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1.  Incidence and Risk Factors of Prosthetic Joint Infection After Total Hip or Knee Replacement in Patients With Rheumatoid Arthritis 
Arthritis and rheumatism  2008;59(12):1713-1720.
Objective
Prosthetic joint infection is one of the most dreaded complications after total joint arthroplasty, a common procedure in patients with rheumatoid arthritis (RA). We conducted a study to evaluate potential risk factors of prosthetic joint infection and to clarify if RA is an independent predictor of this complication.
Methods
This study included all patients with RA who underwent total hip or knee replacement at the Mayo Clinic Rochester between January 1996 and June 2004. The association of potential risk factors with prosthetic joint infection was examined using Cox models. A matched cohort of patients with osteoarthritis (OA) was assembled to determine whether RA is an independent risk factor for prosthetic joint infection.
Results
We identified 462 patients with RA who underwent a total of 657 hip or knee replacements. Overall, 23 (3.7%) joint arthroplasties were complicated by an infection during a mean ± SD followup of 4.3 ± 2.4 years. Revision arthroplasty (hazard ratio [HR] 2.99, 95% confidence interval [95% CI] 1.02–8.75) and a previous prosthetic joint infection of the replaced joint (HR 5.49, 95% CI 1.87–16.14) were significant predictors of postoperative prosthetic joint infection. Comparison of RA patients with a matched cohort of OA patients identified an increased risk of prosthetic joint infections (HR 4.08, 95% CI 1.35–12.33) in patients with RA.
Conclusion
Patients with RA who undergo total hip or knee replacement are at increased risk of prosthetic joint infection, which is further increased in the setting of revision arthroplasty and a previous prosthetic joint infection. These findings highlight the importance of perioperative prophylactic measures and vigilance during the postoperative period.
doi:10.1002/art.24060
PMCID: PMC3923416  PMID: 19035425
2.  Aseptic Tibial Debonding as a Cause of Early Failure in a Modern Total Knee Arthroplasty Design 
Background
We observed isolated tibial component debonding from the cement in one modern primary TKA design (NexGen LPS 3° tibial tray; Zimmer, Warsaw, IN, USA). This failure mechanism is sparsely reported in the literature.
Questions/Purposes
We (1) assessed survivorship of this tibial tray with special emphasis on debonding; (2) described clinical and radiographic features associated with tibial failure; and (3) compared patient and radiographic features of the failures with a matched cohort.
Methods
A total of 1337 primary TKAs were performed with a cemented NexGen LPS 3° tibial tray over an 11-year period. Twenty-five knees (1.9%) were revised for tibial debonding. BMI and radiographic alignment in the tibial debonding group were compared with a matched control group. Implant survivorship was assessed using tibial debonding as the end point.
Results
Survival free of revision from tibial debonding was 100% at 1 year and 97.8% at 5 years. The tibial failures shared a typical radiographic pattern with debonding at the cement-implant interface and subsidence into varus and flexion. We found no link between limb alignment or individual component alignment and failure because 22 of the 25 failures occurred in well-aligned knees.
Conclusions
Our standardized followup of patients undergoing TKA at routine intervals allowed us to discover a higher rate of revision resulting from tibial debonding. We have discontinued the use of this particular tibial tray for primary TKA and surveillance for patients undergoing TKA continues to be warranted.
Level of Evidence
Level III, therapeutic study. See Guidelines for Authors for a complete description of levels of evidence.
doi:10.1007/s11999-012-2467-4
PMCID: PMC3528903  PMID: 22790529
3.  Rapid Molecular Microbiologic Diagnosis of Prosthetic Joint Infection 
Journal of Clinical Microbiology  2013;51(7):2280-2287.
