 11347T.
doi:10.1128/genomeA.01489-14
PMCID: PMC4319510  PMID: 25635016
2.  Genome Sequence of a Sulfate-Reducing Thermophilic Bacterium, Thermodesulfobacterium commune DSM 2178T (Phylum Thermodesulfobacteria) 
Genome Announcements  2015;3(1):e01490-14.
Here, we present the complete genome sequence of Thermodesulfobacterium commune DSM 2178T of the phylum Thermodesulfobacteria.
doi:10.1128/genomeA.01490-14
PMCID: PMC4319511  PMID: 25635017
3.  Draft Genome Sequence of the Pyridinediol-Fermenting Bacterium Synergistes jonesii 78-1 
Genome Announcements  2014;2(4):e00833-14.
Here we present the draft genome of Synergistes jonesii 78-1, ATCC 49833, a member of the Synergistes phylum. This organism was isolated from the rumen of a Hawaiian goat and ferments pyridinediols. The assembly contains 2,747,397 bp in 61 contigs.
doi:10.1128/genomeA.00833-14
PMCID: PMC4153494  PMID: 25146141
4.  Complete Genome Sequence of Coprothermobacter proteolyticus DSM 5265 
Genome Announcements  2014;2(3):e00470-14.
Here we present the complete 1,424,912-bp genome sequence of Coprothermobacter proteolyticus DSM 5265, isolated from a thermophilic digester fermenting tannery wastes and cattle manure.
doi:10.1128/genomeA.00470-14
PMCID: PMC4022818  PMID: 24831154
5.  Complete Genome Sequence of the Extreme Thermophile Dictyoglomus thermophilum H-6-12 
Genome Announcements  2014;2(1):e00109-14.
Here, we present the complete genome of the extreme thermophile, Dictyoglomus thermophilum H-6-12 (phylum Dictyoglomi), which consists of 1,959,987 bp.
doi:10.1128/genomeA.00109-14
PMCID: PMC3931368  PMID: 24558247
6.  Draft Genome Sequence of the Arsenate-Respiring Bacterium Chrysiogenes arsenatis Strain DSM 11915 
Genome Announcements  2013;1(6):e00953-13.
Here we present the draft genome sequence of Chrysiogenes arsenatis strain DSM 11915, only the second genome sequence from the phylum Chrysiogenetes. This strictly anaerobic organism was isolated from arsenic-contaminated gold mine wastewater and respires arsenate or nitrate instead of oxygen. The assembly contains 2,824,977 bp in 22 scaffolds.
doi:10.1128/genomeA.00953-13
PMCID: PMC3828317  PMID: 24233593
7.  Analysis of Genome Content Evolution in PVC Bacterial Super-Phylum: Assessment of Candidate Genes Associated with Cellular Organization and Lifestyle 
Genome Biology and Evolution  2012;4(12):1375-1390.
The Planctomycetes, Verrucomicrobia, Chlamydiae (PVC) super-phylum contains bacteria with either complex cellular organization or simple cell structure; it also includes organisms of different lifestyles (pathogens, mutualists, commensal, and free-living). Genome content evolution of this group has not been studied in a systematic fashion, which would reveal genes underlying the emergence of PVC-specific phenotypes. Here, we analyzed the evolutionary dynamics of 26 PVC genomes and several outgroup species. We inferred HGT, duplications, and losses by reconciliation of 27,123 gene trees with the species phylogeny. We showed that genome expansion and contraction have driven evolution within Planctomycetes and Chlamydiae, respectively, and balanced each other in Verrucomicrobia and Lentisphaerae. We also found that for a large number of genes in PVC genomes the most similar sequences are present in Acidobacteria, suggesting past and/or current ecological interaction between organisms from these groups. We also found evidence of shared ancestry between carbohydrate degradation genes in the mucin-degrading human intestinal commensal Akkermansia muciniphila and sequences from Acidobacteria and Bacteroidetes, suggesting that glycoside hydrolases are transferred laterally between gut microbes and that the process of carbohydrate degradation is crucial for microbial survival within the human digestive system. Further, we identified a highly conserved genetic module preferentially present in compartmentalized PVC species and possibly associated with the complex cell plan in these organisms. This conserved machinery is likely to be membrane targeted and involved in electron transport, although its exact function is unknown. These genes represent good candidates for future functional studies.
