PMCC PMCC

Search tips
Search criteria

Advanced
Results 1-25 (216)
 

Clipboard (0)
None

Select a Filter Below

Journals
more »
Year of Publication
more »
1.  PTSD Risk Associated with a Functional DRD2 Polymorphism in Heroin Dependent Cases and Controls is Limited to Amphetamine Dependent Individuals 
Addiction biology  2013;19(4):700-707.
Posttraumatic stress disorder (PTSD), a pathologic response to severe stress, is a common comorbid disorder in substance dependent individuals. Evidence from twin studies suggests PTSD is moderately heritable. Genetic association studies to date have reported a limited number of replicated findings. We conducted a candidate gene association study in trauma-exposed individuals within the Comorbidity and Trauma Study’s sample (1343 heroin dependent cases and 406 controls from economically-disadvantaged neighborhoods). After data cleaning, the 1430 SNPs retained for analyses provided coverage of 72 candidate genes and included additional SNPs for which association was previously reported as well as 30 ancestry informative markers. We found a functional DRD2 promoter polymorphism (rs12364283) to be most highly associated with PTSD liability [OR 1.65 (1.27–2.15); p= 1.58 × 10−4]; however, this association was not significant with a stringent Bonferroni correction for multiple comparisons. The top hits include SNPs from other dopaminergic system genes: DRD2 DRD3, TH, and DBH. Additional analyses revealed the association involving rs12364283 is largely limited to amphetamine dependent individuals. Substantial risk is observed in amphetamine dependent individuals with at least one copy of this SNP [OR 2.86 (1.92–4.27); p=2.6 × 10−7]. Further analyses do not support extensive mediation of PTSD risk via self-reported impulsivity (BIS total score). These findings suggest roles for impairment in inhibitory control in the pathophysiology of PTSD and raise questions about stimulant use in certain populations (e.g., those in combat).
doi:10.1111/adb.12062
PMCID: PMC3883923  PMID: 23647975
amphetamine dependence; association study; DRD2; PTSD
2.  Molecular analysis of common polymorphisms within the human Tyrosinase locus and genetic association with pigmentation traits 
Pigment cell & melanoma research  2014;27(4):552-564.
Summary
We have compared the melanogenic activities of cultured melanocytes carrying two common TYR alleles as homozygous 192S-402R wildtype, heterozygous and homozygous variant. This includes assays of TYR protein, DOPAoxidase activity, glycosylation and temperature sensitivity of protein and DOPAoxidase levels. Homozygous wildtype strains on average had higher levels of TYR protein and enzyme activity than other genotypes. Homozygous 402Q/Q melanocytes produced significantly less TYR protein, displayed altered trafficking and glycosylation, with reduced DOPAoxidase. However, near wildtype TYR activity levels could be recovered at lower growth temperature. In a sample population from Southeast Queensland these two polymorphisms were present on four TYR haplotypes, designated as WT 192S-402R, 192Y-402R, 192S-402Q with a double variant 192Y-402Q of low frequency at 1.9%. Based on cell culture findings and haplotype associations, we have used an additive model to assess the penetrance of the ten possible TYR genotypes derived from the combination of these haplotypes.
doi:10.1111/pcmr.12253
PMCID: PMC4119297  PMID: 24739399
Tyrosinase; Pigmentation; Melanocyte; Albinism; Melanin
3.  Genome-wide association analysis identifies 11 risk variants associated with the asthma with hay fever phenotype 
Background
To date, no genome-wide association study (GWAS) has considered the combined phenotype of asthma with hay fever. Previous analyses of family data from the Tasmanian Longitudinal Health Study provide evidence that this phenotype has a stronger genetic cause than asthma without hay fever.
Objective
We sought to perform a GWAS of asthma with hay fever to identify variants associated with having both diseases.
Methods
We performed a meta-analysis of GWASs comparing persons with both physician-diagnosed asthma and hay fever (n = 6,685) with persons with neither disease (n = 14,091).
Results
At genome-wide significance, we identified 11 independent variants associated with the risk of having asthma with hay fever, including 2 associations reaching this level of significance with allergic disease for the first time: ZBTB10 (rs7009110; odds ratio [OR], 1.14; P = 4 × 10−9) and CLEC16A (rs62026376; OR, 1.17; P = 1 × 10−8). The rs62026376:C allele associated with increased asthma with hay fever risk has been found to be associated also with decreased expression of the nearby DEXI gene in monocytes. The 11 variants were associated with the risk of asthma and hay fever separately, but the estimated associations with the individual phenotypes were weaker than with the combined asthma with hay fever phenotype. A variant near LRRC32 was a stronger risk factor for hay fever than for asthma, whereas the reverse was observed for variants in/near GSDMA and TSLP. Single nucleotide polymorphisms with suggestive evidence for association with asthma with hay fever risk included rs41295115 near IL2RA (OR, 1.28; P = 5 × 10−7) and rs76043829 in TNS1 (OR, 1.23; P = 2 × 10−6).
Conclusion
By focusing on the combined phenotype of asthma with hay fever, variants associated with the risk of allergic disease can be identified with greater efficiency.
doi:10.1016/j.jaci.2013.10.030
PMCID: PMC4280183  PMID: 24388013
Rhinitis; atopy; selection; genetic correlation; bivariate; single nucleotide polymorphism
4.  Seasonal Effects on Gene Expression 
PLoS ONE  2015;10(5):e0126995.
Many health conditions, ranging from psychiatric disorders to cardiovascular disease, display notable seasonal variation in severity and onset. In order to understand the molecular processes underlying this phenomenon, we have examined seasonal variation in the transcriptome of 606 healthy individuals. We show that 74 transcripts associated with a 12-month seasonal cycle were enriched for processes involved in DNA repair and binding. An additional 94 transcripts demonstrated significant seasonal variability that was largely influenced by blood cell count levels. These transcripts were enriched for immune function, protein production, and specific cellular markers for lymphocytes. Accordingly, cell counts for erythrocytes, platelets, neutrophils, monocytes, and CD19 cells demonstrated significant association with a 12-month seasonal cycle. These results demonstrate that seasonal variation is an important environmental regulator of gene expression and blood cell composition. Notable changes in leukocyte counts and genes involved in immune function indicate that immune cell physiology varies throughout the year in healthy individuals.
doi:10.1371/journal.pone.0126995
PMCID: PMC4449160  PMID: 26023781
5.  Fine mapping of variants associated with endometriosis in the WNT4 region on chromosome 1p36 
Genome-wide association studies show strong evidence of association with endometriosis for markers on chromosome 1p36 spanning the potential candidate genes WNT4, CDC42 and LINC00339. WNT4 is involved in development of the uterus, and the expression of CDC42 and LINC00339 are altered in women with endometriosis. We conducted fine mapping to examine the role of coding variants in WNT4 and CDC42 and determine the key SNPs with strongest evidence of association in this region. We identified rare coding variants in WNT4 and CDC42 present only in endometriosis cases. The frequencies were low and cannot account for the common signal associated with increased risk of endometriosis. Genotypes for five common SNPs in the region of chromosome 1p36 show stronger association signals when compared with rs7521902 reported in published genome scans. Of these, three SNPs rs12404660, rs3820282, and rs55938609 were located in DNA sequences with potential functional roles including overlap with transcription factor binding sites for FOXA1, FOXA2, ESR1, and ESR2. Functional studies will be required to identify the gene or genes implicated in endometriosis risk.
PMCID: PMC3852639  PMID: 24319535
Endometriosis; WNT4; CDC42; chromosome 1p36; rare variants; common variants
6.  Genetics of skin color variation in Europeans: genome-wide association studies with functional follow-up 
Human Genetics  2015;134(8):823-835.
In the International Visible Trait Genetics (VisiGen) Consortium, we investigated the genetics of human skin color by combining a series of genome-wide association studies (GWAS) in a total of 17,262 Europeans with functional follow-up of discovered loci. Our GWAS provide the first genome-wide significant evidence for chromosome 20q11.22 harboring the ASIP gene being explicitly associated with skin color in Europeans. In addition, genomic loci at 5p13.2 (SLC45A2), 6p25.3 (IRF4), 15q13.1 (HERC2/OCA2), and 16q24.3 (MC1R) were confirmed to be involved in skin coloration in Europeans. In follow-up gene expression and regulation studies of 22 genes in 20q11.22, we highlighted two novel genes EIF2S2 and GSS, serving as competing functional candidates in this region and providing future research lines. A genetically inferred skin color score obtained from the 9 top-associated SNPs from 9 genes in 940 worldwide samples (HGDP-CEPH) showed a clear gradual pattern in Western Eurasians similar to the distribution of physical skin color, suggesting the used 9 SNPs as suitable markers for DNA prediction of skin color in Europeans and neighboring populations, relevant in future forensic and anthropological investigations.
