PMCC PMCC

Search tips
Search criteria

Advanced
Results 1-25 (58)
 

Clipboard (0)
None

Select a Filter Below

Journals
more »
Year of Publication
Document Types
1.  A highly recurrent RPS27 5'UTR mutation in melanoma 
Oncotarget  2014;5(10):2912-2917.
The incidence of melanoma continues to rise globally and is increasing at a rate greater than any other cancer. To systematically search for new genes involved in melanomagenesis, we collated exome sequencing data from independent melanoma cohort datasets, including those in the public domain. We identified recurrent mutations that may drive melanoma growth, survival or metastasis, and which may hold promise for the design of novel therapies to treat melanoma. These included a frequent recurrent (i.e. hotspot) mutation in the 5' untranslated region of RPS27 in ~10% of samples. We show that the mutation expands the 5'TOP element, a motif known to regulate the expression of most of the ribosomal protein family, to which RPS27 belongs, and thus might sensitize the mutated transcript to growth-mediated regulation. This finding highlights not only the important role of non-protein coding genetic aberrations in cancer development but also their potential as novel therapeutic targets.
PMCID: PMC4102779  PMID: 24913145
Melanoma; somatic mutation; RPS27; exome sequencing; 5' untranslated region
2.  POT1 loss-of-function variants predispose to familial melanoma 
Nature genetics  2014;46(5):478-481.
Deleterious germline variants in CDKN2A account for around 40% of familial melanoma cases1, while rare variants in CDK4, BRCA2, BAP1, and the promoter of TERT, have also been linked to the disease2-5. Here we set out to identify novel high-penetrance susceptibility genes in unexplained cases by sequencing 184 melanoma patients from 105 pedigrees recruited in the United Kingdom, the Netherlands, and Australia that were negative for variants in known predisposition genes. We identify families where melanoma co-segregates with loss-of-function variants in the protection of telomeres 1 (POT1) gene, a proportion of members presenting with an early age of onset and multiple primaries. We show that these variants either affect POT1 mRNA splicing or alter key residues in the highly conserved oligonucleotide-/oligosaccharide-binding (OB) domains of POT1, disrupting protein-telomere binding, leading to increased telomere length. Thus, POT1 variants predispose to melanoma formation via a direct effect on telomeres.
doi:10.1038/ng.2947
PMCID: PMC4266105  PMID: 24686849
3.  Mixed Lineage Kinases Activate MEK Independently of RAF to Mediate Resistance to RAF Inhibitors 
Nature communications  2014;5:3901.
RAF inhibitor therapy yields significant reductions in tumor burden in the majority of V600E-positive melanoma patients, however resistance occurs within 2-18 months. Here we demonstrate that the mixed lineage kinases (MLK1-4) are MEK kinases that reactivate the MEK/ERK pathway in the presence of RAF inhibitors. Expression of MLK1-4 mediates resistance to RAF inhibitors and promotes survival in V600E-positive melanoma cell lines. Furthermore, we observe upregulation of the MLKs in 9 of 21 melanoma patients with acquired drug resistance. Consistent with this observation, MLKs promote resistance to RAF inhibitors in mouse models, and contribute to acquired resistance in a cell line model. Lastly we observe that a majority of MLK1 mutations identified in patients are gain-of-function mutations. In summary, our data demonstrates a role for MLKs as direct activators of the MEK/ERK pathway with implications for melanomagenesis and resistance to RAF inhibitors.
doi:10.1038/ncomms4901
PMCID: PMC4046110  PMID: 24849047
4.  The risk of Barrett’s esophagus associated with abdominal obesity in males and females 
Esophageal adenocarcinoma arises from Barrett’s esophagus (BE). Both occur predominantly in males. The role of abdominal obesity in this sex distribution is uncertain. This study aimed to determine whether there is an association between abdominal obesity and risk of BE and if present was it modified by sex. A structured interview and anthropometric measures were conducted within a population based case-control study. We recruited 237 BE cases (70% male) and 247 population controls, frequency matched by age and sex. Odds ratios (OR) and 95% confidence intervals (CI) were calculated using multivariable logistic regression analysis. In the overall group and males, all measures of abdominal obesity (waist circumference - WC, waist-hip ratio - WHR, sagittal abdominal diameter – SAD and waist-height ratio - WHtR) were strongly associated with risk of BE. (Overall - WC OR 2.2 95%CI 1.4-3.5, WHR 1.8 95%CI 1.2-2.9, SAD 2.3 95%CI 1.4-3.7, WHtR 1.9 95%CI 1.2-3.0, Males WC 2.5 95%CI 1.4-4.3, WHR 2.4 95%CI 1.3-4.2, SAD 2.5 95%CI 1.4-4.3, WHtR 1.9 95%CI 1.1-3.4). These associations were minimally attenuated by adjusting for ever-symptoms of gastroesophageal reflux (GER). These findings suggest in males, non-GER factors related to abdominal obesity may be important in the development of BE. In females, there was modest association between measures of abdominal obesity and risk of BE but these were all abolished after adjusting for ever-symptoms of GER. The power to detect differences between sexes in the risk of BE associated with abdominal obesity was limited by the number of females in the study.
