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1.  Oxaliplatin-Induced Leukocytoclastic Vasculitis under Adjuvant Chemotherapy for Colorectal Cancer: Two Cases of a Rare Adverse Event 
Case Reports in Oncology  2013;6(3):609-615.
Leukocytoclastic vasculitis is a multicausal systemic inflammatory disease of the small vessels, histologically characterized by inflammation and deposition of both nuclear debris and fibrin in dermal postcapillary venules. The clinical picture typically involves palpable purpura of the lower legs and may be associated with general symptoms such as fatigue, arthralgia and fever. Involvement of the internal organs, most notably the kidneys, the central nervous system or the eyes, is possible and determines the prognosis. Oxaliplatin-induced leukocytoclastic vasculitis is a very rare event that limits treatment options in affected patients. We report 2 patients who developed the condition under chemotherapy for advanced rectal and metastatic colon carcinoma, respectively; a termination of the therapy was therefore necessary. While current therapies for colorectal cancer include the combination of multimodal treatment with new and targeted agents, rare and unusual side effects elicited by established agents also need to be taken into account for the clinical management.
doi:10.1159/000357166
PMCID: PMC3901589  PMID: 24474925
Leukocytoclastic vasculitis; Oxaliplatin; Colorectal cancer; Chemotherapy-associated toxicity; Glomerulonephritis
2.  CAMERA: An integrated strategy for compound spectra extraction and annotation of LC/MS data sets 
Analytical chemistry  2011;84(1):283-289.
Liquid chromatography coupled to mass spectrometry is routinely used for metabolomics experiments. In contrast to the fairly routine and automated data acquisition steps, subsequent compound annotation and identification require extensive manual analysis and thus form a major bottle neck in data interpretation. Here we present CAMERA, a Bioconductor package integrating algorithms to extract compound spectra, annotate isotope and adduct peaks, and propose the accurate compound mass even in highly complex data. To evaluate the algorithms, we compared the annotation of CAMERA against a manually defined annotation for a mixture of known compounds spiked into a complex matrix at different concentrations. CAMERA successfully extracted accurate masses for 89.7% and 90.3% of the annotatable compounds in positive and negative ion mode, respectively. Furthermore, we present a novel annotation approach that combines spectral information of data acquired in opposite ion modes to further improve the annotation rate. We demonstrate the utility of CAMERA in two different, easily adoptable plant metabolomics experiments, where the application of CAMERA drastically reduced the amount of manual analysis.
doi:10.1021/ac202450g
PMCID: PMC3658281  PMID: 22111785
3.  A Cross-platform Toolkit for Mass Spectrometry and Proteomics 
Nature biotechnology  2012;30(10):918-920.
Mass-spectrometry-based proteomics has become an important component of biological research. Numerous proteomics methods have been developed to identify and quantify the proteins in biological and clinical samples1, identify pathways affected by endogenous and exogenous perturbations2, and characterize protein complexes3. Despite successes, the interpretation of vast proteomics datasets remains a challenge. There have been several calls for improvements and standardization of proteomics data analysis frameworks, as well as for an application-programming interface for proteomics data access4,5. In response, we have developed the ProteoWizard Toolkit, a robust set of open-source, software libraries and applications designed to facilitate proteomics research. The libraries implement the first-ever, non-commercial, unified data access interface for proteomics, bridging field-standard open formats and all common vendor formats. In addition, diverse software classes enable rapid development of vendor-agnostic proteomics software. Additionally, ProteoWizard projects and applications, building upon the core libraries, are becoming standard tools for enabling significant proteomics inquiries.
doi:10.1038/nbt.2377
PMCID: PMC3471674  PMID: 23051804
4.  MetaboLights—an open-access general-purpose repository for metabolomics studies and associated meta-data 
Nucleic Acids Research  2012;41(D1):D781-D786.
