PMCC PMCC

Search tips
Search criteria

Advanced
Results 1-18 (18)
 

Clipboard (0)
None

Select a Filter Below

Journals
more »
Year of Publication
2.  The influence of disease categories on gene candidate predictions from model organism phenotypes 
Journal of Biomedical Semantics  2014;5(Suppl 1):S4.
Background
The molecular etiology is still to be identified for about half of the currently described Mendelian diseases in humans, thereby hindering efforts to find treatments or preventive measures. Advances, such as new sequencing technologies, have led to increasing amounts of data becoming available with which to address the problem of identifying disease genes. Therefore, automated methods are needed that reliably predict disease gene candidates based on available data. We have recently developed Exomiser as a tool for identifying causative variants from exome analysis results by filtering and prioritising using a number of criteria including the phenotype similarity between the disease and mouse mutants involving the gene candidates. Initial investigations revealed a variation in performance for different medical categories of disease, due in part to a varying contribution of the phenotype scoring component.
Results
In this study, we further analyse the performance of our cross-species phenotype matching algorithm, and examine in more detail the reasons why disease gene filtering based on phenotype data works better for certain disease categories than others. We found that in addition to misleading phenotype alignments between species, some disease categories are still more amenable to automated predictions than others, and that this often ties in with community perceptions on how well the organism works as model.
Conclusions
In conclusion, our automated disease gene candidate predictions are highly dependent on the organism used for the predictions and the disease category being studied. Future work on computational disease gene prediction using phenotype data would benefit from methods that take into account the disease category and the source of model organism data.
doi:10.1186/2041-1480-5-S1-S4
PMCID: PMC4108905  PMID: 25093073
3.  Genome sequence of the human malaria parasite Plasmodium falciparum 
Nature  2002;419(6906):10.1038/nature01097.
The parasite Plasmodium falciparum is responsible for hundreds of millions of cases of malaria, and kills more than one million African children annually. Here we report an analysis of the genome sequence of P. falciparum clone 3D7. The 23-megabase nuclear genome consists of 14 chromosomes, encodes about 5,300 genes, and is the most (A + T)-rich genome sequenced to date. Genes involved in antigenic variation are concentrated in the subtelomeric regions of the chromosomes. Compared to the genomes of free-living eukaryotic microbes, the genome of this intracellular parasite encodes fewer enzymes and transporters, but a large proportion of genes are devoted to immune evasion and host–parasite interactions. Many nuclear-encoded proteins are targeted to the apicoplast, an organelle involved in fatty-acid and isoprenoid metabolism. The genome sequence provides the foundation for future studies of this organism, and is being exploited in the search for new drugs and vaccines to fight malaria.
doi:10.1038/nature01097
PMCID: PMC3836256  PMID: 12368864
4.  Entity/Quality-Based Logical Definitions for the Human Skeletal Phenome using PATO 
Conference Proceedings  2009;2009:7069-7072.
This paper describes an approach to providing computer-interpretable logical definitions for the terms of the Human Phenotype Ontology (HPO) using PATO, the ontology of phenotypic qualities, to link terms of the HPO to the anatomic and other entities that are affected by abnormal phenotypic qualities. This approach will allow improved computerized reasoning as well as a facility to compare phenotypes between different species. The PATO mapping will also provide direct links from phenotypic abnormalities and underlying anatomic structures encoded using the Foundational Model of Anatomy, which will be a valuable resource for computational investigations of the links between anatomical components and concepts representing diseases with abnormal phenotypes and associated genes.
doi:10.1109/IEMBS.2009.5333362
PMCID: PMC3398700  PMID: 19964203
5.  Improving ontologies by automatic reasoning and evaluation of logical definitions 
BMC Bioinformatics  2011;12:418.
Background
Ontologies are widely used to represent knowledge in biomedicine. Systematic approaches for detecting errors and disagreements are needed for large ontologies with hundreds or thousands of terms and semantic relationships. A recent approach of defining terms using logical definitions is now increasingly being adopted as a method for quality control as well as for facilitating interoperability and data integration.
