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author:("caelius, Mia")
1.  Genetic variants associated with warfarin dose in African-American individuals: a genome-wide association study 
Lancet  2013;382(9894):790-796.
Summary
Background
VKORC1 and CYP2C9 are important contributors to warfarin dose variability, but explain less variability for individuals of African descent than for those of European or Asian descent. We aimed to identify additional variants contributing to warfarin dose requirements in African Americans.
Methods
We did a genome-wide association study of discovery and replication cohorts. Samples from African-American adults (aged ≥18 years) who were taking a stable maintenance dose of warfarin were obtained at International Warfarin Pharmacogenetics Consortium (IWPC) sites and the University of Alabama at Birmingham (Birmingham, AL, USA). Patients enrolled at IWPC sites but who were not used for discovery made up the independent replication cohort. All participants were genotyped. We did a stepwise conditional analysis, conditioning first for VKORC1 −1639G→A, followed by the composite genotype of CYP2C9*2 and CYP2C9*3. We prespecified a genome-wide significance threshold of p<5×10−8 in the discovery cohort and p<0·0038 in the replication cohort.
Findings
The discovery cohort contained 533 participants and the replication cohort 432 participants. After the prespecified conditioning in the discovery cohort, we identified an association between a novel single nucleotide polymorphism in the CYP2C cluster on chromosome 10 (rs12777823) and warfarin dose requirement that reached genome-wide significance (p=1·51×10−8). This association was confirmed in the replication cohort (p=5·04×10−5); analysis of the two cohorts together produced a p value of 4·5×10−12. Individuals heterozygous for the rs12777823 A allele need a dose reduction of 6·92 mg/week and those homozygous 9·34 mg/week. Regression analysis showed that the inclusion of rs12777823 significantly improves warfarin dose variability explained by the IWPC dosing algorithm (21% relative improvement).
Interpretation
A novel CYP2C single nucleotide polymorphism exerts a clinically relevant effect on warfarin dose in African Americans, independent of CYP2C9*2 and CYP2C9*3. Incorporation of this variant into pharmacogenetic dosing algorithms could improve warfarin dose prediction in this population.
Funding
National Institutes of Health, American Heart Association, Howard Hughes Medical Institute, Wisconsin Network for Health Research, and the Wellcome Trust.
doi:10.1016/S0140-6736(13)60681-9
PMCID: PMC3759580  PMID: 23755828
2.  Association of the GGCX (CAA)16/17 repeat polymorphism with higher warfarin dose requirements in African Americans 
Pharmacogenetics and Genomics  2012;22(2):152-158.
Objective
Little is known about genetic contributors to higher than usual warfarin dose requirements, particularly for African Americans. This study tested the hypothesis that the γ-glutamyl carboxylase (GGCX) genotype contributes to warfarin dose requirements >7.5 mg/day in an African American population.
Methods
A total of 338 African Americans on a stable dose of warfarin were enrolled. The GGCX rs10654848 (CAA)n, rs12714145 (G>A), and rs699664 (p.R325Q); VKORC1 c.-1639G>A and rs61162043; and CYP2C9*2, *3, *5, *8, *11, and rs7089580 genotypes tested for their association with dose requirements >7.5 mg/day alone and in the context of other variables known to influence dose variability.
Results
The GGCX rs10654848 (CAA) 16 or 17 repeat occurred at a frequency of 2.6% in African Americans and was overrepresented among patients requiring >7.5mg/day versus those who required lower doses (12% vs 3%, p=0.003; odds ratio 4.0, 95% CI, 1.5–10.5). The GGCX rs10654848 genotype remained associated with high dose requirements on regression analysis including age, body size, and VKORC1 genotype. On linear regression, the GGCX rs10654848 genotype explained 2% of the overall variability in warfarin dose in African Americans. An examination of the GGCX rs10654848 genotype in warfarin-treated Caucasians revealed a (CAA)16 repeat allele frequency of only 0.27% (p=0.008 compared to African Americans).
Conclusion
These data support the GGCX rs10654848 genotype as a predictor of higher than usual warfarin doses in African Americans, who have a 10-fold higher frequency of the (CAA)16/17 repeat compared to Caucasians.
doi:10.1097/FPC.0b013e32834f288f
PMCID: PMC3261355  PMID: 22158446
African American; GGCX; warfarin
3.  Warfarin dose prediction in children using pharmacometric bridging—comparison with published pharmacogenetic dosing algorithms 
Purpose
Numerous studies have investigated causes of warfarin dose variability in adults, whereas studies in children are limited both in numbers and size. Mechanism-based population modelling provides an opportunity to condense and propagate prior knowledge from one population to another. The main objectives with this study were to evaluate the predictive performance of a theoretically bridged adult warfarin model in children, and to compare accuracy in dose prediction relative to published warfarin algorithms for children.