MetaboLights (http://www.ebi.ac.uk/metabolights) is the first general-purpose, open-access repository for metabolomics studies, their raw experimental data and associated metadata, maintained by one of the major open-access data providers in molecular biology. Metabolomic profiling is an important tool for research into biological functioning and into the systemic perturbations caused by diseases, diet and the environment. The effectiveness of such methods depends on the availability of public open data across a broad range of experimental methods and conditions. The MetaboLights repository, powered by the open source ISA framework, is cross-species and cross-technique. It will cover metabolite structures and their reference spectra as well as their biological roles, locations, concentrations and raw data from metabolic experiments. Studies automatically receive a stable unique accession number that can be used as a publication reference (e.g. MTBLS1). At present, the repository includes 15 submitted studies, encompassing 93 protocols for 714 assays, and span over 8 different species including human, Caenorhabditis elegans, Mus musculus and Arabidopsis thaliana. Eight hundred twenty-seven of the metabolites identified in these studies have been mapped to ChEBI. These studies cover a variety of techniques, including NMR spectroscopy and mass spectrometry.
doi:10.1093/nar/gks1004
PMCID: PMC3531110  PMID: 23109552
5.  Toward interoperable bioscience data 
Nature genetics  2012;44(2):121-126.
To make full use of research data, the bioscience community needs to adopt technologies and reward mechanisms that support interoperability and promote the growth of an open ‘data commoning’ culture. Here we describe the prerequisites for data commoning and present an established and growing ecosystem of solutions using the shared ‘Investigation-Study-Assay’ framework to support that vision.
doi:10.1038/ng.1054
PMCID: PMC3428019  PMID: 22281772
6.  TraML—A Standard Format for Exchange of Selected Reaction Monitoring Transition Lists* 
Molecular & Cellular Proteomics : MCP  2011;11(4):R111.015040.
Targeted proteomics via selected reaction monitoring is a powerful mass spectrometric technique affording higher dynamic range, increased specificity and lower limits of detection than other shotgun mass spectrometry methods when applied to proteome analyses. However, it involves selective measurement of predetermined analytes, which requires more preparation in the form of selecting appropriate signatures for the proteins and peptides that are to be targeted. There is a growing number of software programs and resources for selecting optimal transitions and the instrument settings used for the detection and quantification of the targeted peptides, but the exchange of this information is hindered by a lack of a standard format. We have developed a new standardized format, called TraML, for encoding transition lists and associated metadata. In addition to introducing the TraML format, we demonstrate several implementations across the community, and provide semantic validators, extensive documentation, and multiple example instances to demonstrate correctly written documents. Widespread use of TraML will facilitate the exchange of transitions, reduce time spent handling incompatible list formats, increase the reusability of previously optimized transitions, and thus accelerate the widespread adoption of targeted proteomics via selected reaction monitoring.
doi:10.1074/mcp.R111.015040
PMCID: PMC3322582  PMID: 22159873
7.  Meeting Report from the Second “Minimum Information for Biological and Biomedical Investigations” (MIBBI) workshop 
Standards in Genomic Sciences  2010;3(3):259-266.
This report summarizes the proceedings of the second workshop of the ‘Minimum Information for Biological and Biomedical Investigations’ (MIBBI) consortium held on Dec 1-2, 2010 in Rüdesheim, Germany through the sponsorship of the Beilstein-Institute. MIBBI is an umbrella organization uniting communities developing Minimum Information (MI) checklists to standardize the description of data sets, the workflows by which they were generated and the scientific context for the work. This workshop brought together representatives of more than twenty communities to present the status of their MI checklists and plans for future development. Shared challenges and solutions were identified and the role of MIBBI in MI checklist development was discussed. The meeting featured some thirty presentations, wide-ranging discussions and breakout groups. The top outcomes of the two-day workshop as defined by the participants were: 1) the chance to share best practices and to identify areas of synergy; 2) defining a series of tasks for updating the MIBBI Portal; 3) reemphasizing the need to maintain independent MI checklists for various communities while leveraging common terms and workflow elements contained in multiple checklists; and 4) revision of the concept of the MIBBI Foundry to focus on the creation of a core set of MIBBI modules intended for reuse by individual MI checklist projects while maintaining the integrity of each MI project. Further information about MIBBI and its range of activities can be found at http://mibbi.org/.
doi:10.4056/sigs.147362
PMCID: PMC3035314  PMID: 21304730
8.  mzML—a Community Standard for Mass Spectrometry Data* 
Molecular & Cellular Proteomics : MCP  2010;10(1):R110.000133.
