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1.  CONSENSUS TREATMENT PLANS FOR INDUCTION THERAPY OF NEWLY-DIAGNOSED PROLIFERATIVE LUPUS NEPHRITIS IN JUVENILE SYSTEMIC LUPUS ERYTHEMATOSUS 
Arthritis care & research  2012;64(3):375-383.
Objective
To formulate consensus treatment plans (CTPs) for induction therapy of newly-diagnosed proliferative lupus nephritis (LN) in juvenile systemic lupus erythematosus (jSLE).
Methods
A structured consensus formation process was employed by the members of the Childhood Arthritis and Rheumatology Research Alliance (CARRA) after considering the existing medical evidence and current treatment approaches.
Results
After an initial Delphi survey (response rate 70%), a 2-day consensus conference, and two follow-up Delphi surveys (response rates 63–79%), consensus was achieved for a limited set of CTPs addressing the induction therapy of proliferative LN. These CTPs were developed for prototypic patients defined by eligibility characteristics, and included immunosuppressive therapy with either mycophenolic acid orally twice per day, or intravenous cyclophosphamide once per month at standardized doses for six months. Additionally, the CTPs describe three options for standardized use of glucocorticoids; including a primarily oral, a mixed oral/intravenous, and a primarily intravenous regimen. There was consensus on measures of effectiveness and safety of the CTPs. The CTPs were well accepted by the pediatric rheumatology providers treating children with LN, and up to 300 children per year in North America are expected to be candidates for the treatment with the CTPs.
Conclusion
CTPs for induction therapy of proliferative LN in jSLE based on the available scientific evidence and pediatric rheumatology group experience have been developed. Consistent use of the CTPs may improve the prognosis of proliferative LN, and support the conduct of comparative effectiveness studies aimed at optimizing therapeutic strategies for proliferative LN in jSLE.
doi:10.1002/acr.21558
PMCID: PMC3457803  PMID: 22162255
children; SLE; lupus nephritis; induction therapy; consensus
2.  The Lupus Family Registry and Repository 
Rheumatology (Oxford, England)  2010;50(1):47-59.
The Lupus Family Registry and Repository (LFRR) was established with the goal of assembling and distributing materials and data from families with one or more living members diagnosed with SLE, in order to address SLE genetics. In the present article, we describe the problems and solutions of the registry design and biometric data gathering; the protocols implemented to guarantee data quality and protection of participant privacy and consent; and the establishment of a local and international network of collaborators. At the same time, we illustrate how the LFRR has enabled progress in lupus genetics research, answering old scientific questions while laying out new challenges in the elucidation of the biologic mechanisms that underlie disease pathogenesis. Trained staff ascertain SLE cases, unaffected family members and population-based controls, proceeding in compliance with the relevant laws and standards; participant consent and privacy are central to the LFRR’s effort. Data, DNA, serum, plasma, peripheral blood and transformed B-cell lines are collected and stored, and subject to strict quality control and safety measures. Coded data and materials derived from the registry are available for approved scientific users. The LFRR has contributed to the discovery of most of the 37 genetic associations now known to contribute to lupus through 104 publications. The LFRR contains 2618 lupus cases from 1954 pedigrees that are being studied by 76 approved users and their collaborators. The registry includes difficult to obtain populations, such as multiplex pedigrees, minority patients and affected males, and constitutes the largest collection of lupus pedigrees in the world. The LFRR is a useful resource for the discovery and characterization of genetic associations in SLE.
doi:10.1093/rheumatology/keq302
PMCID: PMC3307518  PMID: 20864496
Systemic lupus erythematosus; Registry; Repository; Autoimmune diseases; Genetics; Heritability; Genome-wide association studies; Linkage analysis; Minorities; Women

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