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1.  Fine-mapping identifies multiple prostate cancer risk loci at 5p15, one of which associates with TERT expression 
Kote-Jarai, Zsofia | Saunders, Edward J. | Leongamornlert, Daniel A. | Tymrakiewicz, Malgorzata | Dadaev, Tokhir | Jugurnauth-Little, Sarah | Ross-Adams, Helen | Al Olama, Ali Amin | Benlloch, Sara | Halim, Silvia | Russell, Roslin | Dunning, Alison M. | Luccarini, Craig | Dennis, Joe | Neal, David E. | Hamdy, Freddie C. | Donovan, Jenny L. | Muir, Ken | Giles, Graham G. | Severi, Gianluca | Wiklund, Fredrik | Gronberg, Henrik | Haiman, Christopher A. | Schumacher, Fredrick | Henderson, Brian E. | Le Marchand, Loic | Lindstrom, Sara | Kraft, Peter | Hunter, David J. | Gapstur, Susan | Chanock, Stephen | Berndt, Sonja I. | Albanes, Demetrius | Andriole, Gerald | Schleutker, Johanna | Weischer, Maren | Canzian, Federico | Riboli, Elio | Key, Tim J. | Travis, Ruth C. | Campa, Daniele | Ingles, Sue A. | John, Esther M. | Hayes, Richard B. | Pharoah, Paul | Khaw, Kay-Tee | Stanford, Janet L. | Ostrander, Elaine A. | Signorello, Lisa B. | Thibodeau, Stephen N. | Schaid, Dan | Maier, Christiane | Vogel, Walther | Kibel, Adam S. | Cybulski, Cezary | Lubinski, Jan | Cannon-Albright, Lisa | Brenner, Hermann | Park, Jong Y. | Kaneva, Radka | Batra, Jyotsna | Spurdle, Amanda | Clements, Judith A. | Teixeira, Manuel R. | Govindasami, Koveela | Guy, Michelle | Wilkinson, Rosemary A. | Sawyer, Emma J. | Morgan, Angela | Dicks, Ed | Baynes, Caroline | Conroy, Don | Bojensen, Stig E. | Kaaks, Rudolf | Vincent, Daniel | Bacot, François | Tessier, Daniel C. | Easton, Douglas F. | Eeles, Rosalind A.
Human Molecular Genetics  2013;22(20):4239.
doi:10.1093/hmg/ddt334
PMCID: PMC3871151
2.  Comparative efficacy and safety of treatments for localised prostate cancer: an application of network meta-analysis 
BMJ Open  2014;4(5):e004285.
Context
There is ongoing uncertainty about the optimal management of patients with localised prostate cancer.
Objective
To evaluate the comparative efficacy and safety of different treatments for patients with localised prostate cancer.
Design
Systematic review with Bayesian network meta-analysis to estimate comparative ORs, and a score (0–100%) that, for a given outcome, reflects average rank order of superiority of each treatment compared against all others, using the Surface Under the Cumulative RAnking curve (SUCRA) statistic.
Data sources
Electronic searches of MEDLINE without language restriction.
Study selection
Randomised trials comparing the efficacy and safety of different primary treatments (48 papers from 21 randomised trials included 7350 men).
Data extraction
2 reviewers independently extracted data and assessed risk of bias.
Results
Comparative efficacy and safety evidence was available for prostatectomy, external beam radiotherapy (different types and regimens), observational management and cryotherapy, but not high-intensity focused ultrasound. There was no evidence of superiority for any of the compared treatments in respect of all-cause mortality after 5 years. Cryotherapy was associated with less gastrointestinal and genitourinary toxicity than radiotherapy (SUCRA: 99% and 77% for gastrointestinal and genitourinary toxicity, respectively).
Conclusions
The limited available evidence suggests that different treatments may be optimal for different efficacy and safety outcomes. These findings highlight the importance of informed patient choice and shared decision-making about treatment modality and acceptable trade-offs between different outcomes. More trial evidence is required to reduce uncertainty. Network meta-analysis may be useful to optimise the power of evidence synthesis studies once data from new randomised controlled studies in this field are published in the future.
doi:10.1136/bmjopen-2013-004285
PMCID: PMC4024605  PMID: 24833678
Prostate Cancer; Treatment; Randomised Trials; Systematic Review; Meta-Analysis
3.  The importance of dietary change for men diagnosed with and at risk of prostate cancer: a multi-centre interview study with men, their partners and health professionals 
BMC Family Practice  2014;15:81.
Background
The diagnosis of prostate cancer (PC) can provide a trigger for dietary change, and there is evidence that healthier diets may improve quality of life and clinical outcomes. However, men’s views about dietary change in PC survivorship are largely unknown. This multi-centre qualitative interview study explored men’s views about dietary change in PC survivorship, to better understand motivations for, and barriers to, achieving desired changes. The role of radical and active surveillance treatments on dietary change and the influence of men’s partners were examined. Focus groups also evaluated stakeholder opinion, including healthcare professionals, about the provision of dietary advice to PC patients.
Methods
A multi-centre interview study explored views about diet and motivations for, and barriers to, dietary change in men at elevated risk or diagnosed with PC following prostate specific antigen (PSA) testing. 58 men and 11 partners were interviewed. Interviews and focus groups were undertaken with 11 healthcare professionals, 5 patients and 4 partners to evaluate stakeholders’ opinions about the feasibility and acceptability of providing dietary advice to PC patients. Data were analysed using methods of constant comparison and thematic analysis.
Results
Over half of diagnosed men reported making dietary changes, primarily to promote general or prostate health or facilitate coping, despite their uncertainty about diet-PC links. Interest in dietary advice was high. Information needs varied depending on treatment received, with men on active surveillance more frequently modifying their diet and regarding this as an adjunct therapy. Men considered their partners integral to implementing changes. Provision of dietary advice to men diagnosed with PC was considered by healthcare professionals and men to be feasible and appropriate in the context of a holistic ‘care package’.
Conclusions
Many men make positive dietary changes after PC diagnosis, which are perceived by men and their partners to bring psychological and general health benefits and could help future dietary intervention trials. Men and their partners desire more and better dietary information that may support PC survivorship, particularly among those embarking on active surveillance/monitoring programmes. There are opportunities for healthcare professionals to support PC patients both clinically and psychologically by the routine integration of healthy eating advice into survivorship care plans.
doi:10.1186/1471-2296-15-81
PMCID: PMC4020306  PMID: 24886169
Cancer; Diet; Oncology; Prostatic neoplasms; Qualitative research; Survivors
4.  Regulation of the localisation and function of the oncogene LYRIC/AEG-1 by ubiquitination at K486 and K491 
Molecular Oncology  2014;8(3):633-641.
The pivotal role of LYRIC/AEG-1 in malignant transformation, tumourigenesis and chemo-resistance has previously been demonstrated in different cell types and sub-cellular compartments. The localisation of LYRIC/AEG-1 appears crucial to its function and is regulated by three lysine-rich nuclear localisation signal regions, one of which was previously demonstrated to be modified by ubiquitin. Here we show that mutation of LYRIC/AEG-1 at K486 and K491 results in a loss of ubiquitination. A K486/491R double mutant that is incapable of ubiquitination shows reduced binding to the NFκB subunit p65 or importin-β resulting in a distinctive peri-nuclear localisation of LYRIC/AEG-1. We also provide evidence to suggest that TOPORS, an E3 ligase that also regulates p53 modification may be responsible for LYRIC/AEG-1 ubiquitin modification. Overall we demonstrate that specific sites of LYRIC/AEG-1 ubiquitination are essential for regulating LYRIC/AEG-1 localisation and functionally interacting proteins.
