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1.  Plasma fatty acids and the risk of metabolic syndrome in ethnic Chinese adults in Taiwan 
Background
Evidence of predictive power of various fatty acids on the risk of metabolic syndrome was scanty. We evaluated the role of various fatty acids, including saturated fat, monounsaturated fat, transfat, n-6 fatty acid, eicosapentaenoic acid (EPA) and docosahexaenoic acid (DHA), for the risk of the metabolic syndrome in Taiwan.
Results
A nested case-control study based on 1000 cases of metabolic syndrome and 1:1 matched control subjects. For saturated fat, monounsaturated fat and transfat, the higher the concentration the higher the risk for metabolic syndrome: participants in the highest quintile had a 2.22-fold (95% confidence interval [CI], 1.66 to 2.97) higher risk of metabolic syndrome. In addition, the participants in higher EPA quintiles were less likely to have the risk of metabolic syndrome (adjusted risk, 0.46 [0.34 to 0.61] for the fifth quintile). Participants in the highest risk group (low EPA and high transfat) had a 2.36-fold higher risk of metabolic syndrome (95% CI, 1.38 to 4.03), compared with those in the lowest risk group (high EPA and low transfat). For prediction power, the area under ROC curves increased from 0.926 in the baseline model to 0.928 after adding fatty acids. The net reclassification improvement for metabolic syndrome risk was substantial for saturated fat (2.1%, P = 0.05).
Conclusions
Plasma fatty acid components improved the prediction of the metabolic syndrome risk in Taiwan.
doi:10.1186/1476-511X-10-33
PMCID: PMC3056817  PMID: 21333029
2.  Prediction model for high glycated hemoglobin concentration among ethnic Chinese in Taiwan 
Background
This study aimed to construct a prediction model to identify subjects with high glycated hemoglobin (HbA1c) levels by incorporating anthropometric, lifestyle, clinical, and biochemical information in a large cross-sectional ethnic Chinese population in Taiwan from a health checkup center.
Methods
The prediction model was derived from multivariate logistic regression, and we evaluated the performance of the model in identifying the cases with high HbA1c levels (> = 7.0%). In total 17,773 participants (age > = 30 years) were recruited and 323 participants (1.8%) had high HbA1c levels. The study population was divided randomly into two parts, with 80% as the derivation data and 20% as the validation data.
Results
The point-based clinical model, including age (maximal 8 points), sex (1 point), family history (3 points), body mass index (2 points), waist circumference (4 points), and systolic blood pressure (3 points) reached an area under the receiver operating characteristic curve (AUC) of 0.723 (95% confidence interval, 0.677- 0.769) in the validation data. Adding biochemical measures such as triglycerides and HDL cholesterol improved the prediction power (AUC, 0.770 [0.723 - 0.817], P = < 0.001 compared with the clinical model). A cutoff point of 7 had a sensitivity of 0.76 to 0.96 and a specificity of 0.39 to 0.63 for the prediction model.
Conclusions
A prediction model was constructed for the prevalent risk of high HbA1c, which could be useful in identifying high risk subjects for diabetes among ethnic Chinese in Taiwan.
doi:10.1186/1475-2840-9-59
PMCID: PMC2955643  PMID: 20875098
3.  Postprandial Glucose Improves the Risk Prediction of Cardiovascular Death Beyond the Metabolic Syndrome in the Nondiabetic Population 
Diabetes Care  2009;32(9):1721-1726.
OBJECTIVE
With increasing evidence about the cardiovascular risk associated with postprandial nonfasting glucose and lipid dysmetabolism, it remains uncertain whether the postprandial glucose concentration increases the ability of metabolic syndrome to predict cardiovascular events.
RESEARCH DESIGN AND METHODS
This was an observational study of 15,145 individuals aged 35–75 years without diabetes or cardiovascular diseases. Postprandial glucose was obtained 2 h after a lunch meal. Metabolic syndrome was diagnosed using the criteria of the U.S. National Cholesterol Education Program Adult Treatment Panel III. Cardiovascular and all-cause deaths were primary outcomes.