doi:10.1002/ijc.27887
PMCID: PMC4180019  PMID: 23034724
Barrett’s esophagus; Case-Control; Risk-Factors; Obesity
5.  The Effect on Melanoma Risk of Genes Previously Associated With Telomere Length 
Telomere length has been associated with risk of many cancers, but results are inconsistent. Seven single nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs) previously associated with mean leukocyte telomere length were either genotyped or well-imputed in 11108 case patients and 13933 control patients from Europe, Israel, the United States and Australia, four of the seven SNPs reached a P value under .05 (two-sided). A genetic score that predicts telomere length, derived from these seven SNPs, is strongly associated (P = 8.92x10-9, two-sided) with melanoma risk. This demonstrates that the previously observed association between longer telomere length and increased melanoma risk is not attributable to confounding via shared environmental effects (such as ultraviolet exposure) or reverse causality. We provide the first proof that multiple germline genetic determinants of telomere length influence cancer risk.
doi:10.1093/jnci/dju267
PMCID: PMC4196080  PMID: 25231748
6.  SOX10 ablation arrests the cell cycle, induces senescence and suppresses melanomagenesis 
Cancer research  2013;73(18):5709-5718.
The transcription factor SOX10 is essential for survival and proper differentiation of neural crest cell lineages, where it plays an important role in the generation and maintenance of melanocytes. SOX10 is also highly expressed in melanoma tumors, but a role in disease progression has not been established. Here we report that melanoma tumor cell lines require wild-type SOX10 expression for proliferation, and SOX10 haploinsufficiency reduces melanoma initiation in the metabotropic glutamate receptor 1 (Grm1Tg) transgenic mouse model. Stable SOX10 knockdown in human melanoma cells arrested cell growth, altered cellular morphology, and induced senescence. Melanoma cells with stable loss of SOX10 were arrested in the G1 phase of the cell cycle, with reduced expression in the melanocyte determining factor MITF, elevated expression of p21WAF1 and p27KIP2, hypophosphorylated RB and reduced levels of its binding partner E2F1. Since cell cycle dysregulation is a core event in neoplastic transformation, the role for SOX10 in maintaining cell cycle control in melanocytes suggests a rational new direction for targeted treatment or prevention of melanoma.
doi:10.1158/0008-5472.CAN-12-4620
PMCID: PMC3803156  PMID: 23913827
7.  MC1R is a Potent Regulator of PTEN after UV Exposure in Melanocytes 
Molecular cell  2013;51(4):409-422.
Summary
The individuals carrying melanocortin-1-receptor (MC1R) variants, especially those associated with red hair color, fair skin and poor tanning ability (RHC-trait), are more prone to melanoma while the underlying mechanism is poorly defined. Here, we report that UVB exposure triggers PTEN interaction with wild-type (WT), but not RHC-associated MC1R variants, which protects PTEN from WWP2-mediated degradation, leading to AKT inactivation. Strikingly, the biological consequences of the failure of MC1R variants to suppress PI3K/AKT signaling are highly context dependent. In primary melanocytes, hyperactivation of PI3K/AKT signaling leads to premature senescence; in the presence of BRAFV600E, MC1R deficiency-induced elevated PI3K/AKT signaling drives oncogenic transformation. These studies establish the MC1R-PTEN axis as a central regulator for melanocytes’ response to UVB exposure, and reveal the molecular basis underlying the association between MC1R variants and melanomagenesis.