Highlights
•LYRIC/AEG-1 is an important oncogene.•2 specific lysine residues in exNLS-2 are ubiquitinated.•Deletion of both lysine residues changes localisation and interaction with p65.•LYRIC/AEG-1 interacts with TOPORS, a known E3 ligase.
doi:10.1016/j.molonc.2014.01.009
PMCID: PMC4013555  PMID: 24529480
Ubiquitin; Oncogene; Localisation; Protein–protein interaction
5.  HES6 drives a critical AR transcriptional programme to induce castration-resistant prostate cancer through activation of an E2F1-mediated cell cycle network 
EMBO Molecular Medicine  2014;6(5):651-661.
Castrate-resistant prostate cancer (CRPC) is poorly characterized and heterogeneous and while the androgen receptor (AR) is of singular importance, other factors such as c-Myc and the E2F family also play a role in later stage disease. HES6 is a transcription co-factor associated with stem cell characteristics in neural tissue. Here we show that HES6 is up-regulated in aggressive human prostate cancer and drives castration-resistant tumour growth in the absence of ligand binding by enhancing the transcriptional activity of the AR, which is preferentially directed to a regulatory network enriched for transcription factors such as E2F1. In the clinical setting, we have uncovered a HES6-associated signature that predicts poor outcome in prostate cancer, which can be pharmacologically targeted by inhibition of PLK1 with restoration of sensitivity to castration. We have therefore shown for the first time the critical role of HES6 in the development of CRPC and identified its potential in patient-specific therapeutic strategies.
doi:10.1002/emmm.201303581
PMCID: PMC4023887  PMID: 24737870
androgen receptor; castrate-resistant prostate cancer; gene expression signature; HES6; PLK1
6.  The ETS family member GABPα modulates androgen receptor signalling and mediates an aggressive phenotype in prostate cancer 
Nucleic Acids Research  2014;42(10):6256-6269.
In prostate cancer (PC), the androgen receptor (AR) is a key transcription factor at all disease stages, including the advanced stage of castrate-resistant prostate cancer (CRPC). In the present study, we show that GABPα, an ETS factor that is up-regulated in PC, is an AR-interacting transcription factor. Expression of GABPα enables PC cell lines to acquire some of the molecular and cellular characteristics of CRPC tissues as well as more aggressive growth phenotypes. GABPα has a transcriptional role that dissects the overlapping cistromes of the two most common ETS gene fusions in PC: overlapping significantly with ETV1 but not with ERG target genes. GABPα bound predominantly to gene promoters, regulated the expression of one-third of AR target genes and modulated sensitivity to AR antagonists in hormone responsive and castrate resistant PC models. This study supports a critical role for GABPα in CRPC and reveals potential targets for therapeutic intervention.
doi:10.1093/nar/gku281
PMCID: PMC4041454  PMID: 24753418
7.  Key considerations for the experimental training and evaluation of cancer odour detection dogs: lessons learnt from a double-blind, controlled trial of prostate cancer detection 
BMC Urology  2014;14:22.
Background
Cancer detection using sniffer dogs is a potential technology for clinical use and research. Our study sought to determine whether dogs could be trained to discriminate the odour of urine from men with prostate cancer from controls, using rigorous testing procedures and well-defined samples from a major research hospital.
Methods
We attempted to train ten dogs by initially rewarding them for finding and indicating individual prostate cancer urine samples (Stage 1). If dogs were successful in Stage 1, we then attempted to train them to discriminate prostate cancer samples from controls (Stage 2). The number of samples used to train each dog varied depending on their individual progress. Overall, 50 unique prostate cancer and 67 controls were collected and used during training. Dogs that passed Stage 2 were tested for their ability to discriminate 15 (Test 1) or 16 (Tests 2 and 3) unfamiliar prostate cancer samples from 45 (Test 1) or 48 (Tests 2 and 3) unfamiliar controls under double-blind conditions.
Results
Three dogs reached training Stage 2 and two of these learnt to discriminate potentially familiar prostate cancer samples from controls. However, during double-blind tests using new samples the two dogs did not indicate prostate cancer samples more frequently than expected by chance (Dog A sensitivity 0.13, specificity 0.71, Dog B sensitivity 0.25, specificity 0.75). The other dogs did not progress past Stage 1 as they did not have optimal temperaments for the sensitive odour discrimination training.
Conclusions
Although two dogs appeared to have learnt to select prostate cancer samples during training, they did not generalise on a prostate cancer odour during robust double-blind tests involving new samples. Our study illustrates that these rigorous tests are vital to avoid drawing misleading conclusions about the abilities of dogs to indicate certain odours. Dogs may memorise the individual odours of large numbers of training samples rather than generalise on a common odour. The results do not exclude the possibility that dogs could be trained to detect prostate cancer. We recommend that canine olfactory memory is carefully considered in all future studies and rigorous double-blind methods used to avoid confounding effects.
doi:10.1186/1471-2490-14-22
PMCID: PMC3945616  PMID: 24575737
Prostate cancer; Cancer detection dogs; Cancer odour; Olfactory memory; Multiple sample learning
8.  Fine-Mapping the HOXB Region Detects Common Variants Tagging a Rare Coding Allele: Evidence for Synthetic Association in Prostate Cancer 
PLoS Genetics  2014;10(2):e1004129.
The HOXB13 gene has been implicated in prostate cancer (PrCa) susceptibility. We performed a high resolution fine-mapping analysis to comprehensively evaluate the association between common genetic variation across the HOXB genetic locus at 17q21 and PrCa risk. This involved genotyping 700 SNPs using a custom Illumina iSelect array (iCOGS) followed by imputation of 3195 SNPs in 20,440 PrCa cases and 21,469 controls in The PRACTICAL consortium. We identified a cluster of highly correlated common variants situated within or closely upstream of HOXB13 that were significantly associated with PrCa risk, described by rs117576373 (OR 1.30, P = 2.62×10−14). Additional genotyping, conditional regression and haplotype analyses indicated that the newly identified common variants tag a rare, partially correlated coding variant in the HOXB13 gene (G84E, rs138213197), which has been identified recently as a moderate penetrance PrCa susceptibility allele. The potential for GWAS associations detected through common SNPs to be driven by rare causal variants with higher relative risks has long been proposed; however, to our knowledge this is the first experimental evidence for this phenomenon of synthetic association contributing to cancer susceptibility.