Results
We show how automated reasoning over logical definitions of ontology terms can be used to improve ontology structure. We provide the Java software package GULO (Getting an Understanding of LOgical definitions), which allows fast and easy evaluation for any kind of logically decomposed ontology by generating a composite OWL ontology from appropriate subsets of the referenced ontologies and comparing the inferred relationships with the relationships asserted in the target ontology. As a case study we show how to use GULO to evaluate the logical definitions that have been developed for the Mammalian Phenotype Ontology (MPO).
Conclusions
Logical definitions of terms from biomedical ontologies represent an important resource for error and disagreement detection. GULO gives ontology curators a fast and simple tool for validation of their work.
doi:10.1186/1471-2105-12-418
PMCID: PMC3224779  PMID: 22032770
6.  Mapping between the OBO and OWL ontology languages 
Journal of Biomedical Semantics  2011;2(Suppl 1):S3.
Background
Ontologies are commonly used in biomedicine to organize concepts to describe domains such as anatomies, environments, experiment, taxonomies etc. NCBO BioPortal currently hosts about 180 different biomedical ontologies. These ontologies have been mainly expressed in either the Open Biomedical Ontology (OBO) format or the Web Ontology Language (OWL). OBO emerged from the Gene Ontology, and supports most of the biomedical ontology content. In comparison, OWL is a Semantic Web language, and is supported by the World Wide Web consortium together with integral query languages, rule languages and distributed infrastructure for information interchange. These features are highly desirable for the OBO content as well. A convenient method for leveraging these features for OBO ontologies is by transforming OBO ontologies to OWL.
Results
We have developed a methodology for translating OBO ontologies to OWL using the organization of the Semantic Web itself to guide the work. The approach reveals that the constructs of OBO can be grouped together to form a similar layer cake. Thus we were able to decompose the problem into two parts. Most OBO constructs have easy and obvious equivalence to a construct in OWL. A small subset of OBO constructs requires deeper consideration. We have defined transformations for all constructs in an effort to foster a standard common mapping between OBO and OWL. Our mapping produces OWL-DL, a Description Logics based subset of OWL with desirable computational properties for efficiency and correctness. Our Java implementation of the mapping is part of the official Gene Ontology project source.
Conclusions
Our transformation system provides a lossless roundtrip mapping for OBO ontologies, i.e. an OBO ontology may be translated to OWL and back without loss of knowledge. In addition, it provides a roadmap for bridging the gap between the two ontology languages in order to enable the use of ontology content in a language independent manner.
doi:10.1186/2041-1480-2-S1-S3
PMCID: PMC3105495  PMID: 21388572
7.  Novel sequence feature variant type analysis of the HLA genetic association in systemic sclerosis 
Human Molecular Genetics  2009;19(4):707-719.
We describe a novel approach to genetic association analyses with proteins sub-divided into biologically relevant smaller sequence features (SFs), and their variant types (VTs). SFVT analyses are particularly informative for study of highly polymorphic proteins such as the human leukocyte antigen (HLA), given the nature of its genetic variation: the high level of polymorphism, the pattern of amino acid variability, and that most HLA variation occurs at functionally important sites, as well as its known role in organ transplant rejection, autoimmune disease development and response to infection. Further, combinations of variable amino acid sites shared by several HLA alleles (shared epitopes) are most likely better descriptors of the actual causative genetic variants. In a cohort of systemic sclerosis patients/controls, SFVT analysis shows that a combination of SFs implicating specific amino acid residues in peptide binding pockets 4 and 7 of HLA-DRB1 explains much of the molecular determinant of risk.
doi:10.1093/hmg/ddp521
PMCID: PMC2807365  PMID: 19933168
8.  ONTO-ToolKit: enabling bio-ontology engineering via Galaxy 
BMC Bioinformatics  2010;11(Suppl 12):S8.
Background
The biosciences increasingly face the challenge of integrating a wide variety of available data, information and knowledge in order to gain an understanding of biological systems. Data integration is supported by a diverse series of tools, but the lack of a consistent terminology to label these data still presents significant hurdles. As a consequence, much of the available biological data remains disconnected or worse: becomes misconnected. The need to address this terminology problem has spawned the building of a large number of bio-ontologies. OBOF, RDF and OWL are among the most used ontology formats to capture terms and relationships in the Life Sciences, opening the potential to use the Semantic Web to support data integration and further exploitation of integrated resources via automated retrieval and reasoning procedures.