RESULTS
During a median follow-up of 6.7 years, 410 individuals died, including 82 deaths from cardiovascular causes. In a Cox model adjusting for metabolic syndrome status as well as age, sex, smoking, systolic blood pressure, LDL, and HDL cholesterol levels, elevated 2-h postprandial glucose increased the risk of cardiovascular and all-cause death (per millimole per liter increase, hazard ratio 1.26 [95% CI 1.11–1.42] and 1.10 [1.04–1.16], respectively), with significant trends across the postprandial glucose quintiles. Including 2-h postprandial glucose into a metabolic syndrome–included multivariate risk prediction model conferred a discernible improvement of the model in discriminating between those who died of cardiovascular causes and who did not (integrated discrimination improvement 0.4, P = 0.005; net reclassification improvement 13.4%, P = 0.03); however, the improvement was only marginal for all-cause death.
CONCLUSIONS
Given the risk prediction based on metabolic syndrome and established cardiovascular risk factors, 2-h postprandial glucose improves the predictive ability to identity nondiabetic individuals at increased risk of cardiovascular death.
doi:10.2337/dc08-2337
PMCID: PMC2732157  PMID: 19502543
4.  Cell therapy generates a favourable chemokine gradient for stem cell recruitment into the infarcted heart in rabbits 
European Journal of Heart Failure  2009;11(3):238-245.
Aims
Stem cell recruitment into the heart is determined by a concentration gradient of stromal-derived factor 1 (SDF-1) from bone marrow to peripheral blood and from blood to injured myocardium. However, this gradient is decreased in chronic myocardial infarction (MI). This study evaluated the effect of cell therapy using bone marrow stromal cells (BMSCs) on an SDF-1 gradient in post-infarction rabbits.
Methods and results
Myocardial infarction was induced in male New Zealand white rabbits (2.5–3 kg) by ligation of the left anterior descending coronary artery. Two months later, the rabbits were randomized to either saline or BMSC (2 × 106 autologous BMSCs injected into the left ventricular cavity) treatment. Four weeks after therapy, the SDF-1 gradients from bone marrow to blood and from blood to myocardium increased in the BMSC group compared with the saline group. This was accompanied by an increase in cells positive for CD34, CD117, and STRO-1 in the myocardium, resulting in more capillary density, better cardiac function, and a decrease in infarct size.
Conclusion
Generation of an SDF-1 gradient towards the heart is a novel effect of BMSC-based cell therapy. This effect facilitates stem cell recruitment into remodelled myocardium and supports improvement in cardiac function.
doi:10.1093/eurjhf/hfn035
PMCID: PMC2645052  PMID: 19147447
Stromal-derived factor 1; Bone marrow stromal cell; Myocardial infarction; Ventricular remodelling
5.  Interaction of obesity, metabolic syndrome and Framingham risk on steatohepatitis among healthy Taiwanese: population-based nested case-control study 
Background
There have been scant reports on the cumulative effects of atherosclerotic risk factors on steatohepatitis.
Methods
We defined cases of steatohepatitis (n = 124) from one health examination center at National Taiwan University Hospital from January to December 2002. We selected controls, matched by age, gender and drinking status. Metabolic syndrome was defined by the modified ATP-III guidelines. High-dimensional interactions of risk factors for steatohepatitis were evaluated.
Results
Steatohepatitis cases had the highest C-reactive protein, lymphocytes, Framingham scores and predicted coronary risks. The odds ratio (OR) of metabolic syndrome for steatohepatitis was the highest (OR = 9.9), followed by high glucose status (OR = 4.5) and obesity (OR = 3.6). The highest area under the ROC curve was metabolic syndrome (area = 0.80), followed by obesity (0.75) and high glucose level (0.73). Metabolic syndrome was the highest population-attributable risk factor (0.59). Significant interaction was found with a three-factor model, including obesity, metabolic syndrome and Framingham risk status, with lesser average prediction error (22.6%), higher average cross-validation consistency (6.3) and lower average prediction error (24.3%). Compared with persons with no risk factors, OR increased as the number of risk factors increased (OR = 3.0 with one risk factor, 17.5 with two risk factors, 10.8 with three risk factors, respectively).
Conclusion
Metabolic syndrome, inflammation markers and atherosclerotic risk scores are significantly related to steatohepatitis status among the healthy examinee population in Taiwan.
doi:10.1186/1475-2840-5-12
PMCID: PMC1481540  PMID: 16707022

Results 1-5 (5)