Author Summary
Genome-wide association studies (GWAS) have identified numerous low penetrance disease susceptibility variants, yet few causal alleles have been unambiguously identified. The underlying causal variants are expected to be predominantly common; however synthetic associations with rare, higher penetrance variants have been hypothesised though not yet observed. Here, we report detection of a novel common, low penetrance prostate cancer association at the HOXB locus at ch17q and show that this signal can actually be attributed to a previously identified rare, moderate penetrance coding variant (G84E) in HOXB13. This study therefore provides the first experimental evidence for the existence of synthetic associations in cancer and shows that where GWAS signals arise through this phenomenon, risk predictions derived using the tag SNP would substantially underestimate the relative risk conferred and overestimate the number of carriers of the causal variant. Synthetic associations at GWAS signals could therefore account for a proportion of the missing heritability of complex diseases.
doi:10.1371/journal.pgen.1004129
PMCID: PMC3923678  PMID: 24550738
9.  A meta-analysis of genome-wide association studies to identify prostate cancer susceptibility loci associated with aggressive and non-aggressive disease 
Amin Al Olama, Ali | Kote-Jarai, Zsofia | Schumacher, Fredrick R. | Wiklund, Fredrik | Berndt, Sonja I. | Benlloch, Sara | Giles, Graham G. | Severi, Gianluca | Neal, David E. | Hamdy, Freddie C. | Donovan, Jenny L. | Hunter, David J. | Henderson, Brian E. | Thun, Michael J. | Gaziano, Michael | Giovannucci, Edward L. | Siddiq, Afshan | Travis, Ruth C. | Cox, David G. | Canzian, Federico | Riboli, Elio | Key, Timothy J. | Andriole, Gerald | Albanes, Demetrius | Hayes, Richard B. | Schleutker, Johanna | Auvinen, Anssi | Tammela, Teuvo L.J. | Weischer, Maren | Stanford, Janet L. | Ostrander, Elaine A. | Cybulski, Cezary | Lubinski, Jan | Thibodeau, Stephen N. | Schaid, Daniel J. | Sorensen, Karina D. | Batra, Jyotsna | Clements, Judith A. | Chambers, Suzanne | Aitken, Joanne | Gardiner, Robert A. | Maier, Christiane | Vogel, Walther | Dörk, Thilo | Brenner, Hermann | Habuchi, Tomonori | Ingles, Sue | John, Esther M. | Dickinson, Joanne L. | Cannon-Albright, Lisa | Teixeira, Manuel R. | Kaneva, Radka | Zhang, Hong-Wei | Lu, Yong-Jie | Park, Jong Y. | Cooney, Kathleen A. | Muir, Kenneth R. | Leongamornlert, Daniel A. | Saunders, Edward | Tymrakiewicz, Malgorzata | Mahmud, Nadiya | Guy, Michelle | Govindasami, Koveela | O'Brien, Lynne T. | Wilkinson, Rosemary A. | Hall, Amanda L. | Sawyer, Emma J. | Dadaev, Tokhir | Morrison, Jonathan | Dearnaley, David P. | Horwich, Alan | Huddart, Robert A. | Khoo, Vincent S. | Parker, Christopher C. | Van As, Nicholas | Woodhouse, Christopher J. | Thompson, Alan | Dudderidge, Tim | Ogden, Chris | Cooper, Colin S. | Lophatonanon, Artitaya | Southey, Melissa C. | Hopper, John L. | English, Dallas | Virtamo, Jarmo | Le Marchand, Loic | Campa, Daniele | Kaaks, Rudolf | Lindstrom, Sara | Diver, W. Ryan | Gapstur, Susan | Yeager, Meredith | Cox, Angela | Stern, Mariana C. | Corral, Roman | Aly, Markus | Isaacs, William | Adolfsson, Jan | Xu, Jianfeng | Zheng, S. Lilly | Wahlfors, Tiina | Taari, Kimmo | Kujala, Paula | Klarskov, Peter | Nordestgaard, Børge G. | Røder, M. Andreas | Frikke-Schmidt, Ruth | Bojesen, Stig E. | FitzGerald, Liesel M. | Kolb, Suzanne | Kwon, Erika M. | Karyadi, Danielle M. | Orntoft, Torben Falck | Borre, Michael | Rinckleb, Antje | Luedeke, Manuel | Herkommer, Kathleen | Meyer, Andreas | Serth, Jürgen | Marthick, James R. | Patterson, Briony | Wokolorczyk, Dominika | Spurdle, Amanda | Lose, Felicity | McDonnell, Shannon K. | Joshi, Amit D. | Shahabi, Ahva | Pinto, Pedro | Santos, Joana | Ray, Ana | Sellers, Thomas A. | Lin, Hui-Yi | Stephenson, Robert A. | Teerlink, Craig | Muller, Heiko | Rothenbacher, Dietrich | Tsuchiya, Norihiko | Narita, Shintaro | Cao, Guang-Wen | Slavov, Chavdar | Mitev, Vanio | Chanock, Stephen | Gronberg, Henrik | Haiman, Christopher A. | Kraft, Peter | Easton, Douglas F. | Eeles, Rosalind A.
Human Molecular Genetics  2012;22(2):408-415.
Genome-wide association studies (GWAS) have identified multiple common genetic variants associated with an increased risk of prostate cancer (PrCa), but these explain less than one-third of the heritability. To identify further susceptibility alleles, we conducted a meta-analysis of four GWAS including 5953 cases of aggressive PrCa and 11 463 controls (men without PrCa). We computed association tests for approximately 2.6 million SNPs and followed up the most significant SNPs by genotyping 49 121 samples in 29 studies through the international PRACTICAL and BPC3 consortia. We not only confirmed the association of a PrCa susceptibility locus, rs11672691 on chromosome 19, but also showed an association with aggressive PrCa [odds ratio = 1.12 (95% confidence interval 1.03–1.21), P = 1.4 × 10−8]. This report describes a genetic variant which is associated with aggressive PrCa, which is a type of PrCa associated with a poorer prognosis.
