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1.  Treatment of prediabetes 
World Journal of Diabetes  2015;6(12):1207-1222.
Progression of normal glucose tolerance (NGT) to overt diabetes is mediated by a transition state called impaired glucose tolerance (IGT). Beta cell dysfunction and insulin resistance are the main defects in type 2 diabetes mellitus (type 2 DM) and even normoglycemic IGT patients manifest these defects. Beta cell dysfunction and insulin resistance also contribute to the progression of IGT to type 2 DM. Improving insulin sensitivity and/or preserving functions of beta-cells can be a rational way to normalize the GT and to control transition of IGT to type 2 DM. Loosing weight, for example, improves whole body insulin sensitivity and preserves beta-cell function and its inhibitory effect on progression of IGT to type 2 DM had been proven. But interventions aiming weight loss usually not applicable in real life. Pharmacotherapy is another option to gain better insulin sensitivity and to maintain beta-cell function. In this review, two potential treatment options (lifestyle modification and pharmacologic agents) that limits the IGT-type 2 DM conversion in prediabetic subjects are discussed.
doi:10.4239/wjd.v6.i12.1207
PMCID: PMC4598604  PMID: 26464759
Prediabetes; Impaired fasting glucose; Impared glucose tolerance; Diabetes prevention; Type 2 diabetes mellitus
2.  Chronic Reduction of Plasma Free Fatty Acid Improves Mitochondrial Function and Whole-Body Insulin Sensitivity in Obese and Type 2 Diabetic Individuals 
Diabetes  2014;63(8):2812-2820.
Insulin resistance and dysregulation of free fatty acid (FFA) metabolism are core defects in type 2 diabetic (T2DM) and obese normal glucose tolerant (NGT) individuals. Impaired muscle mitochondrial function (reduced ATP synthesis) also has been described in insulin-resistant T2DM and obese subjects. We examined whether reduction in plasma FFA concentration with acipimox improved ATP synthesis rate and altered reactive oxygen species (ROS) production. Eleven NGT obese and 11 T2DM subjects received 1) OGTT, 2) euglycemic insulin clamp with muscle biopsy, and 3) 1H-magnetic resonance spectroscopy of tibialis anterior muscle before and after acipimox (250 mg every 6 h for 12 days). ATP synthesis rate and ROS generation were measured in mitochondria isolated from muscle tissue ex vivo with chemoluminescence and fluorescence techniques, respectively. Acipimox 1) markedly reduced the fasting plasma FFA concentration and enhanced suppression of plasma FFA during oral glucose tolerance tests and insulin clamp in obese NGT and T2DM subjects and 2) enhanced insulin-mediated muscle glucose disposal and suppression of hepatic glucose production. The improvement in insulin sensitivity was closely correlated with the decrease in plasma FFA in obese NGT (r = 0.81) and T2DM (r = 0.76) subjects (both P < 0.001). Mitochondrial ATP synthesis rate increased by >50% in both obese NGT and T2DM subjects and was strongly correlated with the decrease in plasma FFA and increase in insulin-mediated glucose disposal (both r > 0.70, P < 0.001). Production of ROS did not change after acipimox. Reduction in plasma FFA in obese NGT and T2DM individuals improves mitochondrial ATP synthesis rate, indicating that the mitochondrial defect in insulin-resistant individuals is, at least in part, reversible.
doi:10.2337/db13-1130
PMCID: PMC4113069  PMID: 24353180
3.  Baseline Adiponectin Levels Do Not Influence the Response to Pioglitazone in ACT NOW 
Diabetes Care  2014;37(6):1706-1711.
OBJECTIVE
Plasma adiponectin levels are reduced in type 2 diabetes mellitus (T2DM) and other insulin-resistant states. We examined whether plasma adiponectin levels at baseline and after pioglitazone treatment in impaired glucose tolerance (IGT) subjects were associated with improved insulin sensitivity (SI) and glucose tolerance status.
RESEARCH DESIGN AND METHODS
A total of 602 high-risk IGT subjects in ACT NOW were randomized to receive pioglitazone or placebo with a median follow-up of 2.4 years.
RESULTS
Pioglitazone reduced IGT conversion to diabetes by 72% in association with improved β-cell function by 64% (insulin secretion/insulin resistance index) and increased tissue sensitivity by 88% (Matsuda index). In pioglitazone-treated subjects, plasma adiponectin concentration increased threefold from 13 ± 0.5 to 38 ± 2.5 μg/mL (P < 0.001) and was strongly correlated with the improvement in SI (r = 0.436, P < 0.001) and modestly correlated with glucose area under the curve during oral glucose tolerance test (r = 0.238, P < 0.005) and insulin secretion/insulin resistance index (r = 0.306, P < 0.005). The increase in adiponectin was a strong predictor of reversion to normal glucose tolerance and prevention of T2DM. In the placebo group, plasma adiponectin did not change and was not correlated with changes in glucose levels. There was an inverse association between baseline plasma adiponectin concentration and progression to diabetes in the placebo group but not in the pioglitazone group.