Methods
We extended the Perl suite ONTO-PERL and functionally integrated it into the Galaxy platform. The resulting ONTO-ToolKit supports the analysis and handling of OBO-formatted ontologies via the Galaxy interface, and we demonstrated its functionality in different use cases that illustrate the flexibility to obtain sets of ontology terms that match specific search criteria.
Results
ONTO-ToolKit is available as a tool suite for Galaxy. Galaxy not only provides a user friendly interface allowing the interested biologist to manipulate OBO ontologies, it also opens up the possibility to perform further biological (and ontological) analyses by using other tools available within the Galaxy environment. Moreover, it provides tools to translate OBO-formatted ontologies into Semantic Web formats such as RDF and OWL.
Conclusions
ONTO-ToolKit reaches out to researchers in the biosciences, by providing a user-friendly way to analyse and manipulate ontologies. This type of functionality will become increasingly important given the wealth of information that is becoming available based on ontologies.
doi:10.1186/1471-2105-11-S12-S8
PMCID: PMC3040534  PMID: 21210987
9.  Mouse, man, and meaning: bridging the semantics of mouse phenotype and human disease 
Mammalian Genome  2009;20(8):457-461.
Now that the laboratory mouse genome is sequenced and the annotation of its gene content is improving, the next major challenge is the annotation of the phenotypic associations of mouse genes. This requires the development of systematic phenotyping pipelines that use standardized phenotyping procedures which allow comparison across laboratories. It also requires the development of a sophisticated informatics infrastructure for the description and interchange of phenotype data. Here we focus on the current state of the art in the description of data produced by systematic phenotyping approaches using ontologies, in particular, the EQ (Entity-Quality) approach, and what developments are required to facilitate the linking of phenotypic descriptions of mutant mice to human diseases.
doi:10.1007/s00335-009-9208-3
PMCID: PMC2759022  PMID: 19649761
10.  Comparative Genomics of the Eukaryotes 
Science (New York, N.Y.)  2000;287(5461):2204-2215.
A comparative analysis of the genomes of Drosophila melanogaster, Caenorhabditis elegans, and Saccharomyces cerevisiae—and the proteins they are predicted to encode—was undertaken in the context of cellular, developmental, and evolutionary processes. The nonredundant protein sets of flies and worms are similar in size and are only twice that of yeast, but different gene families are expanded in each genome, and the multidomain proteins and signaling pathways of the fly and worm are far more complex than those of yeast. The fly has orthologs to 177 of the 289 human disease genes examined and provides the foundation for rapid analysis of some of the basic processes involved in human disease.
PMCID: PMC2754258  PMID: 10731134
11.  Survey-based naming conventions for use in OBO Foundry ontology development 
BMC Bioinformatics  2009;10:125.
Background
A wide variety of ontologies relevant to the biological and medical domains are available through the OBO Foundry portal, and their number is growing rapidly. Integration of these ontologies, while requiring considerable effort, is extremely desirable. However, heterogeneities in format and style pose serious obstacles to such integration. In particular, inconsistencies in naming conventions can impair the readability and navigability of ontology class hierarchies, and hinder their alignment and integration. While other sources of diversity are tremendously complex and challenging, agreeing a set of common naming conventions is an achievable goal, particularly if those conventions are based on lessons drawn from pooled practical experience and surveys of community opinion.
Results
We summarize a review of existing naming conventions and highlight certain disadvantages with respect to general applicability in the biological domain. We also present the results of a survey carried out to establish which naming conventions are currently employed by OBO Foundry ontologies and to determine what their special requirements regarding the naming of entities might be. Lastly, we propose an initial set of typographic, syntactic and semantic conventions for labelling classes in OBO Foundry ontologies.