doi:10.1093/hmg/dds425
PMCID: PMC3526158  PMID: 23065704
10.  Identification of 23 new prostate cancer susceptibility loci using the iCOGS custom genotyping array 
Eeles, Rosalind A | Olama, Ali Amin Al | Benlloch, Sara | Saunders, Edward J | Leongamornlert, Daniel A | Tymrakiewicz, Malgorzata | Ghoussaini, Maya | Luccarini, Craig | Dennis, Joe | Jugurnauth-Little, Sarah | Dadaev, Tokhir | Neal, David E | Hamdy, Freddie C | Donovan, Jenny L | Muir, Ken | Giles, Graham G | Severi, Gianluca | Wiklund, Fredrik | Gronberg, Henrik | Haiman, Christopher A | Schumacher, Fredrick | Henderson, Brian | Le Marchand, Loic | Lindstrom, Sara | Kraft, Peter | Hunter, David J | Gapstur, Susan | Chanock, Stephen J | Berndt, Sonja I | Albanes, Demetrius | Andriole, Gerald | Schleutker, Johanna | Weischer, Maren | Canzian, Federico | Riboli, Elio | Key, Tim J | Travis, Ruth | Campa, Daniele | Ingles, Sue A | John, Esther M | Hayes, Richard B | Pharoah, Paul DP | Pashayan, Nora | Khaw, Kay-Tee | Stanford, Janet | Ostrander, Elaine A | Signorello, Lisa B | Thibodeau, Stephen N | Schaid, Dan | Maier, Christiane | Vogel, Walther | Kibel, Adam S | Cybulski, Cezary | Lubinski, Jan | Cannon-Albright,  | Brenner, Hermann | Park, Jong Y | Kaneva, Radka | Batra, Jyotsna | Spurdle, Amanda B | Clements, Judith A | Teixeira, Manuel R | Dicks, Ed | Lee, Andrew | Dunning, Alison | Baynes, Caroline | Conroy, Don | Maranian, Melanie J | Ahmed, Shahana | Govindasami, Koveela | Guy, Michelle | Wilkinson, Rosemary A | Sawyer, Emma J | Morgan, Angela | Dearnaley, David P | Horwich, Alan | Huddart, Robert A | Khoo, Vincent S | Parker, Christopher C | Van As, Nicholas J | Woodhouse, J | Thompson, Alan | Dudderidge, Tim | Ogden, Chris | Cooper, Colin | Lophatananon, Artitaya | Cox, Angela | Southey, Melissa | Hopper, John L | English, Dallas R | Aly, Markus | Adolfsson, Jan | Xu, Jiangfeng | Zheng, Siqun | Yeager, Meredith | Kaaks, Rudolf | Diver, W Ryan | Gaudet, Mia M | Stern, Mariana | Corral, Roman | Joshi, Amit D | Shahabi, Ahva | Wahlfors, Tiina | Tammela, Teuvo J | Auvinen, Anssi | Virtamo, Jarmo | Klarskov, Peter | Nordestgaard, Børge G | Røder, Andreas | Nielsen, Sune F | Bojesen, Stig E | Siddiq, Afshan | FitzGerald, Liesel | Kolb, Suzanne | Kwon, Erika | Karyadi, Danielle | Blot, William J | Zheng, Wei | Cai, Qiuyin | McDonnell, Shannon K | Rinckleb, Antje | Drake, Bettina | Colditz, Graham | Wokolorczyk, Dominika | Stephenson, Robert A | Teerlink, Craig | Muller, Heiko | Rothenbacher, Dietrich | Sellers, Thomas A | Lin, Hui-Yi | Slavov, Chavdar | Mitev, Vanio | Lose, Felicity | Srinivasan, Srilakshmi | Maia, Sofia | Paulo, Paula | Lange, Ethan | Cooney, Kathleen A | Antoniou, Antonis | Vincent, Daniel | Bacot, François | Tessier,  | Kote-Jarai, Zsofia | Easton, Douglas F
Nature genetics  2013;45(4):10.1038/ng.2560.
Prostate cancer is the most frequently diagnosed cancer in males in developed countries. To identify common prostate cancer susceptibility alleles, we genotyped 211,155 SNPs on a custom Illumina array (iCOGS) in blood DNA from 25,074 prostate cancer cases and 24,272 controls from the international PRACTICAL Consortium. Twenty-three new prostate cancer susceptibility loci were identified at genome-wide significance (P < 5 × 10−8). More than 70 prostate cancer susceptibility loci, explaining ~30% of the familial risk for this disease, have now been identified. On the basis of combined risks conferred by the new and previously known risk loci, the top 1% of the risk distribution has a 4.7-fold higher risk than the average of the population being profiled. These results will facilitate population risk stratification for clinical studies.
doi:10.1038/ng.2560
PMCID: PMC3832790  PMID: 23535732
11.  Using genetic proxies for lifecourse sun exposure to assess the causal relationship of sun exposure with circulating vitamin D and prostate cancer risk 
Background
Ecological and epidemiological studies have identified an inverse association of intensity and duration of sunlight exposure with prostate cancer, which may be explained by a reduction in vitamin D synthesis. Pigmentation traits influence sun exposure and therefore may affect prostate cancer risk. Because observational studies are vulnerable to confounding and measurement error, we used Mendelian randomization to examine the relationship of sun exposure with both prostate cancer risk and the intermediate phenotype, plasma levels of vitamin D.
Methods
We created a tanning, a skin color and a freckling score as combinations of SNPs that have been previously associated with these phenotypes. A higher score indicates propensity to burn, have a lighter skin color and freckles. The scores were tested for association with vitamin D levels (25-hydroxyvitamin-D and 1,25-dihydroxyvitamin-D) and PSA-detected prostate cancer in 3123 white British individuals enrolled in the Prostate Testing for cancer and Treatment (ProtecT) study.
Results
The freckling score was inversely associated with 25(OH)D levels (change in 25(OH)D per score unit −0.27; 95%CI: −0.52, −0.01), and the tanning score was positively associated with prostate cancer risk (OR 1.05; 95%CI: 1.02,1.09), after adjustment for population stratification and potential confounders.
Conclusions
Individuals who tend to burn are more likely to spend less time in the sun and consequently have lower plasma vitamin D levels and higher susceptibility to prostate cancer.
Impact
The use of pigmentation related genetic scores is valuable for the assessment of the potential benefits of sun exposure with respect to prostate cancer risk.
doi:10.1158/1055-9965.EPI-12-1248
PMCID: PMC3616836  PMID: 23441100
pigmentation; tanning; sun exposure; vitamin D; prostate cancer
12.  Alcohol consumption and PSA-detected prostate cancer risk—A case-control nested in the ProtecT study 
Alcohol is an established carcinogen but not an established risk factor for prostate cancer, despite some recent prospective studies suggesting increased risk among heavy drinkers. The aim of this study was to investigate the role of alcohol on prostate-specific antigen (PSA) levels and prostate cancer risk. Two thousand four hundred PSA detected prostate cancer cases and 12,700 controls matched on age and general practice were identified through a case-control study nested in the PSA-testing phase of a large UK-based randomized controlled trial for prostate cancer treatment (ProtecT). Linear and multinomial logistic regression models were used to estimate ratios of geometric means (RGMs) of PSA and relative risk ratios (RRRs) of prostate cancer by stage and grade, with 95% confidence intervals (CIs), associated with weekly alcohol intake and drinking patterns. We found evidence of lower PSA (RGM 0.98, 95% CI: 0.98–0.99) and decreased risk of low Gleason-grade (RRR 0.96; 95%CI 0.93–0.99) but increased risk of high-grade prostate cancer (RRR 1.04; 95%CI 0.99–1.08; pdifference=0.004) per 10 units/week increase in alcohol consumption, not explained by current BMI, blood pressure, comorbidities, or reverse causation. This is the first large population-based study to find evidence of lower PSA levels for increasing alcohol consumption, with potential public health implications for the detection of prostate cancer. Our results also support a modestly higher risk of high-grade disease for heavy drinkers, but require independent replication to establish the nature of the association of alcohol with low-grade disease, preferably in cohorts with a heterogeneous case-mix.
What's new?
Alcohol is not an established risk factor for prostate cancer; however, the current work suggests that heavy drinking could cause a small increase in risk of the more aggressive forms. If the results are confirmed to be causal, prostate cancer risk will be added to the many long-term health risks of heavy drinking, and public health strategies will then also reduce high-risk, poorer prognosis prostate cancer. The authors also found that heavy drinkers have lower PSA levels, suggesting that heavy alcohol consumption could be used as a marker to identify men in whom some cancers might be missed.
doi:10.1002/ijc.27877
PMCID: PMC3786564  PMID: 23024014
alcohol; prostate cancer; prostate specific antigen; ProtecT, nested case–control
13.  Circulating folate, vitamin B12, homocysteine, vitamin B12 transport proteins and risk of prostate cancer: a case-control study, systematic review and meta-analysis 
Background
Disturbed folate metabolism is associated with an increased risk of some cancers. Our objective was to determine whether blood levels of folate, vitamin B12 and related metabolites were associated with prostate cancer risk.