doi:10.1093/gbe/evs113
PMCID: PMC3542564  PMID: 23221607
genome evolution in PVC super-phylum; cellular compartmentalization; DUF1501 and Planctomycetes-specific cytochromes; mucin-degradation by Akkermansia muciniphila
8.  Genomic and Experimental Evidence Suggests that Verrucomicrobium spinosum Interacts with Eukaryotes 
Our knowledge of pathogens and symbionts is heavily biased toward phyla containing species that are straightforward to isolate in pure culture. Novel bacterial phyla are often represented by a handful of strains, and the number of species interacting with eukaryotes is likely underestimated. Identification of predicted pathogenesis and symbiosis determinants such as the Type III Secretion System (T3SS) in the genomes of “free-living” bacteria suggests that these microbes participate in uncharacterized interactions with eukaryotes. Our study aimed to test this hypothesis on Verrucomicrobium spinosum (phylum Verrucomicrobia) and to begin characterization of its predicted T3SS. We showed the putative T3SS structural genes to be transcriptionally active, and that expression of predicted effector proteins was toxic to yeast in an established functional screen. Our results suggest that the predicted T3SS genes of V. spinosum could encode a functional T3SS, although further work is needed to determine whether V. spinosum produces a T3SS injectisome that delivers the predicted effectors. In the absence of a known eukaryotic host, we made use of invertebrate infection models. The injection or feeding of V. spinosum to Drosophila melanogaster and Caenorhabditis elegans, respectively, was shown to result in increased mortality rates relative to controls, a phenomenon exaggerated in C. elegans mutants hypersensitive to pathogen infection. This finding, although not conclusively demonstrating pathogenesis, suggests that V. spinosum is capable of pathogenic activity toward an invertebrate host. Symbiotic interactions with a natural host provide an alternative explanation for the results seen in the invertebrate models. Further work is needed to determine whether V. spinosum can establish and maintain interactions with eukaryotic species found in its natural habitat, and whether the predicted T3SS is directly involved in pathogenic or symbiotic activity.
doi:10.3389/fmicb.2011.00211
PMCID: PMC3196152  PMID: 22022322
Verrucomicrobia; genome; eukaryotic host
10.  Genome-Wide Influence of Indel Substitutions on Evolution of Bacteria of the PVC Superphylum, Revealed Using a Novel Computational Method 
Whole-genome scans for positive Darwinian selection are widely used to detect evolution of genome novelty. Most approaches are based on evaluation of nonsynonymous to synonymous substitution rate ratio across evolutionary lineages. These methods are sensitive to saturation of synonymous sites and thus cannot be used to study evolution of distantly related organisms. In contrast, indels occur less frequently than amino acid replacements, accumulate more slowly, and can be employed to characterize evolution of diverged organisms. As indels are also subject to the forces of natural selection, they can generate functional changes through positive selection. Here, we present a new computational approach to detect selective constraints on indel substitutions at the whole-genome level for distantly related organisms. Our method is based on ancestral sequence reconstruction, takes into account the varying susceptibility of different types of secondary structure to indels, and according to simulation studies is conservative. We applied this newly developed framework to characterize the evolution of organisms of the Planctomycetes, Verrucomicrobia, Chlamydiae (PVC) bacterial superphylum. The superphylum contains organisms with unique cell biology, physiology, and diverse lifestyles. It includes bacteria with simple cell organization and more complex eukaryote-like compartmentalization. Lifestyles range from free-living organisms to obligate pathogens. In this study, we conduct a whole-genome level analysis of indel substitutions specific to evolutionary lineages of the PVC superphylum and found that indels evolved under positive selection on up to 12% of gene tree branches. We also analyzed possible functional consequences for several case studies of predicted indel events.
