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1.  Photodynamic diagnosis of shed prostate cancer cells in voided urine treated with 5-aminolevulinic acid 
BMC Urology  2014;14:59.
Background
Past attempts at detecting prostate cancer (PCa) cells in voided urine by traditional cytology have been impeded by undesirably low sensitivities but high specificities. To improve the sensitivities, we evaluate the feasibility and clinical utility of photodynamic diagnosis (PDD) of prostate cancer by using 5-aminolevulinic acid (5-ALA) to examine shed prostate cancer cells in voided urine samples.
Methods
One hundred thirty-eight patients with an abnormal digital rectal exam (DRE) and/or abnormal prostate-specific antigen (PSA) levels were recruited between April 2009 and December 2010. Voided urine specimens were collected before prostate biopsy. Urine specimens were treated with 5-ALA and imaged by fluorescence microscopy and reported as protoporphyrin IX (PPIX) positive (presence of cells demonstrating simultaneous PPIX fluorescence) or PPIX negative (lack of cells demonstrating fluorescence).
Results
Of the 138 patients, PCa was detected on needle biopsy in 81 patients (58.7%); of these 81 patients with PCa, 60 were PPIX-positive (sensitivity: 74.1%). Although 57 patients did not harbor PCa by conventional diagnostic procedures, 17 of these at-risk patients were found to be PPIX-positive (specificity: 70.2%). PPIX–PDD was more sensitive compared with DRE and transrectal ultrasound and more specific compared with PSA and PSA density. The incidence of PPIX–PDD positivity did not increase with increasing total PSA levels, tumor stage or Gleason score.
Conclusions
To our knowledge, this is the first successful demonstration of PPIX in urine sediments treated with 5-ALA used to detect PCa in a noninvasive yet highly sensitive manner. However, further studies are warranted to determine the role of PPIX–PPD for PCa detection.
doi:10.1186/1471-2490-14-59
PMCID: PMC4130698  PMID: 25086448
5-aminolevulinic acid; Prostate cancer; Photodynamic diagnosis; Urine cytology
2.  Nadir PSA level and time to nadir PSA are prognostic factors in patients with metastatic prostate cancer 
BMC Urology  2014;14:33.
Background
Primary androgen deprivation therapy (PADT) is the most effective systemic therapy for patients with metastatic prostate cancer. Nevertheless, once PSA progression develops, the prognosis is serious and mortal. We sought to identify factors that predicted the prognosis in a series of patients with metastatic prostate cancer.
Methods
Two-hundred eighty-six metastatic prostate cancer patients who received PADT from 1998 to 2005 in Nara Uro-Oncology Research Group were enrolled. The log-rank test and Cox’s proportional hazards model were used to determine the predictive factors for prognosis; rate of castration-resistant prostate cancer (CRPC) and overall survival.
Results
The median age, follow-up period and PSA level at diagnosis were 73 years, 47 months and 174 ng/mL, respectively. The 5-year overall survival rate was 63.0%. The multivariable analysis showed that Gleason score (Hazard ratio [HR]:1.362; 95% confidence interval [C.I.], 1.023-1.813), nadir PSA (HR:6.332; 95% C.I., 4.006-9.861) and time from PADT to nadir (HR:4.408; 95% C.I., 3.099-6.271) were independent prognostic factors of the incidence of CRPC. The independent parameters in the multivariate analysis that predicted overall survival were nadir PSA (HR:5.221; 95% C.I., 2.757-9.889) and time from PADT to nadir (HR:4.008; 95% C.I., 2.137-7.517).
Conclusions
Nadir PSA and time from PADT to nadir were factors that affect both CRPC and overall survival in a cohort of patients with metastatic prostate cancer. Lower nadir PSA level and longer time from PADT to nadir were good for survival and progression.
doi:10.1186/1471-2490-14-33
PMCID: PMC4018264  PMID: 24773608
Prostate cancer; Metastasis; Risk factors
3.  Follow-up study of unilateral renal function after nephrectomy assessed by glomerular filtration rate per functional renal volume 
Background
To evaluate the clinical usefulness of estimated glomerular filtration rate (eGFR) divided by functional renal volume (FRV) measured by three-dimensional image reconstruction (eGFR/FRV) for the prediction of functional outcomes after nephrectomy.
