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1.  Is Laparoscopy-assisted Radical Gastrectomy Safe in Patients with Child-Pugh Class A Cirrhosis? 
Journal of Gastric Cancer  2013;13(4):207-213.
Purpose
We investigated early postoperative morbidity and mortality in patients with liver cirrhosis who had undergone radical gastrectomy for gastric cancer.
Materials and Methods
We retrospectively reviewed the medical records of 41 patients who underwent radical gastrectomy at the Chonnam National University Hwasun Hospital (Hwasun-gun, Korea) between August 2004 and June 2009. There were few patients with Child-Pugh class B or C; therefore, we restricted patient selection to those with Child-Pugh class A.
Results
Postoperative complications were observed in 22 (53.7%) patients. The most common complications were ascites (46.3%), postoperative hemorrhage (22.0%) and wound infection (12.2%). Intra-abdominal abscess developed in one (2.4%) patient who had undergone open gastrectomy. Massive ascites occurred in 4 (9.8%) patients. Of the patients who underwent open gastrectomy, nine (21.9%) patients required blood transfusions as a result of postoperative hemorrhage. However, most of these patients had advanced gastric cancer. In contrast, most patients who underwent laparoscopic gastrectomy had early stage gastric cancer, and when the confounding effect from the different stages between the two groups was corrected statistically, no statistically significant difference was found. There was also no significant difference between open and laparoscopic gastrectomy in the occurrence rate of other postoperative complications such as ascites, wound infection, and intra-abdominal abscess. No postoperative mortality occurred.
Conclusions
Laparoscopic gastrectomy is a feasible surgical procedure for patients with moderate hepatic dysfunction.
doi:10.5230/jgc.2013.13.4.207
PMCID: PMC3915182  PMID: 24511416
Stomach neoplasms; Liver cirrhosis; Gastrectomy
2.  Prognostic factors in patients with node-negative gastric carcinoma: A comparison with node-positive gastric carcinoma 
AIM: To identify the clinicopathological characteristics of lymph node-negative gastric carcinoma, and also to evaluate outcome indicators in the lymph node-negative patients.
METHODS: Of 2848 gastric carcinoma patients, 1524 (53.5%) were lymph node-negative. A statistical analysis was performed using the Cox model to estimate outcome indicators.
RESULTS: There was a significant difference in the recurrence rate between lymph node-negative and lymph node-positive patients (14.4% vs 41.0%, P < 0.001). The 5-year survival rate was significantly lower in lymph node-positive than in lymph node-negative patients (31.1% vs 77.4%, P < 0.001). Univariate analysis revealed that the following factors influenced the 5-year survival rate: patient age, tumor size, depth of invasion, tumor location, operative type, and tumor stage at initial diagnosis. The Cox proportional hazard regression model revealed that tumor size, serosal invasion, and curability were independent, statistically significant, prognostic indicators of lymph node-negative gastric carcinoma.
CONCLUSION: Lymph node-negative patients have a favorable outcome attributable to high curability, but the patients with relatively large tumors and serosal invasion have a poor prognosis. Curability is one of the most reliable predictors of long-term survival for lymph node-negative gastric carcinoma patients.
doi:10.3748/wjg.v12.i8.1182
PMCID: PMC4124426  PMID: 16534868
Gastric carcinoma; Survival; Tumor size; Serosal invasion; Curability
3.  Clinicopathologic characteristics of gastric carcinoma in elderly patients: A comparison with young patients 
AIM: To examine the clinicopathologic features of elderly patients with gastric carcinoma and to investigate the relationship between prognosis and age.
METHODS: We reviewed the hospital records of 2014 patients with gastric carcinoma retrospectively to compare the clinicopathologic findings in elderly (age >70 years) and young (age <36 years) patients during the period from 1986 to 2000 in a tertiary referral center in Gwangju, Korea. Overall survival was the main outcome measure.