doi:10.1093/gbe/evq071
PMCID: PMC3000692  PMID: 21048002
selection; indel substitutions; PVC superphylum
11.  Three Genomes from the Phylum Acidobacteria Provide Insight into the Lifestyles of These Microorganisms in Soils▿ †  
The complete genomes of three strains from the phylum Acidobacteria were compared. Phylogenetic analysis placed them as a unique phylum. They share genomic traits with members of the Proteobacteria, the Cyanobacteria, and the Fungi. The three strains appear to be versatile heterotrophs. Genomic and culture traits indicate the use of carbon sources that span simple sugars to more complex substrates such as hemicellulose, cellulose, and chitin. The genomes encode low-specificity major facilitator superfamily transporters and high-affinity ABC transporters for sugars, suggesting that they are best suited to low-nutrient conditions. They appear capable of nitrate and nitrite reduction but not N2 fixation or denitrification. The genomes contained numerous genes that encode siderophore receptors, but no evidence of siderophore production was found, suggesting that they may obtain iron via interaction with other microorganisms. The presence of cellulose synthesis genes and a large class of novel high-molecular-weight excreted proteins suggests potential traits for desiccation resistance, biofilm formation, and/or contribution to soil structure. Polyketide synthase and macrolide glycosylation genes suggest the production of novel antimicrobial compounds. Genes that encode a variety of novel proteins were also identified. The abundance of acidobacteria in soils worldwide and the breadth of potential carbon use by the sequenced strains suggest significant and previously unrecognized contributions to the terrestrial carbon cycle. Combining our genomic evidence with available culture traits, we postulate that cells of these isolates are long-lived, divide slowly, exhibit slow metabolic rates under low-nutrient conditions, and are well equipped to tolerate fluctuations in soil hydration.
doi:10.1128/AEM.02294-08
PMCID: PMC2663196  PMID: 19201974
12.  The Complete Genome of Teredinibacter turnerae T7901: An Intracellular Endosymbiont of Marine Wood-Boring Bivalves (Shipworms) 
PLoS ONE  2009;4(7):e6085.
Here we report the complete genome sequence of Teredinibacter turnerae T7901. T. turnerae is a marine gamma proteobacterium that occurs as an intracellular endosymbiont in the gills of wood-boring marine bivalves of the family Teredinidae (shipworms). This species is the sole cultivated member of an endosymbiotic consortium thought to provide the host with enzymes, including cellulases and nitrogenase, critical for digestion of wood and supplementation of the host's nitrogen-deficient diet. T. turnerae is closely related to the free-living marine polysaccharide degrading bacterium Saccharophagus degradans str. 2–40 and to as yet uncultivated endosymbionts with which it coexists in shipworm cells. Like S. degradans, the T. turnerae genome encodes a large number of enzymes predicted to be involved in complex polysaccharide degradation (>100). However, unlike S. degradans, which degrades a broad spectrum (>10 classes) of complex plant, fungal and algal polysaccharides, T. turnerae primarily encodes enzymes associated with deconstruction of terrestrial woody plant material. Also unlike S. degradans and many other eubacteria, T. turnerae dedicates a large proportion of its genome to genes predicted to function in secondary metabolism. Despite its intracellular niche, the T. turnerae genome lacks many features associated with obligate intracellular existence (e.g. reduced genome size, reduced %G+C, loss of genes of core metabolism) and displays evidence of adaptations common to free-living bacteria (e.g. defense against bacteriophage infection). These results suggest that T. turnerae is likely a facultative intracellular ensosymbiont whose niche presently includes, or recently included, free-living existence. As such, the T. turnerae genome provides insights into the range of genomic adaptations associated with intracellular endosymbiosis as well as enzymatic mechanisms relevant to the recycling of plant materials in marine environments and the production of cellulose-derived biofuels.
doi:10.1371/journal.pone.0006085
PMCID: PMC2699552  PMID: 19568419
13.  Complete Genome Sequence of the Aerobic CO-Oxidizing Thermophile Thermomicrobium roseum 
PLoS ONE  2009;4(1):e4207.