We previously showed that culture of samples obtained by prosthesis vortexing and sonication was more sensitive than tissue culture for prosthetic joint infection (PJI) diagnosis. Despite improved sensitivity, culture-negative cases remained; furthermore, culture has a long turnaround time. We designed a genus-/group-specific rapid PCR assay panel targeting PJI bacteria and applied it to samples obtained by vortexing and sonicating explanted hip and knee prostheses, and we compared the results to those with sonicate fluid and periprosthetic tissue culture obtained at revision or resection arthroplasty. We studied 434 subjects with knee (n = 272) or hip (n = 162) prostheses; using a standardized definition, 144 had PJI. Sensitivities of tissue culture, of sonicate fluid culture, and of PCR were 70.1, 72.9, and 77.1%, respectively. Specificities were 97.9, 98.3, and 97.9%, respectively. Sonicate fluid PCR was more sensitive than tissue culture (P = 0.04). PCR of prosthesis sonication samples is more sensitive than tissue culture for the microbiologic diagnosis of prosthetic hip and knee infection and provides same-day PJI diagnosis with definition of microbiology. The high assay specificity suggests that typical PJI bacteria may not cause aseptic implant failure.
doi:10.1128/JCM.00335-13
PMCID: PMC3697690  PMID: 23658273
4.  Lack of Detection of Human Retrovirus-5 Proviral DNA in Synovial Tissue and Blood Specimens From Individuals With Rheumatoid Arthritis or Osteoarthritis 
Arthritis and rheumatism  2006;55(1):123-125.
Objective
Prior studies have suggested an association of human retrovirus 5 with rheumatoid arthritis. The purpose of this study was to determine if human retrovirus-5 proviral DNA is present in synovial tissue and blood specimens from patients with rheumatoid arthritis or osteoarthritis, or those without joint disease.
Methods
Synovial tissue and whole blood from 75 patients with rheumatoid arthritis, 75 patients with osteoarthritis, and 50 patients without a primary arthritis diagnosis were assayed by real-time quantitative polymerase chain reaction (PCR) using primers that amplify a 186-bp fragment of human retrovirus-5 proviral DNA.
Results
A total of 200 tissue specimens, 200 mononuclear cells, and 196 of 200 granulocyte specimens tested negative for human retrovirus-5 proviral DNA. No association between human retrovirus 5 and rheumatoid arthritis or osteoarthritis (P = 0.516) was identified. Granulocyte specimens from 4 patients, 2 with rheumatoid arthritis and 2 with osteoarthritis, yielded a low positive human retrovirus-5 proviral DNA signal (83–1,365 copies of human retrovirus-5 proviral DNA/ml blood).
Conclusion
Contrary to prior reports, we did not find an association between human retrovirus 5 and rheumatoid arthritis or osteoarthritis using a real-time PCR assay. Our findings are consistent with the recent finding that human retrovirus 5 is actually rabbit endogenous retrovirus H.
doi:10.1002/art.21690
PMCID: PMC1464419  PMID: 16463423
Human retrovirus-5; Rheumatoid arthritis; Osteoarthritis
5.  Prosthetic Joint Infection Diagnosis Using Broad-Range PCR of Biofilms Dislodged from Knee and Hip Arthroplasty Surfaces Using Sonication 
Journal of Clinical Microbiology  2012;50(11):3501-3508.
Periprosthetic tissue and/or synovial fluid PCR has been previously studied for prosthetic joint infection (PJI) diagnosis; however, few studies have assessed the utility of PCR on biofilms dislodged from the surface of explanted arthroplasties using vortexing and sonication (i.e., sonicate fluid PCR). We compared sonicate fluid 16S rRNA gene real-time PCR and sequencing to culture of synovial fluid, tissue, and sonicate fluid for the microbiologic diagnosis of PJI. PCR sequences generating mixed chromatograms were decatenated using RipSeq Mixed. We studied sonicate fluids from 135 and 231 subjects with PJI and aseptic failure, respectively. Synovial fluid, tissue, and sonicate fluid culture and sonicate fluid PCR had similar sensitivities (64.7, 70.4, 72.6, and 70.4%, respectively; P > 0.05) and specificities (96.9, 98.7, 98.3, and 97.8%, respectively; P > 0.05). Combining sonicate fluid culture and PCR, the sensitivity was higher (78.5%, P < 0.05) than those of individual tests, with similar specificity (97.0%). Thirteen subjects had positive sonicate fluid culture but negative PCR, and 11 had negative sonicate fluid culture but positive PCR (among which 7 had prior use of antimicrobials). Broad-range PCR and culture of sonicate fluid have equivalent performance for PJI diagnosis.