CONCLUSIONS
Baseline adiponectin does not predict the response to pioglitazone. The increase in plasma adiponectin concentration after pioglitazone therapy in IGT subjects is strongly related to improved glucose tolerance status and enhanced tissue sensitivity to insulin.
doi:10.2337/dc13-1745
PMCID: PMC4179517  PMID: 24705615
4.  APPL1 Potentiates Insulin Sensitivity by Facilitating the Binding of IRS1/2 to the Insulin Receptor 
Cell reports  2014;7(4):1227-1238.
SUMMARY
Binding of insulin receptor substrate proteins 1 and 2 (IRS1/2) to the insulin receptor (IR) is essential for the regulation of insulin sensitivity and energy homeostasis. However, the mechanism of IRS1/2 recruitment to the IR remains elusive. Here, we identify adaptor protein APPL1 as a critical molecule that promotes IRS1/2-IR interaction. APPL1 forms a complex with IRS1/2 under basal conditions, and this complex is then recruited to the IR in response to insulin or adiponectin stimulation. The interaction between APPL1 and IR depends on insulin- or adiponectin-stimulated APPL1 phosphorylation, which is greatly reduced in insulin target tissues in obese mice. appl1 deletion in mice consistently leads to systemic insulin resistance and a significant reduction in insulin-stimulated IRS1/2, but not IR, tyrosine phosphorylation, indicating that APPL1 sensitizes insulin signaling by acting at a site downstream of the IR. Our study uncovers a mechanism regulating insulin signaling and crosstalk between the insulin and adiponectin pathways.
doi:10.1016/j.celrep.2014.04.006
PMCID: PMC4380268  PMID: 24813896
5.  Novel Agents for the Treatment of Type 2 Diabetes 
In Brief
Impaired insulin secretion, increased hepatic glucose production, and decreased peripheral glucose utilization are the core defects responsible for the development and progression of type 2 diabetes. However, the pathophysiology of this disease also includes adipocyte insulin resistance (increased lipolysis), reduced incretin secretion/sensitivity, increased glucagon secretion, enhanced renal glucose reabsorption, and brain insulin resistance/neurotransmitter dysfunction. Although current diabetes management focuses on lowering blood glucose, the goal of therapy should be to delay disease progression and eventual treatment failure. Recent innovative treatment approaches target the multiple pathophysiological defects present in type 2 diabetes. Optimal management should include early initiation of combination therapy using multiple drugs with different mechanisms of action. This review examines novel therapeutic options that hold particular promise.
doi:10.2337/diaspect.27.2.100
PMCID: PMC4522879  PMID: 26246766
6.  Successful β cells islet regeneration in streptozotocin-induced diabetic baboons using ultrasound-targeted microbubble gene therapy with cyclinD2/CDK4/GLP1 
Cell Cycle  2014;13(7):1145-1151.
Both major forms of diabetes mellitus (DM) involve β-cell destruction and dysfunction. New treatment strategies have focused on replenishing the deficiency of β-cell mass common to both major forms of diabetes by islet transplantation or β-cell regeneration. The pancreas, not the liver, is the ideal organ for islet regeneration, because it is the natural milieu for islets. Since islet mass is known to increase during obesity and pregnancy, the concept of stimulating pancreatic islet regeneration in vivo is both rational and physiologic. This paper proposes a novel approach in which non-viral gene therapy is targeted to pancreatic islets using ultrasound targeted microbubble destruction (UTMD) in a non-human primate model (NHP), the baboon. Treated baboons received a gene cocktail comprised of cyclinD2, CDK, and GLP1, which in rats results in robust and durable islet regeneration with normalization of blood glucose, insulin, and C-peptide levels. We were able to generate important preliminary data indicating that gene therapy by UTMD can achieve in vivo normalization of the intravenous (IV) glucose tolerance test (IVGTT) curves in STZ hyperglycemic-induced conscious tethered baboons. Immunohistochemistry clearly demonstrated evidence of islet regeneration and restoration of β-cell mass.
doi:10.4161/cc.27997
PMCID: PMC4013164  PMID: 24553120
cell cycle regulation; GLP-1; CyclinD2; CDK4; gene therapy; insulin gene promoter; proliferation; differentiation; islets regeneration; diabetes; baboons; nonhuman primates
7.  Transcriptomic Identification of ADH1B as a Novel Candidate Gene for Obesity and Insulin Resistance in Human Adipose Tissue in Mexican Americans from the Veterans Administration Genetic Epidemiology Study (VAGES) 
PLoS ONE  2015;10(4):e0119941.