In order to enrich the phylogenetic diversity represented in the available sequenced bacterial genomes and as part of an “Assembling the Tree of Life” project, we determined the genome sequence of Thermomicrobium roseum DSM 5159. T. roseum DSM 5159 is a red-pigmented, rod-shaped, Gram-negative extreme thermophile isolated from a hot spring that possesses both an atypical cell wall composition and an unusual cell membrane that is composed entirely of long-chain 1,2-diols. Its genome is composed of two circular DNA elements, one of 2,006,217 bp (referred to as the chromosome) and one of 919,596 bp (referred to as the megaplasmid). Strikingly, though few standard housekeeping genes are found on the megaplasmid, it does encode a complete system for chemotaxis including both chemosensory components and an entire flagellar apparatus. This is the first known example of a complete flagellar system being encoded on a plasmid and suggests a straightforward means for lateral transfer of flagellum-based motility. Phylogenomic analyses support the recent rRNA-based analyses that led to T. roseum being removed from the phylum Thermomicrobia and assigned to the phylum Chloroflexi. Because T. roseum is a deep-branching member of this phylum, analysis of its genome provides insights into the evolution of the Chloroflexi. In addition, even though this species is not photosynthetic, analysis of the genome provides some insight into the origins of photosynthesis in the Chloroflexi. Metabolic pathway reconstructions and experimental studies revealed new aspects of the biology of this species. For example, we present evidence that T. roseum oxidizes CO aerobically, making it the first thermophile known to do so. In addition, we propose that glycosylation of its carotenoids plays a crucial role in the adaptation of the cell membrane to this bacterium's thermophilic lifestyle. Analyses of published metagenomic sequences from two hot springs similar to the one from which this strain was isolated, show that close relatives of T. roseum DSM 5159 are present but have some key differences from the strain sequenced.
doi:10.1371/journal.pone.0004207
PMCID: PMC2615216  PMID: 19148287
14.  Correction: An Automated Phylogenetic Tree-Based Small Subunit rRNA Taxonomy and Alignment Pipeline (STAP) 
PLoS ONE  2008;3(7):10.1371/annotation/c1aa88dd-4360-4902-8599-4d7edca79817.
doi:10.1371/annotation/c1aa88dd-4360-4902-8599-4d7edca79817
PMCID: PMC2645283
15.  An Automated Phylogenetic Tree-Based Small Subunit rRNA Taxonomy and Alignment Pipeline (STAP) 
PLoS ONE  2008;3(7):e2566.
Comparative analysis of small-subunit ribosomal RNA (ss-rRNA) gene sequences forms the basis for much of what we know about the phylogenetic diversity of both cultured and uncultured microorganisms. As sequencing costs continue to decline and throughput increases, sequences of ss-rRNA genes are being obtained at an ever-increasing rate. This increasing flow of data has opened many new windows into microbial diversity and evolution, and at the same time has created significant methodological challenges. Those processes which commonly require time-consuming human intervention, such as the preparation of multiple sequence alignments, simply cannot keep up with the flood of incoming data. Fully automated methods of analysis are needed. Notably, existing automated methods avoid one or more steps that, though computationally costly or difficult, we consider to be important. In particular, we regard both the building of multiple sequence alignments and the performance of high quality phylogenetic analysis to be necessary. We describe here our fully-automated ss-rRNA taxonomy and alignment pipeline (STAP). It generates both high-quality multiple sequence alignments and phylogenetic trees, and thus can be used for multiple purposes including phylogenetically-based taxonomic assignments and analysis of species diversity in environmental samples. The pipeline combines publicly-available packages (PHYML, BLASTN and CLUSTALW) with our automatic alignment, masking, and tree-parsing programs. Most importantly, this automated process yields results comparable to those achievable by manual analysis, yet offers speed and capacity that are unattainable by manual efforts.
doi:10.1371/journal.pone.0002566
PMCID: PMC2432038  PMID: 18596968
16.  The minimum information about a genome sequence (MIGS) specification 
Nature biotechnology  2008;26(5):541-547.
With the quantity of genomic data increasing at an exponential rate, it is imperative that these data be captured electronically, in a standard format. Standardization activities must proceed within the auspices of open-access and international working bodies. To tackle the issues surrounding the development of better descriptions of genomic investigations, we have formed the Genomic Standards Consortium (GSC). Here, we introduce the minimum information about a genome sequence (MIGS) specification with the intent of promoting participation in its development and discussing the resources that will be required to develop improved mechanisms of metadata capture and exchange. As part of its wider goals, the GSC also supports improving the ‘transparency’ of the information contained in existing genomic databases.
doi:10.1038/nbt1360
PMCID: PMC2409278  PMID: 18464787
17.  Comparative Genomic Evidence for a Close Relationship between the Dimorphic Prosthecate Bacteria Hyphomonas neptunium and Caulobacter crescentus 
Journal of Bacteriology  2006;188(19):6841-6850.