doi:10.1128/JCM.00834-12
PMCID: PMC3486250  PMID: 22895042
6.  Increased risk of prosthetic joint infection associated with esophago-gastro-duodenoscopy with biopsy 
Acta Orthopaedica  2013;84(1):82-86.
Background
There are no prospective data regarding the risk of prosthetic joint infection following routine gastrointestinal endoscopic procedures. We wanted to determine the risk of prosthetic hip or knee infection following gastrointestinal endoscopic procedures in patients with joint arthroplasty.
Methods
We conducted a prospective, single-center, case-control study at a single, tertiary-care referral center. Cases were defined as adult patients hospitalized for prosthetic joint infection of the hip or knee between December 1, 2001 and May 31, 2006. Controls were adult patients with hip or knee arthroplasties but without a diagnosis of joint infection, hospitalized during the same time period at the same orthopedic hospital. The main outcome measure was the odds ratio (OR) of prosthetic joint infection after gastrointestinal endoscopic procedures performed within 2 years before admission.
Results
339 cases and 339 controls were included in the study. Of these, 70 cases (21%) cases and 82 controls (24%) had undergone a gastrointestinal endoscopic procedure in the preceding 2 years. Among gastrointestinal procedures that were assessed, esophago-gastro-duodenoscopy (EGD) with biopsy was associated with an increased risk of prosthetic joint infection (OR = 3, 95% CI: 1.1–7). In a multivariable analysis adjusting for sex, age, joint age, immunosuppression, BMI, presence of wound drain, prior arthroplasty, malignancy, ASA score, and prothrombin time, the OR for infection after EGD with biopsy was 4 (95% CI: 1.5–10).
Interpretation
EGD with biopsy was associated with an increased risk of prosthetic joint infection in patients with hip or knee arthroplasties. This association will need to be confirmed in other epidemiological studies and adequately powered prospective clinical trials prior to recommending antibiotic prophylaxis in these patients.
doi:10.3109/17453674.2013.769079
PMCID: PMC3584609  PMID: 23350577
7.  Reinfection after two-stage revision for periprosthetic infection of total knee arthroplasty 
International Orthopaedics  2011;36(1):65-71.
Purpose
Limited data exist regarding the long-term results or risk factors for failure after two-stage reimplantation for periprosthetic knee infection. The purpose of this retrospective review was to investigate infection-free implant survival and identify variables associated with reinfection after this procedure. Furthermore, a staging system was evaluated as a possible prognostic tool for patients undergoing two-stage reimplantation of infected total knee arthroplasty (TKA).
Methods
In this level II, retrospective prognostic study, 368 patients with infected TKA treated with a two-stage revision protocol at our institution between 1998 and 2006 were reviewed. Patients who developed recurrent infection and an equal number of patients randomly selected for the control group were analysed for risk factors associated with treatment failure.
Results
At the most recent follow-up, 58 (15.8%) patients had developed reinfection after the two-stage reimplantation. The median time to reinfection was 1,303 days (3.6 years), with follow-up time ranging from six to 2,853 days (7.8 years). The strongest positive predictors of treatment failure included chronic lymphoedema [hazard ratio (HR) = 2.28, 95% confidence interval (CI) 1.16–4.48; p = 0.02),and revision between resection and definitive reimplantation (HR = 2.13, 95% CI 1.20–3.79; p = 0.01, whereas patients treated with intravenously administered Cefazolin had a significant reduction in recurrent infection rate (HR = 0.48, 95% CI 0.25–0.90; p = 0.02).