RESULTS: Of the 2014 patients, 194 (9.6%) were in the elderly group and 137 (6.8%) were in the young group. The elderly and young patients had similar distributions with respect to depth of invasion, nodal involvement, hepatic metastasis, peritoneal dissemination, tumor stage at the initial diagnosis, and type of surgery. Synchronous multiple carcinomas were found in 14/194 (7.2%) of the elderly group and 4/137 (2.9%) of the young group (P<0.05). Using the Borrmann classification, type IV was more frequent in the young patients than in the elderly patients (P<0.05). Significantly more elderly patients had a well or moderately differentiated histology, and more young patients had a poorly differentiated histology and signet ring cell carcinoma (P<0.001). The 5-year survival rates of elderly and young patients did not differ statistically (52.8% vs 46.5%, P = 0.5290). Multivariate analysis showed that the histologic type, nodal involvement and operative curability were significant prognostic factors, and age itself was not an independent prognostic factor of survival for elderly gastric carcinoma patients.
CONCLUSION: Elderly patients with gastric carcinoma do not have a worse prognosis than young patients. The important prognostic factor is whether the patients undergo a curative resection.
doi:10.3748/wjg.v11.i1.22
PMCID: PMC4205377  PMID: 15609390
Gastric carcinomas; Prognosis; Age; Surgery
5.  Prognosis of early mucinous gastric carcinoma 
Purpose
Little is known about the clinicopathological features of early mucinous gastric carcinoma (MGC). The purpose of this study was to compare the clinicopathological features and prognosis between patients with early MGC and those with early nonmucinous gastric carcinoma (NMGC).
Methods
We reviewed the records of 2,732 patients diagnosed with gastric carcinoma who were treated surgically. There were 14 patients (0.5%) with early MGC and 958 with early NMGC.
Results
Early MGC patients had a higher prevalence of elevated type (71.4%) compared with early NMGC patients (29.5%). More early MGC patients had submucosal carcinoma, compared with early NMGC patients (78.6% vs. 64.1%). The overall 5-year survival of the patients with early MGC was 97.2% as compared with 92.7% for the patients with early NMGC (P < 0.01). The statistically significant prognostic parameters influencing the 5-year survival rate according to Cox's proportional hazard regression model were: age (risk ratio, 2.22; 95% confidence interval [CI], 1.62-3.04; P < 0.01); sex (risk ratio, 1.97; 95% CI, 1.42-2.73; P < 0.01); and lymph node metastases (risk ratio, 1.88; 95% CI, 1.28-2.77; P < 0.01).
Conclusion
Patients with early MGC had a better prognosis than those with early NMGC. Mucinous histology itself appears not to be an independent prognostic factor. Therefore, early detection is important for improving the prognosis for patients with gastric carcinoma regardless of tumor histology.
doi:10.4174/astr.2014.87.1.5
PMCID: PMC4091442  PMID: 25025020
Gastric neoplasm; Mucinous; Prognosis; Tumor histology
6.  Prospective randomized controlled trial (phase III) to comparing laparoscopic distal gastrectomy with open distal gastrectomy for gastric adenocarcinoma (KLASS 01) 
A randomized controlled trial to evaluate the long-term outcomes of laparoscopic distal gastrectomy for gastric cancer is currently ongoing in Korea. Patients with cT1N0M0-cT2aN0M0 (American Joint Committee on Cancer, 6th edition) distal gastric cancer were randomized to receive either laparoscopic or open distal gastrectomy. For surgical quality control, the surgeons participating in this trial had to have performed at least 50 cases each of laparoscopy-assisted distal gastrectomy and open distal gastrectomy and their institutions should have performed more than 80 cases each of both procedures each year. Fifteen surgeons from 12 institutions recruited 1,415 patients. The primary endpoint is overall survival. The secondary endpoints are disease-free survival, morbidity, mortality, quality of life, inflammatory and immune responses, and cost-effectiveness (ClinicalTrials.gov ID: NCT00452751).
doi:10.4174/jkss.2013.84.2.123
PMCID: PMC3566471  PMID: 23396494
Gastric cancer; Laparoscopy distal gastrectomy; Open distal gastrectomy; Randomized controlled trial
7.  Preoperative predictors of malignant gastric submucosal tumor 
Purpose
The preoperative prediction of malignant potential in patients with gastric submucosal tumors (SMTs) plays an important role in decisions regarding their surgical management.
