PMCC PMCC

Search tips
Search criteria

Advanced
Results 1-4 (4)
 

Clipboard (0)
None

Select a Filter Below

Journals
Authors
more »
Year of Publication
Document Types
author:("Tang, gengou")
1.  Gender-Specific Association of Sleep Duration with Blood Pressure in Rural Chinese Adults 
Sleep medicine  2011;12(7):693-699.
Background
There are limited data about the role of gender on the relationship between sleep duration and blood pressure (BP) from rural populations.
Methods
We conducted a cross-sectional rural population-based study. This report includes 1,033 men and 783 women aged 18–65 years from a cohort of twins enrolled in Anhui, China, between 2005 and 2008. Sleep duration was derived from typical bedtime, wake-up time, and sleep latency as reported on a standard sleep questionnaire. Primary outcomes included measured systolic blood pressure (SBP) and diastolic blood pressure (DBP). High blood pressure (HBP) was defined as SBP≥130 mmHg, DBP ≥85 mmHg, or physician diagnosed hypertension. Linear and logistic regression models were used to assess gender-specific associations between sleep duration and BP or HBP, respectively, with adjustment for known risk factors including adiposity and sleep-related disorder risk from the questionnaires. Generalized estimating equations were used to account for intra-twin pair correlations.
Results
Compared with those sleeping 7 to less than 9 hours, women sleeping <7 hours had a higher risk of HBP (odds ratios [ORs] 3.0, 95% confidence interval [CI], 1.4–6.6); men sleeping ≥9 hours had a higher risk of HBP (ORs=1.5, 95%CI: 1.1–2.2).
Conclusions
Among rural Chinese adults, a gender-specific association of sleep duration with BP exists such that HBP is associated with short sleep duration in women and long sleep duration in men. Longitudinal studies are needed to further examine the temporal relationship and biological mechanisms underlying sleep duration and BP in this population. Our findings underscore the potential importance of appropriate sleep duration for optimal blood pressure.
doi:10.1016/j.sleep.2010.12.019
PMCID: PMC3755492  PMID: 21764369
sleep duration; high blood pressure; gender difference; rural Chinese
2.  Association between Short Sleep Duration and the Risk of Sensitization to Food and Aero Allergens in Rural Chinese Adolescents 
Background
Both long and short sleep duration have been associated with obesity, cardiovascular disease, and diabetes. However, there have been no previous studies investigating the potential relationship between altered sleep duration and allergen sensitization.
Objective
To explore the association between sleep duration and sensitization to food and aeroallergens.
Methods
This study includes 1534 rural Chinese adolescent twins aged 12 to 21 years who completed standard sleep questionnaires and skin prick tests (SPTs) to 9 food and 5 aeroallergens. Total sleep time was defined as the interval from bedtime to wake-up time minus sleep latency. Sensitization was defined as having at least one positive SPT.
Results
Compared to individuals with the highest (3rd) tertile of sleep duration, those who slept less were more likely to be sensitized to any food allergen with odds ratios (ORs) of 1.9 (95% confidence interval(CI):1.3–2.7) and 1.4 (95%CI:1.0–1.9) for the 1st and 2nd tertiles (trend test Ptrend=3×10−4), respectively. The corresponding ORs for sensitization to any aeroallergen were 1.5 (95%CI: 1.1–2.0) and 1.3 (95%CI:1.0–1.7) (Ptrend=8×10−3). These associations were independent of percent body fat. In addition, we observed a significant dose-response association between the number of positive SPTs and percentage of shortest sleep duration (1st tertile) (Ptrend=1×10−3).
Conclusions and Clinical Relevance
In this sample of relatively lean rural Chinese adolescents, we found that short sleep duration was associated with increased risk of sensitization to food and aeroallergens, independent of percent body fat. Longitudinal studies are needed to further determine the temporal and causal relationships. If short sleep duration indeed is one of the risk factors for allergic sensitization, the global burden of allergic diseases could be dramatically reduced by providing appropriate guidance on sleep duration for youth.