Electronic supplementary material
The online version of this article (doi:10.1007/s00439-015-1559-0) contains supplementary material, which is available to authorized users.
doi:10.1007/s00439-015-1559-0
PMCID: PMC4495261  PMID: 25963972
7.  Genome-wide association study identifies 25 known breast cancer susceptibility loci as risk factors for triple-negative breast cancer 
Purrington, Kristen S. | Slager, Susan | Eccles, Diana | Yannoukakos, Drakoulis | Fasching, Peter A. | Miron, Penelope | Carpenter, Jane | Chang-Claude, Jenny | Martin, Nicholas G. | Montgomery, Grant W. | Kristensen, Vessela | Anton-Culver, Hoda | Goodfellow, Paul | Tapper, William J. | Rafiq, Sajjad | Gerty, Susan M. | Durcan, Lorraine | Konstantopoulou, Irene | Fostira, Florentia | Vratimos, Athanassios | Apostolou, Paraskevi | Konstanta, Irene | Kotoula, Vassiliki | Lakis, Sotiris | Dimopoulos, Meletios A. | Skarlos, Dimosthenis | Pectasides, Dimitrios | Fountzilas, George | Beckmann, Matthias W. | Hein, Alexander | Ruebner, Matthias | Ekici, Arif B. | Hartmann, Arndt | Schulz-Wendtland, Ruediger | Renner, Stefan P. | Janni, Wolfgang | Rack, Brigitte | Scholz, Christoph | Neugebauer, Julia | Andergassen, Ulrich | Lux, Michael P. | Haeberle, Lothar | Clarke, Christine | Pathmanathan, Nirmala | Rudolph, Anja | Flesch-Janys, Dieter | Nickels, Stefan | Olson, Janet E. | Ingle, James N. | Olswold, Curtis | Slettedahl, Seth | Eckel-Passow, Jeanette E. | Anderson, S.Keith | Visscher, Daniel W. | Cafourek, Victoria L. | Sicotte, Hugues | Prodduturi, Naresh | Weiderpass, Elisabete | Bernstein, Leslie | Ziogas, Argyrios | Ivanovich, Jennifer | Giles, Graham G. | Baglietto, Laura | Southey, Melissa | Kosma, Veli-Matti | Fischer, Hans-Peter | Reed, Malcom W.R. | Cross, Simon S. | Deming-Halverson, Sandra | Shrubsole, Martha | Cai, Qiuyin | Shu, Xiao-Ou | Daly, Mary | Weaver, JoEllen | Ross, Eric | Klemp, Jennifer | Sharma, Priyanka | Torres, Diana | Rüdiger, Thomas | Wölfing, Heidrun | Ulmer, Hans-Ulrich | Försti, Asta | Khoury, Thaer | Kumar, Shicha | Pilarski, Robert | Shapiro, Charles L. | Greco, Dario | Heikkilä, Päivi | Aittomäki, Kristiina | Blomqvist, Carl | Irwanto, Astrid | Liu, Jianjun | Pankratz, Vernon Shane | Wang, Xianshu | Severi, Gianluca | Mannermaa, Arto | Easton, Douglas | Hall, Per | Brauch, Hiltrud | Cox, Angela | Zheng, Wei | Godwin, Andrew K. | Hamann, Ute | Ambrosone, Christine | Toland, Amanda Ewart | Nevanlinna, Heli | Vachon, Celine M. | Couch, Fergus J.
Carcinogenesis  2013;35(5):1012-1019.
Summary
In a genome-wide scan, we show that 30 variants in 25 genomic regions are associated with risk of TN breast cancer. Women carrying many of the risk variants may have 4-fold increased risk relative to women with few variants.
Triple-negative (TN) breast cancer is an aggressive subtype of breast cancer associated with a unique set of epidemiologic and genetic risk factors. We conducted a two-stage genome-wide association study of TN breast cancer (stage 1: 1529 TN cases, 3399 controls; stage 2: 2148 cases, 1309 controls) to identify loci that influence TN breast cancer risk. Variants in the 19p13.1 and PTHLH loci showed genome-wide significant associations (P < 5 × 10− 8) in stage 1 and 2 combined. Results also suggested a substantial enrichment of significantly associated variants among the single nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs) analyzed in stage 2. Variants from 25 of 74 known breast cancer susceptibility loci were also associated with risk of TN breast cancer (P < 0.05). Associations with TN breast cancer were confirmed for 10 loci (LGR6, MDM4, CASP8, 2q35, 2p24.1, TERT-rs10069690, ESR1, TOX3, 19p13.1, RALY), and we identified associations with TN breast cancer for 15 additional breast cancer loci (P < 0.05: PEX14, 2q24.1, 2q31.1, ADAM29, EBF1, TCF7L2, 11q13.1, 11q24.3, 12p13.1, PTHLH, NTN4, 12q24, BRCA2, RAD51L1-rs2588809, MKL1). Further, two SNPs independent of previously reported signals in ESR1 [rs12525163 odds ratio (OR) = 1.15, P = 4.9 × 10− 4] and 19p13.1 (rs1864112 OR = 0.84, P = 1.8 × 10− 9) were associated with TN breast cancer. A polygenic risk score (PRS) for TN breast cancer based on known breast cancer risk variants showed a 4-fold difference in risk between the highest and lowest PRS quintiles (OR = 4.03, 95% confidence interval 3.46–4.70, P = 4.8 × 10− 69). This translates to an absolute risk for TN breast cancer ranging from 0.8% to 3.4%, suggesting that genetic variation may be used for TN breast cancer risk prediction.
doi:10.1093/carcin/bgt404
PMCID: PMC4004200  PMID: 24325915
8.  Novel loci affecting iron homeostasis and their effects in individuals at risk for hemochromatosis 
Nature communications  2014;5:4926.
Variation in body iron is associated with or causes diseases, including anaemia and iron overload. Here we analyse genetic association data on biochemical markers of iron status from eleven European-population studies, with replication in eight additional cohorts (total up to 48,972 subjects). We find eleven genome-wide-significant (p < 5 × 10−8) loci, some including known iron-related genes (HFE, SLC40A1, TF, TFR2, TFRC, TMPRSS6) and others novel (ABO, ARNTL, FADS2, NAT2, TEX14). SNPs at ARNTL, TF, and TFR2 affect iron markers in HFE C282Y homozygotes at risk for hemochromatosis. There is substantial overlap between our iron loci and loci affecting erythrocyte and lipid phenotypes. These results will facilitate investigation of the roles of iron in disease.
doi:10.1038/ncomms5926
PMCID: PMC4215164  PMID: 25352340
10.  Testing the role of circadian genes in conferring risk for psychiatric disorders 
Disturbed sleep and disrupted circadian rhythms are a common feature of psychiatric disorders, and many groups have postulated an association between genetic variants in circadian clock genes and psychiatric disorders.
Using summary data from the association analyses of the Psychiatric Genomics Consortia (PGC) for schizophrenia, bipolar disorder and Major Depressive Disorder, we evaluated the evidence that common SNPs in genes encoding components of the molecular clock influence risk to psychiatric disorders. Initially, gene-based and SNP p-values were analysed for 21 core circadian genes. Subsequently, an expanded list of genes linked to control of circadian rhythms was analysed.
After correcting for multiple comparisons, none of the circadian genes were significantly associated with any of the three disorders. Several genes previously implicated in the etiology of psychiatric disorders harboured no SNPs significant at the nominal level of p < 0.05, and none of the the variants identified in candidate studies of clock genes that were included in the PGC datasets were significant after correction for multiple testing. There was no evidence of an enrichment of associations in genes linked to control of circadian rhythms in human cells.
