PMCC PMCC

Search tips
Search criteria

Advanced
Results 1-5 (5)
 

Clipboard (0)
None

Select a Filter Below

Journals
Authors
more »
Year of Publication
Document Types
author:("Kwon, Ah-rem")
2.  Longitudinal Standards for Height and Height Velocity in Korean Children and Adolescents: the Kangwha Cohort Study 
Journal of Korean Medical Science  2013;28(10):1512-1517.
Longitudinal standards for height and height velocity are essential to monitor for appropriate linear growth. We aimed to construct standards in Korean children and adolescents through the population-based longitudinal Kangwha study. Our study was a part of a community-based prospective cohort study from 1986 to 1999 with 800 school children. Height and height velocity were recorded annually from age 6 until final height. Results were compared with cross-sectional data from the 2007 Korean National Growth Charts. Final height was 173.5 cm in boys and 160.5 cm in girls. Although final height was similar between longitudinal and cross-sectional standards, the mean height for age was higher in the longitudinal standard by 1-4 cm from age 6 until the completion of puberty. Using the longitudinal standard, age at peak height velocity (PHV) was 12 in boys and 10 in girls; height velocity at PHV was 8.62 cm/yr in boys and 7.07 cm/yr in girls. The mean height velocity was less than 1 cm/yr at age 17 in boys and 15 in girls. Thus, we have presented the first report of longitudinal standards for height and height velocity in Korean children and adolescents by analyzing longitudinal data from the Kangwha cohort.
doi:10.3346/jkms.2013.28.10.1512
PMCID: PMC3792607  PMID: 24133358
Growth; Height Velocity; Longitudinal Studies; Reference Standards; Child
3.  The Clinical Measures Associated with C-peptide Decline in Patients with Type 1 Diabetes over 15 Years 
Journal of Korean Medical Science  2013;28(9):1340-1344.
This study was done to characterize the natural course of C-peptide levels in patients with type 1 diabetes and identify distinguishing characters among patients with lower rates of C-peptide decline. A sample of 95 children with type 1 diabetes was analyzed to retrospectively track serum levels of C-peptide, HbA1c, weight, BMI, and diabetic complications for the 15 yr after diagnosis. The clinical characteristics were compared between the patients with low and high C-peptide levels, respectively. The average C-peptide level among all patients was significantly reduced five years after diagnosis (P < 0.001). The incidence of diabetic ketoacidosis was significantly lower among the patients with high levels of C-peptide (P = 0.038). The body weight and BMI standard deviation scores (SDS) 15 yr after diagnosis were significantly higher among the patients with low C-peptide levels (weight SDS, P = 0.012; BMI SDS, P = 0.044). In conclusion, C-peptide level was significantly decreased after 5 yr from diagnosis. Type 1 diabetes patients whose beta-cell functions were preserved might have low incidence of diabetic ketoacidosis. The declines of C-peptide level after diagnosis in type 1 diabetes may be associated with changes of body weight and BMI.
doi:10.3346/jkms.2013.28.9.1340
PMCID: PMC3763109  PMID: 24015040
Diabetes Mellitus, Type 1; C-Peptide; Body Weight; Body Mass Index; Diabetic Ketoacidosis
4.  Spot Urine Albumin to Creatinine Ratio and Serum Cystatin C are Effective for Detection of Diabetic Nephropathy in Childhood Diabetic Patients 
Journal of Korean Medical Science  2012;27(7):784-787.
Spot urinary albumin to creatinine ratio (ACR) measurement has been suggested as a surrogate to 24-hr urine collection for the assessment of microalbuminuria, and cystatin C (cysC) is known as an advantageous marker for renal function. The aim of this study was to evaluate the clinical values of spot urinary ACR and serum cysC for the assessment of diabetic nephropathy instead of 24-hr urine microalbumin in children and adolescents with diabetes. A total of 113 children and adolescents (age 12-19 yr, M:F = 47:66) with type 1 or 2 diabetes were enrolled. We evaluated the validity of spot urine ACR and serum cysC, and then compared them to 24-hr urine microalbumin and creatinine clearance. Spot urine ACR was correlated with 24-hr urine albumin excretion (R2 = 0.828, P = 0.001) and creatinine clearance (R2 = 0.249, P = 0.017). The ROC curve analysis of serum cysC demonstrated higher diagnostic accuracy than that of serum creatinine (AUC 0.732 vs 0.615). Both the measurements of spot urine ACR and serum cysC might better predict the presence of diabetic nephropathy than 24-hr urine microalbumin in childhood diabetic patients.
doi:10.3346/jkms.2012.27.7.784
PMCID: PMC3390728  PMID: 22787375
Diabetic Nephropathies; Albumin to Creatinine Ratio; Cystatin C; Childhood Diabetes
5.  Serum Kisspeptin Levels in Korean Girls with Central Precocious Puberty 
Journal of Korean Medical Science  2011;26(7):927-931.
Central precocious puberty (CPP) is caused by premature activation of hypothalamic gonadotropin-releasing hormone (GnRH) secretion. Kisspeptin and G-protein coupled receptor-54 system is the essential gatekeeper of the reproductive system, playing a key role in the activation of the gonadotropic axis at puberty. We aimed to determine whether serum kisspeptin may function as a marker for CPP by investigating serum kisspeptin levels in Korean girls with CPP and their prepubertal controls. Serum kisspeptin levels of Korean girls with CPP (n = 30) and age-matched healthy prepubertal controls (n = 30) were measured with a competitive enzyme immunoassay. Serum kisspeptin levels were significantly higher in CPP group than in control group (4.61 ± 1.78 vs 2.15 ± 1.52 pM/L, P < 0.001). Serum kisspeptin was positively correlated with peak luteinizing hormone (LH), peak/basal LH ratio and peak LH/follicular-stimulating hormone (FSH) ratio during GnRH stimulation test. CPP is supposed to be triggered by premature increase of kisspeptin. Serum kisspeptin may be used as a marker of CPP. Further studies on KISS1 gene polymorphisms leading to higher risk of premature increase of kisspeptin and upstream regulator of kisspeptin are also needed.
doi:10.3346/jkms.2011.26.7.927
PMCID: PMC3124724  PMID: 21738347
Kisspeptin; KISS1 Gene; G-protein Coupled Receptor-54; Central Precocious Puberty; Gonadotropin-Releasing Hormone

Results 1-5 (5)