Method
An adult population pharmacokinetic/pharmacodynamic (PK/PD) model for warfarin, with CYP2C9 and VKORC1 genotype, age and target international normalized ratio (INR) as dose predictors, was bridged to children using allometric scaling methods. Its predictive properties were evaluated in an external data set of children 0–18 years old, including comparison of dose prediction accuracy with three pharmacogenetics-based algorithms for children.
Results
Overall, the bridged model predicted INR response well in 64 warfarin-treated Swedish children (median age 4.3 years), but with a tendency to overpredict INR in children ≤2 years old. The bridged model predicted 20 of 49 children (41 %) within ± 20 % of actual maintenance dose (median age 7.2 years). In comparison, the published dosing algorithms predicted 33–41 % of the children within ±20 % of actual dose. Dose optimization with the bridged model based on up to three individual INR observations increased the proportion within ±20 % of actual dose to 70 %.
Conclusion
A mechanism-based population model developed on adult data provides a promising first step towards more individualized warfarin therapy in children.
Electronic supplementary material
The online version of this article (doi:10.1007/s00228-012-1466-4) contains supplementary material, which is available to authorized users.
doi:10.1007/s00228-012-1466-4
PMCID: PMC3651819  PMID: 23307232
PK/PD model; Population analysis; Warfarin; Dosing; Children
4.  Pharmacogenomics and personalized medicine: the plunge into next-generation sequencing 
Genome Medicine  2011;3(12):78.
A report on the 9th Annual Cold Spring Harbor/Wellcome Trust meeting 'Pharmacogenomics and Personalized Medicine', Hinxton, Cambridge, UK, 29 September to 2 October 2011.
doi:10.1186/gm294
PMCID: PMC3334543  PMID: 22204519
Consortium; genome-wide association study; meta-analysis; next-generation sequencing; pharmacogenomics/pharmacogenetics; public health genomics; P4 medicine
5.  miR-133a Regulates Vitamin K 2,3-Epoxide Reductase Complex Subunit 1 (VKORC1), a Key Protein in the Vitamin K Cycle 
Molecular Medicine  2012;18(1):1466-1472.
Regulation of key proteins by microRNAs (miRNAs) is an emergent field in biomedicine. Vitamin K 2,3-epoxide reductase complex subunit 1 (VKORC1) is a relevant molecule for cardiovascular diseases, since it is the target of oral anticoagulant drugs and plays a role in soft tissue calcification. The objective of this study was to determine the influence of miRNAs on the expression of VKORC1. Potential miRNAs targeting VKORC1 mRNA were searched by using online algorithms. Validation studies were carried out in HepG2 cells by using miRNA precursors; direct miRNA interaction was investigated with reporter assays. In silico studies identified two putative conserved binding sites for miR-133a and miR-137 on VKORC1 mRNA. Ex vivo studies showed that only miR-133a was expressed in liver; transfection of miRNA precursors of miR-133a in HepG2 cells reduced VKORC1 mRNA expression in a dose-dependent manner, as assessed by quantitative reverse transcriptase–polymerase chain reaction (qRT-PCR) as well as protein expression. Reporter assays in HEK293T cells showed that miR-133a interacts with the 3′UTR of VKORC1. Additionally, miR-133a levels correlated inversely with VKORC1 mRNA levels in 23 liver samples from healthy subjects. In conclusion, miR-133a appears to have a direct regulatory effect on expression of VKORC1 in humans; this regulation may have potential importance for anticoagulant therapy or aortic calcification.
doi:10.2119/molmed.2012.00062
PMCID: PMC3563709  PMID: 23154637
6.  Pharmacogenetic Warfarin Dose Refinements Remain Significantly Influenced by Genetic Factors after One Week of Therapy 
Thrombosis and Haemostasis  2011;107(2):232-240.
Summary
Introduction
By guiding initial warfarin dose, pharmacogenetic (PGx) algorithms may improve the safety of warfarin initiation. However, once INR response is known, the contribution of PGx to dose refinements is uncertain. This study sought to develop and validate clinical and PGx dosing algorithms for warfarin dose refinement on days 6–11 after therapy initiation.
Materials and Methods
An international sample of 2,022 patients at 13 medical centers on 3 continents provided clinical, INR, and genetic data at treatment days 6–11 to predict therapeutic warfarin dose. Independent derivation and retrospective validation samples were composed by randomly dividing the population (80%/20%). Prior warfarin doses were weighted by their expected effect on S-warfarin concentrations using an exponential-decay pharmacokinetic model. The INR divided by that “effective” dose constituted a treatment response index.