Conclusion
Adherence to common naming conventions is more than just a matter of aesthetics. Such conventions provide guidance to ontology creators, help developers avoid flaws and inaccuracies when editing, and especially when interlinking, ontologies. Common naming conventions will also assist consumers of ontologies to more readily understand what meanings were intended by the authors of ontologies used in annotating bodies of data.
doi:10.1186/1471-2105-10-125
PMCID: PMC2684543  PMID: 19397794
12.  An improved ontological representation of dendritic cells as a paradigm for all cell types 
BMC Bioinformatics  2009;10:70.
Background
Recent increases in the volume and diversity of life science data and information and an increasing emphasis on data sharing and interoperability have resulted in the creation of a large number of biological ontologies, including the Cell Ontology (CL), designed to provide a standardized representation of cell types for data annotation. Ontologies have been shown to have significant benefits for computational analyses of large data sets and for automated reasoning applications, leading to organized attempts to improve the structure and formal rigor of ontologies to better support computation. Currently, the CL employs multiple is_a relations, defining cell types in terms of histological, functional, and lineage properties, and the majority of definitions are written with sufficient generality to hold across multiple species. This approach limits the CL's utility for computation and for cross-species data integration.
Results
To enhance the CL's utility for computational analyses, we developed a method for the ontological representation of cells and applied this method to develop a dendritic cell ontology (DC-CL). DC-CL subtypes are delineated on the basis of surface protein expression, systematically including both species-general and species-specific types and optimizing DC-CL for the analysis of flow cytometry data. We avoid multiple uses of is_a by linking DC-CL terms to terms in other ontologies via additional, formally defined relations such as has_function.
Conclusion
This approach brings benefits in the form of increased accuracy, support for reasoning, and interoperability with other ontology resources. Accordingly, we propose our method as a general strategy for the ontological representation of cells. DC-CL is available from .
doi:10.1186/1471-2105-10-70
PMCID: PMC2662812  PMID: 19243617
13.  Genome-Wide Analysis of Human Disease Alleles Reveals That Their Locations Are Correlated in Paralogous Proteins 
PLoS Computational Biology  2008;4(11):e1000218.
The millions of mutations and polymorphisms that occur in human populations are potential predictors of disease, of our reactions to drugs, of predisposition to microbial infections, and of age-related conditions such as impaired brain and cardiovascular functions. However, predicting the phenotypic consequences and eventual clinical significance of a sequence variant is not an easy task. Computational approaches have found perturbation of conserved amino acids to be a useful criterion for identifying variants likely to have phenotypic consequences. To our knowledge, however, no study to date has explored the potential of variants that occur at homologous positions within paralogous human proteins as a means of identifying polymorphisms with likely phenotypic consequences. In order to investigate the potential of this approach, we have assembled a unique collection of known disease-causing variants from OMIM and the Human Genome Mutation Database (HGMD) and used them to identify and characterize pairs of sequence variants that occur at homologous positions within paralogous human proteins. Our analyses demonstrate that the locations of variants are correlated in paralogous proteins. Moreover, if one member of a variant-pair is disease-causing, its partner is likely to be disease-causing as well. Thus, information about variant-pairs can be used to identify potentially disease-causing variants, extend existing procedures for polymorphism prioritization, and provide a suite of candidates for further diagnostic and therapeutic purposes.
Author Summary
There exists a superabundance of human sequence variations. Testing every sequence variant for association with human disease is often infeasible, as studies must be very large—and hence expensive—to overcome the statistical penalties used to control for multiple tests. A common alternative is to assay only a subset of sequence variants for which there are prior reasons to believe they may be disease-causing. Sequence variants that change conserved amino acids, for example, are often disease-causing. As an adjunct to this approach, we have explored the potential of variants that occur at homologous positions within paralogous human proteins as a means of identifying disease-causing DNA sequence variations. We find that DNA sequence variants co-occur at aligned amino acid pairs more frequently than expected by chance, suggesting that similar functional constraints on paralogous proteins result in coordinated distributions of variants along their lengths. Moreover, if one member of a variant-pair is disease-causing, its partner is likely to be disease-causing as well. These facts provide new avenues for the identification of disease-causing sequence variations.
doi:10.1371/journal.pcbi.1000218
PMCID: PMC2565504  PMID: 18989397
14.  Large-Scale Trends in the Evolution of Gene Structures within 11 Animal Genomes 
PLoS Computational Biology  2006;2(3):e15.