Methods
Eighty-three patients who underwent nephrectomy were enrolled. The FRV of each patient was measured before surgery. Preoperative medical information on proteinuria, blood pressure, blood glucose level, body mass index (BMI), hemoglobin level and serum cholesterol level were also obtained. We evaluated the relationships between eGFR/FRV and each of these parameters before surgery. We also assessed the potential relationship between eGFR/FRV and the 3-year postoperative eGFR. Stepwise multiple regression analyses were conducted to elucidate independent factors.
Results
The median FRV and eGFR were 310.15 cm3 and 79.0 ml/min/1.73 m2 before surgery, respectively. The correlation between FRV and eGFR was statistically significant (r = 0.465, P < 0.001). The median eGFR/FRV was 0.24 ml/min/1.73 m2/cm3. Stepwise multiple regression analysis showed that the independent parameters (multiple correlation coefficient, r = 0.389, P = 0.031) associated with eGFR/FRV were proteinuria, BMI, age and hypertension. Proteinuria was statistically associated with eGFR/FRV, and the independent parameters (multiple correlation coefficient, r = 0.694, P < 0.001) associated with the 3-year postoperative eGFR were age, BMI and eGFR/FRV. The eGFR/FRV was statistically associated with the 3-year postoperative eGFR (r = 0.559, P < 0.001).
Conclusion
The present results demonstrated that patients with proteinuria are expected to have a lower eGFR/FRV than those without proteinuria. The present study also supports the notion that eGFR/FRV is the primary determinant of the long-term functional outcome after nephrectomy. It should be taken into consideration that patients with a low eGFR/FRV may develop chronic kidney disease after nephrectomy.
doi:10.1186/1477-7819-12-59
PMCID: PMC3995114  PMID: 24641796
Functional renal parenchymal volume; eGFR; Proteinuria; Renal surgery
4.  Seventh Joint Meeting of K-J-CaP and CaPSURE: extending the global initiative to improve prostate cancer management 
Prostate International  2014;2(2):50-69.
This report summarizes the presentations and discussions that took place at the Seventh Joint Meeting of the Korea–Japan Study Group of Prostate Cancer (K-J-CaP) and the Cancer of the Prostate Strategic Urologic Research Endeavor (CaPSURE) held in Seoul, Korea, in September 2013. The original J-CaP and CaPSURE Joint Initiative has now been established since 2007 and since the initial collaboration between research teams in the United States (US) and Japan, the project has expanded to include several other Asian countries. The objective of the initiative is to analyze and compare data for prostate cancer patients in the participating countries, looking at similarities and differences in patient management and outcomes. Until now the focus has been primarily on data generated within J-CaP and CaPSURE, both large-scale, longitudinal, observational databases of prostate cancer patients in Japan and the US, respectively. This year’s meeting was hosted for the first time in Korea which has recently established its own national database–K-CaP–to add to the wealth of data generated by J-CaP and CaPSURE. As a newly-developed database, K-CaP has also provided a valuable ‘template’ for other countries, such as China and Indonesia, planning to establish their own national databases and this will ultimately allow greater opportunities for international data comparisons. A range of topics was discussed at this Seventh Joint Meeting including comparison of outcomes following androgen deprivation therapy or radical prostatectomy in patients with localized prostate cancer, the use of active surveillance as a treatment option and the triggers for intervention when employing this regimen, patient quality of life during treatment, the impact of comorbidities on outcomes, and a comparison of recent outcomes data between J-CaP and CaPSURE. The participants recognized that prostate cancer was now a global disease and therefore major insights into understanding and improving the management of this condition would arise from global interactions such as this joint initiative.
doi:10.12954/PI.14047
PMCID: PMC4099396
Prostatic neoplasms; Prostatectomy; Drug therapy for prostate cancer; Comorbidity; Quality of life
5.  Distinct cellular distributions of Kv4 pore-forming and auxiliary subunits in rat dorsal root ganglion neurons 
Life sciences  2012;91(0):258-263.