Type 2 diabetes (T2D) is a complex metabolic disease that is more prevalent in ethnic groups such as Mexican Americans, and is strongly associated with the risk factors obesity and insulin resistance. The goal of this study was to perform whole genome gene expression profiling in adipose tissue to detect common patterns of gene regulation associated with obesity and insulin resistance. We used phenotypic and genotypic data from 308 Mexican American participants from the Veterans Administration Genetic Epidemiology Study (VAGES). Basal fasting RNA was extracted from adipose tissue biopsies from a subset of 75 unrelated individuals, and gene expression data generated on the Illumina BeadArray platform. The number of gene probes with significant expression above baseline was approximately 31,000. We performed multiple regression analysis of all probes with 15 metabolic traits. Adipose tissue had 3,012 genes significantly associated with the traits of interest (false discovery rate, FDR ≤ 0.05). The significance of gene expression changes was used to select 52 genes with significant (FDR ≤ 10-4) gene expression changes across multiple traits. Gene sets/Pathways analysis identified one gene, alcohol dehydrogenase 1B (ADH1B) that was significantly enriched (P < 10-60) as a prime candidate for involvement in multiple relevant metabolic pathways. Illumina BeadChip derived ADH1B expression data was consistent with quantitative real time PCR data. We observed significant inverse correlations with waist circumference (2.8 x 10-9), BMI (5.4 x 10-6), and fasting plasma insulin (P < 0.001). These findings are consistent with a central role for ADH1B in obesity and insulin resistance and provide evidence for a novel genetic regulatory mechanism for human metabolic diseases related to these traits.
doi:10.1371/journal.pone.0119941
PMCID: PMC4382323  PMID: 25830378
8.  Genetic Disruption of SOD1 Gene Causes Glucose Intolerance and Impairs β-Cell Function 
Diabetes  2013;62(12):4201-4207.
Oxidative stress has been associated with insulin resistance and type 2 diabetes. However, it is not clear whether oxidative damage is a cause or a consequence of the metabolic abnormalities present in diabetic subjects. The goal of this study was to determine whether inducing oxidative damage through genetic ablation of superoxide dismutase 1 (SOD1) leads to abnormalities in glucose homeostasis. We studied SOD1-null mice and wild-type (WT) littermates. Glucose tolerance was evaluated with intraperitoneal glucose tolerance tests. Peripheral and hepatic insulin sensitivity was quantitated with the euglycemic-hyperinsulinemic clamp. β-Cell function was determined with the hyperglycemic clamp and morphometric analysis of pancreatic islets. Genetic ablation of SOD1 caused glucose intolerance, which was associated with reduced in vivo β-cell insulin secretion and decreased β-cell volume. Peripheral and hepatic insulin sensitivity were not significantly altered in SOD1-null mice. High-fat diet caused glucose intolerance in WT mice but did not further worsen the glucose intolerance observed in standard chow–fed SOD1-null mice. Our findings suggest that oxidative stress per se does not play a major role in the pathogenesis of insulin resistance and demonstrate that oxidative stress caused by SOD1 ablation leads to glucose intolerance secondary to β-cell dysfunction.
doi:10.2337/db13-0314
PMCID: PMC3837066  PMID: 24009256
9.  The mechanisms of genome-wide target gene regulation by TCF7L2 in liver cells 
Nucleic Acids Research  2014;42(22):13646-13661.
In the liver Wnt-signaling contributes to the metabolic fate of hepatocytes, but the precise role of the TCF7L2 in this process is unknown. We employed a temporal RNA-Seq approach to examine gene expression 3–96 h following Tcf7l2 silencing in rat hepatoma cells, and combined this with ChIP-Seq to investigate mechanisms of target gene regulation by TCF7L2. Silencing Tcf7l2 led to a time-dependent appearance of 406 differentially expressed genes (DEGs), including key regulators of cellular growth and differentiation, and amino acid, lipid and glucose metabolism. Direct regulation of 149 DEGs was suggested by strong proximal TCF7L2 binding (peak proximity score > 10) and early mRNA expression changes (≤18 h). Indirect gene regulation by TCF7L2 likely occurred via alternate transcription factors, including Hnf4a, Foxo1, Cited2, Myc and Lef1, which were differentially expressed following Tcf7l2 knock-down. Tcf7l2-silencing enhanced the expression and chromatin occupancy of HNF4α, and co-siRNA experiments revealed that HNF4α was required for the regulation of a subset of metabolic genes by TCF7L2, particularly those involved in lipid and amino-acid metabolism. Our findings suggest TCF7L2 is an important regulator of the hepatic phenotype, and highlight novel mechanisms of gene regulation by TCF7L2 that involve interplay between multiple hepatic transcriptional pathways.
doi:10.1093/nar/gku1225
PMCID: PMC4267646  PMID: 25414334
10.  Prediction of Diabetes Based on Baseline Metabolic Characteristics in Individuals at High Risk 
Diabetes Care  2013;36(11):3607-3612.