Methods
Matched case-control study nested within the UK population-based ProtecT study of PSA-detected prostate cancer in men aged 50–69 years. Plasma concentrations of folate, B12 (cobalamin), holo-haptocorrin, holo- and total-transcobalamin, and total homocysteine (tHcy) were measured in 1,461 cases and 1,507 controls. ProtecT study estimates for associations of folate, B12, and tHcy with prostate cancer risk were included in a meta-analysis, based on a systematic review.
Results
In the ProtecT study, increased B12 and holo-haptocorrin concentrations showed positive associations with prostate cancer risk (highest vs lowest quartile of B12 odds ratio (OR)=1.17 (95% CI 0.95–1.43), P-for-trend=0.06; highest vs lowest quartile of holo-haptocorrin OR=1.27 (1.04–1.56), P-for-trend=0.01); folate, holo-transcobalamin and tHcy were not associated with prostate cancer risk. In the meta-analysis, circulating B12 levels were associated with an increased prostate cancer risk (pooled OR=1.10 (1.01–1.19) per 100 pmol/L increase in B12, P=0.002); the pooled OR for the association of folate with prostate cancer was positive (OR=1.11 (0.96–1.28) per 10 nmol/L, P=0.2) and conventionally statistically significant if ProtecT (the only case-control study) was excluded (OR=1.18 (1.00–1.40) per 10 nmol/L, P=0.02).
Conclusion
Vitamin B12 and (in cohort studies) folate were associated with increased prostate cancer risk.
Impact
Given current controversies over mandatory fortification, further research is needed to determine whether these are causal associations.
doi:10.1158/1055-9965.EPI-10-0180
PMCID: PMC3759018  PMID: 20501771
folate; vitamin B12; cobalamin; transcobalamin; haptocorrin; homocysteine; folate-mediated one-carbon metabolism; prostate cancer
14.  A genome-wide association scan (GWAS) for mean telomere length within the COGS project: identified loci show little association with hormone-related cancer risk 
Human Molecular Genetics  2013;22(24):5056-5064.
Mean telomere length (TL) in blood cells is heritable and has been reported to be associated with risks of several diseases, including cancer. We conducted a meta-analysis of three GWAS for TL (total n=2240) and selected 1629 variants for replication via the “iCOGS” custom genotyping array. All ∼200 000 iCOGS variants were analysed with TL, and those displaying associations in healthy controls (n = 15 065) were further tested in breast cancer cases (n = 11 024). We found a novel TL association (Ptrend < 4 × 10−10) at 3p14.4 close to PXK and evidence (Ptrend < 7 × 10−7) for TL loci at 6p22.1 (ZNF311) and 20q11.2 (BCL2L1). We additionally confirmed (Ptrend < 5 × 10−14) the previously reported loci at 3q26.2 (TERC), 5p15.3 (TERT) and 10q24.3 (OBFC1) and found supportive evidence (Ptrend < 5 × 10−4) for the published loci at 2p16.2 (ACYP2), 4q32.2 (NAF1) and 20q13.3 (RTEL1). SNPs tagging these loci explain TL differences of up to 731 bp (corresponding to 18% of total TL in healthy individuals), however, they display little direct evidence for association with breast, ovarian or prostate cancer risks.
doi:10.1093/hmg/ddt355
PMCID: PMC3836481  PMID: 23900074
15.  A study based on whole-genome sequencing yields a rare variant at 8q24 associated with prostate cancer 
Nature genetics  2012;44(12):1326-1329.
Western countries, prostate cancer is the most prevalent cancer of men, and one of the leading causes of cancer-related death in men. Several genome-wide association studies have yielded numerous common variants conferring risk of prostate cancer. In the present study we analyzed 32.5 million variants discovered by whole-genome sequencing 1,795 Icelanders. One variant was found to be associated with prostate cancer in European populations: rs188140481[A] (OR = 2.90, Pcomb = 6.2×10−34) located on 8q24, with an average risk allele control frequency of 0.54%. This variant is only very weakly correlated (r2 ≤ 0.06) with previously reported risk variants on 8q24, and remains significant after adjustment for all of them. Carriers of rs188140481[A] were diagnosed with prostate cancer 1.26 years younger than non-carriers (P = 0.0059). We also report results for the previously described HOXB13 mutation (rs138213197[T]), confirming it as prostate cancer risk variant in populations from all over Europe.
doi:10.1038/ng.2437
PMCID: PMC3562711  PMID: 23104005
16.  Evaluating genetic risk for prostate cancer among Japanese and Latinos 
Background
There have been few genome-wide association studies (GWAS) of prostate cancer among diverse populations. To search for novel prostate cancer risk variants, we conducted GWAS of prostate cancer in Japanese and Latinos. In addition, we tested prostate cancer risk variants and developed genetic risk models of prostate cancer for Japanese and Latinos.
Methods
Our first stage GWAS of prostate cancer included Japanese (cases/controls=1,033/1,042) and Latino (cases/controls=1,043/1,057) from the Multiethnic Cohort. Significant associations from stage 1 (P < 1.0×10−4) were examined in silico in GWAS of prostate cancer (stage 2) in Japanese (cases/controls=1,583/3,386) and Europeans (cases/controls=1,854/1,894).
Results
No novel stage 1 SNPs outside of known risk regions reached genome-wide significance. For Japanese, in stage 1, the most notable putative novel association was seen with 10 SNPs (P<8.0. x10−6) at chromosome 2q33; however, this was not replicated in stage 2. For Latinos, the most significant association was observed with rs17023900 at the known 3p12 risk locus (stage 1: OR=1.45; P=7.01×10−5 and stage 2: OR=1.58; P =3.05×10−7). The majority of the established risk variants for prostate cancer, 79% and 88%, were positively associated with prostate cancer in Japanese and Latinos (stage I), respectively. The cumulative effects of these variants significantly influence prostate cancer risk (OR per allele=1.10; P = 2.71×10−25 and OR=1.07; P = 1.02×10−16 for Japanese and Latinos, respectively).