Aims
Dorsal root ganglia contain heterogeneous populations of primary afferent neurons that transmit various sensory stimuli. This functional diversity may be correlated with differential expression of voltage-gated K+ (Kv) channels. Here, we examine cellular distributions of Kv4 pore-forming and ancillary subunits that are responsible for fast-inactivating A-type K+ current.
Main methods
Expression pattern of Kv α-subunit, β-subunit and auxiliary subunit was investigated using immunohistochemistry, in situ hybridization and RT-PCR technique.
Key findings
The two pore-forming subunits Kv4.1 and Kv4.3 show distinct cellular distributions: Kv4.3 is predominantly in small-sized C-fiber neurons, whereas Kv4.1 is seen in DRG neurons in various sizes. Furthermore, the two classes of Kv4 channel auxiliary subunits are also distributed in different-sized cells. KChIP3 is the only significantly expressed Ca2+-binding cytosolic ancillary subunit in DRGs and present in medium to large-sized neurons. The membrane-spanning auxiliary subunit DPP6 is seen in a large number of DRG neurons in various sizes, whereas DPP10 is restricted in small-sized neurons.
Significance
Distinct combinations of Kv4 pore-forming and auxiliary subunits may constitute A-type channels in DRG neurons with different physiological roles. Kv4.1 subunit, in combination with KChIP3 and/or DPP6, form A-type K+ channels in medium to large-sized A-fiber DRG neurons. In contrast, Kv4.3 and DPP10 may contribute to A-type current in non-peptidergic, C-fiber somatic afferent neurons.
doi:10.1016/j.lfs.2012.07.007
PMCID: PMC3667739  PMID: 22820170
Dorsal root ganglion; Voltage-gated potassium channel; Kv4.1; KChIP; DPP
6.  Diagnostic markers of urothelial cancer based on DNA methylation analysis 
BMC Cancer  2013;13:275.
Background
Early detection and risk assessment are crucial for treating urothelial cancer (UC), which is characterized by a high recurrence rate, and necessitates frequent and invasive monitoring. We aimed to establish diagnostic markers for UC based on DNA methylation.
Methods
In this multi-center study, three independent sample sets were prepared. First, DNA methylation levels at CpG loci were measured in the training sets (tumor samples from 91 UC patients, corresponding normal-appearing tissue from these patients, and 12 normal tissues from age-matched bladder cancer-free patients) using the Illumina Golden Gate methylation assay to identify differentially methylated loci. Next, these methylated loci were validated by quantitative DNA methylation by pyrosequencing, using another cohort of tissue samples (Tissue validation set). Lastly, methylation of these markers was analyzed in the independent urine samples (Urine validation set). ROC analysis was performed to evaluate the diagnostic accuracy of these 12 selected markers.
Results
Of the 1303 CpG sites, 158 were hyper ethylated and 356 were hypo ethylated in tumor tissues compared to normal tissues. In the panel analysis, 12 loci showed remarkable alterations between tumor and normal samples, with 94.3% sensitivity and 97.8% specificity. Similarly, corresponding normal tissue could be distinguished from normal tissues with 76.0% sensitivity and 100% specificity. Furthermore, the diagnostic accuracy for UC of these markers determined in urine samples was high, with 100% sensitivity and 100% specificity.
Conclusion
Based on these preliminary findings, diagnostic markers based on differential DNA methylation at specific loci can be useful for non-invasive and reliable detection of UC and epigenetic field defect.
doi:10.1186/1471-2407-13-275
PMCID: PMC3691617  PMID: 23735005
Urothelial cancer; DNA methylation; Pyrosequencing; ROC; Piagnostic accuracy
7.  The Effects of Chlormadinone Acetate on Lower Urinary Tract Symptoms and Erectile Functions of Patients with Benign Prostatic Hyperplasia: A Prospective Multicenter Clinical Study 
Advances in Urology  2013;2013:584678.