Our results suggest that genes encoding components of the molecular clock are not good candidates for harbouring common variants that increase risk to bipolar disorder, schizophrenia or Major Depressive Disorder.
doi:10.1002/ajmg.b.32230
PMCID: PMC4397914  PMID: 24687905
11.  Common genetic variants influence human subcortical brain structures 
Hibar, Derrek P. | Stein, Jason L. | Renteria, Miguel E. | Arias-Vasquez, Alejandro | Desrivières, Sylvane | Jahanshad, Neda | Toro, Roberto | Wittfeld, Katharina | Abramovic, Lucija | Andersson, Micael | Aribisala, Benjamin S. | Armstrong, Nicola J. | Bernard, Manon | Bohlken, Marc M. | Boks, Marco P. | Bralten, Janita | Brown, Andrew A. | Chakravarty, M. Mallar | Chen, Qiang | Ching, Christopher R. K. | Cuellar-Partida, Gabriel | den Braber, Anouk | Giddaluru, Sudheer | Goldman, Aaron L. | Grimm, Oliver | Guadalupe, Tulio | Hass, Johanna | Woldehawariat, Girma | Holmes, Avram J. | Hoogman, Martine | Janowitz, Deborah | Jia, Tianye | Kim, Sungeun | Klein, Marieke | Kraemer, Bernd | Lee, Phil H. | Olde Loohuis, Loes M. | Luciano, Michelle | Macare, Christine | Mather, Karen A. | Mattheisen, Manuel | Milaneschi, Yuri | Nho, Kwangsik | Papmeyer, Martina | Ramasamy, Adaikalavan | Risacher, Shannon L. | Roiz-Santiañez, Roberto | Rose, Emma J. | Salami, Alireza | Sämann, Philipp G. | Schmaal, Lianne | Schork, Andrew J. | Shin, Jean | Strike, Lachlan T. | Teumer, Alexander | van Donkelaar, Marjolein M. J. | van Eijk, Kristel R. | Walters, Raymond K. | Westlye, Lars T. | Whelan, Christopher D. | Winkler, Anderson M. | Zwiers, Marcel P. | Alhusaini, Saud | Athanasiu, Lavinia | Ehrlich, Stefan | Hakobjan, Marina M. H. | Hartberg, Cecilie B. | Haukvik, Unn K. | Heister, Angelien J. G. A. M. | Hoehn, David | Kasperaviciute, Dalia | Liewald, David C. M. | Lopez, Lorna M. | Makkinje, Remco R. R. | Matarin, Mar | Naber, Marlies A. M. | McKay, D. Reese | Needham, Margaret | Nugent, Allison C. | Pütz, Benno | Royle, Natalie A. | Shen, Li | Sprooten, Emma | Trabzuni, Daniah | van der Marel, Saskia S. L. | van Hulzen, Kimm J. E. | Walton, Esther | Wolf, Christiane | Almasy, Laura | Ames, David | Arepalli, Sampath | Assareh, Amelia A. | Bastin, Mark E. | Brodaty, Henry | Bulayeva, Kazima B. | Carless, Melanie A. | Cichon, Sven | Corvin, Aiden | Curran, Joanne E. | Czisch, Michael | de Zubicaray, Greig I. | Dillman, Allissa | Duggirala, Ravi | Dyer, Thomas D. | Erk, Susanne | Fedko, Iryna O. | Ferrucci, Luigi | Foroud, Tatiana M. | Fox, Peter T. | Fukunaga, Masaki | Gibbs, J. Raphael | Göring, Harald H. H. | Green, Robert C. | Guelfi, Sebastian | Hansell, Narelle K. | Hartman, Catharina A. | Hegenscheid, Katrin | Heinz, Andreas | Hernandez, Dena G. | Heslenfeld, Dirk J. | Hoekstra, Pieter J. | Holsboer, Florian | Homuth, Georg | Hottenga, Jouke-Jan | Ikeda, Masashi | Jack, Clifford R. | Jenkinson, Mark | Johnson, Robert | Kanai, Ryota | Keil, Maria | Kent, Jack W. | Kochunov, Peter | Kwok, John B. | Lawrie, Stephen M. | Liu, Xinmin | Longo, Dan L. | McMahon, Katie L. | Meisenzahl, Eva | Melle, Ingrid | Mohnke, Sebastian | Montgomery, Grant W. | Mostert, Jeanette C. | Mühleisen, Thomas W. | Nalls, Michael A. | Nichols, Thomas E. | Nilsson, Lars G. | Nöthen, Markus M. | Ohi, Kazutaka | Olvera, Rene L. | Perez-Iglesias, Rocio | Pike, G. Bruce | Potkin, Steven G. | Reinvang, Ivar | Reppermund, Simone | Rietschel, Marcella | Romanczuk-Seiferth, Nina | Rosen, Glenn D. | Rujescu, Dan | Schnell, Knut | Schofield, Peter R. | Smith, Colin | Steen, Vidar M. | Sussmann, Jessika E. | Thalamuthu, Anbupalam | Toga, Arthur W. | Traynor, Bryan J. | Troncoso, Juan | Turner, Jessica A. | Valdés Hernández, Maria C. | van ’t Ent, Dennis | van der Brug, Marcel | van der Wee, Nic J. A. | van Tol, Marie-Jose | Veltman, Dick J. | Wassink, Thomas H. | Westman, Eric | Zielke, Ronald H. | Zonderman, Alan B. | Ashbrook, David G. | Hager, Reinmar | Lu, Lu | McMahon, Francis J. | Morris, Derek W. | Williams, Robert W. | Brunner, Han G. | Buckner, Randy L. | Buitelaar, Jan K. | Cahn, Wiepke | Calhoun, Vince D. | Cavalleri, Gianpiero L. | Crespo-Facorro, Benedicto | Dale, Anders M. | Davies, Gareth E. | Delanty, Norman | Depondt, Chantal | Djurovic, Srdjan | Drevets, Wayne C. | Espeseth, Thomas | Gollub, Randy L. | Ho, Beng-Choon | Hoffmann, Wolfgang | Hosten, Norbert | Kahn, René S. | Le Hellard, Stephanie | Meyer-Lindenberg, Andreas | Müller-Myhsok, Bertram | Nauck, Matthias | Nyberg, Lars | Pandolfo, Massimo | Penninx, Brenda W. J. H. | Roffman, Joshua L. | Sisodiya, Sanjay M. | Smoller, Jordan W. | van Bokhoven, Hans | van Haren, Neeltje E. M. | Völzke, Henry | Walter, Henrik | Weiner, Michael W. | Wen, Wei | White, Tonya | Agartz, Ingrid | Andreassen, Ole A. | Blangero, John | Boomsma, Dorret I. | Brouwer, Rachel M. | Cannon, Dara M. | Cookson, Mark R. | de Geus, Eco J. C. | Deary, Ian J. | Donohoe, Gary | Fernández, Guillén | Fisher, Simon E. | Francks, Clyde | Glahn, David C. | Grabe, Hans J. | Gruber, Oliver | Hardy, John | Hashimoto, Ryota | Hulshoff Pol, Hilleke E. | Jönsson, Erik G. | Kloszewska, Iwona | Lovestone, Simon | Mattay, Venkata S. | Mecocci, Patrizia | McDonald, Colm | McIntosh, Andrew M. | Ophoff, Roel A. | Paus, Tomas | Pausova, Zdenka | Ryten, Mina | Sachdev, Perminder S. | Saykin, Andrew J. | Simmons, Andy | Singleton, Andrew | Soininen, Hilkka | Wardlaw, Joanna M. | Weale, Michael E. | Weinberger, Daniel R. | Adams, Hieab H. H. | Launer, Lenore J. | Seiler, Stephan | Schmidt, Reinhold | Chauhan, Ganesh | Satizabal, Claudia L. | Becker, James T. | Yanek, Lisa | van der Lee, Sven J. | Ebling, Maritza | Fischl, Bruce | Longstreth, W. T. | Greve, Douglas | Schmidt, Helena | Nyquist, Paul | Vinke, Louis N. | van Duijn, Cornelia M. | Xue, Luting | Mazoyer, Bernard | Bis, Joshua C. | Gudnason, Vilmundur | Seshadri, Sudha | Ikram, M. Arfan | Martin, Nicholas G. | Wright, Margaret J. | Schumann, Gunter | Franke, Barbara | Thompson, Paul M. | Medland, Sarah E.
Nature  2015;520(7546):224-229.