Conclusion and Impact
Our GWAS of prostate cancer did not identify novel genome-wide significant variants. However, our findings demonstrate that established risk variants for prostate cancer significantly contribute to risk among Japanese and Latinos.
doi:10.1158/1055-9965.EPI-12-0598
PMCID: PMC3494732  PMID: 22923026
17.  Fine-mapping identifies multiple prostate cancer risk loci at 5p15, one of which associates with TERT expression 
Kote-Jarai, Zsofia | Saunders, Edward J. | Leongamornlert, Daniel A. | Tymrakiewicz, Malgorzata | Dadaev, Tokhir | Jugurnauth-Little, Sarah | Ross-Adams, Helen | Al Olama, Ali Amin | Benlloch, Sara | Halim, Silvia | Russel, Roslin | Dunning, Alison M. | Luccarini, Craig | Dennis, Joe | Neal, David E. | Hamdy, Freddie C. | Donovan, Jenny L. | Muir, Ken | Giles, Graham G. | Severi, Gianluca | Wiklund, Fredrik | Gronberg, Henrik | Haiman, Christopher A. | Schumacher, Fredrick | Henderson, Brian E. | Le Marchand, Loic | Lindstrom, Sara | Kraft, Peter | Hunter, David J. | Gapstur, Susan | Chanock, Stephen | Berndt, Sonja I. | Albanes, Demetrius | Andriole, Gerald | Schleutker, Johanna | Weischer, Maren | Canzian, Federico | Riboli, Elio | Key, Tim J. | Travis, Ruth C. | Campa, Daniele | Ingles, Sue A. | John, Esther M. | Hayes, Richard B. | Pharoah, Paul | Khaw, Kay-Tee | Stanford, Janet L. | Ostrander, Elaine A. | Signorello, Lisa B. | Thibodeau, Stephen N. | Schaid, Dan | Maier, Christiane | Vogel, Walther | Kibel, Adam S. | Cybulski, Cezary | Lubinski, Jan | Cannon-Albright, Lisa | Brenner, Hermann | Park, Jong Y. | Kaneva, Radka | Batra, Jyotsna | Spurdle, Amanda | Clements, Judith A. | Teixeira, Manuel R. | Govindasami, Koveela | Guy, Michelle | Wilkinson, Rosemary A. | Sawyer, Emma J. | Morgan, Angela | Dicks, Ed | Baynes, Caroline | Conroy, Don | Bojesen, Stig E. | Kaaks, Rudolf | Vincent, Daniel | Bacot, François | Tessier, Daniel C. | Easton, Douglas F. | Eeles, Rosalind A.
Human Molecular Genetics  2013;22(12):2520-2528.
Associations between single nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs) at 5p15 and multiple cancer types have been reported. We have previously shown evidence for a strong association between prostate cancer (PrCa) risk and rs2242652 at 5p15, intronic in the telomerase reverse transcriptase (TERT) gene that encodes TERT. To comprehensively evaluate the association between genetic variation across this region and PrCa, we performed a fine-mapping analysis by genotyping 134 SNPs using a custom Illumina iSelect array or Sequenom MassArray iPlex, followed by imputation of 1094 SNPs in 22 301 PrCa cases and 22 320 controls in The PRACTICAL consortium. Multiple stepwise logistic regression analysis identified four signals in the promoter or intronic regions of TERT that independently associated with PrCa risk. Gene expression analysis of normal prostate tissue showed evidence that SNPs within one of these regions also associated with TERT expression, providing a potential mechanism for predisposition to disease.
doi:10.1093/hmg/ddt086
PMCID: PMC3658165  PMID: 23535824
18.  Genetic correction of PSA values using sequence variants associated with PSA levels 
Science translational medicine  2010;2(62):62ra92.
Measuring serum levels of the prostate specific antigen (PSA) is the most common screening method for prostate cancer. However, PSA levels are affected by a number of factors apart from neoplasia. Notably, around 40% of the variability of PSA levels in the general population is accounted for by inherited factors, suggesting that it may be possible to improve both sensitivity and specificity by adjusting test results for genetic effects. In order to search for sequence variants that associate with PSA levels, we performed a genome-wide association study and follow-up analysis using PSA information from 15,757 Icelandic and 454 British men not diagnosed with prostate cancer. Overall, we detected a genome-wide significant association between PSA levels and SNPs at six loci: 5p15.33 (rs2736098), 10q11 (rs10993994), 10q26 (rs10788160), 12q24 (rs11067228), 17q12 (rs4430796), and 19q13.33 (rs17632542 (KLK3: I179T), each with Pcombined < 3×10−10. Among 3,834 men who underwent a biopsy of the prostate, the 10q26, 12q24, and 19q13.33 alleles that associate with high PSA levels are associated with higher probability of a negative biopsy (OR between 1.15 and 1.27). Assessment of association between the 6 loci and prostate cancer risk in 5,325 cases and 41,417 controls from Iceland, the Netherlands, Spain, Romania, and the US showed that the SNPs at 10q26 and 12q24 were exclusively associated with PSA levels, whereas the other 4 loci also were associated with prostate cancer risk. We propose that a personalized PSA cutoff value, based on genotype, should be used when deciding to perform a prostate biopsy.
doi:10.1126/scitranslmed.3001513
PMCID: PMC3564581  PMID: 21160077
19.  A germline variant in the TP53 polyadenylation signal confers cancer susceptibility 
Stacey, Simon N | Sulem, Patrick | Jonasdottir, Aslaug | Masson, Gisli | Gudmundsson, Julius | Gudbjartsson, Daniel F | Magnusson, Olafur T | Gudjonsson, Sigurjon A | Sigurgeirsson, Bardur | Thorisdottir, Kristin | Ragnarsson, Rafn | Benediktsdottir, Kristrun R | Nexø, Bjørn A | Tjønneland, Anne | Overvad, Kim | Rudnai, Peter | Gurzau, Eugene | Koppova, Kvetoslava | Hemminki, Kari | Corredera, Cristina | Fuentelsaz, Victoria | Grasa, Pilar | Navarrete, Sebastian | Fuertes, Fernando | García-Prats, Maria D | Sanambrosio, Enrique | Panadero, Angeles | De Juan, Ana | Garcia, Almudena | Rivera, Fernando | Planelles, Dolores | Soriano, Virtudes | Requena, Celia | Aben, Katja K | van Rossum, Michelle M | Cremers, Ruben G H M | van Oort, Inge M | van Spronsen, Dick-Johan | Schalken, Jack A | Peters, Wilbert H M | Helfand, Brian T | Donovan, Jenny L | Hamdy, Freddie C | Badescu, Daniel | Codreanu, Ovidiu | Jinga, Mariana | Csiki, Irma E | Constantinescu, Vali | Badea, Paula | Mates, Ioan N | Dinu, Daniela E | Constantin, Adrian | Mates, Dana | Kristjansdottir, Sjofn | Agnarsson, Bjarni A | Jonsson, Eirikur | Barkardottir, Rosa B | Einarsson, Gudmundur V | Sigurdsson, Fridbjorn | Moller, Pall H | Stefansson, Tryggvi | Valdimarsson, Trausti | Johannsson, Oskar T | Sigurdsson, Helgi | Jonsson, Thorvaldur | Jonasson, Jon G | Tryggvadottir, Laufey | Rice, Terri | Hansen, Helen M | Xiao, Yuanyuan | Lachance, Daniel H | O’Neill, Brian Patrick | Kosel, Matthew L | Decker, Paul A | Thorleifsson, Gudmar | Johannsdottir, Hrefna | Helgadottir, Hafdis T | Sigurdsson, Asgeir | Steinthorsdottir, Valgerdur | Lindblom, Annika | Sandler, Robert S | Keku, Temitope O | Banasik, Karina | Jørgensen, Torben | Witte, Daniel R | Hansen, Torben | Pedersen, Oluf | Jinga, Viorel | Neal, David E | Catalona, William J | Wrensch, Margaret | Wiencke, John | Jenkins, Robert B | Nagore, Eduardo | Vogel, Ulla | Kiemeney, Lambertus A | Kumar, Rajiv | Mayordomo, José I | Olafsson, Jon H | Kong, Augustine | Thorsteinsdottir, Unnur | Rafnar, Thorunn | Stefansson, Kari
Nature Genetics  2011;43(11):1098-1103.