OBJECTIVE
Individuals with impaired glucose tolerance (IGT) are at high risk for developing type 2 diabetes mellitus (T2DM). We examined which characteristics at baseline predicted the development of T2DM versus maintenance of IGT or conversion to normal glucose tolerance.
RESEARCH DESIGN AND METHODS
We studied 228 subjects at high risk with IGT who received treatment with placebo in ACT NOW and who underwent baseline anthropometric measures and oral glucose tolerance test (OGTT) at baseline and after a mean follow-up of 2.4 years.
RESULTS
In a univariate analysis, 45 of 228 (19.7%) IGT individuals developed diabetes. After adjusting for age, sex, and center, increased fasting plasma glucose, 2-h plasma glucose, ∆G0–120 during OGTT, HbA1c, adipocyte insulin resistance index, ln fasting plasma insulin, and ln ∆I0–120, as well as family history of diabetes and presence of metabolic syndrome, were associated with increased risk of diabetes. At baseline, higher insulin secretion (ln [∆I0–120/∆G0–120]) during the OGTT was associated with decreased risk of diabetes. Higher β-cell function (insulin secretion/insulin resistance or disposition index; ln [∆I0–120/∆G0–120 × Matsuda index of insulin sensitivity]; odds ratio 0.11; P < 0.0001) was the variable most closely associated with reduced risk of diabetes.
CONCLUSIONS
In a stepwise multiple-variable analysis, only HbA1c and β-cell function (ln insulin secretion/insulin resistance index) predicted the development of diabetes (r = 0.49; P < 0.0001).
doi:10.2337/dc13-0520
PMCID: PMC3816921  PMID: 24062330
11.  Prevention of Diabetes With Pioglitazone in ACT NOW 
Diabetes  2013;62(11):3920-3926.
We examined the metabolic characteristics that attend the development of type 2 diabetes (T2DM) in 441 impaired glucose tolerance (IGT) subjects who participated in the ACT NOW Study and had complete end-of-study metabolic measurements. Subjects were randomized to receive pioglitazone (PGZ; 45 mg/day) or placebo and were observed for a median of 2.4 years. Indices of insulin sensitivity (Matsuda index [MI]), insulin secretion (IS)/insulin resistance (IR; ΔI0–120/ΔG0–120, ΔIS rate [ISR]0–120/ΔG0–120), and β-cell function (ΔI/ΔG × MI and ΔISR/ΔG × MI) were calculated from plasma glucose, insulin, and C-peptide concentrations during oral glucose tolerance tests at baseline and study end. Diabetes developed in 45 placebo-treated vs. 15 PGZ-treated subjects (odds ratio [OR] 0.28 [95% CI 0.15–0.49]; P < 0.0001); 48% of PGZ-treated subjects reverted to normal glucose tolerance (NGT) versus 28% of placebo-treated subjects (P < 0.005). Higher final glucose tolerance status (NGT > IGT > T2DM) was associated with improvements in insulin sensitivity (OR 0.61 [95% CI 0.54–0.80]), IS (OR 0.61 [95% CI 0.50–0.75]), and β-cell function (ln IS/IR index and ln ISR/IR index) (OR 0.26 [95% CI 0.19–0.37]; all P < 0.0001). Of the factors measured, improved β-cell function was most closely associated with final glucose tolerance status.
doi:10.2337/db13-0265
PMCID: PMC3806596  PMID: 23863810
12.  Novel Hypothesis to Explain Why SGLT2 Inhibitors Inhibit Only 30–50% of Filtered Glucose Load in Humans 
Diabetes  2013;62(10):3324-3328.
Inhibitors of sodium-glucose cotransporter 2 (SGLT2) are a novel class of antidiabetes drugs, and members of this class are under various stages of clinical development for the management of type 2 diabetes mellitus (T2DM). It is widely accepted that SGLT2 is responsible for >80% of the reabsorption of the renal filtered glucose load. However, maximal doses of SGLT2 inhibitors fail to inhibit >50% of the filtered glucose load. Because the clinical efficacy of this group of drugs is entirely dependent on the amount of glucosuria produced, it is important to understand why SGLT2 inhibitors inhibit <50% of the filtered glucose load. In this Perspective, we provide a novel hypothesis that explains this apparent puzzle and discuss some of the clinical implications inherent in this hypothesis.
doi:10.2337/db13-0604
PMCID: PMC3781482  PMID: 24065789
13.  Characterization of Renal Glucose Reabsorption in Response to Dapagliflozin in Healthy Subjects and Subjects With Type 2 Diabetes 
Diabetes Care  2013;36(10):3169-3176.