doi:10.1016/j.molcel.2013.08.010
PMCID: PMC3792490  PMID: 23973372
8.  Somatic mutations in MAP3K5 attenuate its pro-apoptotic function in melanoma through increased binding to Thioredoxin 
Patients with advanced metastatic melanoma have poor prognosis and the genetics underlying its pathogenesis are poorly understood. High throughput sequencing has allowed comprehensive discovery of somatic mutations in cancer samples. Here, upon analysis of our whole-genome and whole-exome sequencing data of 29 melanoma samples we identified several genes that harbor recurrent non-synonymous mutations. These included MAP3K5, which in a prevalence screen of 288 melanomas was found to harbor a R256C substitution in 5 cases. All MAP3K5 mutated samples were wild-type for BRAF, suggesting a mutual exclusivity for these mutations. Functional analysis of the MAP3K5 R256C mutation revealed attenuation of MKK4 activation through increased binding of the inhibitory protein thioredoxin (TXN/TRX-1/Trx); resulting in increased proliferation and anchorage-independent growth of melanoma cells. This mutation represents a potential target for the design of new therapies to treat melanoma.
doi:10.1038/jid.2013.365
PMCID: PMC3947167  PMID: 24008424
9.  Assessment of PALB2 as a Candidate Melanoma Susceptibility Gene 
PLoS ONE  2014;9(6):e100683.
Partner and localizer of BRCA2 (PALB2) interacts with BRCA2 to enable double strand break repair through homologous recombination. Similar to BRCA2, germline mutations in PALB2 have been shown to predispose to Fanconi anaemia as well as pancreatic and breast cancer. The PALB2/BRCA2 protein interaction, as well as the increased melanoma risk observed in families harbouring BRCA2 mutations, makes PALB2 a candidate for melanoma susceptibility. In order to assess PALB2 as a melanoma predisposition gene, we sequenced the entire protein-coding sequence of PALB2 in probands from 182 melanoma families lacking pathogenic mutations in known high penetrance melanoma susceptibility genes: CDKN2A, CDK4, and BAP1. In addition, we interrogated whole-genome and exome data from another 19 kindreds with a strong family history of melanoma for deleterious mutations in PALB2. Here we report a rare known deleterious PALB2 mutation (rs118203998) causing a premature truncation of the protein (p.Y1183X) in an individual who had developed four different cancer types, including melanoma. Three other family members affected with melanoma did not carry the variant. Overall our data do not support a case for PALB2 being associated with melanoma predisposition.
doi:10.1371/journal.pone.0100683
PMCID: PMC4065098  PMID: 24949998
11.  Association between putative functional variants in the PSMB9 gene and risk of melanoma - re-analysis of published melanoma genome-wide association studies 
Pigment cell & melanoma research  2013;26(3):10.1111/pcmr.12069.
Summary
To mine possibly hidden causal single nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs) in the etiology of melanoma, we investigated the association of SNPs in 76 M/G1 transition genes with melanoma risk using our published genome-wide association study (GWAS) dataset with 1804 melanoma cases and 1,026 cancer-free controls. We found multiple SNPs with P < 0.01 and performed validation studies for 18 putative functional SNPs in PSMB9 in other two GWAS datasets. Two SNPs (rs1351383 and rs2127675) were associated with melanoma risk in the GenoMEL dataset (P = 0.013 and 0.004, respectively), but failed validation in the Australia dataset. Genotype-phenotype analysis revealed these two SNPs were significantly correlated with mRNA expression levels of PSMB9. Further experiments revealed that the promoter SNP rs2071480, which is in high LD with rs1351383 and rs2127675, involved in influencing transcription factor binding and gene expression. Taken together, our data suggested that functional variants in PSMB9 may contribute to melanoma susceptibility.
doi:10.1111/pcmr.12069
PMCID: PMC3721546  PMID: 23360169
GWAS; Cell cycle; PSMB9; Polymorphism; melanoma
12.  Features associated with germline CDKN2A mutations: a GenoMEL study of melanoma‐prone families from three continents 
Journal of Medical Genetics  2006;44(2):99-106.
Background
The major factors individually reported to be associated with an increased frequency of CDKN2A mutations are increased number of patients with melanoma in a family, early age at melanoma diagnosis, and family members with multiple primary melanomas (MPM) or pancreatic cancer.
Methods
These four features were examined in 385 families with ⩾3 patients with melanoma pooled by 17 GenoMEL groups, and these attributes were compared across continents.
