PMCC PMCC

Search tips
Search criteria

Advanced
Results 1-3 (3)
 

Clipboard (0)
None

Select a Filter Below

Journals
Year of Publication
Document Types
1.  A prevalent mutation with founder effect in Spanish Recessive Dystrophic Epidermolysis Bullosa families 
BMC Medical Genetics  2010;11:139.
Background
Recessive Dystrophic Epidermolysis Bullosa (RDEB) is a genodermatosis caused by more than 500 different mutations in the COL7A1 gene and characterized by blistering of the skin following a minimal friction or mechanical trauma.
The identification of a cluster of RDEB pedigrees carrying the c.6527insC mutation in a specific area raises the question of the origin of this mutation from a common ancestor or as a result of a hotspot mutation. The aim of this study was to investigate the origin of the c.6527insC mutation.
Methods
Haplotypes were constructed by genotyping nine single nucleotides polymorphisms (SNPs) throughout the COL7A1 gene. Haplotypes were determined in RDEB patients and control samples, both of Spanish origin.
Results
Sixteen different haplotypes were identified in our study. A single haplotype cosegregated with the c.6527insC mutation.
Conclusion
Haplotype analysis showed that all alleles carrying the c.6527insC mutation shared the same haplotype cosegregating with this mutation (CCGCTCAAA_6527insC), thus suggesting the presence of a common ancestor.
doi:10.1186/1471-2350-11-139
PMCID: PMC2957067  PMID: 20920254
2.  Cerebrospinal fluid biomarkers in human genetic transmissible spongiform encephalopathies 
Journal of Neurology  2009;256(10):1620-1628.
The 14-3-3 protein test has been shown to support the clinical diagnosis of sporadic Creutzfeldt-Jakob disease (CJD) when associated with an adequate clinical context, and a high differential potential for the diagnosis of sporadic CJD has been attributed to other cerebrospinal fluid (CSF) proteins such as tau protein, S100b and neuron specific enolase (NSE). So far there has been only limited information available about biochemical markers in genetic transmissible spongiform encephalopathies (gTSE), although they represent 10–15% of human TSEs. In this study, we analyzed CSF of 174 patients with gTSEs for 14-3-3 (n = 166), tau protein (n = 78), S100b (n = 46) and NSE (n = 50). Levels of brain-derived proteins in CSF varied in different forms of gTSE. Biomarkers were found positive in the majority of gCJD (81%) and insert gTSE (69%), while they were negative in most cases of fatal familial insomnia (13%) and Gerstmann-Sträussler-Scheinker syndrome (10%). Disease duration and codon 129 genotype influence the findings in a different way than in sporadic CJD.
doi:10.1007/s00415-009-5163-x
PMCID: PMC3085782  PMID: 19444528
Creutzfeldt-Jakob disease; CSF proteins; 14-3-3 protein; Tau
3.  Impact of the clinical context on the 14-3-3 test for the diagnosis of sporadic CJD 
BMC Neurology  2006;6:25.
Background
The 14-3-3 test appears to be a valuable aid for the clinical diagnosis of sporadic Creutzfeldt-Jakob disease (sCJD) in selected populations. However, its usefulness in routine practice has been challenged. In this study, the influence of the clinical context on the performance of the 14-3-3 test for the diagnosis of sCJD is investigated through the analysis of a large prospective clinical series.
Methods
Six hundred seventy-two Spanish patients with clinically suspected sCJD were analyzed. Clinical classification at sample reception according to the World Health Organization's (WHO) criteria (excluding the 14-3-3 test result) was used to explore the influence of the clinical context on the pre-test probabilities, and positive (PPV) and negative (NPV) predictive values of the 14-3-3 test.
Results
Predictive values of the test varied greatly according to the initial clinical classification: PPV of 98.8%, 96.5% and 45.0%, and NPV of 26.1%, 66.6% and 100% for probable sCJDi (n = 115), possible sCJDi (n = 73) and non-sCJDi (n = 484) cases, respectively. According to multivariate and Bayesian analyses, these values represent an improvement of diagnostic certainty compared to clinical data alone.
Conclusion
In three different contexts of sCJD suspicion, the 14-3-3 assay provides useful information complementary to clinical and electroencephalographic (EEG) data. The test is most useful supporting a clinical impression, whilst it may show deceptive when it is not in agreement with clinical data.
doi:10.1186/1471-2377-6-25
PMCID: PMC1570138  PMID: 16872484

Results 1-3 (3)