We have used the annotations of six animal genomes (Homo sapiens, Mus musculus, Ciona intestinalis, Drosophila melanogaster, Anopheles gambiae, and Caenorhabditis elegans) together with the sequences of five unannotated Drosophila genomes to survey changes in protein sequence and gene structure over a variety of timescales—from the less than 5 million years since the divergence of D. simulans and D. melanogaster to the more than 500 million years that have elapsed since the Cambrian explosion. To do so, we have developed a new open-source software library called CGL (for “Comparative Genomics Library”). Our results demonstrate that change in intron–exon structure is gradual, clock-like, and largely independent of coding-sequence evolution. This means that genome annotations can be used in new ways to inform, corroborate, and test conclusions drawn from comparative genomics analyses that are based upon protein and nucleotide sequence similarities.
Synopsis
Just as protein sequences change over time, so do gene structures. Over comparatively short evolutionary timescales, introns lengthen and shorten; and over longer timescales the number and positions of introns in homologous genes can change. These facts suggest that the intron–exon structures of genes may provide a source of evolutionary information. The utility of gene structures as materials for phylogenetic analyses, however, depends upon their independence from the forces driving protein evolution. If, for example, intron–exon structures are strongly influenced by selection at the amino acid level, then using them for phylogenetic investigations is largely pointless, as the same information could have been more easily gained from protein analyses. Using 11 animal genomes, Yandell et al. show that evolution of intron lengths and positions is largely—though not completely—independent of protein sequence evolution. This means that gene structures provide a source of information about the evolutionary past independent of protein sequence similarities—a finding the authors employ to investigate the accuracy of the protein clock and to explore the utility of gene structures as a means to resolve deep phylogenetic relationships within the animals.
doi:10.1371/journal.pcbi.0020015
PMCID: PMC1386723  PMID: 16518452
15.  Relations in biomedical ontologies 
Genome Biology  2005;6(5):R46.
To enhance the treatment of relations in biomedical ontologies we advance a methodology for providing consistent and unambiguous formal definitions of the relational expressions used in such ontologies in a way designed to assist developers and users in avoiding errors in coding and annotation.
To enhance the treatment of relations in biomedical ontologies we advance a methodology for providing consistent and unambiguous formal definitions of the relational expressions used in such ontologies in a way designed to assist developers and users in avoiding errors in coding and annotation. The resulting Relation Ontology can promote interoperability of ontologies and support new types of automated reasoning about the spatial and temporal dimensions of biological and medical phenomena.
doi:10.1186/gb-2005-6-5-r46
PMCID: PMC1175958  PMID: 15892874
16.  Assessing the impact of comparative genomic sequence data on the functional annotation of the Drosophila genome 
Genome Biology  2002;3(12):research0086.1-86.2.
Analysis of conservation in eight genomic regions (apterous, even-skipped, fushi tarazu, twist, and Rhodopsins 1, 2, 3 and 4) from four Drosophila species (D. erecta, D. pseudoobscura, D. willistoni, and D. littoralis) covering more than 500 kb of the D. melanogaster genome. All D. melanogaster genes (and 78-82% of coding exons) identified in divergent species such as D. pseudoobscura show evidence of functional constraint. Addition of a third species can reveal functional constraint in otherwise non-significant pairwise exon comparisons.
Background
It is widely accepted that comparative sequence data can aid the functional annotation of genome sequences; however, the most informative species and features of genome evolution for comparison remain to be determined.
Results
We analyzed conservation in eight genomic regions (apterous, even-skipped, fushi tarazu, twist, and Rhodopsins 1, 2, 3 and 4) from four Drosophila species (D. erecta, D. pseudoobscura, D. willistoni, and D. littoralis) covering more than 500 kb of the D. melanogaster genome. All D. melanogaster genes (and 78-82% of coding exons) identified in divergent species such as D. pseudoobscura show evidence of functional constraint. Addition of a third species can reveal functional constraint in otherwise non-significant pairwise exon comparisons. Microsynteny is largely conserved, with rearrangement breakpoints, novel transposable element insertions, and gene transpositions occurring in similar numbers. Rates of amino-acid substitution are higher in uncharacterized genes relative to genes that have previously been studied. Conserved non-coding sequences (CNCSs) tend to be spatially clustered with conserved spacing between CNCSs, and clusters of CNCSs can be used to predict enhancer sequences.
