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1.  Genomic Encyclopedia of Type Strains, Phase I: The one thousand microbial genomes (KMG-I) project 
Standards in Genomic Sciences  2013;9(3):1278-1284.
The Genomic Encyclopedia of Bacteria and Archaea (GEBA) project was launched by the JGI in 2007 as a pilot project with the objective of sequencing 250 bacterial and archaeal genomes. The two major goals of that project were (a) to test the hypothesis that there are many benefits to the use the phylogenetic diversity of organisms in the tree of life as a primary criterion for generating their genome sequence and (b) to develop the necessary framework, technology and organization for large-scale sequencing of microbial isolate genomes. While the GEBA pilot project has not yet been entirely completed, both of the original goals have already been successfully accomplished, leading the way for the next phase of the project.
Here we propose taking the GEBA project to the next level, by generating high quality draft genomes for 1,000 bacterial and archaeal strains. This represents a combined 16-fold increase in both scale and speed as compared to the GEBA pilot project (250 isolate genomes in 4+ years). We will follow a similar approach for organism selection and sequencing prioritization as was done for the GEBA pilot project (i.e. phylogenetic novelty, availability and growth of cultures of type strains and DNA extraction capability), focusing on type strains as this ensures reproducibility of our results and provides the strongest linkage between genome sequences and other knowledge about each strain. In turn, this project will constitute a pilot phase of a larger effort that will target the genome sequences of all available type strains of the Bacteria and Archaea.
doi:10.4056/sigs.5068949
PMCID: PMC4148999  PMID: 25197443
2.  Prokaryotic Super Program Advisory Committee DOE Joint Genome Institute, Walnut Creek, CA, March 27, 2013 
Standards in Genomic Sciences  2013;8(3):561-570.
The Prokaryotic Super Program Advisory Committee met on March 27, 2013 for their annual review the Prokaryotic Super Program at the DOE Joint Genome Institute. As is the case with any site visit or program review, the objective is to evaluate progress in meeting organizational objectives, provide feedback to from the user-community and to assist the JGI in formulating plans for the coming year. The advisors want to commend the JGI for its central role in developing new technologies and capabilities, and for catalyzing the formation of new collaborative user communities. Highlights of the post-meeting exchanges among the advisors focused on the importance of programmatic initiatives including:
• GEBA, which serves as a phylogenetic “base-map” on which our knowledge of functional diversity can be layered.
• FEBA, which promises to provide new insights into the physiological capabilities of prokaryotes under highly standardized conditions.
• Single-cell genomics technology, which is seen to significantly enhance our ability to interpret genomic and metagenomic data and broaden the scope of the GEBA program to encompass at least a part of the microbial “dark-matter”.
• IMG, which is seen to play a central role in JGI programs and is viewed as a strategically important asset in the JGI portfolio.
On this latter point, the committee encourages the formation of a strategic relationship between IMG and the Kbase to ensure that the intelligence, deep knowledge and experience captured in the former is not lost. The committee strongly urges the DOE to continue its support for maintaining this critical resource.
doi:10.4056/sigs.4638348
PMCID: PMC3910701  PMID: 24501639
3.  The minimum information about a genome sequence (MIGS) specification 
Nature biotechnology  2008;26(5):541-547.
With the quantity of genomic data increasing at an exponential rate, it is imperative that these data be captured electronically, in a standard format. Standardization activities must proceed within the auspices of open-access and international working bodies. To tackle the issues surrounding the development of better descriptions of genomic investigations, we have formed the Genomic Standards Consortium (GSC). Here, we introduce the minimum information about a genome sequence (MIGS) specification with the intent of promoting participation in its development and discussing the resources that will be required to develop improved mechanisms of metadata capture and exchange. As part of its wider goals, the GSC also supports improving the ‘transparency’ of the information contained in existing genomic databases.
doi:10.1038/nbt1360
PMCID: PMC2409278  PMID: 18464787

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