To identify new risk variants for cutaneous basal cell carcinoma, we performed a genome-wide association study of 16 million SNPs identified through whole-genome sequencing of 457 Icelanders. We imputed genotypes for 41,675 Illumina SNP chip-typed Icelanders and their relatives. In the discovery phase, the strongest signal came from rs78378222[C] (odds ratio (OR) = 2.36, P = 5.2 × 10−17), which has a frequency of 0.0192 in the Icelandic population. We then confirmed this association in non-Icelandic samples (OR = 1.75, P = 0.0060; overall OR = 2.16, P = 2.2 × 10−20). rs78378222 is in the 3′ untranslated region of TP53 and changes the AATAAA polyadenylation signal to AATACA, resulting in impaired 3′-end processing of TP53 mRNA. Investigation of other tumor types identified associations of this SNP with prostate cancer (OR = 1.44, P = 2.4 × 10−6), glioma (OR = 2.35, P = 1.0 × 10−5) and colorectal adenoma (OR = 1.39, P = 1.6 × 10−4). However, we observed no effect for breast cancer, a common Li-Fraumeni syndrome tumor (OR = 1.06, P = 0.57, 95% confidence interval 0.88–1.27).
doi:10.1038/ng.926
PMCID: PMC3263694  PMID: 21946351
20.  Genome-wide association study identifies new prostate cancer susceptibility loci 
Human Molecular Genetics  2011;20(19):3867-3875.
Prostate cancer (PrCa) is the most common non-skin cancer diagnosed among males in developed countries and the second leading cause of cancer mortality, yet little is known regarding its etiology and factors that influence clinical outcome. Genome-wide association studies (GWAS) of PrCa have identified at least 30 distinct loci associated with small differences in risk. We conducted a GWAS in 2782 advanced PrCa cases (Gleason grade ≥ 8 or tumor stage C/D) and 4458 controls with 571 243 single nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs). Based on in silico replication of 4679 SNPs (Stage 1, P < 0.02) in two published GWAS with 7358 PrCa cases and 6732 controls, we identified a new susceptibility locus associated with overall PrCa risk at 2q37.3 (rs2292884, P= 4.3 × 10−8). We also confirmed a locus suggested by an earlier GWAS at 12q13 (rs902774, P= 8.6 × 10−9). The estimated per-allele odds ratios for these loci (1.14 for rs2292884 and 1.17 for rs902774) did not differ between advanced and non-advanced PrCa (case-only test for heterogeneity P= 0.72 and P= 0.61, respectively). Further studies will be needed to assess whether these or other loci are differentially associated with PrCa subtypes.
doi:10.1093/hmg/ddr295
PMCID: PMC3168287  PMID: 21743057
21.  Associations of Circulating 25-hydroxyvitamin D with prostate cancer diagnosis, stage and grade 
Epidemiological studies suggest that vitamin D protects against prostate cancer, although evidence is limited and inconsistent. We investigated associations of circulating total 25-hydroxyvitamin D (25(OH)D) with PSA-detected prostate cancer in a case-control study nested within the Prostate Testing for Cancer and Treatment (ProtecT) trial. Conditional logistic regression was used to estimate odds ratios (OR) and 95% confidence intervals (CI) quantifying the association between circulating total 25(OH)D and prostate cancer. In case-only analyses, we used unconditional logistic regression to quantify associations of total 25(OH)D with stage (advanced vs localized) and Gleason grade (high-grade (≥7) vs low-grade (<7)). Pre-determined categories of total 25(OH)D were defined as: high: ≥30ng/mL; adequate: 20-<30ng/mL; insufficient: 12-<20ng/mL; deficient: <12ng/mL. Fractional polynomials were used to investigate the existence of any U-shaped relationship. We included 1,447 prostate cancer cases (153 advanced, 469 high-grade) and 1,449 healthy controls. There was evidence that men deficient in vitamin D had a two-fold increased risk of advanced versus localized cancer (OR for deficient vs adequate total 25(OH)D=2.33, 95% CI: 1.26,4.28) and high-grade versus low-grade cancer (OR for deficient vs adequate total 25(OH)D=1.78, 95% CI: 1.15,2.77). There was no evidence of a linear association between total 25(OH)D and prostate cancer (p=0.44) or of an increased risk of prostate cancer with high and low vitamin D levels. Our study provides evidence that lower 25(OH)D concentrations were associated with more aggressive cancers (advanced versus localized cancers and high- versus low- Gleason grade), but there was no evidence of an association with overall prostate cancer risk.
doi:10.1002/ijc.27327
PMCID: PMC3378478  PMID: 22033893
Prostate cancer; vitamin D; 25-hydroxyvitamn D
22.  Seven novel prostate cancer susceptibility loci identified by a multi-stage genome-wide association study 
Kote-Jarai, Zsofia | Olama, Ali Amin Al | Giles, Graham G. | Severi, Gianluca | Schleutker, Johanna | Weischer, Maren | Canzian, Frederico | Riboli, Elio | Key, Tim | Gronberg, Henrik | Hunter, David J. | Kraft, Peter | Thun, Michael J | Ingles, Sue | Chanock, Stephen | Albanes, Demetrius | Hayes, Richard B | Neal, David E. | Hamdy, Freddie C. | Donovan, Jenny L. | Pharoah, Paul | Schumacher, Fredrick | Henderson, Brian E. | Stanford, Janet L. | Ostrander, Elaine A. | Sorensen, Karina Dalsgaard | Dörk, Thilo | Andriole, Gerald | Dickinson, Joanne L. | Cybulski, Cezary | Lubinski, Jan | Spurdle, Amanda | Clements, Judith A. | Chambers, Suzanne | Aitken, Joanne | Frank Gardiner, R. A. | Thibodeau, Stephen N. | Schaid, Dan | John, Esther M. | Maier, Christiane | Vogel, Walther | Cooney, Kathleen A. | Park, Jong Y. | Cannon-Albright, Lisa | Brenner, Hermann | Habuchi, Tomonori | Zhang, Hong-Wei | Lu, Yong-Jie | Kaneva, Radka | Muir, Ken | Benlloch, Sara | Leongamornlert, Daniel A. | Saunders, Edward J. | Tymrakiewicz, Malgorzata | Mahmud, Nadiya | Guy, Michelle | O’Brien, Lynne T. | Wilkinson, Rosemary A. | Hall, Amanda L. | Sawyer, Emma J. | Dadaev, Tokhir | Morrison, Jonathan | Dearnaley, David P. | Horwich, Alan | Huddart, Robert A. | Khoo, Vincent S. | Parker, Christopher C. | Van As, Nicholas | Woodhouse, Christopher J. | Thompson, Alan | Christmas, Tim | Ogden, Chris | Cooper, Colin S. | Lophatonanon, Aritaya | Southey, Melissa C. | Hopper, John L. | English, Dallas | Wahlfors, Tiina | Tammela, Teuvo LJ | Klarskov, Peter | Nordestgaard, Børge G. | Røder, M. Andreas | Tybjærg-Hansen, Anne | Bojesen, Stig E. | Travis, Ruth | Campa, Daniele | Kaaks, Rudolf | Wiklund, Fredrik | Aly, Markus | Lindstrom, Sara | Diver, W Ryan | Gapstur, Susan | Stern, Mariana C | Corral, Roman | Virtamo, Jarmo | Cox, Angela | Haiman, Christopher A. | Le Marchand, Loic | FitzGerald, Liesel | Kolb, Suzanne | Kwon, Erika M. | Karyadi, Danielle M. | Orntoft, Torben Falck | Borre, Michael | Meyer, Andreas | Serth, Jürgen | Yeager, Meredith | Berndt, Sonja I. | Marthick, James R | Patterson, Briony | Wokolorczyk, Dominika | Batra, Jyotsna | Lose, Felicity | McDonnell, Shannon K | Joshi, Amit D. | Shahabi, Ahva | Rinckleb, Antje E. | Ray, Ana | Sellers, Thomas A. | Lin, Huo-Yi | Stephenson, Robert A | Farnham, James | Muller, Heiko | Rothenbacher, Dietrich | Tsuchiya, Norihiko | Narita, Shintaro | Cao, Guang-Wen | Slavov, Chavdar | Mitev, Vanio | Easton, Douglas F. | Eeles, Rosalind A.
