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1.  Mean Platelet Volume and Long-Term Mortality in Patients Undergoing Percutaneous Coronary Intervention 
The American journal of cardiology  2012;111(2):185-189.
Increased platelet activity is associated with adverse cardiovascular events. Mean platelet volume (MPV) correlates with platelet activity but the relationship between MPV and long-term mortalityin patients undergoing percutaneous coronary intervention(PCI) is not well established. Furthermore, the role of change in MPV over time has not been previously evaluated. We evaluatedMPV at baseline, 30 days, 60 days, 90 days, 1 year, 2 years, and 3 years post-procedure in 1,512 patients who underwent PCI. The speed of change in MPV was estimated using slope of linear regression. Mortality was determined by query of social security death index. Over a median of 8.7 years, mortality was 49.3% post-PCI. There was no significant difference in mortality when stratified by MPV quartiles (1stquartile 50.1%, 2nd quartile 47.7%, 3rd quartile 51.3%, 4thquartile 48.3%, p=0.74). In patients with available data to determine a change in MPV over time post-PCI (n=839), mortality was 49.1% and significantly higher in patients with an increase (52.9%) compared to those with a decrease (44.2%) or no change (49.1%) in MPV over time (p<0.0001). In conclusion, there was no association between baseline MPV and long-term mortality in patients undergoing PCI. However, there was increased mortality when MPV increasedover time post-PCI. Monitoring MPV after coronary revascularization may play a role in risk stratification.
doi:10.1016/j.amjcard.2012.09.014
PMCID: PMC3538911  PMID: 23102880
Mean platelet volume; percutaneous coronary intervention; long-term mortality
2.  Food allergy knowledge, attitudes and beliefs: Focus groups of parents, physicians and the general public 
BMC Pediatrics  2008;8:36.
Background
Food allergy prevalence is increasing in US children. Presently, the primary means of preventing potentially fatal reactions are avoidance of allergens, prompt recognition of food allergy reactions, and knowledge about food allergy reaction treatments. Focus groups were held as a preliminary step in the development of validated survey instruments to assess food allergy knowledge, attitudes, and beliefs of parents, physicians, and the general public.
Methods
Eight focus groups were conducted between January and July of 2006 in the Chicago area with parents of children with food allergy (3 groups), physicians (3 groups), and the general public (2 groups). A constant comparative method was used to identify the emerging themes which were then grouped into key domains of food allergy knowledge, attitudes, and beliefs.
Results
Parents of children with food allergy had solid fundamental knowledge but had concerns about primary care physicians' knowledge of food allergy, diagnostic approaches, and treatment practices. The considerable impact of children's food allergies on familial quality of life was articulated. Physicians had good basic knowledge of food allergy but differed in their approach to diagnosis and advice about starting solids and breastfeeding. The general public had wide variation in knowledge about food allergy with many misconceptions of key concepts related to prevalence, definition, and triggers of food allergy.
Conclusion
Appreciable food allergy knowledge gaps exist, especially among physicians and the general public. The quality of life for children with food allergy and their families is significantly affected.
doi:10.1186/1471-2431-8-36
PMCID: PMC2564918  PMID: 18803842

Results 1-2 (2)