OBJECTIVE
To examine the effect of dapagliflozin, a sodium-glucose cotransporter 2 (SGLT2) inhibitor, on the major components of renal glucose reabsorption (decreased maximum renal glucose reabsorptive capacity [TmG], increased splay, and reduced threshold), using the pancreatic/stepped hyperglycemic clamp (SHC) technique.
RESEARCH DESIGN AND METHODS
Subjects with type 2 diabetes (n = 12) and matched healthy subjects (n = 12) underwent pancreatic/SHC (plasma glucose range 5.5–30.5 mmol/L) at baseline and after 7 days of dapagliflozin treatment. A pharmacodynamic model was developed to describe the major components of renal glucose reabsorption for both groups and then used to estimate these parameters from individual glucose titration curves.
RESULTS
At baseline, type 2 diabetic subjects had elevated TmG, splay, and threshold compared with controls. Dapagliflozin treatment reduced the TmG and splay in both groups. However, the most significant effect of dapagliflozin was a reduction of the renal threshold for glucose excretion in type 2 diabetic and control subjects.
CONCLUSIONS
The SGLT2 inhibitor dapagliflozin improves glycemic control in diabetic patients by reducing the TmG and threshold at which glucose is excreted in the urine.
doi:10.2337/dc13-0387
PMCID: PMC3781504  PMID: 23735727
14.  Linkage of Type 2 Diabetes on Chromosome 9p24 in Mexican Americans: Additional Evidence from the Veterans Administration Genetic Epidemiology Study (VAGES) 
Human heredity  2013;76(1):36-46.
Objective
Type 2 diabetes (T2DM) is a complex metabolic disease and is more prevalent in certain ethnic groups such as the Mexican Americans. The goal of our study was to perform a genome-wide linkage analysis to localize T2DM susceptibility loci in Mexican Americans.
Methods
We used the phenotypic and genotypic data from 1,122 Mexican American individuals (307 families) who participated in the Veterans Administration Genetic Epidemiology Study (VAGES). Genome-wide linkage analysis was performed, using the variance components approach. Data from two additional Mexican American family studies, the San Antonio Family Heart Study (SAFHS) and the San Antonio Family Diabetes/Gallbladder Study (SAFDGS), were combined with the VAGES data to test for improved linkage evidence.
Results
After adjusting for covariate effects, T2DM was found to be under significant genetic influences (h2 = 0.62, P = 2.7 × 10−6). The strongest evidence for linkage of T2DM occurred between markers D9S1871 and D9S2169 on chromosome 9p24.2-p24.1 (LOD = 1.8). Given that we previously reported suggestive evidence for linkage of T2DM at this region in SAFDGS also, we found the significant and increased linkage evidence (LOD = 4.3, empirical P = 1.0 × 10−5, genome-wide P = 1.6 × 10−3) for T2DM at the same chromosomal region when we performed genome-wide linkage analysis of the VAGES data combined with SAFHS and SAFDGS data.
Conclusion
Significant T2DM linkage evidence was found on chromosome 9p24 in Mexican Americans. Importantly, the chromosomal region of interest in this study overlaps with several recent genome-wide association studies (GWASs) involving T2DM related traits. Given its overlap with such findings and our own initial T2DM association findings in the 9p24 chromosomal region, high throughput sequencing of the linked chromosomal region could identify the potential causal T2DM genes.
doi:10.1159/000354849
PMCID: PMC3919448  PMID: 24060607
Type 2 diabetes; Linkage; Chromosome 9p24; Mexican Americans; VAGES
15.  Genetic epidemiology of cardiometabolic risk ractors and their clustering patterns in Mexican American children and adolescents: The SAFARI Study 
Human genetics  2013;132(9):10.1007/s00439-013-1315-2.