Mass spectrometry is a fundamental tool for discovery and analysis in the life sciences. With the rapid advances in mass spectrometry technology and methods, it has become imperative to provide a standard output format for mass spectrometry data that will facilitate data sharing and analysis. Initially, the efforts to develop a standard format for mass spectrometry data resulted in multiple formats, each designed with a different underlying philosophy. To resolve the issues associated with having multiple formats, vendors, researchers, and software developers convened under the banner of the HUPO PSI to develop a single standard. The new data format incorporated many of the desirable technical attributes from the previous data formats, while adding a number of improvements, including features such as a controlled vocabulary with validation tools to ensure consistent usage of the format, improved support for selected reaction monitoring data, and immediately available implementations to facilitate rapid adoption by the community. The resulting standard data format, mzML, is a well tested open-source format for mass spectrometer output files that can be readily utilized by the community and easily adapted for incremental advances in mass spectrometry technology.
doi:10.1074/mcp.R110.000133
PMCID: PMC3013463  PMID: 20716697
9.  ISA software suite: supporting standards-compliant experimental annotation and enabling curation at the community level 
Bioinformatics  2010;26(18):2354-2356.
Summary: The first open source software suite for experimentalists and curators that (i) assists in the annotation and local management of experimental metadata from high-throughput studies employing one or a combination of omics and other technologies; (ii) empowers users to uptake community-defined checklists and ontologies; and (iii) facilitates submission to international public repositories.
Availability and Implementation: Software, documentation, case studies and implementations at http://www.isa-tools.org
Contact: isatools@googlegroups.com
doi:10.1093/bioinformatics/btq415
PMCID: PMC2935443  PMID: 20679334
10.  In silico fragmentation for computer assisted identification of metabolite mass spectra 
BMC Bioinformatics  2010;11:148.
Background
Mass spectrometry has become the analytical method of choice in metabolomics research. The identification of unknown compounds is the main bottleneck. In addition to the precursor mass, tandem MS spectra carry informative fragment peaks, but the coverage of spectral libraries of measured reference compounds are far from covering the complete chemical space. Compound libraries such as PubChem or KEGG describe a larger number of compounds, which can be used to compare their in silico fragmentation with spectra of unknown metabolites.
Results
We created the MetFrag suite to obtain a candidate list from compound libraries based on the precursor mass, subsequently ranked by the agreement between measured and in silico fragments. In the evaluation MetFrag was able to rank most of the correct compounds within the top 3 candidates returned by an exact mass query in KEGG. Compared to a previously published study, MetFrag obtained better results than the commercial MassFrontier software. Especially for large compound libraries, the candidates with a good score show a high structural similarity or just different stereochemistry, a subsequent clustering based on chemical distances reduces this redundancy. The in silico fragmentation requires less than a second to process a molecule, and MetFrag performs a search in KEGG or PubChem on average within 30 to 300 seconds, respectively, on an average desktop PC.
Conclusions
We presented a method that is able to identify small molecules from tandem MS measurements, even without spectral reference data or a large set of fragmentation rules. With today's massive general purpose compound libraries we obtain dozens of very similar candidates, which still allows a confident estimate of the correct compound class. Our tool MetFrag improves the identification of unknown substances from tandem MS spectra and delivers better results than comparable commercial software. MetFrag is available through a web application, web services and as java library. The web frontend allows the end-user to analyse single spectra and browse the results, whereas the web service and console application are aimed to perform batch searches and evaluation.
doi:10.1186/1471-2105-11-148
PMCID: PMC2853470  PMID: 20307295
11.  Highly sensitive feature detection for high resolution LC/MS 
BMC Bioinformatics  2008;9:504.
Background
Liquid chromatography coupled to mass spectrometry (LC/MS) is an important analytical technology for e.g. metabolomics experiments. Determining the boundaries, centres and intensities of the two-dimensional signals in the LC/MS raw data is called feature detection. For the subsequent analysis of complex samples such as plant extracts, which may contain hundreds of compounds, corresponding to thousands of features – a reliable feature detection is mandatory.