The highly complex structure of the human brain is strongly shaped by genetic influences1. Subcortical brain regions form circuits with cortical areas to coordinate movement2, learning, memory3 and motivation4, and altered circuits can lead to abnormal behaviour and disease2. To investigate how common genetic variants affect the structure of these brain regions, here we conduct genome-wide association studies of the volumes of seven subcortical regions and the intracranial volume derived from magnetic resonance images of 30,717 individuals from 50 cohorts. We identify five novel genetic variants influencing the volumes of the putamen and caudate nucleus. We also find stronger evidence for three loci with previously established influences on hippocampal volume5 and intracranial volume6. These variants show specific volumetric effects on brain structures rather than global effects across structures. The strongest effects were found for the putamen, where a novel intergenic locus with replicable influence on volume (rs945270; P = 1.08 × 10−33; 0.52% variance explained) showed evidence of altering the expression of the KTN1 gene in both brain and blood tissue. Variants influencing putamen volume clustered near developmental genes that regulate apoptosis, axon guidance and vesicle transport. Identification of these genetic variants provides insight into the causes of variability inhuman brain development, and may help to determine mechanisms of neuropsychiatric dysfunction.
doi:10.1038/nature14101
PMCID: PMC4393366  PMID: 25607358
12.  Genetic Basis of a Cognitive Complexity Metric 
PLoS ONE  2015;10(4):e0123886.
Relational complexity (RC) is a metric reflecting capacity limitation in relational processing. It plays a crucial role in higher cognitive processes and is an endophenotype for several disorders. However, the genetic underpinnings of complex relational processing have not been investigated. Using the classical twin model, we estimated the heritability of RC and genetic overlap with intelligence (IQ), reasoning, and working memory in a twin and sibling sample aged 15-29 years (N = 787). Further, in an exploratory search for genetic loci contributing to RC, we examined associated genetic markers and genes in our Discovery sample and selected loci for replication in four independent samples (ALSPAC, LBC1936, NTR, NCNG), followed by meta-analysis (N>6500) at the single marker level. Twin modelling showed RC is highly heritable (67%), has considerable genetic overlap with IQ (59%), and is a major component of genetic covariation between reasoning and working memory (72%). At the molecular level, we found preliminary support for four single-marker loci (one in the gene DGKB), and at a gene-based level for the NPS gene, having influence on cognition. These results indicate that genetic sources influencing relational processing are a key component of the genetic architecture of broader cognitive abilities. Further, they suggest a genetic cascade, whereby genetic factors influencing capacity limitation in relational processing have a flow-on effect to more complex cognitive traits, including reasoning and working memory, and ultimately, IQ.
doi:10.1371/journal.pone.0123886
PMCID: PMC4393228  PMID: 25860228
13.  Parent-of-origin specific allelic associations among 106 genomic loci for age at menarche 
Perry, John RB | Day, Felix | Elks, Cathy E | Sulem, Patrick | Thompson, Deborah J | Ferreira, Teresa | He, Chunyan | Chasman, Daniel I | Esko, Tõnu | Thorleifsson, Gudmar | Albrecht, Eva | Ang, Wei Q | Corre, Tanguy | Cousminer, Diana L | Feenstra, Bjarke | Franceschini, Nora | Ganna, Andrea | Johnson, Andrew D | Kjellqvist, Sanela | Lunetta, Kathryn L | McMahon, George | Nolte, Ilja M | Paternoster, Lavinia | Porcu, Eleonora | Smith, Albert V | Stolk, Lisette | Teumer, Alexander | Tšernikova, Natalia | Tikkanen, Emmi | Ulivi, Sheila | Wagner, Erin K | Amin, Najaf | Bierut, Laura J | Byrne, Enda M | Hottenga, Jouke-Jan | Koller, Daniel L | Mangino, Massimo | Pers, Tune H | Yerges-Armstrong, Laura M | Zhao, Jing Hua | Andrulis, Irene L | Anton-Culver, Hoda | Atsma, Femke | Bandinelli, Stefania | Beckmann, Matthias W | Benitez, Javier | Blomqvist, Carl | Bojesen, Stig E | Bolla, Manjeet K | Bonanni, Bernardo | Brauch, Hiltrud | Brenner, Hermann | Buring, Julie E | Chang-Claude, Jenny | Chanock, Stephen | Chen, Jinhui | Chenevix-Trench, Georgia | Collée, J. Margriet | Couch, Fergus J | Couper, David | Coveillo, Andrea D | Cox, Angela | Czene, Kamila | D’adamo, Adamo Pio | Smith, George Davey | De Vivo, Immaculata | Demerath, Ellen W | Dennis, Joe | Devilee, Peter | Dieffenbach, Aida K | Dunning, Alison M | Eiriksdottir, Gudny | Eriksson, Johan G | Fasching, Peter A | Ferrucci, Luigi | Flesch-Janys, Dieter | Flyger, Henrik | Foroud, Tatiana | Franke, Lude | Garcia, Melissa E | García-Closas, Montserrat | Geller, Frank | de Geus, Eco EJ | Giles, Graham G | Gudbjartsson, Daniel F | Gudnason, Vilmundur | Guénel, Pascal | Guo, Suiqun | Hall, Per | Hamann, Ute | Haring, Robin | Hartman, Catharina A | Heath, Andrew C | Hofman, Albert | Hooning, Maartje J | Hopper, John L | Hu, Frank B | Hunter, David J | Karasik, David | Kiel, Douglas P | Knight, Julia A | Kosma, Veli-Matti | Kutalik, Zoltan | Lai, Sandra | Lambrechts, Diether | Lindblom, Annika | Mägi, Reedik | Magnusson, Patrik K | Mannermaa, Arto | Martin, Nicholas G | Masson, Gisli | McArdle, Patrick F | McArdle, Wendy L | Melbye, Mads | Michailidou, Kyriaki | Mihailov, Evelin | Milani, Lili | Milne, Roger L | Nevanlinna, Heli | Neven, Patrick | Nohr, Ellen A | Oldehinkel, Albertine J | Oostra, Ben A | Palotie, Aarno | Peacock, Munro | Pedersen, Nancy L | Peterlongo, Paolo | Peto, Julian | Pharoah, Paul DP | Postma, Dirkje S | Pouta, Anneli | Pylkäs, Katri | Radice, Paolo | Ring, Susan | Rivadeneira, Fernando | Robino, Antonietta | Rose, Lynda M | Rudolph, Anja | Salomaa, Veikko | Sanna, Serena | Schlessinger, David | Schmidt, Marjanka K | Southey, Mellissa C | Sovio, Ulla | Stampfer, Meir J | Stöckl, Doris | Storniolo, Anna M | Timpson, Nicholas J | Tyrer, Jonathan | Visser, Jenny A | Vollenweider, Peter | Völzke, Henry | Waeber, Gerard | Waldenberger, Melanie | Wallaschofski, Henri | Wang, Qin | Willemsen, Gonneke | Winqvist, Robert | Wolffenbuttel, Bruce HR | Wright, Margaret J | Boomsma, Dorret I | Econs, Michael J | Khaw, Kay-Tee | Loos, Ruth JF | McCarthy, Mark I | Montgomery, Grant W | Rice, John P | Streeten, Elizabeth A | Thorsteinsdottir, Unnur | van Duijn, Cornelia M | Alizadeh, Behrooz Z | Bergmann, Sven | Boerwinkle, Eric | Boyd, Heather A | Crisponi, Laura | Gasparini, Paolo | Gieger, Christian | Harris, Tamara B | Ingelsson, Erik | Järvelin, Marjo-Riitta | Kraft, Peter | Lawlor, Debbie | Metspalu, Andres | Pennell, Craig E | Ridker, Paul M | Snieder, Harold | Sørensen, Thorkild IA | Spector, Tim D | Strachan, David P | Uitterlinden, André G | Wareham, Nicholas J | Widen, Elisabeth | Zygmunt, Marek | Murray, Anna | Easton, Douglas F | Stefansson, Kari | Murabito, Joanne M | Ong, Ken K
Nature  2014;514(7520):92-97.
Age at menarche is a marker of timing of puberty in females. It varies widely between individuals, is a heritable trait and is associated with risks for obesity, type 2 diabetes, cardiovascular disease, breast cancer and all-cause mortality1. Studies of rare human disorders of puberty and animal models point to a complex hypothalamic-pituitary-hormonal regulation2,3, but the mechanisms that determine pubertal timing and underlie its links to disease risk remain unclear. Here, using genome-wide and custom-genotyping arrays in up to 182,416 women of European descent from 57 studies, we found robust evidence (P<5×10−8) for 123 signals at 106 genomic loci associated with age at menarche. Many loci were associated with other pubertal traits in both sexes, and there was substantial overlap with genes implicated in body mass index and various diseases, including rare disorders of puberty. Menarche signals were enriched in imprinted regions, with three loci (DLK1/WDR25, MKRN3/MAGEL2 and KCNK9) demonstrating parent-of-origin specific associations concordant with known parental expression patterns. Pathway analyses implicated nuclear hormone receptors, particularly retinoic acid and gamma-aminobutyric acid-B2 receptor signaling, among novel mechanisms that regulate pubertal timing in humans. Our findings suggest a genetic architecture involving at least hundreds of common variants in the coordinated timing of the pubertal transition.
doi:10.1038/nature13545
PMCID: PMC4185210  PMID: 25231870
14.  Genetic predisposition to schizophrenia associated with increased use of cannabis 
Molecular psychiatry  2014;19(11):1201-1204.