Methods
We evaluated the predictors of malignant gastric SMTs in 314 patients with gastric SMTs who underwent surgery in Chonnam National University Hospital.
Results
The malignant SMTs were significantly associated with age (odds ratio [OR], 1.067; 95% confidence interval [CI], 1.042 to 1.091; P < 0.0001), presence of central ulceration (OR, 2.690; 95% CI, 1.224 to 5.909; P = 0.014), and tumor size (OR, 1.791; 95% CI, 1.483 to 2.164; P < 0.0001). Receiver operating characteristic curve analysis showed that tumor size was a good predictor of malignant potential. The most relevant predictor of malignant gastric SMT was tumor size with cut-offs of 4.05 and 6.40 cm.
Conclusion
Our findings indicated that age, central ulceration, and tumor size were significant preoperative predictors of malignant SMTs. We suggest that 4 cm be selected as a threshold value for malignant gastric SMTs. In patients with a gastric SMT larger than 4 cm with ulceration, wide resection of the full thickness of the gastric wall or gastrectomy with adequate margins should be performed because of its malignant potential.
doi:10.4174/jkss.2012.83.2.83
PMCID: PMC3412188  PMID: 22880181
Stomach neoplasms; Submucosal tumor; Malignant factor; Preoperative predictor
8.  Clinicopathological Features of Female Gastric Carcinoma Patients with Curative Resection: Comparison with Male Patients 
Chonnam Medical Journal  2012;48(2):86-90.
Little is known about the clinicopathological features of female gastric carcinoma (FGC) patients. We compared the clinicopathologic features and outcomes of FGC patients with curative resection with those of male gastric carcinoma (MGC) patients. We reviewed the hospital records of 940 FGC patients between 1986 and 2005 at Chonnam National University Hospital. Multivariate analysis showed that presence of serosal invasion, lymph node metastasis, and operative type were significant prognostic factors for survival of FGC patients with curative resection. Furthermore, the overall 5-year survival rate of FGC patients with curative resection (53.4%) was higher than that of MGC patients (47.6%, p<0.05). In advanced cases, no significant difference was observed in the overall 5-year survival rate between the FGC and MGC patients (41.6% vs 37.4%, p>0.05). Therefore, serosal invasion, lymph node metastasis, and type of operation were statistically significant parameters associated with survival. Early detection is more important for improving the prognosis of female patients with gastric cancer than for male patients.
doi:10.4068/cmj.2012.48.2.86
PMCID: PMC3434796  PMID: 22977748
Female gastric carcinoma; Prognosis; Early detection of cancer
9.  Recurring gastrointestinal stromal tumor with splenic metastasis 
Journal of the Korean Surgical Society  2011;81(Suppl 1):S25-S29.
Malignant gastrointestinal stromal tumors (GISTs) are rare non-epithelial, mesenchymal neoplasms of the gastrointestinal tract that metastasize or recur in 30% of patients who undergo surgical resection with curative intent. A 59-year-old man visited our hospital for an examination of a palpable mass in the left abdomen. Fourteen months prior to his visit, the patient underwent gastric wedge resection to remove a GIST of the gastric cardia. At the time of surgery, no evidence of metastatic disease was observed and the pathological interpretation was a high-risk GIST. A follow-up computed tomography scan of the abdomen revealed a partially necrotic solid mass (9.8 × 7.6 cm) and enhancing mass in the spleen (2.3 cm). On exploration, multiple masses were found in the liver, greater omentum, and mesentery. Here, we report a case of recurring GIST of the stomach that metastasized to the spleen. To the best of our knowledge, few reports of metastasis to the spleen exist.
doi:10.4174/jkss.2011.81.Suppl1.S25
PMCID: PMC3267060  PMID: 22319733
Gastrointestinal stromal tumors; Neoplasm metastasis; Spleen
10.  Clinicopathologic characteristics of serosa-positive gastric carcinoma in elderly patients 
Purpose
The relationship between the prognosis and the age of patients with gastric carcinoma is controversial. This study examined the clinicopathologic features of elderly gastric carcinoma patients with serosal invasion.