The dimorphic prosthecate bacteria (DPB) are α-proteobacteria that reproduce in an asymmetric manner rather than by binary fission and are of interest as simple models of development. Prior to this work, the only member of this group for which genome sequence was available was the model freshwater organism Caulobacter crescentus. Here we describe the genome sequence of Hyphomonas neptunium, a marine member of the DPB that differs from C. crescentus in that H. neptunium uses its stalk as a reproductive structure. Genome analysis indicates that this organism shares more genes with C. crescentus than it does with Silicibacter pomeroyi (a closer relative according to 16S rRNA phylogeny), that it relies upon a heterotrophic strategy utilizing a wide range of substrates, that its cell cycle is likely to be regulated in a similar manner to that of C. crescentus, and that the outer membrane complements of H. neptunium and C. crescentus are remarkably similar. H. neptunium swarmer cells are highly motile via a single polar flagellum. With the exception of cheY and cheR, genes required for chemotaxis were absent in the H. neptunium genome. Consistent with this observation, H. neptunium swarmer cells did not respond to any chemotactic stimuli that were tested, which suggests that H. neptunium motility is a random dispersal mechanism for swarmer cells rather than a stimulus-controlled navigation system for locating specific environments. In addition to providing insights into bacterial development, the H. neptunium genome will provide an important resource for the study of other interesting biological processes including chromosome segregation, polar growth, and cell aging.
doi:10.1128/JB.00111-06
PMCID: PMC1595504  PMID: 16980487
18.  Exopolysaccharide-associated protein sorting in environmental organisms: the PEP-CTERM/EpsH system. Application of a novel phylogenetic profiling heuristic 
BMC Biology  2006;4:29.
Background
Protein translocation to the proper cellular destination may be guided by various classes of sorting signals recognizable in the primary sequence. Detection in some genomes, but not others, may reveal sorting system components by comparison of the phylogenetic profile of the class of sorting signal to that of various protein families.
Results
We describe a short C-terminal homology domain, sporadically distributed in bacteria, with several key characteristics of protein sorting signals. The domain includes a near-invariant motif Pro-Glu-Pro (PEP). This possible recognition or processing site is followed by a predicted transmembrane helix and a cluster rich in basic amino acids. We designate this domain PEP-CTERM. It tends to occur multiple times in a genome if it occurs at all, with a median count of eight instances; Verrucomicrobium spinosum has sixty-five. PEP-CTERM-containing proteins generally contain an N-terminal signal peptide and exhibit high diversity and little homology to known proteins. All bacteria with PEP-CTERM have both an outer membrane and exopolysaccharide (EPS) production genes. By a simple heuristic for screening phylogenetic profiles in the absence of pre-formed protein families, we discovered that a homolog of the membrane protein EpsH (exopolysaccharide locus protein H) occurs in a species when PEP-CTERM domains are found. The EpsH family contains invariant residues consistent with a transpeptidase function. Most PEP-CTERM proteins are encoded by single-gene operons preceded by large intergenic regions. In the Proteobacteria, most of these upstream regions share a DNA sequence, a probable cis-regulatory site that contains a sigma-54 binding motif. The phylogenetic profile for this DNA sequence exactly matches that of three proteins: a sigma-54-interacting response regulator (PrsR), a transmembrane histidine kinase (PrsK), and a TPR protein (PrsT).
Conclusion
These findings are consistent with the hypothesis that PEP-CTERM and EpsH form a protein export sorting system, analogous to the LPXTG/sortase system of Gram-positive bacteria, and correlated to EPS expression. It occurs preferentially in bacteria from sediments, soils, and biofilms. The novel method that led to these findings, partial phylogenetic profiling, requires neither global sequence clustering nor arbitrary similarity cutoffs and appears to be a rapid, effective alternative to other profiling methods.
doi:10.1186/1741-7007-4-29
PMCID: PMC1569441  PMID: 16930487
19.  Characterization of Bacterial Communities Associated with Deep-Sea Corals on Gulf of Alaska Seamounts†  
Although microbes associated with shallow-water corals have been reported, deepwater coral microbes are poorly characterized. A cultivation-independent analysis of Alaskan seamount octocoral microflora showed that Proteobacteria (classes Alphaproteobacteria and Gammaproteobacteria), Firmicutes, Bacteroidetes, and Acidobacteria dominate and vary in abundance. More sampling is needed to understand the basis and significance of this variation.
doi:10.1128/AEM.72.2.1680-1683.2006
PMCID: PMC1392894  PMID: 16461727
20.  Expression Characteristics of the Transfer-Related kilB Gene Product of Streptomyces Plasmid pIJ101: Implications for the Plasmid Spread Function 
Journal of Bacteriology  2001;183(4):1339-1345.