Cannabis is the most commonly used illicit drug worldwide. With debate surrounding the legalization and control of use, investigating its health risks has become a pressing area of research. One established association is that between cannabis use and schizophrenia, a debilitating psychiatric disorder affecting approximately 1% of the population over their lifetime. Although considerable evidence implicates cannabis use as a component cause of schizophrenia, it remains unclear whether this is entirely due to cannabis directly raising risk of psychosis, or whether the same genes that increases psychosis risk may also increase risk of cannabis use.
In a sample of 2,082 healthy individuals, we show an association between an individual’s burden of schizophrenia risk alleles and use of cannabis. This was significant both for comparing those who have ever vs. never used cannabis (p=2.6×10−4), and for quantity of use within users (p=3.0×10−3). While directly predicting only a small amount of the variance in cannabis use, these findings suggest that part of the association between schizophrenia and cannabis is due to a shared genetic aetiology. This form of gene-environment correlation is an important consideration when calculating the impact of environmental risk factors, including cannabis use.
doi:10.1038/mp.2014.51
PMCID: PMC4382963  PMID: 24957864
15.  Common variants near ABCA1, AFAP1 and GMDS confer risk of primary open-angle glaucoma 
Nature genetics  2014;46(10):1120-1125.
Primary open-angle glaucoma (POAG) is a major cause of irreversible blindness worldwide. We performed a genome-wide association study in an Australian discovery cohort comprising 1,155 advanced POAG cases and 1,992 controls. Association of the top SNPs from the discovery stage was investigated in two Australian replication cohorts (total 932 cases, 6,862 controls) and two US replication cohorts (total 2,616 cases, 2,634 controls). Meta-analysis of all cohorts revealed three novel loci associated with development of POAG. These loci are located upstream of ABCA1 (rs2472493 [G] OR=1.31, P= 2.1 × 10-19), within AFAP1 (rs4619890 [G] OR=1.20, P= 7.0 × 10-10) and within GMDS (rs11969985 [G] OR=1.31, and P= 7.7 × 10-10). Using RT-PCR and immunolabelling, we also showed that these genes are expressed within human retina, optic nerve and trabecular meshwork and that ABCA1 and AFAP1 are also expressed in retinal ganglion cells.
doi:10.1038/ng.3079
PMCID: PMC4177327  PMID: 25173105
16.  Common variants near ABCA1, AFAP1 and GMDS confer risk of primary open-angle glaucoma 
Nature genetics  2014;46(10):1120-1125.
Primary open-angle glaucoma (POAG) is a major cause of irreversible blindness worldwide. We performed a genome-wide association study in an Australian discovery cohort comprising 1,155 advanced POAG cases and 1,992 controls. Association of the top SNPs from the discovery stage was investigated in two Australian replication cohorts (total 932 cases, 6,862 controls) and two US replication cohorts (total 2,616 cases, 2,634 controls). Meta-analysis of all cohorts revealed three novel loci associated with development of POAG. These loci are located upstream of ABCA1 (rs2472493 [G] OR=1.31, P= 2.1 × 10−19), within AFAP1 (rs4619890 [G] OR=1.20, P= 7.0 × 10−10) and within GMDS (rs11969985 [G] OR=1.31, and P= 7.7 × 10−10). Using RT-PCR and immunolabelling, we also showed that these genes are expressed within human retina, optic nerve and trabecular meshwork and that ABCA1 and AFAP1 are also expressed in retinal ganglion cells.
doi:10.1038/ng.3079
PMCID: PMC4177327  PMID: 25173105
17.  Genetic studies of body mass index yield new insights for obesity biology 
Locke, Adam E. | Kahali, Bratati | Berndt, Sonja I. | Justice, Anne E. | Pers, Tune H. | Day, Felix R. | Powell, Corey | Vedantam, Sailaja | Buchkovich, Martin L. | Yang, Jian | Croteau-Chonka, Damien C. | Esko, Tonu | Fall, Tove | Ferreira, Teresa | Gustafsson, Stefan | Kutalik, Zoltán | Luan, Jian’an | Mägi, Reedik | Randall, Joshua C. | Winkler, Thomas W. | Wood, Andrew R. | Workalemahu, Tsegaselassie | Faul, Jessica D. | Smith, Jennifer A. | Zhao, Jing Hua | Zhao, Wei | Chen, Jin | Fehrmann, Rudolf | Hedman, Åsa K. | Karjalainen, Juha | Schmidt, Ellen M. | Absher, Devin | Amin, Najaf | Anderson, Denise | Beekman, Marian | Bolton, Jennifer L. | Bragg-Gresham, Jennifer L. | Buyske, Steven | Demirkan, Ayse | Deng, Guohong | Ehret, Georg B. | Feenstra, Bjarke | Feitosa, Mary F. | Fischer, Krista | Goel, Anuj | Gong, Jian | Jackson, Anne U. | Kanoni, Stavroula | Kleber, Marcus E. | Kristiansson, Kati | Lim, Unhee | Lotay, Vaneet | Mangino, Massimo | Leach, Irene Mateo | Medina-Gomez, Carolina | Medland, Sarah E. | Nalls, Michael A. | Palmer, Cameron D. | Pasko, Dorota | Pechlivanis, Sonali | Peters, Marjolein J. | Prokopenko, Inga | Shungin, Dmitry | Stančáková, Alena | Strawbridge, Rona J. | Sung, Yun Ju | Tanaka, Toshiko | Teumer, Alexander | Trompet, Stella | van der Laan, Sander W. | van Setten, Jessica | Van Vliet-Ostaptchouk, Jana V. | Wang, Zhaoming | Yengo, Loïc | Zhang, Weihua | Isaacs, Aaron | Albrecht, Eva | Ärnlöv, Johan | Arscott, Gillian M. | Attwood, Antony P. | Bandinelli, Stefania | Barrett, Amy | Bas, Isabelita N. | Bellis, Claire | Bennett, Amanda J. | Berne, Christian | Blagieva, Roza | Blüher, Matthias | Böhringer, Stefan | Bonnycastle, Lori L. | Böttcher, Yvonne | Boyd, Heather A. | Bruinenberg, Marcel | Caspersen, Ida H. | Chen, Yii-Der Ida | Clarke, Robert | Daw, E. Warwick | de Craen, Anton J. M. | Delgado, Graciela | Dimitriou, Maria | Doney, Alex S. F. | Eklund, Niina | Estrada, Karol | Eury, Elodie | Folkersen, Lasse | Fraser, Ross M. | Garcia, Melissa E. | Geller, Frank | Giedraitis, Vilmantas | Gigante, Bruna | Go, Alan S. | Golay, Alain | Goodall, Alison H. | Gordon, Scott D. | Gorski, Mathias | Grabe, Hans-Jörgen | Grallert, Harald | Grammer, Tanja B. | Gräßler, Jürgen | Grönberg, Henrik | Groves, Christopher J. | Gusto, Gaëlle | Haessler, Jeffrey | Hall, Per | Haller, Toomas | Hallmans, Goran | Hartman, Catharina A. | Hassinen, Maija | Hayward, Caroline | Heard-Costa, Nancy L. | Helmer, Quinta | Hengstenberg, Christian | Holmen, Oddgeir | Hottenga, Jouke-Jan | James, Alan L. | Jeff, Janina M. | Johansson, Åsa | Jolley, Jennifer | Juliusdottir, Thorhildur | Kinnunen, Leena | Koenig, Wolfgang | Koskenvuo, Markku | Kratzer, Wolfgang | Laitinen, Jaana | Lamina, Claudia | Leander, Karin | Lee, Nanette R. | Lichtner, Peter | Lind, Lars | Lindström, Jaana | Lo, Ken Sin | Lobbens, Stéphane | Lorbeer, Roberto | Lu, Yingchang | Mach, François | Magnusson, Patrik K. E. | Mahajan, Anubha | McArdle, Wendy L. | McLachlan, Stela | Menni, Cristina | Merger, Sigrun | Mihailov, Evelin | Milani, Lili | Moayyeri, Alireza | Monda, Keri L. | Morken, Mario A. | Mulas, Antonella | Müller, Gabriele | Müller-Nurasyid, Martina | Musk, Arthur W. | Nagaraja, Ramaiah | Nöthen, Markus M. | Nolte, Ilja M. | Pilz, Stefan | Rayner, Nigel W. | Renstrom, Frida | Rettig, Rainer | Ried, Janina S. | Ripke, Stephan | Robertson, Neil R. | Rose, Lynda M. | Sanna, Serena | Scharnagl, Hubert | Scholtens, Salome | Schumacher, Fredrick R. | Scott, William R. | Seufferlein, Thomas | Shi, Jianxin | Smith, Albert Vernon | Smolonska, Joanna | Stanton, Alice V. | Steinthorsdottir, Valgerdur | Stirrups, Kathleen | Stringham, Heather M. | Sundström, Johan | Swertz, Morris A. | Swift, Amy J. | Syvänen, Ann-Christine | Tan, Sian-Tsung | Tayo, Bamidele O. | Thorand, Barbara | Thorleifsson, Gudmar | Tyrer, Jonathan P. | Uh, Hae-Won | Vandenput, Liesbeth | Verhulst, Frank C. | Vermeulen, Sita H. | Verweij, Niek | Vonk, Judith M. | Waite, Lindsay L. | Warren, Helen R. | Waterworth, Dawn | Weedon, Michael N. | Wilkens, Lynne R. | Willenborg, Christina | Wilsgaard, Tom | Wojczynski, Mary K. | Wong, Andrew | Wright, Alan F. | Zhang, Qunyuan | Brennan, Eoin P. | Choi, Murim | Dastani, Zari | Drong, Alexander W. | Eriksson, Per | Franco-Cereceda, Anders | Gådin, Jesper R. | Gharavi, Ali G. | Goddard, Michael E. | Handsaker, Robert E. | Huang, Jinyan | Karpe, Fredrik | Kathiresan, Sekar | Keildson, Sarah | Kiryluk, Krzysztof | Kubo, Michiaki | Lee, Jong-Young | Liang, Liming | Lifton, Richard P. | Ma, Baoshan | McCarroll, Steven A. | McKnight, Amy J. | Min, Josine L. | Moffatt, Miriam F. | Montgomery, Grant W. | Murabito, Joanne M. | Nicholson, George | Nyholt, Dale R. | Okada, Yukinori | Perry, John R. B. | Dorajoo, Rajkumar | Reinmaa, Eva | Salem, Rany M. | Sandholm, Niina | Scott, Robert A. | Stolk, Lisette | Takahashi, Atsushi | Tanaka, Toshihiro | van ’t Hooft, Ferdinand M. | Vinkhuyzen, Anna A. E. | Westra, Harm-Jan | Zheng, Wei | Zondervan, Krina T. | Heath, Andrew C. | Arveiler, Dominique | Bakker, Stephan J. L. | Beilby, John | Bergman, Richard N. | Blangero, John | Bovet, Pascal | Campbell, Harry | Caulfield, Mark J. | Cesana, Giancarlo | Chakravarti, Aravinda | Chasman, Daniel I. | Chines, Peter S. | Collins, Francis S. | Crawford, Dana C. | Cupples, L. Adrienne | Cusi, Daniele | Danesh, John | de Faire, Ulf | den Ruijter, Hester M. | Dominiczak, Anna F. | Erbel, Raimund | Erdmann, Jeanette | Eriksson, Johan G. | Farrall, Martin | Felix, Stephan B. | Ferrannini, Ele | Ferrières, Jean | Ford, Ian | Forouhi, Nita G. | Forrester, Terrence | Franco, Oscar H. | Gansevoort, Ron T. | Gejman, Pablo V. | Gieger, Christian | Gottesman, Omri | Gudnason, Vilmundur | Gyllensten, Ulf | Hall, Alistair S. | Harris, Tamara B. | Hattersley, Andrew T. | Hicks, Andrew A. | Hindorff, Lucia A. | Hingorani, Aroon D. | Hofman, Albert | Homuth, Georg | Hovingh, G. Kees | Humphries, Steve E. | Hunt, Steven C. | Hyppönen, Elina | Illig, Thomas | Jacobs, Kevin B. | Jarvelin, Marjo-Riitta | Jöckel, Karl-Heinz | Johansen, Berit | Jousilahti, Pekka | Jukema, J. Wouter | Jula, Antti M. | Kaprio, Jaakko | Kastelein, John J. P. | Keinanen-Kiukaanniemi, Sirkka M. | Kiemeney, Lambertus A. | Knekt, Paul | Kooner, Jaspal S. | Kooperberg, Charles | Kovacs, Peter | Kraja, Aldi T. | Kumari, Meena | Kuusisto, Johanna | Lakka, Timo A. | Langenberg, Claudia | Marchand, Loic Le | Lehtimäki, Terho | Lyssenko, Valeriya | Männistö, Satu | Marette, André | Matise, Tara C. | McKenzie, Colin A. | McKnight, Barbara | Moll, Frans L. | Morris, Andrew D. | Morris, Andrew P. | Murray, Jeffrey C. | Nelis, Mari | Ohlsson, Claes | Oldehinkel, Albertine J. | Ong, Ken K. | Madden, Pamela A. F. | Pasterkamp, Gerard | Peden, John F. | Peters, Annette | Postma, Dirkje S. | Pramstaller, Peter P. | Price, Jackie F. | Qi, Lu | Raitakari, Olli T. | Rankinen, Tuomo | Rao, D. C. | Rice, Treva K. | Ridker, Paul M. | Rioux, John D. | Ritchie, Marylyn D. | Rudan, Igor | Salomaa, Veikko | Samani, Nilesh J. | Saramies, Jouko | Sarzynski, Mark A. | Schunkert, Heribert | Schwarz, Peter E. H. | Sever, Peter | Shuldiner, Alan R. | Sinisalo, Juha | Stolk, Ronald P. | Strauch, Konstantin | Tönjes, Anke | Trégouët, David-Alexandre | Tremblay, Angelo | Tremoli, Elena | Virtamo, Jarmo | Vohl, Marie-Claude | Völker, Uwe | Waeber, Gérard | Willemsen, Gonneke | Witteman, Jacqueline C. | Zillikens, M. Carola | Adair, Linda S. | Amouyel, Philippe | Asselbergs, Folkert W. | Assimes, Themistocles L. | Bochud, Murielle | Boehm, Bernhard O. | Boerwinkle, Eric | Bornstein, Stefan R. | Bottinger, Erwin P. | Bouchard, Claude | Cauchi, Stéphane | Chambers, John C. | Chanock, Stephen J. | Cooper, Richard S. | de Bakker, Paul I. W. | Dedoussis, George | Ferrucci, Luigi | Franks, Paul W. | Froguel, Philippe | Groop, Leif C. | Haiman, Christopher A. | Hamsten, Anders | Hui, Jennie | Hunter, David J. | Hveem, Kristian | Kaplan, Robert C. | Kivimaki, Mika | Kuh, Diana | Laakso, Markku | Liu, Yongmei | Martin, Nicholas G. | März, Winfried | Melbye, Mads | Metspalu, Andres | Moebus, Susanne | Munroe, Patricia B. | Njølstad, Inger | Oostra, Ben A. | Palmer, Colin N. A. | Pedersen, Nancy L. | Perola, Markus | Pérusse, Louis | Peters, Ulrike | Power, Chris | Quertermous, Thomas | Rauramaa, Rainer | Rivadeneira, Fernando | Saaristo, Timo E. | Saleheen, Danish | Sattar, Naveed | Schadt, Eric E. | Schlessinger, David | Slagboom, P. Eline | Snieder, Harold | Spector, Tim D. | Thorsteinsdottir, Unnur | Stumvoll, Michael | Tuomilehto, Jaakko | Uitterlinden, André G. | Uusitupa, Matti | van der Harst, Pim | Walker, Mark | Wallaschofski, Henri | Wareham, Nicholas J. | Watkins, Hugh | Weir, David R. | Wichmann, H-Erich | Wilson, James F. | Zanen, Pieter | Borecki, Ingrid B. | Deloukas, Panos | Fox, Caroline S. | Heid, Iris M. | O’Connell, Jeffrey R. | Strachan, David P. | Stefansson, Kari | van Duijn, Cornelia M. | Abecasis, Gonçalo R. | Franke, Lude | Frayling, Timothy M. | McCarthy, Mark I. | Visscher, Peter M. | Scherag, André | Willer, Cristen J. | Boehnke, Michael | Mohlke, Karen L. | Lindgren, Cecilia M. | Beckmann, Jacques S. | Barroso, Inês | North, Kari E. | Ingelsson, Erik | Hirschhorn, Joel N. | Loos, Ruth J. F. | Speliotes, Elizabeth K.