Conclusions
Our findings should be of help in counselling patients regarding their prognosis when faced with two-stage exchange for infected TKA and provide a basis for future comparisons.
doi:10.1007/s00264-011-1267-x
PMCID: PMC3251662  PMID: 21553042
8.  Corynebacterium Prosthetic Joint Infection 
Journal of Clinical Microbiology  2012;50(5):1518-1523.
Identification of Corynebacterium species may be challenging. Corynebacterium species are occasional causes of prosthetic joint infection (PJI), but few data are available on the subject. Based on the literature, C. amycolatum, C. aurimucosum, C. jeikeium, and C. striatum are the most common Corynebacterium species that cause PJI. We designed a rapid PCR assay to detect the most common human Corynebacterium species, with a specific focus on PJI. A polyphosphate kinase gene identified using whole-genome sequence was targeted. The assay differentiates the antibiotic-resistant species C. jeikeium and C. urealyticum from other species in a single assay. The assay was applied to a collection of human Corynebacterium isolates from multiple clinical sources, and clinically relevant species were detected. The assay was then tested on Corynebacterium isolates specifically associated with PJI; all were detected. We also describe the first case of C. simulans PJI.
doi:10.1128/JCM.06439-11
PMCID: PMC3347109  PMID: 22337986
9.  Failed Metal-on-Metal Hip Arthroplasties: A Spectrum of Clinical Presentations and Operative Findings 
Background
A number of recent reports have described novel failure mechanisms of metal-on-metal bearings in total and resurfacing hip arthroplasty. Hip arthroplasties with metal-on-metal articulations are also subject to the traditional methods of failure seen with different bearing couples. There is currently little information in the literature to help guide timely clinical evaluation and management of these patients.
Questions/purposes
We therefore describe the (1) clinical presentations; (2) reasons for failure; (3) operative findings; and (4) histologic findings in patients with failed metal-on-metal hip arthroplasties.
Methods
We retrospectively identified all 37 patients (37 hips) with metal on metal total hip or resurfacing arthroplasties who underwent revision over the past 3 years at our institution. Relevant clinical, radiographic, laboratory, intraoperative, and histopathologic findings were analyzed for all patients.
Results
Of the 37 patients, 10 were revised for presumed hypersensitivity specific to the metal-on-metal articulation. This group included eight patients with tissue histology confirming chronic inflammation with lymphocytic infiltration, eight with aseptic loosening of a monoblock screwless uncemented acetabular component, two with iliopsoas impingement associated with a large-diameter femoral head, and three with femoral neck fracture after resurfacing arthroplasty; the remainder of the patients were revised for infection, instability, component malposition, and periprosthetic fracture.
Conclusions
Increased awareness of the modes of failure will bring to light the potential complications particular to metal-on-metal articulations while placing these complications into the context of failures associated with all hip arthroplasties. This novel clinical information should be valuable for the practicing surgeon faced with this patient population.
Level of Evidence
Level IV, therapeutic study. See Guidelines for Authors for a complete description of levels of evidence.
doi:10.1007/s11999-010-1419-0
PMCID: PMC2919884  PMID: 20559767
10.  Prior Use of Antimicrobial Therapy is a Risk Factor for Culture-negative Prosthetic Joint Infection 
Background
Clinical characteristics and control of the infection of patients with culture-negative (CN) prosthetic joint infection (PJI) have not been well assessed. Prior use of antimicrobial therapy has been speculated but not proven as a risk factor for CNPJI.
Questions/purposes
We therefore determined whether prior use of antimicrobial therapy, prior PJI, and postoperative wound healing complications were associated with CN PJI.
Methods
We performed a retrospective case-control study of 135 patients with CN PJI treated between January 1, 1985, and December 31, 2000 matched with 135 patients with culture-positive (CP) PJIs (control patients) during the study period. The time to failure of therapy compared between cases and control patients using a Kaplan-Meier analysis.