Pediatric metabolic syndrome (MS) and its cardiometabolic components (MSCs) have become increasingly prevalent, yet little is known about the genetics underlying MS risk in children. We examined the prevalence and genetics of MS-related traits among 670 non-diabetic Mexican American (MA) children and adolescents, aged 6–17 years (49 % female), who were participants in the San Antonio Family Assessment of Metabolic Risk Indicators in Youth (SAFARI) study. These children are offspring or biological relatives of adult participants from three well-established Mexican American family studies in San Antonio, Texas, at increased risk of type 2 diabetes. MS was defined as ≥ 3 abnormalities among 6 MSC measures: waist circumference, systolic and/or diastolic blood pressure, fasting insulin, triglycerides, HDL-cholesterol, and fasting and/or 2-h OGTT glucose. Genetic analyses of MS, number of MSCs (MSC-N), MS factors, and bivariate MS traits were performed. Overweight/obesity (53 %), pre-diabetes (13 %), acanthosis nigricans (33 %), and MS (19 %) were strikingly prevalent, as were MS components, including abdominal adiposity (32 %) and low HDL-cholesterol (32 %). Factor analysis of MS traits yielded three constructs: adipo-insulin-lipid, blood pressure, and glucose factors, and their factor scores were highly heritable. MS itself exhibited 68 % heritability. MSC-N showed strong positive genetic correlations with obesity, insulin resistance, inflammation, and acanthosis nigricans, and negative genetic correlation with physical fitness. MS trait pairs exhibited strong genetic and/or environmental correlations. These findings highlight the complex genetic architecture of MS/MSCs in MA children, and underscore the need for early screening and intervention to prevent chronic sequelae in this vulnerable pediatric population.
doi:10.1007/s00439-013-1315-2
PMCID: PMC3845827  PMID: 23736306
16.  Mechanisms of Glucose Lowering of Dipeptidyl Peptidase-4 Inhibitor Sitagliptin When Used Alone or With Metformin in Type 2 Diabetes 
Diabetes Care  2013;36(9):2756-2762.
OBJECTIVE
To assess glucose-lowering mechanisms of sitagliptin (S), metformin (M), and the two combined (M+S).
RESEARCH DESIGN AND METHODS
We randomized 16 patients with type 2 diabetes mellitus (T2DM) to four 6-week treatments with placebo (P), M, S, and M+S. After each period, subjects received a 6-h meal tolerance test (MTT) with [14C]glucose to calculate glucose kinetics. Fasting plasma glucose (FPG), fasting plasma insulin, C-peptide (insulin secretory rate [ISR]), fasting plasma glucagon, and bioactive glucagon-like peptide (GLP-1) and gastrointestinal insulinotropic peptide (GIP) were measured.
RESULTS
FPG decreased from P, 160 ± 4 to M, 150 ± 4; S, 154 ± 4; and M+S, 125 ± 3 mg/dL. Mean post-MTT plasma glucose decreased from P, 207 ± 5 to M, 191 ± 4; S, 195 ± 4; and M+S, 161 ± 3 mg/dL (P < 0.01). The increase in mean post-MTT plasma insulin and in ISR was similar in P, M, and S and slightly greater in M+S. Fasting plasma glucagon was equal (∼65–75 pg/mL) with all treatments, but there was a significant drop during the initial 120 min with S 24% and M+S 34% (both P < 0.05) vs. P 17% and M 16%. Fasting and mean post-MTT plasma bioactive GLP-1 were higher (P < 0.01) after S and M+S vs. M and P. Basal endogenous glucose production (EGP) fell from P 2.0 ± 0.1 to S 1.8 ± 0.1 mg/kg ⋅ min, M 1.8 ± 0.2 mg/kg ⋅ min (both P < 0.05 vs. P), and M+S 1.5 ± 0.1 mg/kg ⋅ min (P < 0.01 vs. P). Although the EGP slope of decline was faster in M and M+S vs. S, all had comparable greater post-MTT EGP inhibition vs. P (P < 0.05).
CONCLUSIONS
M+S combined produce additive effects to 1) reduce FPG and postmeal plasma glucose, 2) augment GLP-1 secretion and β-cell function, 3) decrease plasma glucagon, and 4) inhibit fasting and postmeal EGP compared with M or S monotherapy.
doi:10.2337/dc12-2072
PMCID: PMC3747902  PMID: 23579178
17.  Pathophysiologic Approach to Therapy in Patients With Newly Diagnosed Type 2 Diabetes 
Diabetes Care  2013;36(Suppl 2):S127-S138.
doi:10.2337/dcS13-2011
PMCID: PMC3920797  PMID: 23882037
18.  In Vivo Actions of Peroxisome Proliferator–Activated Receptors 
Diabetes Care  2013;36(Suppl 2):S162-S174.
doi:10.2337/dcS13-2003
PMCID: PMC3920780  PMID: 23882042
19.  Is Incretin-Based Therapy Ready for the Care of Hospitalized Patients With Type 2 Diabetes? 
Diabetes Care  2013;36(7):2107-2111.