Results
Treatment response index, age, amiodarone, body surface area, warfarin indication, and target INR were associated with dose in the derivation sample. A clinical algorithm based on these factors was remarkably accurate: in the retrospective validation cohort its R2 was 61.2% and median absolute error (MAE) was 5.0 mg/week. Accuracy and safety was confirmed in a prospective cohort (N=43). CYP2C9 variants and VKORC1-1639 G→A were significant dose predictors in both the derivation and validation samples. In the retrospective validation cohort, the PGx algorithm had: R2= 69.1% (P<0.05 vs. clinical algorithm), MAE= 4.7 mg/week.
Conclusions
A pharmacogenetic warfarin dose-refinement algorithm based on clinical, INR, and genetic factors can explain at least 69.1% of therapeutic warfarin dose variability after about one week of therapy.
doi:10.1160/TH11-06-0388
PMCID: PMC3292349  PMID: 22186998
warfarin; VKORC1; CYP2C9; pharmacogenetic
7.  A Genome-Wide Association Study Confirms VKORC1, CYP2C9, and CYP4F2 as Principal Genetic Determinants of Warfarin Dose 
PLoS Genetics  2009;5(3):e1000433.
We report the first genome-wide association study (GWAS) whose sample size (1,053 Swedish subjects) is sufficiently powered to detect genome-wide significance (p<1.5×10−7) for polymorphisms that modestly alter therapeutic warfarin dose. The anticoagulant drug warfarin is widely prescribed for reducing the risk of stroke, thrombosis, pulmonary embolism, and coronary malfunction. However, Caucasians vary widely (20-fold) in the dose needed for therapeutic anticoagulation, and hence prescribed doses may be too low (risking serious illness) or too high (risking severe bleeding). Prior work established that ∼30% of the dose variance is explained by single nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs) in the warfarin drug target VKORC1 and another ∼12% by two non-synonymous SNPs (*2, *3) in the cytochrome P450 warfarin-metabolizing gene CYP2C9. We initially tested each of 325,997 GWAS SNPs for association with warfarin dose by univariate regression and found the strongest statistical signals (p<10−78) at SNPs clustering near VKORC1 and the second lowest p-values (p<10−31) emanating from CYP2C9. No other SNPs approached genome-wide significance. To enhance detection of weaker effects, we conducted multiple regression adjusting for known influences on warfarin dose (VKORC1, CYP2C9, age, gender) and identified a single SNP (rs2108622) with genome-wide significance (p = 8.3×10−10) that alters protein coding of the CYP4F2 gene. We confirmed this result in 588 additional Swedish patients (p<0.0029) and, during our investigation, a second group provided independent confirmation from a scan of warfarin-metabolizing genes. We also thoroughly investigated copy number variations, haplotypes, and imputed SNPs, but found no additional highly significant warfarin associations. We present power analysis of our GWAS that is generalizable to other studies, and conclude we had 80% power to detect genome-wide significance for common causative variants or markers explaining at least 1.5% of dose variance. These GWAS results provide further impetus for conducting large-scale trials assessing patient benefit from genotype-based forecasting of warfarin dose.
Author Summary
Recently, geneticists have begun assaying hundreds of thousands of genetic markers covering the entire human genome to systematically search for and identify genes that cause disease. We have extended this “genome-wide association study” (GWAS) method by assaying ∼326,000 markers in 1,053 Swedish patients in order to identify genes that alter response to the anticoagulant drug warfarin. Warfarin is widely prescribed to reduce blood clotting in order to protect high-risk patients from stroke, thrombosis, and heart attack. But patients vary widely (20-fold) in the warfarin dose needed for proper blood thinning, which means that initial doses in some patients are too high (risking severe bleeding) or too low (risking serious illness). Our GWAS detected two genes (VKORC1, CYP2C9) already known to cause ∼40% of the variability in warfarin dose and discovered a new gene (CYP4F2) contributing 1%–2% of the variability. Since our GWAS searched the entire genome, additional genes having a major influence on warfarin dose might not exist or be found in the near-term. Hence, clinical trials assessing patient benefit from individualized dose forecasting based on a patient's genetic makeup at VKORC1, CYP2C9 and possibly CYP4F2 could provide state-of-the-art clinical benchmarks for warfarin use during the foreseeable future.
doi:10.1371/journal.pgen.1000433
PMCID: PMC2652833  PMID: 19300499
8.  Association of warfarin dose with genes involved in its action and metabolism 
Human Genetics  2006;121(1):23-34.