Conclusions
Our results provide the basis for choosing species whose genome sequences would be most useful in aiding the functional annotation of coding and cis-regulatory sequences in Drosophila. Furthermore, this work shows how decoding the spatial organization of conserved sequences, such as the clustering of CNCSs, can complement efforts to annotate eukaryotic genomes on the basis of sequence conservation alone.
doi:10.1186/gb-2002-3-12-research0086
PMCID: PMC151188  PMID: 12537575
17.  Heterochromatic sequences in a Drosophila whole-genome shotgun assembly 
Genome Biology  2002;3(12):research0085.1-85.16.
Annotation of an improved whole-genome shotgun assembly of the Drosophila melanogaster genome predicted 297 protein-coding genes and six non-protein-coding genes, including known heterochromatic genes, and regions of similarity to known transposable elements. Fluorescence in situ hybridization was used to correlate the genomic sequence with the cytogenetic map; the annotated euchromatic sequence extends into the centric heterochromatin on each chromosome arm.
Background
Most eukaryotic genomes include a substantial repeat-rich fraction termed heterochromatin, which is concentrated in centric and telomeric regions. The repetitive nature of heterochromatic sequence makes it difficult to assemble and analyze. To better understand the heterochromatic component of the Drosophila melanogaster genome, we characterized and annotated portions of a whole-genome shotgun sequence assembly.
Results
WGS3, an improved whole-genome shotgun assembly, includes 20.7 Mb of draft-quality sequence not represented in the Release 3 sequence spanning the euchromatin. We annotated this sequence using the methods employed in the re-annotation of the Release 3 euchromatic sequence. This analysis predicted 297 protein-coding genes and six non-protein-coding genes, including known heterochromatic genes, and regions of similarity to known transposable elements. Bacterial artificial chromosome (BAC)-based fluorescence in situ hybridization analysis was used to correlate the genomic sequence with the cytogenetic map in order to refine the genomic definition of the centric heterochromatin; on the basis of our cytological definition, the annotated Release 3 euchromatic sequence extends into the centric heterochromatin on each chromosome arm.
Conclusions
Whole-genome shotgun assembly produced a reliable draft-quality sequence of a significant part of the Drosophila heterochromatin. Annotation of this sequence defined the intron-exon structures of 30 known protein-coding genes and 267 protein-coding gene models. The cytogenetic mapping suggests that an additional 150 predicted genes are located in heterochromatin at the base of the Release 3 euchromatic sequence. Our analysis suggests strategies for improving the sequence and annotation of the heterochromatic portions of the Drosophila and other complex genomes.
doi:10.1186/gb-2002-3-12-research0085
PMCID: PMC151187  PMID: 12537574
18.  The ARKdb: genome databases for farmed and other animals 
Nucleic Acids Research  2001;29(1):106-110.
The ARKdb genome databases provide comprehensive public repositories for genome mapping data from farmed species and other animals (http://www.thearkdb.org) providing a resource similar in function to that offered by GDB or MGD for human or mouse genome mapping data, respectively. Because we have attempted to build a generic mapping database, the system has wide utility, particularly for those species for which development of a specific resource would be prohibitive. The ARKdb genome database model has been implemented for 10 species to date. These are pig, chicken, sheep, cattle, horse, deer, tilapia, cat, turkey and salmon. Access to the ARKdb databases is effected via the World Wide Web using the ARKdb browser and Anubis map viewer. The information stored includes details of loci, maps, experimental methods and the source references. Links to other information sources such as PubMed and EMBL/GenBank are provided. Responsibility for data entry and curation is shared amongst scientists active in genome research in the species of interest. Mirror sites in the United States are maintained in addition to the central genome server at Roslin.
PMCID: PMC29807  PMID: 11125062

Results 1-18 (18)