Nature  2015;518(7538):197-206.
Obesity is heritable and predisposes to many diseases. To understand the genetic basis of obesity better, here we conduct a genome-wide association study and Metabochip meta-analysis of body mass index (BMI), a measure commonly used to define obesity and assess adiposity, in up to 339,224 individuals. This analysis identifies 97 BMI-associated loci (P < 5 × 10−8), 56 of which are novel. Five loci demonstrate clear evidence of several independent association signals, and many loci have significant effects on other metabolic phenotypes. The 97 loci account for ~2.7% of BMI variation, and genome-wide estimates suggest that common variation accounts for >20% of BMI variation. Pathway analyses provide strong support for a role of the central nervous system in obesity susceptibility and implicate new genes and pathways, including those related to synaptic function, glutamate signalling, insulin secretion/action, energy metabolism, lipid biology and adipogenesis.
doi:10.1038/nature14177
PMCID: PMC4382211  PMID: 25673413
18.  A Genome-Wide Association Study of Monozygotic Twin-Pairs Suggests a Locus Related to Variability of Serum High-Density Lipoprotein Cholesterol 
Genome-wide association analysis on monozygotic twin pairs offers a route to discovery of gene–environment interactions through testing for variability loci associated with sensitivity to individual environment/lifestyle. We present a genome-wide scan of loci associated with intra-pair differences in serum lipid and apolipoprotein levels. We report data for 1,720 monozygotic female twin pairs from GenomEUtwin project with 2.5 million SNPs, imputed or genotyped, and measured serum lipid fractions for both twins. We found one locus associated with intra-pair differences in high density lipoprotein (HDL) cholesterol, rs2483058 in an intron of SRGAP2, where twins carrying the C allele are more sensitive to environmental factors (p = 3.98 × 10−8). We followed up the association in further genotyped monozygotic twins (N = 1 261) which showed a moderate association for the variant (p = .002, same direction of an effect). In addition, we report a new association on the level of apolipoprotein A-II (p = 4.03 × 10−8).
doi:10.1017/thg.2012.63
PMCID: PMC4333218  PMID: 23031429
twins; association; lipids; apolipoproteins; interaction
19.  DNA methylation age of blood predicts all-cause mortality in later life 
Genome Biology  2015;16(1):25.
Background
DNA methylation levels change with age. Recent studies have identified biomarkers of chronological age based on DNA methylation levels. It is not yet known whether DNA methylation age captures aspects of biological age.
Results
Here we test whether differences between people’s chronological ages and estimated ages, DNA methylation age, predict all-cause mortality in later life. The difference between DNA methylation age and chronological age (Δage) was calculated in four longitudinal cohorts of older people. Meta-analysis of proportional hazards models from the four cohorts was used to determine the association between Δage and mortality. A 5-year higher Δage is associated with a 21% higher mortality risk, adjusting for age and sex. After further adjustments for childhood IQ, education, social class, hypertension, diabetes, cardiovascular disease, and APOE e4 status, there is a 16% increased mortality risk for those with a 5-year higher Δage. A pedigree-based heritability analysis of Δage was conducted in a separate cohort. The heritability of Δage was 0.43.
Conclusions
DNA methylation-derived measures of accelerated aging are heritable traits that predict mortality independently of health status, lifestyle factors, and known genetic factors.
Electronic supplementary material
The online version of this article (doi:10.1186/s13059-015-0584-6) contains supplementary material, which is available to authorized users.
doi:10.1186/s13059-015-0584-6
PMCID: PMC4350614  PMID: 25633388
20.  Association of OPRD1 Polymorphisms with Heroin Dependence in a Large Case-control Series 
Addiction biology  2012;19(1):10.1111/j.1369-1600.2012.00445.x.
Genes encoding the opioid receptors (OPRM1, OPRD1, and OPRK1) are obvious candidates for involvement in risk for heroin dependence. Prior association studies commonly had samples of modest size, included limited single nucleotide polymorphism (SNP) coverage of these genes, and yielded inconsistent results. Participants for the current investigation included 1459 heroin dependent cases ascertained from maintenance clinics in New South Wales, Australia, 1495 unrelated individuals selected from an Australian sample of twins and siblings as not meeting DSM-IV criteria for lifetime alcohol or illicit drug dependence (non-dependent controls), and 531 controls ascertained from economically-disadvantaged neighborhoods in proximity to the maintenance clinics. A total of 136 OPRM1, OPRD1, and OPRK1 SNPs were genotyped in this sample. After controlling for admixture with principal components analysis, our comparison of cases to non-dependent controls found 4 OPRD1 SNPs in fairly high linkage disequilibrium for which adjusted p values remained significant (e.g., rs2236857; OR 1.25; p=2.95 × 10−4) replicating a previously reported association. A post-hoc analysis revealed that the two-SNP (rs2236857 and rs581111) GA haplotype in OPRD1 is associated with greater risk (OR 1.68; p=1.41 × 10−5). No OPRM1 or OPRK1 SNPs reached more than nominal significance. Comparisons of cases to neighborhood controls reached only nominal significance. Our results replicate a prior report providing strong evidence implicating OPRD1 SNPs and, in particular, the two SNP (rs2236857 and rs581111) GA haplotype in liability for heroin dependence. Support was not found for similar association involving either OPRM1 or OPRK1 SNPs.
doi:10.1111/j.1369-1600.2012.00445.x
PMCID: PMC3867542  PMID: 22500942
association study; heroin dependence; OPRD1; OPRK1; OPRM1
21.  POT1 loss-of-function variants predispose to familial melanoma 
Nature genetics  2014;46(5):478-481.
Deleterious germline variants in CDKN2A account for around 40% of familial melanoma cases1, while rare variants in CDK4, BRCA2, BAP1, and the promoter of TERT, have also been linked to the disease2-5. Here we set out to identify novel high-penetrance susceptibility genes in unexplained cases by sequencing 184 melanoma patients from 105 pedigrees recruited in the United Kingdom, the Netherlands, and Australia that were negative for variants in known predisposition genes. We identify families where melanoma co-segregates with loss-of-function variants in the protection of telomeres 1 (POT1) gene, a proportion of members presenting with an early age of onset and multiple primaries. We show that these variants either affect POT1 mRNA splicing or alter key residues in the highly conserved oligonucleotide-/oligosaccharide-binding (OB) domains of POT1, disrupting protein-telomere binding, leading to increased telomere length. Thus, POT1 variants predispose to melanoma formation via a direct effect on telomeres.
doi:10.1038/ng.2947
PMCID: PMC4266105  PMID: 24686849
22.  A new regulatory variant in the interleukin-6 receptor gene associates with asthma risk 
Genes and immunity  2013;14(7):441-446.
The main genetic determinant of soluble IL-6R levels is the missense variant rs2228145, which maps to the cleavage site of IL-6R. For each Ala allele, sIL-6R serum levels increase by ~20 ng/ml and asthma risk by 1.09-fold. However, this variant does not explain the total heritability for sIL-6R levels. Additional independent variants in IL6R may therefore contribute to variation in sIL-6R levels and influence asthma risk. We imputed 471 variants in IL6R and tested these for association with sIL-6R serum levels in 360 individuals. An intronic variant (rs12083537) was associated with sIL-6R levels independently of rs4129267 (P = 0.0005), a proxy SNP for rs2228145. A significant and consistent association for rs12083537 was observed in a replication panel of 354 individuals (P = 0.033). Each rs12083537:A allele increased sIL-6R serum levels by 2.4 ng/ml Analysis of mRNA levels in two cohorts did not identify significant associations between rs12083537 and IL6R transcription levels. On the other hand, results from 16 705 asthmatics and 30 809 controls showed that the rs12083537:A allele increased asthma risk by 1.04-fold (P = 0.0419). Genetic risk scores based on IL6R regulatory variants may prove useful in explaining variation in clinical response to tocilizumab, an anti-IL-6R monoclonal antibody.
doi:10.1038/gene.2013.38
PMCID: PMC4233139  PMID: 23945879
allergy; eQTL; expression; disease
23.  Relation between variants in the neurotrophin receptor gene, NTRK3, and white matter integrity in healthy young adults 
NeuroImage  2013;82:146-153.