Significant data suggest that overt hyperglycemia, either observed with or without a prior diagnosis of diabetes, contributes to an increase in mortality and morbidity in hospitalized patients. In this regard, goal-directed insulin therapy has remained as the standard of care for achieving and maintaining glycemic control in hospitalized patients with critical and noncritical illness. As such, protocols to assist in the management of hyperglycemia in the inpatient setting have become commonplace in hospital settings. Clearly, insulin is a known entity, has been in clinical use for almost a century, and is effective. However, there are limitations to its use. Based on the observed mechanisms of action and efficacy, there has been a great interest in using incretin-based therapy with glucagon-like peptide-1 (GLP-1) receptor agonists instead of, or complementary to, an insulin-based approach to improve glycemic control in hospitalized, severely ill diabetic patients. To provide an understanding of both sides of the argument, we provide a discussion of this topic as part of this two-part point-counterpoint narrative. In this point narrative as presented below, Drs. Schwartz and DeFronzo provide an opinion that now is the time to consider GLP-1 receptor agonists as a logical consideration for inpatient glycemic control. It is important to note the recommendations they propose under “incretin-based approach” with these agents represent their opinion for use and, as they point out, well-designed prospective studies comparing these agents with insulin will be required to establish their efficacy and safety. In the counterpoint narrative following Drs. Schwartz and DeFronzo’s contribution, Drs. Umpierrez and Korytkowski provide a defense of insulin in the inpatient setting as the unquestioned gold standard for glycemic management in hospitalized settings.
—William T. Cefalu
Editor in Chief, Diabetes Care
doi:10.2337/dc12-2060
PMCID: PMC3687277  PMID: 23801800
20.  Personalized Management of Hyperglycemia in Type 2 Diabetes 
Diabetes Care  2013;36(6):1779-1788.
In June 2012, 13 thought leaders convened in a Diabetes Care Editors’ Expert Forum to discuss the concept of personalized medicine in the wake of a recently published American Diabetes Association/European Association for the Study of Diabetes position statement calling for a patient-centered approach to hyperglycemia management in type 2 diabetes. This article, an outgrowth of that forum, offers a clinical translation of the underlying issues that need to be considered for effectively personalizing diabetes care. The medical management of type 2 diabetes has become increasingly complex, and its complications remain a great burden to individual patients and the larger society. The burgeoning armamentarium of pharmacological agents for hyperglycemia management should aid clinicians in providing early treatment to delay or prevent these complications. However, trial evidence is limited for the optimal use of these agents, especially in dual or triple combinations. In the distant future, genotyping and testing for metabolomic markers may help us to better phenotype patients and predict their responses to antihyperglycemic drugs. For now, a personalized (“n of 1”) approach in which drugs are tested in a trial-and-error manner in each patient may be the most practical strategy for achieving therapeutic targets. Patient-centered care and standardized algorithmic management are conflicting approaches, but they can be made more compatible by recognizing instances in which personalized A1C targets are warranted and clinical circumstances that may call for comanagement by primary care and specialty clinicians.
doi:10.2337/dc13-0512
PMCID: PMC3661796  PMID: 23704680
22.  IMPACT OF OBESITY SEVERITY AND DURATION ON PANCREATIC β-AND α-CELLS DYNAMICS IN NORMOGLYCEMIC NON-HUMAN PRIMATES 
Objective
Obesity is associated to high insulin and glucagon plasma levels. Enhanced β–cell function and β–cell expansion are responsible for insulin hypersecretion. It is unknown whether hyperglucagonemia is due to α-cell hypersecretion or to an increase in α-cell mass. In this study, we investigated the dynamics of the β-cell and α-cell function and mass in pancreas of obese normoglycemic baboons.
Methods
Pancreatic β- and α-cell volumes were measured in 51 normoglycemic baboons divided into 6 groups according to overweight severity or duration. Islets morphometric parameters were correlated to overweight and to diverse metabolic and laboratory parameters.
Results
Relative α-cell volume (RαV) and relative islet α-cell volume (RIαV) increased significantly with both overweight duration and severity. Conversely, in spite of the induction of insulin resistance, overweight produced only modest effects on relative β-cell volume (RβV) and relative islet β-cell volume (RIβV). Of note, RIβV did not increase neither with overweight duration nor with overweight severity, supposedly because of the concomitant, greater, increase in RIαV. Baboons' body weights correlated with serum levels of Interleukin-6 and Tumour Necrosis Factor-α soluble Receptors (IL-6sR and sTNF-R1), demonstrating that overweight induces abnormal activation of the signaling of two cytokines known to impact differently β- and α-cell viability and replication.
Conclusion
In conclusion, overweight and insulin resistance induce in baboons a significant increase in α-cell volumes (RαV, RIαV) while have minimal effects on the β-cells. This study suggests that an increase in the α-cell mass may precede the loss of β-cells and the transition to overt hyperglycemia and diabetes.
doi:10.1038/ijo.2012.205
PMCID: PMC3906680  PMID: 23229736
Obesity duration; obesity severity; α-cell volume; β-cells volume; pancreatic islet remodelling; insulin resistance
23.  Pioglitazone slows progression of atherosclerosis in prediabetes independent of changes in cardiovascular risk factors 
Objective
To determine whether changes in standard and novel risk factors during the ACT NOW trial explained the slower rate of CIMT progression with pioglitazone treatment in persons with prediabetes.