Intermycelial transfer of Streptomyces plasmid pIJ101 occurs prior to cellular differentiation and is mediated by plasmid functions that are also required for production of zones of growth-inhibited recipient cells (i.e., pocks) that develop around individual donors during mating on agar medium. Several other pIJ101 functions, including that of the kilB gene, whose unregulated expression on pIJ101 is lethal, are required for normal pock size and so have been postulated to mediate intramycelial spread of the plasmid throughout recipient cells. Using antibodies raised against a KilB fusion protein expressed in Escherichia coli, native KilB protein was detected throughout development of pIJ101-containing Streptomyces lividans cells, with the concentration of KilB increasing dramatically and reaching a maximum during the final stages (i.e., sporulation and secondary metabolism) of cellular differentiation. Insertion of the kilB gene of pIJ101 into the S. lividans chromosome in cells lacking the pIJ101 KorB protein, which normally represses kilB gene transcription, resulted in elevated but still temporally increasing amounts of KilB. The increased expression or accumulation of the KilB spread protein throughout cellular differentiation of S. lividans, which leads to maximum KilB concentrations during developmental stages that occur far later than when intermycelial transfer of pIJ101 is mediated, supports the existence of a subsequent intramycelial component to the pIJ101 spread function. The results also suggest that intramycelial spread of pIJ101 molecules within the recipient extends beyond intercompartmental movements within the substrate mycelia and includes undetermined steps within the spore-yielding aerial hyphae as well.
doi:10.1128/JB.183.4.1339-1345.2001
PMCID: PMC95008  PMID: 11157947
21.  Genomic Insights into Methanotrophy: The Complete Genome Sequence of Methylococcus capsulatus (Bath) 
PLoS Biology  2004;2(10):e303.
Methanotrophs are ubiquitous bacteria that can use the greenhouse gas methane as a sole carbon and energy source for growth, thus playing major roles in global carbon cycles, and in particular, substantially reducing emissions of biologically generated methane to the atmosphere. Despite their importance, and in contrast to organisms that play roles in other major parts of the carbon cycle such as photosynthesis, no genome-level studies have been published on the biology of methanotrophs. We report the first complete genome sequence to our knowledge from an obligate methanotroph, Methylococcus capsulatus (Bath), obtained by the shotgun sequencing approach. Analysis revealed a 3.3-Mb genome highly specialized for a methanotrophic lifestyle, including redundant pathways predicted to be involved in methanotrophy and duplicated genes for essential enzymes such as the methane monooxygenases. We used phylogenomic analysis, gene order information, and comparative analysis with the partially sequenced methylotroph Methylobacterium extorquens to detect genes of unknown function likely to be involved in methanotrophy and methylotrophy. Genome analysis suggests the ability of M. capsulatus to scavenge copper (including a previously unreported nonribosomal peptide synthetase) and to use copper in regulation of methanotrophy, but the exact regulatory mechanisms remain unclear. One of the most surprising outcomes of the project is evidence suggesting the existence of previously unsuspected metabolic flexibility in M. capsulatus, including an ability to grow on sugars, oxidize chemolithotrophic hydrogen and sulfur, and live under reduced oxygen tension, all of which have implications for methanotroph ecology. The availability of the complete genome of M. capsulatus (Bath) deepens our understanding of methanotroph biology and its relationship to global carbon cycles. We have gained evidence for greater metabolic flexibility than was previously known, and for genetic components that may have biotechnological potential.
Methanotrophs are bacteria that use methane as a sole carbon source. The genome sequence of Methylococcus capsulatus deepens our understanding of methanotroph biology and its relationship to global carbon cycles
doi:10.1371/journal.pbio.0020303
PMCID: PMC517821  PMID: 15383840

Results 1-21 (21)