Purpose. To evaluate the effects of chlormadinone acetate (CMA), progesterone-derived antiandrogen, on lower urinary tract symptoms (LUTS) and erectile functions of benign prostatic hyperplasia (BPH). Methods. A multicenter, single-cohort prospective study was conducted. A total of 114 patients received CMA for 16 weeks. The endpoints were changes in International Prostate Symptom Scores (IPSS), IPSS-QOL, International Index of Erectile Function-5, Qmax prostate volume, and residual urine volume. Results. Significant improvements were observed in IPSS from week 8 to week 48 (32 weeks after treatment). IPSS-QOL improvements were also significant from week 8 to week 48. Qmax increased to a maximum at Week 16 and remained elevated throughout the study. Moreover, a decrease of 25% in prostate volume was observed at Week 16. IPSS, QOL, and Qmax changes during the study were not different between the previously treated and untreated patients. IPSS storage subscore changes differed between the age groups. Few severe adverse reactions were observed, except for erectile dysfunction. Conclusions. CMA rapidly and significantly reduced prostate volume and improved voiding and storage symptoms and QOL. Our results suggest that CMA is safe and beneficial, especially for elderly patients with LUTS associated with BPH.
doi:10.1155/2013/584678
PMCID: PMC3671298  PMID: 23762042
8.  Inhibition of COX-2 expression by topical diclofenac enhanced radiation sensitivity via enhancement of TRAIL in human prostate adenocarcinoma xenograft model 
BMC Urology  2013;13:1.
Background
COX-2 inhibitors have an antitumor potential and have been verified by many researchers. Treatment of cancer cells with external stressors such as irradiation can stimulate the over-expression of COX-2 and possibly confer radiation resistance. In this study, we tested if topical diclofenac, which inhibits both COX-1 and COX-2, administration rendered prostate tumor cells sensitize to the effects of radiation.
Methods
LNCaP-COX-2 and LNCaP-Neo cells were treated with 0 to 1000 μM diclofenac. Next, a clonogenic assay was performed in which cells were subjected to irradiation (0 to 4 Gy) with or without diclofenac. COX-2 expression and other relevant molecules were measured by real-time PCR and immunohistochemistry after irradiation and diclofenac treatment. In addition, we assessed the tumor volumes of xenograft LNCaP-COX-2 cells treated with topical diclofenac with or without radiation therapy (RT).
Results
LNCaP-COX-2 and LNCaP-Neo cell lines experienced cytotoxic effects of diclofenac in a dose related manner. Clonogenic assays demonstrated that LNCaP-COX-2 cells were significantly more resistant to RT than LNCaP-Neo cells. Furthermore, the addition of diclofenac sensitized LNCaP-COX-2 not but LNCaP-Neo cells to the cytocidal effects of radiation. In LNCaP-COX-2 cells, diclofenac enhanced radiation-induced apoptosis compared with RT alone. This phenomenon might be attributed to enhancement of RT-induced TRAIL expression as demonstrated by real-time PCR analysis. Lastly, tumor volumes of LNCaP-COX-2 cells xenograft treated with diclofenac or RT alone was >4-fold higher than in mice treated with combined diclofenac and radiation (p<0.05).
Conclusions
These in vitro and in vivo findings suggest that conventional COX inhibitor, diclofenac enhances the effect of RT on prostate cancer cells that express COX-2. Thus, diclofenac may have potential as radiosensitizer for treatment of prostate cancer.
doi:10.1186/1471-2490-13-1
PMCID: PMC3561196  PMID: 23289871
Prostate cancer; Radiation therapy; COX-2; TRAIL; Apoptosis; Topical therapy; Radiosensitizer; Diclofenac; Radioresistance
9.  Evaluation of primary androgen deprivation therapy in prostate cancer patients using the J-CAPRA risk score 
Prostate International  2013;1(2):81-88.
Purpose:
To determine the influence of maximal androgen blockade (MAB) and non-MAB hormonal therapy with an luteinizing hormone releasing hormone (LHRH) analog on overall survival of prostate cancer patients in the Japan Study Group of Prostate Cancer (J-CaP) registry according to risk, as assessed using the novel J-CAPRA risk instrument. To undertake a multivariate analysis combining J-CAPRA risk score, type of hormonal therapy and comorbidities, in order to assess their impact on overall survival.
Methods:
The J-CaP database includes men in Japan diagnosed with any stage of prostate cancer between 2001 and 2003 and treated with primary androgen deprivation therapy (PADT), as monotherapy or in combination. A total of 26,272 men were enrolled and of these 19,265 were treated with PADT. This analysis was undertaken using the latest data set (30 April, 2010) including a total of 15,727 patients who received PADT and had follow-up data for periods ranging from 0 to 9.2 years.