Results
Overall, 39% of families had CDKN2A mutations ranging from 20% (32/162) in Australia to 45% (29/65) in North America to 57% (89/157) in Europe. All four features in each group, except pancreatic cancer in Australia (p = 0.38), individually showed significant associations with CDKN2A mutations, but the effects varied widely across continents. Multivariate examination also showed different predictors of mutation risk across continents. In Australian families, ⩾2 patients with MPM, median age at melanoma diagnosis ⩽40 years and ⩾6 patients with melanoma in a family jointly predicted the mutation risk. In European families, all four factors concurrently predicted the risk, but with less stringent criteria than in Australia. In North American families, only ⩾1 patient with MPM and age at diagnosis ⩽40 years simultaneously predicted the mutation risk.
Conclusions
The variation in CDKN2A mutations for the four features across continents is consistent with the lower melanoma incidence rates in Europe and higher rates of sporadic melanoma in Australia. The lack of a pancreatic cancer–CDKN2A mutation relationship in Australia probably reflects the divergent spectrum of mutations in families from Australia versus those from North America and Europe. GenoMEL is exploring candidate host, genetic and/or environmental risk factors to better understand the variation observed.
doi:10.1136/jmg.2006.043802
PMCID: PMC2598064  PMID: 16905682
melanoma;  CDKN2A ; multiple primary melanomas; pancreatic cancer
13.  Association between functional polymorphisms in genes involved in the MAPK signaling pathways and cutaneous melanoma risk 
Carcinogenesis  2013;34(4):885-892.
Genome-wide association studies (GWASs) have mainly focused on top significant single nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs), most of which did not have clear biological functions but were just surrogates for unknown causal variants. Studying SNPs with modest association and putative functions in biologically plausible pathways has become one complementary approach to GWASs. To unravel the key roles of mitogen-activated protein kinase (MAPK) pathways in cutaneous melanoma (CM) risk, we re-evaluated the associations between 47 818 SNPs in 280 MAPK genes and CM risk using our published GWAS dataset with 1804 CM cases and 1026 controls. We initially found 105 SNPs with P ≤ 0.001, more than expected by chance, 26 of which were predicted to be putatively functional SNPs. The risk associations with 16 SNPs around DUSP14 (rs1051849) and a previous reported melanoma locus MAFF/PLA2G6 (proxy SNP rs4608623) were replicated in the GenoMEL dataset (P < 0.01) but failed in the Australian dataset. Meta-analysis showed that rs1051849 in the 3ʹ untranslated regions of DUSP14 was associated with a reduced risk of melanoma (odds ratio = 0.89, 95% confidence interval: 0.82–0.96, P = 0.003, false discovery rate = 0.056). Further genotype–phenotype correlation analysis using the 90 HapMap lymphoblastoid cell lines from Caucasians showed significant correlations between two SNPs (rs1051849 and rs4608623) and messenger RNA expression levels of DUSP14 and MAFF (P = 0.025 and P = 0.010, respectively). Gene-based tests also revealed significant SNPs were over-represented in MAFF, PLA2G6, DUSP14 and other 16 genes. Our results suggest that functional SNPs in MAPK pathways may contribute to CM risk. Further studies are warranted to validate our findings.
doi:10.1093/carcin/bgs407
PMCID: PMC3616673  PMID: 23291271
14.  MicroRNA-34c is associated with emphysema severity and modulates SERPINE1 expression 
BMC Genomics  2014;15:88.
Background
MicroRNAs (MiRNA) are small non-coding RNAs that regulate gene expression. The aim of this study was to identify miRNAs differentially expressed between mild and moderately emphysematous lung, as well as their functional target mRNAs. Resected lung from patients with COPD undergoing lung cancer surgery was profiled using miRNA (Agilent Human miRNA profiler G4470 V1.01) and mRNA (OperonV2.0) microarrays. Cells of lung origin (BEAS-2B and HFL1) were profiled using mRNA microarrays (Illumina HumanHT-12 V3) after in vitro manipulation.
Results
COPD patients had mean (SD) age 68 (6) years, FEV1 72 (17)% predicted and gas transfer (KCO) 70 (10)% predicted. Five miRNAs (miR-34c, miR-34b, miR-149, miR-133a and miR-133b) were significantly down-regulated in lung from patients with moderate compared to mild emphysema as defined by gas transfer (p < 0.01). In vitro upregulation of miR-34c in respiratory cells led to down-regulation of predicted target mRNAs, including SERPINE1, MAP4K4, ZNF3, ALDOA and HNF4A. The fold change in ex-vivo expression of all five predicted target genes inversely correlated with that of miR-34c in emphysematous lung, but this relationship was strongest for SERPINE1 (p = 0.05).