Nature Genetics  2011;43(8):785-791.
Prostate cancer (PrCa) is the most frequently diagnosed male cancer in developed countries. To identify common PrCa susceptibility alleles, we conducted a multi-stage genome-wide association study and previously reported the results of the first two stages, which identified 16 novel susceptibility loci for PrCa. Here we report the results of stage 3 in which we evaluated 1,536 SNPs in 4,574 cases and 4,164 controls. Ten novel association signals were followed up through genotyping in 51,311 samples in 30 studies through the international PRACTICAL consortium. In addition to previously reported loci, we identified a further seven new prostate cancer susceptibility loci on chromosomes 2p, 3q, 5p, 6p, 12q and Xq (P=4.0 ×10−8 to P=2.7 ×10−24). We also identified a SNP in TERT more strongly associated with PrCa than that previously reported. More than 40 PrCa susceptibility loci, explaining ~25% of the familial risk in this disease, have now been identified.
doi:10.1038/ng.882
PMCID: PMC3396006  PMID: 21743467
23.  Circulating insulin-like growth factors (IGFs) and IGF binding proteins (IGFBPs) in PSA-detected prostate cancer: the large case control study ProtecT 
Cancer research  2011;72(2):503-515.
Circulating insulin-like growth factor-I (IGF-I) has been studied extensively in prostate cancer, but there is still little information about IGFs and IGF binding proteins (IGFBPs) in cancers detected by the prostate-specific antigen (PSA) test. Here we report the findings of a United Kingdom-based case-control study to investigate circulating IGFs and IGFBPs in PSA-detected prostate cancer with regard to their potential associations with different cancer stages or grades. PSA testing was offered to 110,000 men aged 50-69 years from 2002-2009. Participants with an elevated level of PSA (≥ 3.0 ng/ml) underwent prostate biopsy and measurements of blood serum IGF-I, IGF-II, IGFBP-2 and IGFBP-3 obtained at recruitment. We found that serum levels of IGF-II (OR per standard deviation increase: 1.16; 95%CI 1.08,1.24;ptrend<0.001), IGFBP-2 (1.18;1.06,1.31;ptrend<0.01) and IGFBP-3 (1.27;1.19,1.36;ptrend<0.001), but not IGF-I (0.99;0.93,1.04;ptrend=0.62), were associated with PSA-detected prostate cancer. After controlling for IGFBP-3, IGF-II was no longer associated (0.99;0.91,1.08;ptrend=0.62) and IGF-I was inversely associated (0.85;0.79,0.91;ptrend<0.001) with prostate cancer. In addition, no strong associations existed with cancer stage or grade. Overall, these findings suggest potentially important roles for circulating IGF-II, IGFBP-2 and IGFBP-3 in PSA-detected prostate cancer, in support of recent in vitro evidence. While our findings for IGF-I agree with previous results from PSA-screening trials, they contrast with positive associations in routinely-detected disease, suggesting that reducing levels of circulating IGF-I might not prevent the initiation of prostate cancer but might nonetheless prevent its progression.
doi:10.1158/0008-5472.CAN-11-1601
PMCID: PMC3272440  PMID: 22106399
case-control study; insulin-like growth factors; insulin-like growth factor binding proteins; prostate cancer
24.  RB1 Methylation by SMYD2 Enhances Cell Cycle Progression through an Increase of RB1 Phosphorylation12 
Neoplasia (New York, N.Y.)  2012;14(6):476-486.
It is well known that RB functions are regulated by posttranslational modifications such as phosphorylation and acetylation, but the significance of lysine methylation on RB has not been fully elucidated. Our expression analysis of SMYD2 by quantitative real-time polymerase chain reaction showed that expression levels of SMYD2 are significantly elevated in human bladder carcinomas compared with nonneoplastic bladder tissues (P < .0001), and its expression levels in tumor tissues were much higher than those of any other normal tissues. SMYD2 knockdown resulted in the suppression of cancer cell growth, and cell cycle analysis indicated that SMYD2 might play a crucial role in the G1/S transition. According to an in vitro methyltransferase assay, we found that SMYD2 methylates RB1 protein, and liquid chromatography-tandem mass spectrometry analysis revealed lysine 810 of RB1 to be methylated by SMYD2. Importantly, this methylation enhanced Ser 807/811 phosphorylation of RB1 both in vitro and in vivo. Furthermore, we demonstrated that methylated RB1 accelerates E2F transcriptional activity and promotes cell cycle progression. SMYD2 is an important oncoprotein in various types of cancer, and SMYD2-dependent RB1 methylation at lysine 810 promotes cell cycle progression of cancer cells. Further study may explore SMYD2-dependent RB1 methylation as a potential therapeutic target in human cancer.
PMCID: PMC3394190  PMID: 22787429
25.  No Evidence for Infection of UK Prostate Cancer Patients with XMRV, BK Virus, Trichomonas vaginalis or Human Papilloma Viruses 
PLoS ONE  2012;7(3):e34221.
The prevalence of specific infections in UK prostate cancer patients was investigated. Serum from 84 patients and 62 controls was tested for neutralisation of xenotropic murine leukaemia virus-related virus (XMRV) Envelope. No reactivity was found in the patient samples. In addition, a further 100 prostate DNA samples were tested for XMRV, BK virus, Trichomonas vaginalis and human papilloma viruses by nucleic acid detection techniques. Despite demonstrating DNA integrity and assay sensitivity, we failed to detect the presence of any of these agents in DNA samples, bar one sample that was weakly positive for HPV16. Therefore we conclude that these infections are absent in this typical cohort of men with prostate cancer.
doi:10.1371/journal.pone.0034221
PMCID: PMC3314598  PMID: 22470540

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