Results:
MAB for prostate cancer patients with intermediate- or high-risk disease has a significant benefit in terms of overall survival compared with LHRH analog monotherapy or surgical castration alone. Better results may be achieved in older (≥75 years) patients. Patient comorbidities are an important factor in determining overall survival, notably in older patients, and should be considered when selecting therapy.
Conclusions:
Based on large-scale registry data, this report is the first to analyze the outcomes of MAB therapy in patients with prostate cancer at a wide range of disease stages. MAB therapy may provide significant survival benefits in intermediate- and high-risk patients.
doi:10.12954/PI.12016
PMCID: PMC3814111  PMID: 24223407
Prostate neoplasms; Maximal androgen blockade; Overall survival; Primary androgen deprivation therapy; Risk scoring
10.  Improvement of the surgical curability of locally confined prostate cancer including non-organ-confined high-risk disease through retropubic radical prostatectomy with intentional wide resection 
Background
Retropubic radical prostatectomy with intentional wide resection (RRP-WR), which enables clear location of the prostate apex and the performance of posterolateral wider resection to remove extraprostatic extension, was introduced to our institutions. The aim of this study is to assess the feasibility and the efficacy of RRP-WR as a surgical intervention for locally confined prostate cancer.
Methods
A total of 90 Japanese patients with pathologically proven and clinically locally confined hormone-naïve prostate cancer were treated through RRP-WR, and the surgical morbidity was assessed. The patients were observed without immediate treatment until biochemical recurrence (BCR).
Results
The surgical morbidities were comparable to conventional procedures. No positive surgical margin (pSM) was pathologically identified in pT2 cases from prostatectomy specimens. It was identified in only 14.3% of pT3a cases, 36.4% of pT3b cases and 100% of pT4 cases. No apical pSM was found except for one of the pT4 cases in the levator ani muscle. PSA was at an undetectable level in 80.0% of all cases, 90.0% of pT2 cases, and 67.5% of pT3 and pT4 cases after surgery. The BCR-free survival rate in all cases was 82.4% and that of high-risk cases without pSM was 76.9% at a median follow-up of 19.3 months (3.3 to 59.2).
Conclusions
RRP-WR is feasible and effective in removing organ-confined prostate cancer as well as extraprostatic extension without pSM. Thus, it is worthwhile to evaluate if this procedure improves the clinical outcome of locally confined prostate cancer including high-risk conditions treated by surgical intervention.
doi:10.1186/1477-7819-10-249
PMCID: PMC3523069  PMID: 23158926
Prostate; Neoplasms; Prostatectomy
11.  Minimal percentage of dose received by 90% of the urethra (%UD90) is the most significant predictor of PSA bounce in patients who underwent low-dose-rate brachytherapy (LDR-brachytherapy) for prostate cancer 
BMC Urology  2012;12:28.
Background
To clarify the significant clinicopathological and postdosimetric parameters to predict PSA bounce in patients who underwent low-dose-rate brachytherapy (LDR-brachytherapy) for prostate cancer.
Methods
We studied 200 consecutive patients who received LDR-brachytherapy between July 2004 and November 2008. Of them, 137 patients did not receive neoadjuvant or adjuvant androgen deprivation therapy. One hundred and forty-two patients were treated with LDR-brachytherapy alone, and 58 were treated with LDR-brachytherapy in combination with external beam radiation therapy. The cut-off value of PSA bounce was 0.1 ng/mL. The incidence, time, height, and duration of PSA bounce were investigated. Clinicopathological and postdosimetric parameters were evaluated to elucidate independent factors to predict PSA bounce in hormone-naïve patients who underwent LDR-brachytherapy alone.
Results
Fifty patients (25%) showed PSA bounce and 10 patients (5%) showed PSA failure. The median time, height, and duration of PSA bounce were 17 months, 0.29 ng/mL, and 7.0 months, respectively. In 103 hormone-naïve patients treated with LDR-brachytherapy alone, and univariate Cox proportional regression hazard model indicated that age and minimal percentage of the dose received by 30% and 90% of the urethra were independent predictors of PSA bounce. With a multivariate Cox proportional regression hazard model, minimal percentage of the dose received by 90% of the urethra was the most significant parameter of PSA bounce.