Conclusion
Differences in miRNA expression are associated with emphysema severity in COPD patients. MiR-34c modulates expression of its putative target gene, SERPINE1, in vitro in respiratory cell lines and ex vivo in emphysematous lung tissue.
doi:10.1186/1471-2164-15-88
PMCID: PMC3922660  PMID: 24479666
Chronic obstructive pulmonary disease; microRNA; miR-34c; Microarray
15.  A variant in FTO shows association with melanoma risk not due to BMI 
Iles, Mark M | Law, Matthew H | Stacey, Simon N | Han, Jiali | Fang, Shenying | Pfeiffer, Ruth | Harland, Mark | MacGregor, Stuart | Taylor, John C | Aben, Katja K | Akslen, Lars A | Avril, Marie-Françoise | Azizi, Esther | Bakker, Bert | Benediktsdottir, Kristrun R | Bergman, Wilma | Scarrà, Giovanna Bianchi | Brown, Kevin M | Calista, Donato | Chaudru, Valerié | Fargnoli, Maria Concetta | Cust, Anne E | Demenais, Florence | de Waal, Anne C | Dębniak, Tadeusz | Elder, David E | Friedman, Eitan | Galan, Pilar | Ghiorzo, Paola | Gillanders, Elizabeth M | Goldstein, Alisa M | Gruis, Nelleke A | Hansson, Johan | Helsing, Per | Hočevar, Marko | Höiom, Veronica | Hopper, John L | Ingvar, Christian | Janssen, Marjolein | Jenkins, Mark A | Kanetsky, Peter A | Kiemeney, Lambertus A | Lang, Julie | Lathrop, G Mark | Leachman, Sancy | Lee, Jeffrey E | Lubiński, Jan | Mackie, Rona M | Mann, Graham J | Mayordomo, Jose I | Molven, Anders | Mulder, Suzanne | Nagore, Eduardo | Novaković, Srdjan | Okamoto, Ichiro | Olafsson, Jon H | Olsson, Håkan | Pehamberger, Hubert | Peris, Ketty | Grasa, Maria Pilar | Planelles, Dolores | Puig, Susana | Puig-Butille, Joan Anton | Randerson-Moor, Juliette | Requena, Celia | Rivoltini, Licia | Rodolfo, Monica | Santinami, Mario | Sigurgeirsson, Bardur | Snowden, Helen | Song, Fengju | Sulem, Patrick | Thorisdottir, Kristin | Tuominen, Rainer | Van Belle, Patricia | van der Stoep, Nienke | van Rossum, Michelle M | Wei, Qingyi | Wendt, Judith | Zelenika, Diana | Zhang, Mingfeng | Landi, Maria Teresa | Thorleifsson, Gudmar | Bishop, D Timothy | Amos, Christopher I | Hayward, Nicholas K | Stefansson, Kari | Bishop, Julia A Newton | Barrett, Jennifer H
Nature genetics  2013;45(4):428-432.
We report the results of an association study of melanoma based on the genome-wide imputation of the genotypes of 1,353 cases and 3,566 controls of European origin conducted by the GenoMEL consortium. This revealed a novel association between several single nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs) in intron 8 of the FTO gene, including rs16953002, which replicated using 12,313 cases and 55,667 controls of European ancestry from Europe, the USA and Australia (combined p=3.6×10−12, per-allele OR for A=1.16). As well as identifying a novel melanoma susceptibility locus, this is the first study to identify and replicate an association with SNPs in FTO not related to body mass index (BMI). These SNPs are not in intron 1 (the BMI-related region) and show no association with BMI. This suggests FTO’s function may be broader than the existing paradigm that FTO variants influence multiple traits only through their associations with BMI and obesity.
doi:10.1038/ng.2571
PMCID: PMC3640814  PMID: 23455637
16.  A BAP1 Mutation in a Danish Family Predisposes to Uveal Melanoma and Other Cancers 
PLoS ONE  2013;8(8):e72144.