The NTRK3 gene (also known as TRKC) encodes a high affinity receptor for the neurotrophin 3′-nucleotidase (NT3), which is implicated in oligodendrocyte and myelin development. We previously found that white matter integrity in young adults related to genetic variants in genes encoding neurotrophins and their receptors. This underscores the importance of neurotrophins for white matter development. NTRK3 variants are putative risk factors for schizophrenia, bipolar disorder, and obsessive-compulsive disorder hoarding, suggesting that some NTRK3 variants may affect the brain.
To test this, we scanned 392 healthy adult twins and their siblings (mean age, 23.6 ± 2.2 years; range: 20-29 years) with 105-gradient 4-Tesla diffusion tensor imaging (DTI). We identified 18 single nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs) in the NTRK3 gene that have been associated with neuropsychiatric disorders. We used a multi-SNP model, adjusting for family relatedness, age, and sex, to relate these variants to voxelwise fractional anisotropy (FA) – a DTI measure of white matter integrity.
FA was optimally predicted (based on the highest false discovery rate critical p), by five SNPs (rs1017412, rs2114252, rs16941261, rs3784406, and rs7176429; overall FDR critical p = 0.028). Gene effects were widespread and included the corpus callosum genu and inferior longitudinal fasciculus - regions implicated in several neuropsychiatric disorders and previously associated with other neurotrophin-related genetic variants in an overlapping sample of subjects. NTRK3 genetic variants, and neurotrophins more generally, may influence white matter integrity in brain regions implicated in neuropsychiatric disorders.
doi:10.1016/j.neuroimage.2013.05.095
PMCID: PMC3948328  PMID: 23727532
Fractional anisotropy; diffusion tensor imaging; single nucleotide polymorphism; schizophrenia; obsessive compulsive disorder; bipolar disorder
24.  High-density fine-mapping of a chromosome 10q26 linkage peak suggests association between endometriosis and variants close to CYP2C19 
Fertility and sterility  2011;95(7):2236-2240.
Objective
To refine a previously reported linkage peak for endometriosis on chromosome 10q26, and conduct follow-up analyses and a fine-mapping association study across the region to identify new candidate genes for endometriosis.
Design
Case-control study.
Setting
Academic research.
Subject(s)
Cases = 3,223 women with surgically confirmed endometriosis; Controls = 1,190 women without endometriosis and 7,060 population samples.
Intervention(s)
Analysis of 11,984 SNPs on chromosome 10.
Main outcome measure(s)
Allele frequency differences between cases and controls.
Results
Linkage analyses on families grouped by endometriosis symptoms (primarily subfertility) provided increased evidence for linkage (logarithm of odds (LOD) score = 3.62) near a previously reported linkage peak. Three independent association signals were found at 96.59 Mb (rs11592737, P=4.9 × 10−4), 105.63 Mb (rs1253130, P=2.5 × 10−4) and 124.25 Mb (rs2250804, P=9.7 × 10−4). Analyses including only samples from linkage families supported the association at all three regions. However, only rs11592737 in the cytochrome P450 subfamily C (CYP2C19) gene was replicated in an independent sample of 2,079 cases and 7060 population controls.
Conclusion(s)
The role of the CYP2C19 gene in conferring risk for endometriosis warrants further investigation.
doi:10.1016/j.fertnstert.2011.03.062
PMCID: PMC3125525  PMID: 21497341
Endometriosis; linkage; association; subfertility; CYP2C19
25.  Fine-mapping of the HNF1B multicancer locus identifies candidate variants that mediate endometrial cancer risk 
Painter, Jodie N. | O'Mara, Tracy A. | Batra, Jyotsna | Cheng, Timothy | Lose, Felicity A. | Dennis, Joe | Michailidou, Kyriaki | Tyrer, Jonathan P. | Ahmed, Shahana | Ferguson, Kaltin | Healey, Catherine S. | Kaufmann, Susanne | Hillman, Kristine M. | Walpole, Carina | Moya, Leire | Pollock, Pamela | Jones, Angela | Howarth, Kimberley | Martin, Lynn | Gorman, Maggie | Hodgson, Shirley | De Polanco, Ma. Magdalena Echeverry | Sans, Monica | Carracedo, Angel | Castellvi-Bel, Sergi | Rojas-Martinez, Augusto | Santos, Erika | Teixeira, Manuel R. | Carvajal-Carmona, Luis | Shu, Xiao-Ou | Long, Jirong | Zheng, Wei | Xiang, Yong-Bing | Montgomery, Grant W. | Webb, Penelope M. | Scott, Rodney J. | McEvoy, Mark | Attia, John | Holliday, Elizabeth | Martin, Nicholas G. | Nyholt, Dale R. | Henders, Anjali K. | Fasching, Peter A. | Hein, Alexander | Beckmann, Matthias W. | Renner, Stefan P. | Dörk, Thilo | Hillemanns, Peter | Dürst, Matthias | Runnebaum, Ingo | Lambrechts, Diether | Coenegrachts, Lieve | Schrauwen, Stefanie | Amant, Frederic | Winterhoff, Boris | Dowdy, Sean C. | Goode, Ellen L. | Teoman, Attila | Salvesen, Helga B. | Trovik, Jone | Njolstad, Tormund S. | Werner, Henrica M.J. | Ashton, Katie | Proietto, Tony | Otton, Geoffrey | Tzortzatos, Gerasimos | Mints, Miriam | Tham, Emma | Hall, Per | Czene, Kamila | Liu, Jianjun | Li, Jingmei | Hopper, John L. | Southey, Melissa C. | Ekici, Arif B. | Ruebner, Matthias | Johnson, Nicola | Peto, Julian | Burwinkel, Barbara | Marme, Frederik | Brenner, Hermann | Dieffenbach, Aida K. | Meindl, Alfons | Brauch, Hiltrud | Lindblom, Annika | Depreeuw, Jeroen | Moisse, Matthieu | Chang-Claude, Jenny | Rudolph, Anja | Couch, Fergus J. | Olson, Janet E. | Giles, Graham G. | Bruinsma, Fiona | Cunningham, Julie M. | Fridley, Brooke L. | Børresen-Dale, Anne-Lise | Kristensen, Vessela N. | Cox, Angela | Swerdlow, Anthony J. | Orr, Nicholas | Bolla, Manjeet K. | Wang, Qin | Weber, Rachel Palmieri | Chen, Zhihua | Shah, Mitul | French, Juliet D. | Pharoah, Paul D.P. | Dunning, Alison M. | Tomlinson, Ian | Easton, Douglas F. | Edwards, Stacey L. | Thompson, Deborah J. | Spurdle, Amanda B.
Human Molecular Genetics  2014;24(5):1478-1492.
Common variants in the hepatocyte nuclear factor 1 homeobox B (HNF1B) gene are associated with the risk of Type II diabetes and multiple cancers. Evidence to date indicates that cancer risk may be mediated via genetic or epigenetic effects on HNF1B gene expression. We previously found single-nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs) at the HNF1B locus to be associated with endometrial cancer, and now report extensive fine-mapping and in silico and laboratory analyses of this locus. Analysis of 1184 genotyped and imputed SNPs in 6608 Caucasian cases and 37 925 controls, and 895 Asian cases and 1968 controls, revealed the best signal of association for SNP rs11263763 (P = 8.4 × 10−14, odds ratio = 0.86, 95% confidence interval = 0.82–0.89), located within HNF1B intron 1. Haplotype analysis and conditional analyses provide no evidence of further independent endometrial cancer risk variants at this locus. SNP rs11263763 genotype was associated with HNF1B mRNA expression but not with HNF1B methylation in endometrial tumor samples from The Cancer Genome Atlas. Genetic analyses prioritized rs11263763 and four other SNPs in high-to-moderate linkage disequilibrium as the most likely causal SNPs. Three of these SNPs map to the extended HNF1B promoter based on chromatin marks extending from the minimal promoter region. Reporter assays demonstrated that this extended region reduces activity in combination with the minimal HNF1B promoter, and that the minor alleles of rs11263763 or rs8064454 are associated with decreased HNF1B promoter activity. Our findings provide evidence for a single signal associated with endometrial cancer risk at the HNF1B locus, and that risk is likely mediated via altered HNF1B gene expression.
doi:10.1093/hmg/ddu552
PMCID: PMC4321445  PMID: 25378557

Results 1-25 (216)