Conclusions
Minimal percentage of the dose received by 90% of the urethra was the most significant predictor of PSA bounce in hormone-naïve patients treated with LDR-brachytherapy alone.
doi:10.1186/1471-2490-12-28
PMCID: PMC3487947  PMID: 22974428
Prostate cancer; Brachytherapy; PSA bounce; Post-dosimetry; UD90 (%)
12.  Calculated Tumor Volume Is an Independent Predictor of Biochemical Recurrence in Patients Who Underwent Retropubic Radical Prostatectomy 
Advances in Urology  2012;2012:204215.
Purpose. The purpose of this study is to investigate whether the clinicopathological biopsy findings can predict the oncological outcome in patients who undergo radical prostatectomy. Materials and Methods. Between January 1997 and March 2006, 255 patients with clinically localized adenocarcinoma of the prostate (clinical T1-3N0M0) who had undergone retropubic radical prostatectomy were enrolled in this study. None of the patients received neoadjuvant or adjuvant therapy. Clinicopathological parameters were assessed to determine a predictive parameter of biochemical recurrence. Results. Of the total 255 patients, 77 showed biochemical recurrence during the follow-up period. The estimated 5-year overall survival, 5-year cause-specific survival, and 5-year biochemical recurrence-free survival rates were 97.7%, 99.5%, and 67.3%, respectively. Multivariate analysis using the Cox proportional hazards model showed that calculated cancer volume was an independent predictor among the preoperative clinicopathological parameters (P < 0.05). SVI and PSM were independent predictors among the postoperative parameters (SVI; P < 0.001, PSM; P = 0.049). Among the significant preoperative and postoperative parameters, calculated cancer volume remained an independent predictive parameter in multivariate analysis (P < 0.01). Conclusions. Tumor volume, as calculated by preoperative parameters, is an independent predictor of biochemical recurrence in patients who had undergone radical prostatectomy.
doi:10.1155/2012/204215
PMCID: PMC3359669  PMID: 22654901
13.  5-fluorouracil enhances the antitumor effect of sorafenib and sunitinib in a xenograft model of human renal cell carcinoma 
Oncology Letters  2012;3(6):1195-1202.
Sorafenib and sunitinib are multi-kinase inhibitors with antitumor activity in patients with advanced renal cell carcinoma (RCC). Several studies have evaluated the effect of sorafenib/sunitinib in combination with chemotherapeutic agents in different types of tumor. However, few studies have addressed the activity of fluorinated pyrimidine in combination with sorafenib/sunitinib. In this study, we examined the potential of combination therapy with 5FU and sorafenib/sunitinib in human RCC cell lines. Three human RCC cell lines, ACHN, Caki-1 and Caki-2, were used to assess sensitivity to 5-fluorouracil (5FU), sorafenib and sunitinib alone or in combination using an in vitro cell survival assay. Caki-2 cells demonstrated significantly higher resistance to 5FU and sorafenib as compared to ACHN and Caki-1. Additive antitumor effects of the combination therapy were observed in the in vitro study. There was a tendency for a positive correlation between the sensitivity to sunitinib and platelet-derived growth factor β (PDGFR-β) expression levels, which were examined by reverse transcription polymerase chain reaction. Caki-1 xenograft models were prepared by inoculating cells subcutaneously into nude mice, which were divided randomly into six groups: control, 5FU (8 mg/kg/day, intraperitoneally), sorafenib (15 mg/kg/day, orally), sunitinib (20 mg/kg/day, orally), and 5FU with sorafenib or sunitinib. The treatments were administered on 5 days each week, and tumor growth was monitored for 42 days following inoculation of cells. Synergistic antitumor effects of the combination therapy were observed in an in vivo study. The resected tumors were evaluated using the Ki-67 labeling index and microvessel density. Both the Ki-67 labeling index and microvessel density were decreased in tumors treated with the combination therapy compared to those treated with sorafenib/sunitinib alone. These findings suggest that the combination therapy of 5FU with sorafenib/sunitinib may be an effective therapeutic modality for advanced RCC patients.