Truncating germline mutations in the tumor suppressor gene BRCA-1 associated protein-1 (BAP1) have been reported in families predisposed to developing a wide range of different cancer types including uveal melanoma and cutaneous melanoma. There has also been an association between amelanotic tumor development and germline BAP1 mutation suggesting a possible phenotypic characteristic of BAP1 mutation carriers. Though there have been many types of cancer associated with germline BAP1 mutation, the full spectrum of disease association is yet to be ascertained. Here we describe a Danish family with predominantly uveal melanoma but also a range of other tumor types including lung, neuroendocrine, stomach, and breast cancer; as well as pigmented skin lesions. Whole-exome sequencing identified a BAP1 splice mutation located at c.581-2A>G, which leads to a premature truncation of BAP1 in an individual with uveal melanoma. This mutation was carried by several other family members with melanoma or various cancers. The finding expands on the growing profile of BAP1 as an important uveal and cutaneous melanoma tumor suppressor gene and implicates its involvement in the development of lung, and stomach cancer.
doi:10.1371/journal.pone.0072144
PMCID: PMC3747051  PMID: 23977234
17.  The Queensland study of Melanoma: Environmental and Genetic Associations (Q-MEGA). Study design, baseline characteristics, and repeatability of phenotype and sun exposure measures 
Cutaneous malignant melanoma (CMM) is a major health issue in Queensland, Australia which has the world’s highest incidence. Recent molecular and epidemiologic studies suggest that CMM arises through multiple etiological pathways involving gene-environment interactions. Understanding the potential mechanisms leading to CMM requires larger studies than those previously conducted. This article describes the design and baseline characteristics of Q-MEGA, the Queensland study of Melanoma: Environmental and Genetic Associations, which followed-up four population-based samples of CMM patients in Queensland, including children, adolescents, men aged over 50, and a large sample of adult cases and their families, including twins. Q-MEGA aims to investigate the roles of genetic and environmental factors, and their interaction, in the etiology of melanoma. 3,471 participants took part in the follow-up study and were administered a computer-assisted telephone interview in 2002–2005. Updated data on environmental and phenotypic risk factors, and 2,777 blood samples were collected from interviewed participants as well as a subset of relatives. This study provides a large and well-described population-based sample of CMM cases with follow-up data. Characteristics of the cases and repeatability of sun exposure and phenotype measures between the baseline and the follow-up surveys, from six to 17 years later, are also described.
doi:10.1375/twin.11.2.183
PMCID: PMC3677021  PMID: 18361720
18.  Multiple pigmentation gene polymorphisms account for a substantial proportion of risk of cutaneous malignant melanoma 
We have previously described the role of red hair (Melanocortin 1 Receptor, MC1R) and blue eye (Oculocutaneous Albinism Type 2, OCA2) gene polymorphisms in modulating risk of cutaneous malignant melanoma (CMM) in a highly sun-exposed population of European descent. A number of recent studies, including genome-wide association studies (GWAS), have identified numerous polymorphisms controlling human hair, eye and skin colour. In this paper, we test a selected set of polymorphisms in pigmentation loci (ASIP, TYR, TYRP1, MC1R, OCA2, IRF4, SLC24A4, SLC45A2) for association with CMM risk in a large Australian population-based case control study. Variants in IRF4 and SLC24A4, despite being strongly associated with pigmentation in our sample, did not modify CMM risk, but the other six did. Three SNPs (rs28777, rs35391, rs16891982) in the MATP gene (SLC45A2) exhibited the strongest crude association with risk, but this was attenuated to approximately the same effect size as that of a MC1R red hair color allele by controlling for ancestry of cases and controls. We also detected significant epistatic interactions between SLC45A2 and OCA2 alleles, and MC1R and ASIP alleles. Overall, these measured variants account for 12% of the familial risk of CMM in our population.
doi:10.1038/jid.2009.258
PMCID: PMC3672059  PMID: 19710684
19.  Predictors of Sun Protection Behaviours and Severe Sunburn inan International on-line study 
Background
The incidence of melanoma continues to increase in many countries, and primary prevention of melanoma includes avoidance of sunburn as well as adequate sun protection behaviour. The aim of this study was to examine the prevalence of self-reported sun protection behaviours and sunburn in users of the Internet, and to identify the demographic, clinical and attitudinal/motivational correlates of sun protection behaviours.
Methods
Self-report data were gathered on behalf of GenoMEL (www.genomel.org) using an online survey available in 10 different languages, and 8,178 individuals successfully completed at least 80% of survey items, with 73% of respondents from Europe, 12% from Australia, 7% from the USA, 2% from Israel, and 6% from other countries.