We report an extensive study of variability in genes encoding proteins that are believed to be involved in the action and biotransformation of warfarin. Warfarin is a commonly prescribed anticoagulant that is difficult to use because of the wide interindividual variation in dose requirements, the narrow therapeutic range and the risk of serious bleeding. We genotyped 201 patients for polymorphisms in 29 genes in the warfarin interactive pathways and tested them for association with dose requirement. In our study, polymorphisms in or flanking the genes VKORC1, CYP2C9, CYP2C18, CYP2C19, PROC, APOE, EPHX1, CALU, GGCX and ORM1-ORM2 and haplotypes of VKORC1, CYP2C9, CYP2C8, CYP2C19, PROC, F7, GGCX, PROZ, F9, NR1I2 and ORM1-ORM2 were associated with dose (P < 0.05). VKORC1, CYP2C9, CYP2C18 and CYP2C19 were significant after experiment-wise correction for multiple testing (P < 0.000175), however, the association of CYP2C18 and CYP2C19 was fully explained by linkage disequilibrium with CYP2C9*2 and/or *3. PROC and APOE were both significantly associated with dose after correction within each gene. A multiple regression model with VKORC1, CYP2C9, PROC and the non-genetic predictors age, bodyweight, drug interactions and indication for treatment jointly accounted for 62% of variance in warfarin dose. Weaker associations observed for other genes could explain up to ∼10% additional dose variance, but require testing and validation in an independent and larger data set. Translation of this knowledge into clinical guidelines for warfarin prescription will be likely to have a major impact on the safety and efficacy of warfarin.
Electronic supplementary material
Supplementary material is available in the online version of this article at http://dx.doi.org/10.1007/s00439-006-0260-8 and is accessible for authorized users.
doi:10.1007/s00439-006-0260-8
PMCID: PMC1797064  PMID: 17048007
9.  Can mutations in ELA2, neutrophil elastase expression or differential cell toxicity explain sulphasalazine-induced agranulocytosis? 
Background
Drug-induced agranulocytosis, a severe side effect marked by a deficit or absolute lack of granulocytic white blood cells, is a rare side-effect of the anti-inflammatory drug sulphasalazine. Mutations in the human neutrophil elastase gene (ELA2), causing increased intracellular concentration of this serine protease, inhibits neutrophil differentiation in severe congenital neutropenia (SCN). Since the clinical symptoms of agranulocytosis and SCN are similar, we hypothesized that it may origin from a common genetic variation in ELA2 or that sulphasalazine may affect human neutrophil elastase activity and protein expression.
Methods
We screened for genetic differences in ELA2 in DNA from 36 patients who had suffered from sulphasalazine-induced agranulocytosis, and compared them with 72 patients treated with sulphasalazine without blood reactions. We also performed in vitro studies of the blood cell lines HL60 and U937 after sulphasalazine exposure with respect to cell survival index, neutrophil elastase protein expression and activity.
Results
None of the mutations in ELA2, which previously have been reported to be associated with SCN, was found in this material. Protein expression of human neutrophil elastase in lymphoma U937 cells was not affected by treatment with concentrations equivalent to therapeutic doses. Cell survival of lymphoma U937 and promyelocytic leukemia HL-60 cells was not affected in this concentration range, but exhibited a decreased proliferative capacity with higher sulphasalazine concentrations. Interestingly the promyelocytic cells were more sensitive to sulphasalazine than the lymphoma cell line.
Conclusion
Neutrophil elastase expression and ELA2 mutations do, however, not seem to be involved in the etilogy of sulphasalazine-induced agranulocytosis. Why sulphasalazine is more toxic to promyelocytes than to lymphocytes remains to be explained.
doi:10.1186/1471-2326-4-5
PMCID: PMC535939  PMID: 15575961
10.  Incorporation of Pharmacogenomics into Routine Clinical Practice: the Clinical Pharmacogenetics Implementation Consortium (CPIC) Guideline Development Process 
Current Drug Metabolism  2014;15(2):209-217.
The Clinical Pharmacogenetics Implementation Consortium (CPIC) publishes genotype-based drug guidelines to help clinicians understand how available genetic test results could be used to optimize drug therapy. CPIC has focused initially on well-known examples of pharmacogenomic associations that have been implemented in selected clinical settings, publishing nine to date. Each CPIC guideline adheres to a standardized format and includes a standard system for grading levels of evidence linking genotypes to phenotypes and assigning a level of strength to each prescribing recommendation. CPIC guidelines contain the necessary information to help clinicians translate patient-specific diplotypes for each gene into clinical phenotypes or drug dosing groups. This paper reviews the development process of the CPIC guidelines and compares this process to the Institute of Medicine’s Standards for Developing Trustworthy Clinical Practice Guidelines.
doi:10.2174/1389200215666140130124910
PMCID: PMC3977533  PMID: 24479687
Clinical practice guideline; guideline; pharmacogenetics; pharmacogenomics.

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