doi:10.1111/j.1365-2222.2010.03677.x
PMCID: PMC3056931  PMID: 21255141
sleep duration; skin prick test; allergen; sensitization; adolescent
3.  The patterns of glucose tolerance and insulin resistance among rural Chinese twin children, Adolescents and young adults 
Metabolism: clinical and experimental  2010;59(12):1752-1759.
Pubertal insulin resistance (IR) is well recognized but little data is available for glucose and insulin pattern from a large, unselected lean population. This report describes the age- and gender-specific distributions of glucose tolerance and IR in a rural Chinese twin population. This report includes 4,488 subjects aged 6 to 24 years. The primary variables of interest are fasting plasma glucose (FPG), 2h post-load plasma glucose (2h PG), fasting serum insulin (FSI), 2h post-load insulin (2h PI) and the homeostatic model assessment for IR (HOMA-IR) index. Age- and gender-specific patterns for the primary variables are described using smoothing plot, arithmetic or geometric mean, and percentiles. There is an increase in FPG, 2h PG and IR during puberty (10–19years) and return to pre-puberty level by the age of 20 years. IR peaks around age of 14 years in girls, and 16 years in boys. 2h PG and 2h PI are higher in girls than in boys from early puberty, and the gender differences are more pronounced afterward. Moreover, the prevalence of impaired fasting glucose (IFG) and impaired glucose tolerance (IGT) increase after puberty, and higher in girls than in boys. In this community based, non-obese rural Chinese twin population, we observed gender-specific remarkable pubertal surge of IR and modest increase in plasma glucose as well as increasing prevalence of IFG and IGT with age. Notably, females had higher 2h PG and higher prevalence of IFG and IGT. Our study underscored that adolescence (even more so in females) is a critical period for developing IR and pre-diabetes.
doi:10.1016/j.metabol.2010.04.022
PMCID: PMC2974012  PMID: 20580383
adolescents; glucose tolerance; insulin resistance; Chinese
4.  Percent Fat Mass Is Inversely Associated With Bone Mass and Hip Geometry in Rural Chinese Adolescents 
Journal of Bone and Mineral Research  2010;25(7):1544-1554.
This study was an attempt to examine the phenotypic, genetic, and environmental correlations between percent fat mass (PFM) and bone parameters, especially hip geometry, among 786 males and 618 females aged 13 to 21 years from a Chinese twin cohort. PFM, bone area (BA), bone mineral content (BMC), cross-sectional area (CSA), and section modulus (SM) were obtained by dual-energy X-ray absorptiometry. Multiple linear regression models were used to assess the PFM-bone relationships. A structural equation model for twin design was used to estimate genetic/environmental influences on individual phenotype and phenotypic correlations. After controlling for body weight and other pertinent covariates, we observed inverse associations between PFM and bone parameters: Compared with the lowest age- and gender-specific tertile of PFM, males in the highest tertile of PFM had lower measures of whole-body-less-head BA (WB-BA), lumbar spine BA (L2–L4-BA), total-hip BA (TH-BA), total-hip BMC, CSA, and SM (p < .005 for all, adjusted p < .05). Similar inverse associations were observed in females for all the preceding parameters except WB-BA and L2–L4-BA. These associations did not vary significantly by Tanner stages. In both genders, the estimated heritabilities were 80% to 86% for BMC, 67% to 80% for BA, 74% to 77% for CSA, and 64% for SM. Both shared genetics and environmental factors contributed to the inverse PFM-bone correlations. We conclude that in this sample of relatively lean Chinese adolescents, at a given body weight, PFM is inversely associated with BA, BMC, and hip geometry in both genders, and such associations are attributed to both shared genetic and environmental factors. © 2010 American Society for Bone and Mineral Research.
doi:10.1002/jbmr.40
PMCID: PMC3153997  PMID: 20200956
percent fat mass; hip geometry; bone mineral content; adolescence; coheritability

Results 1-4 (4)