Results
The use of prior antimicrobial therapy and postoperative wound drainage after index arthroplasty were associated with increased odds of PJI being culture-negative (odds ratio, 4.7; 95% CI, 2.8–8.1 and odds ratio, 3.5; 95% CI, 1.5–8.1, respectively). The percent (± SE) cumulative incidence free of treatment failure at 2 years followup was similar for CN and CP PJI: 75% (± 4%) and 79% (± 4%), respectively.
Conclusions
Prior antimicrobial therapy and postoperative wound drainage were associated with an increased risk of negative cultures among patients with PJI. Physicians should critically evaluate the need for antimicrobial therapy before establishing a microbiologic diagnosis of PJI in patients with suspected PJI.
Level of Evidence
Level III, therapeutic study. See Guidelines for Authors for a complete description of levels of evidence.
doi:10.1007/s11999-010-1338-0
PMCID: PMC2895855  PMID: 20401555
11.  Papers Presented at the Hip Society Meetings 2009: Editorial Comment 
doi:10.1007/s11999-009-1142-x
PMCID: PMC2806978  PMID: 19911246
12.  Does Prior Infection Alter the Outcome of TKA After Tibial Plateau Fracture? 
Total knee arthroplasty performed after tibial plateau fracture has a known high rate of complications. We hypothesized TKAs performed after infected tibial plateau fractures would have an even higher complication rate when compared with noninfected tibial plateau fractures. In a matched case-control study, we retrospectively reviewed 19 patients who underwent primary TKAs after infected tibial plateau fractures between 1971 and 2005. The mean time from the most recent infection to arthroplasty was 5.6 years. The minimum clinical followup after TKA was 2 years (mean, 6.4 years; range, 2–15.1 years). Case patients were matched for age, gender, and arthroplasty year with 19 control subjects who underwent TKAs for tibial plateau fractures with no history of infections. After surgery, the Knee Society scores for the study group improved from 45 to 63 for pain and from 37 to 63 for function. Ten case patients (53%) sustained complications, including surgery for wound breakdown (three), manipulation (one), aseptic loosening (two), definitive resection arthroplasty (two), and above-knee amputation (two). Recurrent infections occurred in five patients (26%) at a mean of 1.1 years. Previously infected knees were 4.1 times more likely to require additional procedures compared with knees with no previous infection.
Level of Evidence: Level III, therapeutic study. See the Guidelines for Authors for a complete description of levels of evidence.
doi:10.1007/s11999-008-0615-7
PMCID: PMC2690739  PMID: 19002742
13.  Case Report: Capnocytophaga canimorsus A Novel Pathogen for Joint Arthroplasty 
We report the case of a 59-year-old man with Waldenstrom’s macroglobulinemia and active alcohol use who presented with bilateral knee pain 5 years after a bilateral staged TKA. Cultures of synovial fluid and periprosthetic tissue specimens from both knees yielded, after prolonged anaerobic incubation, a catalase- and oxidase-positive gram-negative bacillus, which was identified as Capnocytophaga canimorsus by 16S ribosomal RNA PCR analysis. C canimorsus, an organism that is commonly found in dog and cat saliva, is a rare cause of various infections in immunocompromised and healthy individuals. However, a review of the medical literature indicates C canimorsus has not been reported previously to cause infection after joint arthroplasty. The patient was immunocompromised by cytotoxic chemotherapy, corticosteroids, and alcohol use. The patient was managed successfully with bilateral two-stage exchange and 6 weeks of intravenous ertapenem therapy. Because of its fastidious and slow-growing characteristics, C canimorsus may be an unrecognized cause of culture-negative joint arthroplasty infections, especially in cases when dog and cat exposure is evident in the clinical history.