doi:10.3892/ol.2012.662
PMCID: PMC3392575  PMID: 22783417
renal cell carcinoma; 5-fluorouracil; sorafenib; sunitinib; angiogenesis
14.  Transverse testicular ectopia with disorders of sex development 
Transverse testicular ectopia (TTE) is a rare congenital anomaly. Although TTE often coexists with abnormalities such as inguinal hernia and persistent Mullerian duct syndrome, disorders of sex development (DSD) in combination with TTE is extremely rare. We report a case of DSD with sex chromosomal abnormality in combination with TTE. To our knowledge, this case report is a first presentation of such anomaly.
doi:10.4103/0970-1591.94965
PMCID: PMC3339796  PMID: 22557726
Disorders of sex development; laparoscopy; transverse testicular ectopia
15.  The primary therapy chosen for patients with localized prostate cancer between the university hospital and its affiliated hospitals in Nara Uro-oncological research group registration 
BMC Urology  2011;11:6.
Background
We investigated the differences between the preferential primary therapy conceived by the primary doctors and the primary therapy actually conducted for prostate cancer patients in Nara, Japan.
Methods
The distribution of primary therapy and clinical characteristics of 2303 prostate cancer patients - diagnosed between 2004 and 2006 at Nara Medical University and its 23 affiliated hospitals - were assessed. Moreover, the preferential primary therapy for the patients at each clinical stage (cT1-T3bN0M0) conceived by the primary doctors was investigated and compared to the actual therapy.
Results
Of all patients, 51% received primary androgen deprivation therapy (PADT), 30% underwent radical prostatectomy (RP), and 14% received radiation therapy (RT). The preferential primary therapy for cT1-2N0M0 was RP (92%) while 38% of the patients actually received PADT (RP: 40%). For cT3aN0M0, the preferential primary therapy was both RP and external beam radiation therapy (EBRT) while 58% of the patients actually received PADT (RP: 16%, EBRT: 24%). For cT3bN0M0, the most preferential primary therapy was EBRT (46%) while 67% of the patients actually received PADT (EBRT: 21%). This trend was more notable in the affiliated hospitals than in the University hospital. The hospitals with lower volume of RP per year significantly conducted PADT compared with those with higher volume of RP.
Conclusions
PADT was commonly used to treat localized prostate cancer as well as locally advanced prostate cancer in Japan. There was a definite discrepancy between the preferential primary therapy conceived by the primary doctors and the actual therapy provided to the patients.
doi:10.1186/1471-2490-11-6
PMCID: PMC3095576  PMID: 21524283
16.  Differential roles of M2 and M3 muscarinic receptor subtypes in modulation of bladder afferent activity in rats 
Urology  2010;75(4):862-867.
Objectives
It has been proposed that the urothelium modulates the activity of bladder afferent pathways. However, the differential roles of muscarinic acetylcholine receptor (mAChR) subtypes in local bladder afferent activation remain unclear. We investigated the effects of various mAChR antagonists including selective M2 and M3 mAChR antagonists on bladder overactivity.
Methods
Cystometry was performed in urethane anesthetized female rats. We examined the effects of intravesical administration of antimuscarinic agents (non-selective mAChR antagonists; atropine sulfate, tolterodine tartrate and propiverine hydrochloride, M2-selective antagonists; dimethindene maleate and methoctramine hemihydrate, M3-selective antagonists; darifenacin hydrobromide and 4-DAMP) on bladder overactivity induced by oxotremorine-M (Oxo-M; non-selective mAChR agonist).
Results
Intravesical administration of Oxo-M (200 μM) elicited bladder overactivity as evidenced by decreased intercontraction interval, bladder capacity and pressure threshold. These effects were blocked by intravesical administration of non-selective or M2-selective antagonists (30–60 μM) whereas M3-selective antagonists (150 μM) did not suppress the overactivity. When instilled intravesically by itself, none of antimuscarinic agents (non-selective, M2-selective or M3-selective antagonists) affected any cystometric parameters.