Results
Half of all respondents and 27% of those with a previous melanoma reported at least one severe sunburn during the previous 12 months. The strongest factors associated with sun protection behaviour were perceived barriers to protection (β=−0.44/β=−0.37), and respondents who reported a positive attitude towards suntans were less likely to protect (β=−0.16/β=−0.14). Reported use of protective clothing and shade, as well as avoidance of midday sun exposure, were more strongly related to reduced risk of sunburn than sunscreen use.
Conclusions
Despite widespread dissemination of public health messages about the importance of sun protection, a substantial proportion of this international sample, including respondents with a previous melanoma, reported inadequate sun protection behaviours resulting in severe sunburn.
Impact
Future strategies to decrease sunburn should target the practical, social and psychological barriers associated with non-uptake of sun protection.
doi:10.1158/1055-9965.EPI-10-0196
PMCID: PMC3672402  PMID: 20643826
Sun exposure; Sunburn; Sun protection; Melanoma
20.  Melanoma Risk Factors, Perceived threat and Intentional Tanning: An Online Survey 
Background
Cutaneous melanoma continues to increase in incidence in many countries, and intentional tanning is a risk factor for melanoma. The aim of this study was to understand how melanoma risk factors, perceived threat, and preferences for a suntan relate to intentional tanning.
Methods
Self-report data were collected on behalf of GenoMEL (www.genomel.org) from members of the general population using an online survey. A total of 8,178 individuals successfully completed at least 80% of the survey, with 72.8% of respondents from Europe, 12.1% from Australia, 7.1% from the USA, 2.5% from Israel, and 5.5% from other countries.
Results
Seven percent of respondents had previously been diagnosed with melanoma and 8% had at least one first-degree relative with a previous melanoma. Overall, 70% of the respondents reported some degree of intentional tanning during the past year, and 38% of respondents previously diagnosed with melanoma had intentionally tanned. Total number of objective risk factors was positively correlated with perceived risk of melanoma (correlation coefficient (ρ)=0.27), and negatively correlated with intentional tanning (ρ=−0.16). Preference for a dark suntan was the strongest predictor of intentional tanning (regression coefficient (β)=0.35, p<0.001), even in those with a previous melanoma (β=0.33, p<0.01).
Conclusions
A substantial proportion of participants reported having phenotypic and behavioural risk factors for melanoma. The preference regarding suntans seemed more important in the participants’ decision to intentionally tan than their perceived risk of developing melanoma, and this finding was consistent among respondents from different countries. The drive to sunbathe in order to tan appears to be a key psychological factor to be moderated if melanoma incidence is to be reduced.
doi:10.1097/CEJ.0b013e3283354847
PMCID: PMC3672405  PMID: 20093934
Intentional tanning; Sunbathing, Suntan; Perceived threat; Melanoma; Risk factors; Familial risk
21.  Polymorphisms in the Syntaxin 17 Gene are not Associated with Human Cutaneous Malignant Melanoma 
Melanoma research  2009;19(2):80-86.
The prevalence of cutaneous malignant melanoma (CMM) has increased significantly in most Caucasian populations in recent decades. Both genetic and environment are significant risk factors involved in the development of CMM. A germline mutation in the Syntaxin 17 (STX17) gene was recently identified in horses causing premature hair gray and associated with susceptibility to melanoma. We hypothesized that common germline variants in the STX17 gene might be associated with predisposition to human CMM or might interact with other melanoma risk genes. We conducted a case-control study by genotyping 26 tagging single nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs) across the STX17 gene region in an Australian sample and performed logistic regression analysis for predicting the possible SNP interactions in a combined dataset. Our results do not support an association between CMM and any of the STX17 SNPs and provide no evidence for interactions between the melanoma risk SNP rs910873 on chromosome 20 and any of the STX17 SNPs. We conclude that common variants in the STX17 gene region do not play a key role in the pathogenesis of human melanoma.