doi:10.1007/s11999-008-0658-9
PMCID: PMC2674163  PMID: 19067091
14.  Limitations of Structural Allograft in Revision Total Knee Arthroplasty 
Management of large bone defects in total knee arthroplasty (TKA) usually has involved modular prostheses with metal augments, structural allografts, and megaprostheses. We retrospectively reviewed the outcome of treatment of major bone defects for 74 patients (79 knees) who had revision TKAs with structural allografts; nine patients were lost to followup before 5 years, leaving 65 patients (70 knees, or 88%) followed for a minimum of 5 years or until revision or death. Medical records, radiographs, patient surveys, and correspondence were used for all data. Sixteen patients (22.8%) had failed reconstructions and underwent additional revision surgery; eight of the 16 were secondary to allograft failure, three were secondary to failure of a component not supported by allograft, and five were secondary to infection. In patients not requiring revision surgery, the Knee Society score improved from 49 preoperatively to 87 postoperatively. We observed revision-free survival of 80.7% (95% confidence interval, 71.7–90.8) at 5 years and 75.9% (95% confidence interval, 65.6–87.8) at 10 years. Our data support the selective use of structural allograft for large cavitary defects encountered during TKA. However, the rates of complications and reoperations suggest efforts to improve results or develop more durable alternative methods are warranted for these challenging reconstructions.
Level of Evidence: Level IV, therapeutic study. See the Guidelines for Authors for a complete description of levels of evidence.
doi:10.1007/s11999-008-0679-4
PMCID: PMC2635432  PMID: 19130161
15.  C-Reactive Protein, Erythrocyte Sedimentation Rate and Orthopedic Implant Infection 
PLoS ONE  2010;5(2):e9358.
Background
C-reactive protein (CRP) and erythrocyte sedimentation rate (ESR) have been shown to be useful for diagnosis of prosthetic hip and knee infection. Little information is available on CRP and ESR in patients undergoing revision or resection of shoulder arthroplasties or spine implants.
Methods/Results
We analyzed preoperative CRP and ESR in 636 subjects who underwent knee (n = 297), hip (n = 221) or shoulder (n = 64) arthroplasty, or spine implant (n = 54) removal. A standardized definition of orthopedic implant-associated infection was applied. Receiver operating curve analysis was used to determine ideal cutoff values for differentiating infected from non-infected cases. ESR was significantly different in subjects with aseptic failure infection of knee (median 11 and 53.5 mm/h, respectively, p = <0.0001) and hip (median 11 and 30 mm/h, respectively, p = <0.0001) arthroplasties and spine implants (median 10 and 48.5 mm/h, respectively, p = 0.0033), but not shoulder arthroplasties (median 10 and 9 mm/h, respectively, p = 0.9883). Optimized ESR cutoffs for knee, hip and shoulder arthroplasties and spine implants were 19, 13, 26, and 45 mm/h, respectively. Using these cutoffs, sensitivity and specificity to detect infection were 89 and 74% for knee, 82 and 60% for hip, and 32 and 93% for shoulder arthroplasties, and 57 and 90% for spine implants. CRP was significantly different in subjects with aseptic failure and infection of knee (median 4 and 51 mg/l, respectively, p<0.0001), hip (median 3 and 18 mg/l, respectively, p<0.0001), and shoulder (median 3 and 10 mg/l, respectively, p = 0.01) arthroplasties, and spine implants (median 3 and 20 mg/l, respectively, p = 0.0011). Optimized CRP cutoffs for knee, hip, and shoulder arthroplasties, and spine implants were 14.5, 10.3, 7, and 4.6 mg/l, respectively. Using these cutoffs, sensitivity and specificity to detect infection were 79 and 88% for knee, 74 and 79% for hip, and 63 and 73% for shoulder arthroplasties, and 79 and 68% for spine implants.
