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author:("Seth, diva")
1.  Endogenous protein S-nitrosylation in E. coli: regulation by OxyR 
Science (New York, N.Y.)  2012;336(6080):10.1126/science.1215643.
Endogenous S-nitrosylation of proteins, a principal mechanism of cellular signaling in eukaryotes, has not been observed in microbes. We report that protein S-nitrosylation is an obligate concomitant of anaerobic respiration on nitrate in Escherichia coli. Endogenous S-nitrosylation during anaerobic respiration is controlled by the transcription factor OxyR, previously thought to operate only under aerobic conditions. Deletion of OxyR resulted in large increases in protein S-nitrosylation, and S-nitrosylation of OxyR induced transcription from a regulon that is distinct from the regulon induced by OxyR oxidation. Furthermore, products unique to the anaerobic regulon protected against S-nitrosothiols, and anaerobic growth of E. coli lacking OxyR was impaired on nitrate. Thus, OxyR serves as a master regulator of S-nitrosylation, and alternative posttranslational modifications of OxyR control distinct transcriptional responses.
doi:10.1126/science.1215643
PMCID: PMC3837355  PMID: 22539721
2.  Lipid profiles and the risk of endometrial cancer in the Swedish AMORIS study 
Background
While the association between obesity and endometrial cancer (EC) is well established, the underlying mechanisms require further study. We assessed possible links between lipid profiles and EC risk, while also taking into account BMI, parity, and menopausal status at baseline.
Methods
Using the information available from the Swedish Apolipoprotein MOrtality RISk (AMORIS) study we created a cohort of 225,432 women with baseline values for glucose, triglycerides (TG), and total cholesterol (TC). Two subgroups of 31,792 and 26,317 had, in addition, baseline measurements of HDL, LDL, apolipoprotein A-I and apoB and BMI, respectively. We used Multivariate Cox proportional hazards models to analyze quartiles and dichotomized values of these lipid components for a link to EC risk.
Results
During mean follow-up of 12 years (SD: 4.15), 1,144 persons developed endometrial cancer. A statistically significant association was found between TG and EC risk when using both quartiles and a clinical cut-off (Hazard Ratio (HR): 1.10 (95%CI: 0.88-1.37), 1.34 (1.09-1.63), and 1.57 (1.28-1.92)) for the 2nd, 3rd, and 4th quartile, compared to the 1st, with P-value for trend: <0.001). The association remained after exclusion of the first three years of follow-up. Also total cholesterol and TG/HDL ratio were positively associated with EC risk, but no link was found for the other lipid components studied.
Conclusion
This detailed analysis of lipid components showed a consistent relation between TG levels and EC risk. Future research should continue to analyze the metabolic pathway and its relation to EC risk, as a pathway to further understand the relation of obesity and disease.
PMCID: PMC3376923  PMID: 22724049
Lipid profiles; risk factor; endometrial cancer; Swedish AMORIS study
3.  The SNO-proteome: Causation and Classifications 
Cell signaling is a complex and highly regulated process. Post-translational modifications of proteins serve to sense and transduce cellular signals in a precisely coordinated manner. It is increasingly recognized that protein S-nitrosylation, the addition of a nitric oxide group to cysteine thiols, serves an important role in a wide range of signaling pathways. In spite of the large number of SNO-proteins now identified (~1000), the observed specificity of S-nitrosylation in terms of target proteins and specific cysteines within modified proteins is incompletely understood. Here we review the progress made in S-nitrosylation detection methods that have facilitated the study of the SNO-proteome under physiological and pathophysiological conditions, and some factors important in determining the SNO-proteome. Classification schemes for emergent denitrosylases and prospective ‘protein S-nitrosylases’ are provided.
doi:10.1016/j.cbpa.2010.10.012
PMCID: PMC3040261  PMID: 21087893

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