Methods
We reviewed the hospital records of 136 elderly gastric carcinoma patients with serosal invasion retrospectively to compare the clinicopathologic findings in the elderly (aged > 70 years) and young (aged < 36 years).
Results
The 5-year survival rates of elderly and young patients with curative resection did not differ statistically (33.9% vs. 43.3%; P = 0.318). Multivariate analysis showed that two factors were independent, statistically significant parameters associated with survival: histologic type (risk ratio, 1.805; 95% confidence interval [CI], 1.041 to 3.132; P < 0.05) and operative curability (risk ratio, 2.506; 95% CI, 1.371 to 4.581; P < 0.01).
Conclusion
This study demonstrated that elderly gastric carcinoma patients with serosal invasion do not have a worse prognosis than young patients. The important prognostic factor was whether the patients underwent curative resection.
doi:10.4174/jkss.2011.81.1.19
PMCID: PMC3204556  PMID: 22066096
Gastric carcinoma; Serosal invasion; Elderly; Prognosis; Age
11.  Primary Epithelial Ovarian Carcinoma with Gastric Metastasis Mimic Gastrointestinal Stromal Tumor 
Epithelial ovarian carcinoma rarely metastasizes to the parenchyma of the stomach. A 55-years-old woman presented with epigastric pain and a feeling of fullness for one month. A subsequent contrast-enhanced CT scan demonstrated a 4.5×4 cm submucosal mass with focal ulceration in the gastric antrum, and this finding was suggestive of GIST. After gastric antrectomy, the final pathology showed metastatic gastric tumor from a primary ovarian serous carcinoma. Because epithelial ovarian carcinoma is usually spread along the peritoneal surface, stomach involvement is rare. Furthermore, transmural gastric metastasis is very rare in a patient with primary ovarian carcinoma. Until now, there has been no reported case of stomach involvement at presentation in a patient with primary ovarian carcinoma. We present here a case of ovarian carcinoma with gastric metastasis that mimicked GIST.
doi:10.4143/crt.2008.40.2.93
PMCID: PMC2697489  PMID: 19688055
Gastric metastasis; Gastrointestinal stromal tumors; Ovarian carcinoma
12.  Acute Appendicitis in Henoch-Schönlein Purpura : A Case Report 
Journal of Korean Medical Science  2005;20(5):899-900.
Common complications of Henoch-Schönlein purpura (HSP) that lead to surgical intervention include intussusception, perforation, necrosis, and massive gastrointestinal bleeding. Acute appendicitis is rarely seen as a complication of HSP. A seven-year-old boy was admitted for arthralgia, abdominal pain, hematochezia, melena, and purpuric rash on the lower extremities. On admission day abdominal ultrasonography was normal, but on day 5, he became pyrexial and developed right iliac fossa pain and tenderness with guarding. Ultrasonography showed distended appendix surrounded by hyperechoic inflamed fat. On exploration an acutely inflamed, necrotic appendix was removed and grossly there was an appendiceal perforation in the appendiceal tip. Microscopically some of the small blood vessels in the submucosa showed fibrinoid necrosis with neutrophilic infiltrations. The authors report the case of a child who developed acute perforative appendicitis requiring appendectomy while on treatment for HSP.
doi:10.3346/jkms.2005.20.5.899
PMCID: PMC2779295  PMID: 16224172
Purpura, Henoch-Schoenlein; Appendicitis; complications

Results 1-12 (12)