Conclusion
CRP and ESR have poor sensitivity for the diagnosis of shoulder implant infection. A CRP of 4.6 mg/l had a sensitivity of 79 and a specificity of 68% to detect infection of spine implants.
doi:10.1371/journal.pone.0009358
PMCID: PMC2825262  PMID: 20179760
16.  Papers Presented at the Hip Society Meetings 2008: Editorial Comment 
doi:10.1007/s11999-008-0520-0
PMCID: PMC2601014  PMID: 18818982
17.  Midterm to Long-term Followup of Staged Reimplantation for Infected Hip Arthroplasty 
Most reports on two-stage reimplantation have focused on the short-term cure rate of infection, but little is known about long-term reinfection-free survival or mechanical durability. We retrospectively reviewed 168 patients (169 hips) with infected arthroplasty, all of whom had two-stage reimplantation for the treatment of an infected total hip arthroplasty between 1988 and 1998. In the second stage, the femoral component was fixed with antibiotic-loaded bone cement in 121 hips; the remaining femoral components and all acetabular components were uncemented. The minimum followup time was 2 years (mean, 7 years; range, 2–16 years). At most recent followup, 12 hips (7.1%) were reoperated on for reinfection and 13 hips (7.7%) were revised for aseptic loosening or osteolysis. Apparently aseptic loosening occurred on one or both sides of the joint in 24 hips (14.2%). The 10-year survivals free of reinfection and mechanical failure were 87.5% and 75.2% respectively. Nineteen hips dislocated and eight underwent revision surgery for instability. The method of femoral component fixation, either with or without cement, did not correlate with risk of infection, loosening, or mechanical failure. Based on these results, the method of fixation used for the femoral component during two-stage reimplantation surgery should be based on the surgeon’s preference for fixation combined with the assessment of femoral bone stock.
Level of Evidence: Level IV, case series. See the Guidelines for Authors for a complete description of levels of evidence.
doi:10.1007/s11999-008-0480-4
PMCID: PMC2600996  PMID: 18813895
18.  Sonication of Explanted Prosthetic Components in Bags for Diagnosis of Prosthetic Joint Infection Is Associated with Risk of Contamination 
Journal of Clinical Microbiology  2006;44(2):628-631.
Explanted orthopedic implants from 54 patients with aseptic failure and 24 patients with prosthetic knee or hip infection were sonicated in polyethylene bags. The sensitivities of periprosthetic tissue and sonicate fluid cultures for the diagnosis of prosthetic joint infection were 54% and 75%, whereas the specificities were 98% and 87%, respectively. Sonication in bags improved bacterial recovery from the surface of orthopedic implants; however, it lacked specificity, due to bag leakage.
doi:10.1128/JCM.44.2.628-631.2006
PMCID: PMC1392705  PMID: 16455930
19.  icaA Is Not a Useful Diagnostic Marker for Prosthetic Joint Infection 
Journal of Clinical Microbiology  2004;42(10):4846-4849.
A collection of 99 staphylococcal isolates associated with prosthetic joint infection and 23 coagulase-negative staphylococci isolated from noninfected arthroplasty-associated specimens were screened in order to determine whether the presence of icaA could be used to distinguish between pathogens and nonpathogens. All Staphylococcus aureus prosthetic joint infection isolates (n = 55) were icaA positive. A total of 46% (20 out of 44) of coagulase-negative staphylococcal prosthetic joint infection isolates were icaA positive, and 30% (7 out of 23) of arthroplasty-associated non-prosthetic joint infection-associated coagulase-negative staphylococcal isolates were icaA positive (P = 0.23). Certain coagulase-negative Staphylococcus species appeared more likely to be isolated as either arthroplasty-associated non-prosthetic joint infection-associated isolates (e.g., Staphylococcus warneri and Staphylococcus hominis) or pathogens (e.g., Staphylococcus lugdunensis). The presence of icaA in a coagulase-negative staphylococcal isolate associated with an arthroplasty is not a useful diagnostic indicator of pathogenicity.
doi:10.1128/JCM.42.10.4846-4849.2004
PMCID: PMC522308  PMID: 15472359

Results 1-19 (19)