Conclusions
The M2 mAChR subtype plays an important role in the local cholinergic modulation of bladder afferent activity that contributes to bladder overactivity in normal rats. Therefore, it is expected that antimuscarinic agents that have antagonistic activity against M2 mAChR can be more beneficial for the treatment of patients with overactive bladder if enhanced ACh mechanisms are involved in pathogenesis of overactive bladder.
doi:10.1016/j.urology.2009.12.013
PMCID: PMC2871158  PMID: 20156651
rat; urinary bladder; afferent pathways; muscarinic receptor
17.  PTEN Knockout Prostate Cancer as a Model for Experimental Immunotherapy 
The Journal of urology  2008;181(1):354-362.
Purpose
Testing immunotherapeutic strategies for prostate cancer has been impeded by the lack of relevant tumor models in immunocompetent animals. This opportunity is now provided by the recent development of prostate specific PTEN knockout mice, which show spontaneous development of true adenocarcinoma arising from prostate epithelium and more faithfully recapitulate the human disease than any previous model. We investigated the feasibility of using tumor cells derived from this model to test tumor vaccination and adoptive immunotherapeutic strategies for prostate cancer.
Materials and Methods
PTEN-CaP8 adenocarcinoma cells derived from the biallelic PTEN knockout prostate cancer model were used to vaccinate nontumor bearing litter mates. Tumor specific effector cells were generated from splenocytes of vaccinated mice by mixed lymphocyte-tumor reactions, and antiproliferative effects and cytokine generation were examined in vitro. The effect of vaccination or adoptive immunotherapy on luciferase marked PTEN-CaP8 subcutaneous tumors was monitored by tumor volumetric measurements and noninvasive bioluminescence imaging.
Results
Vaccination of litter mate mice with irradiated PTEN-CaP8 cells showed a significant prophylactic effect against the subsequent tumor challenge. Effector cells harvested from vaccinated litter mates showed significant interferon-γ secretion upon co-incubation with PTEN-CaP8 target cells and they were capable of efficient target cell growth inhibition in vitro. Intratumor adoptive transfer of effector cells resulted in significant growth inhibition of preestablished prostate tumors in vivo.
Conclusions
The PTEN knockout model serves as a highly useful model in which to investigate tumor cell vaccination and adoptive immunotherapeutic strategies in the context of true adenocarcinoma of the prostate. This model should accelerate efforts to develop effective immunotherapies for human prostate cancer.
doi:10.1016/j.juro.2008.08.124
PMCID: PMC2838731  PMID: 19010487
prostate; prostatic neoplasms; PLIP protein; mouse; cancer vaccines; immunotherapy; adoptive
18.  Quality of care associated with number of cases seen and self-reports of clinical competence for Japanese physicians-in-training in internal medicine 
Background
The extent of clinical exposure needed to ensure quality care has not been well determined during internal medicine training. We aimed to determine the association between clinical exposure (number of cases seen), self- reports of clinical competence, and type of institution (predictor variables) and quality of care (outcome variable) as measured by clinical vignettes.
Methods
Cross-sectional study using univariate and multivariate linear analyses in 11 teaching hospitals in Japan. Participants were physicians-in-training in internal medicine departments. Main outcome measure was standardized t-scores (quality of care) derived from responses to five clinical vignettes.
Results
Of the 375 eligible participants, 263 (70.1%) completed the vignettes. Most were in their first (57.8%) and second year (28.5%) of training; on average, the participants were 1.8 years (range = 1–8) after graduation. Two thirds of the participants (68.8%) worked in university-affiliated teaching hospitals. The median number of cases seen was 210 (range = 10–11400). Greater exposure to cases (p = 0.0005), higher self-reports of clinical competence (p = 0.0095), and type of institution (p < 0.0001) were significantly associated with higher quality of care, using a multivariate linear model and adjusting for the remaining factors. Quality of care rapidly increased for the first 100 to 200 cases seen and tapered thereafter.
Conclusion
The amount of clinical exposure and levels of self-reports of clinical competence, not years after graduation, were positively associated with quality of care, adjusting for the remaining factors. The learning curve tapered after about 200 cases.
doi:10.1186/1472-6920-6-33
PMCID: PMC1513227  PMID: 16768807

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