Methods and Results
CIMT was measured in 382 participants at the beginning and up to three additional times during follow-up of the ACT NOW trial. During an average follow-up of 2.3 years, the mean unadjusted annual rate of CIMT progression was significantly (P=0.01) lower with pioglitazone treatment (4.76 × 10−3 mm/year, 95% CI, 2.39 × 10−3 – 7.14 × 10−3 mm/year) compared with placebo (9.69 × 10−3 mm/year, 95% CI, 7.24 × 10−3 – 12.15 × 10−3 mm/year). High-density lipoprotein cholesterol, fasting and 2-hour glucose, HbA1c, fasting insulin, Matsuda insulin sensitivity index, adiponectin and plasminogen activator inhibitor-1 levels improved significantly with pioglitazone treatment compared with placebo (P < 0.001). However, the effect of pioglitazone on CIMT progression was not attenuated by multiple methods of adjustment for traditional, metabolic and inflammatory risk factors and concomitant medications, and was independent of changes in risk factors during pioglitazone treatment.
Conclusions
Pioglitazone slowed progression of CIMT, independent of improvement in hyperglycemia, insulin resistance, dyslipidemia and systemic inflammation in prediabetes. These results suggest a possible direct vascular benefit of pioglitazone.
doi:10.1161/ATVBAHA.112.300346
PMCID: PMC3908828  PMID: 23175674
Carotid atherosclerosis progression; Impaired glucose tolerance; Insulin resistance; Inflammation; Pioglitazone
24.  Dapagliflozin improves muscle insulin sensitivity but enhances endogenous glucose production 
Chronic hyperglycemia impairs insulin action, resulting in glucotoxicity, which can be ameliorated in animal models by inducing glucosuria with renal glucose transport inhibitors. Here, we examined whether reduction of plasma glucose with a sodium-glucose cotransporter 2 (SGLT2) inhibitor could improve insulin-mediated tissue glucose disposal in patients with type 2 diabetes. Eighteen diabetic men were randomized to receive either dapagliflozin (n = 12) or placebo (n = 6) for 2 weeks. We measured insulin-mediated whole body glucose uptake and endogenous glucose production (EGP) at baseline and 2 weeks after treatment using the euglycemic hyperinsulinemic clamp technique. Dapagliflozin treatment induced glucosuria and markedly lowered fasting plasma glucose. Insulin-mediated tissue glucose disposal increased by approximately 18% after 2 weeks of dapagliflozin treatment, while placebo-treated subjects had no change in insulin sensitivity. Surprisingly, following dapagliflozin treatment, EGP increased substantially and was accompanied by an increase in fasting plasma glucagon concentration. Together, our data indicate that reduction of plasma glucose with an agent that works specifically on the kidney to induce glucosuria improves muscle insulin sensitivity. However, glucosuria induction following SGLT2 inhibition is associated with a paradoxical increase in EGP. These results provide support for the glucotoxicity hypothesis, which suggests that chronic hyperglycemia impairs insulin action in individuals with type 2 diabetes.
doi:10.1172/JCI70704
PMCID: PMC3904617  PMID: 24463448
25.  Disruption of Growth Factor Receptor–Binding Protein 10 in the Pancreas Enhances β-Cell Proliferation and Protects Mice From Streptozotocin-Induced β-Cell Apoptosis 
Diabetes  2012;61(12):3189-3198.
Defects in insulin secretion and reduction in β-cell mass are associated with type 2 diabetes in humans, and understanding the basis for these dysfunctions may reveal strategies for diabetes therapy. In this study, we show that pancreas-specific knockout of growth factor receptor–binding protein 10 (Grb10), which is highly expressed in pancreas and islets, leads to elevated insulin/IGF-1 signaling in islets, enhanced β-cell mass and insulin content, and increased insulin secretion in mice. Pancreas-specific disruption of Grb10 expression also improved glucose tolerance in mice fed with a high-fat diet and protected mice from streptozotocin-induced β-cell apoptosis and body weight loss. Our study has identified Grb10 as an important regulator of β-cell proliferation and demonstrated that reducing the expression level of Grb10 could provide a novel means to increase β-cell mass and reduce β-cell apoptosis. This is critical for effective therapeutic treatment of both type 1 and 2 diabetes.
doi:10.2337/db12-0249
PMCID: PMC3501856  PMID: 22923474

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