doi:10.1097/CMR.0b013e328322fc45
PMCID: PMC3665505  PMID: 19209086
Syntaxin 17; melanoma; polymorphisms
23.  Helicobacter pylori infection and the risks of Barrett's oesophagus: a population-based case-control study 
Infection with Helicobacter pylori is associated with significantly reduced risks of oesophageal adenocarcinoma, however few studies have examined the association between H pylori and Barrett's oesophagus (BO), the precursor lesion. We explored the relationship between H pylori infection and BO and sought to identify potential modifiers. We compared the prevalence of positive H pylori serology among 217 adults with simple BO (without dysplasia), 95 with dysplastic BO and 398 population controls sourced from the metropolitan Brisbane area. We determined H pylori serostatus using enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay. To estimate relative risks, we calculated odds ratios (OR) and 95% confidence intervals (CI) using multivariable logistic regression in the entire sample and stratified by factors known to cause BO. The prevalence of H pylori seropositivity was 12%, 3% and 18% respectively, among patients with simple BO, dysplastic BO and population controls. BO patients were significantly less likely to have antibodies for H pylori (Simple BO: OR=0.51, 95% CI: 0.30-0.86; Dysplastic BO: OR=0.10, 95% CI: 0.03-0.33) than population controls. For simple BO, the association was diminished after adjustment for frequency of gastro-oesophageal reflux (GOR) symptoms. Adjustment for frequency of GOR symptoms did not substantially alter the observed effect for dysplastic BO. While there was some variation in the magnitude of risk estimates across strata of age, sex, GOR symptoms, and use of PPIs or H2-receptor antagonists, the differences were uniformly nonsignificant. H pylori infection is inversely associated with BO, and our findings suggest that decreased acid load is not the only mechanism underlying the H pylori protective effect.
doi:10.1002/ijc.26242
PMCID: PMC3306509  PMID: 21681741
Barrett's oesophagus; environmental modifiers; epidemiology; Helicobacter pylori; gastro-oesophageal reflux
24.  Exome sequencing identifies recurrent somatic RAC1 mutations in melanoma 
Nature genetics  2012;44(9):1006-1014.
We characterized the mutational landscape of melanoma, the form of skin cancer with the highest mortality rate, by sequencing the exomes of 147 melanomas. Sun-exposed melanomas had markedly more ultraviolet (UV)-like C>T somatic mutations compared to sun-shielded acral, mucosal and uveal melanomas. Among the newly identified cancer genes was PPP6C, encoding a serine/threonine phosphatase, which harbored mutations that clustered in the active site in 12% of sun-exposed melanomas, exclusively in tumors with mutations in BRAF or NRAS. Notably, we identified a recurrent UV-signature, an activating mutation in RAC1 in 9.2% of sun-exposed melanomas. This activating mutation, the third most frequent in our cohort of sun-exposed melanoma after those of BRAF and NRAS, changes Pro29 to serine (RAC1P29S) in the highly conserved switch I domain. Crystal structures, and biochemical and functional studies of RAC1P29S showed that the alteration releases the conformational restraint conferred by the conserved proline, causes an increased binding of the protein to downstream effectors, and promotes melanocyte proliferation and migration. These findings raise the possibility that pharmacological inhibition of downstream effectors of RAC1 signaling could be of therapeutic benefit.
doi:10.1038/ng.2359
PMCID: PMC3432702  PMID: 22842228
25.  Duplication of CXC chemokine genes on chromosome 4q13 in a melanoma-prone family 
Pigment cell & melanoma research  2012;25(2):243-247.
Summary
Copy number variations (CNVs) have been shown to contribute substantially to disease susceptibility in several inherited diseases including cancer. We conducted a genome-wide search for CNVs in blood-derived DNA from 79 individuals (62 melanoma patients and 17 spouse controls) of 30 high-risk melanoma-prone families without known segregating mutations using genome-wide comparative genomic hybridization (CGH) tiling arrays. We identified a duplicated region on chromosome 4q13 in germline DNA of all melanoma patients in a melanoma-prone family with three affected siblings. We confirmed the duplication using quantitative PCR and a custom-made CGH array design spanning the 4q13 region. The duplicated region contains 10 genes, most of which encode CXC chemokines. Among them, CXCL1 (melanoma growth-stimulating activity α) and IL8 (interleukin 8) have been shown to stimulate melanoma growth in vitro and in vivo. Our data suggests that the alteration of CXC chemokine genes may confer susceptibility to melanoma.
doi:10.1111/j.1755-148X.2012.00969.x
PMCID: PMC3288577  PMID: 22225770
Familial melanoma; Germline copy number variations; disease susceptibility; CXC chemokines; chromosome 4q13

Results 1-25 (58)