Results
We developed a new feature detection algorithm centWave for high-resolution LC/MS data sets, which collects regions of interest (partial mass traces) in the raw-data, and applies continuous wavelet transformation and optionally Gauss-fitting in the chromatographic domain. We evaluated our feature detection algorithm on dilution series and mixtures of seed and leaf extracts, and estimated recall, precision and F-score of seed and leaf specific features in two experiments of different complexity.
Conclusion
The new feature detection algorithm meets the requirements of current metabolomics experiments. centWave can detect close-by and partially overlapping features and has the highest overall recall and precision values compared to the other algorithms, matchedFilter (the original algorithm of XCMS) and the centroidPicker from MZmine. The centWave algorithm was integrated into the Bioconductor R-package XCMS and is available from
doi:10.1186/1471-2105-9-504
PMCID: PMC2639432  PMID: 19040729
12.  Building blocks for automated elucidation of metabolites: Machine learning methods for NMR prediction 
BMC Bioinformatics  2008;9:400.
Background
Current efforts in Metabolomics, such as the Human Metabolome Project, collect structures of biological metabolites as well as data for their characterisation, such as spectra for identification of substances and measurements of their concentration. Still, only a fraction of existing metabolites and their spectral fingerprints are known. Computer-Assisted Structure Elucidation (CASE) of biological metabolites will be an important tool to leverage this lack of knowledge. Indispensable for CASE are modules to predict spectra for hypothetical structures. This paper evaluates different statistical and machine learning methods to perform predictions of proton NMR spectra based on data from our open database NMRShiftDB.
Results
A mean absolute error of 0.18 ppm was achieved for the prediction of proton NMR shifts ranging from 0 to 11 ppm. Random forest, J48 decision tree and support vector machines achieved similar overall errors. HOSE codes being a notably simple method achieved a comparatively good result of 0.17 ppm mean absolute error.
Conclusion
NMR prediction methods applied in the course of this work delivered precise predictions which can serve as a building block for Computer-Assisted Structure Elucidation for biological metabolites.
doi:10.1186/1471-2105-9-400
PMCID: PMC2605476  PMID: 18817546
13.  Critical assessment of alignment procedures for LC-MS proteomics and metabolomics measurements 
BMC Bioinformatics  2008;9:375.
Background
Liquid chromatography coupled to mass spectrometry (LC-MS) has become a prominent tool for the analysis of complex proteomics and metabolomics samples. In many applications multiple LC-MS measurements need to be compared, e. g. to improve reliability or to combine results from different samples in a statistical comparative analysis. As in all physical experiments, LC-MS data are affected by uncertainties, and variability of retention time is encountered in all data sets. It is therefore necessary to estimate and correct the underlying distortions of the retention time axis to search for corresponding compounds in different samples. To this end, a variety of so-called LC-MS map alignment algorithms have been developed during the last four years. Most of these approaches are well documented, but they are usually evaluated on very specific samples only. So far, no publication has been assessing different alignment algorithms using a standard LC-MS sample along with commonly used quality criteria.
Results
We propose two LC-MS proteomics as well as two LC-MS metabolomics data sets that represent typical alignment scenarios. Furthermore, we introduce a new quality measure for the evaluation of LC-MS alignment algorithms. Using the four data sets to compare six freely available alignment algorithms proposed for the alignment of metabolomics and proteomics LC-MS measurements, we found significant differences with respect to alignment quality, running time, and usability in general.
Conclusion
The multitude of available alignment methods necessitates the generation of standard data sets and quality measures that allow users as well as developers to benchmark and compare their map alignment tools on a fair basis. Our study represents a first step in this direction. Currently, the installation and evaluation of the "correct" parameter settings can be quite a time-consuming task, and the success of a particular method is still highly dependent on the experience of the user. Therefore, we propose to continue and extend this type of study to a community-wide competition. All data as well as our evaluation scripts are available at .
doi:10.1186/1471-2105-9-375
PMCID: PMC2570366  PMID: 18793413

Results 1-13 (13)