PMCC PMCC

Search tips
Search criteria

Advanced
Results 1-5 (5)
 

Clipboard (0)
None

Select a Filter Below

Journals
Year of Publication
Document Types
1.  Chondromyxoid fibroma of the sacrum: A case report and literature review 
Surgical Neurology International  2016;7(Suppl 13):S370-S374.
Background:
Chondromyxoid fibroma (CMF) is an extremely rare, benign cartilaginous tumor that makes up <0.5% of all bone tumors, typically presenting in the second or third decade of life. CMF of the sacrum is exceedingly rare, with only seven documented cases reported in the neurosurgical literature.
Case Description:
We report a case of a 35-year-old female with a 3 month history of lower back pain after sustaining a fall on her sacrum/coccyx presenting with a progressive complaint of localized lower back pain, occasional urinary retention without incontinence, gluteal hypesthesia, and pressure below the gluteal crease. Imaging demonstrated a large, expansile enhancing soft-tissue lesion involving the sacrum, distal to the S2-3 disc space. The tumor was removed with partial sacrectomy for open en bloc resection with partial nerve sparing. The patient was found at 1.5-year follow-up with the improvement of symptoms, no recurrence, and no residual neurologic dysfunction.
Conclusion:
Sacral CMF is a rare clinical entity that may mirror more aggressive sacral pathology, including chordoma, in both clinical presentation and imaging characteristics. A review of the available literature regarding diagnosis, surgical management options, and prognosis for sacral CMF is provided.
doi:10.4103/2152-7806.182547
PMCID: PMC4879845  PMID: 27274412
Chondromyxoid fibroma; chondrosarcoma; sacral chordomas; sacrectomy; sacrum
2.  IB-07HISTOPLASMOSIS WITH CNS INVOLVEMENT: CASE PRESENTATION WITH DISCUSSION AND LITERATURE REVIEW 
Neuro-Oncology  2014;16(Suppl 5):v108.
Histoplasma capsulatum is one of the most common fungal respiratory infections in the world. CNS histoplasmosis is rare and difficult to diagnose because it is often overlooked or mistaken for other pathologies due to its non-specific symptoms. Failure to quickly diagnose CNS histoplasmosis leads to a poor prognosis. A 32-year-old homosexual Hispanic male with advanced AIDS presented with an altered mental status and reported confusion for the past three months. He had a GSC scale of 12, repetitive non-fluent speech, and a disconjugate gaze with a right gaze preference. Lung-CT findings indicated a pulmonary histoplasmosis infection. An MRI of the brain revealed a ring-enhancing lesion in the left caudate nucleus. A CT guided left retroperitoneal node biopsy was performed and indicated a benign inflammatory process with organisms compatible with fungal yeast. Treatment with amphotericin B followed by itraconazole was initiated in spite of negative CSF cultures and proved effective in mitigating associated CNS lesions and resolving neurologic deficits. The patient was discharged three weeks later in stable condition. Six weeks later, his left basal ganglia mass decreased from 30 x 36.9mm to 28.3 x 23.3mm. Early recognition of symptoms and proper steps are key in improving outcomes of CNS histoplasmosis. Aggressive medical management is possible in treatment of intracranial deep mass lesions, and disseminated histoplasmosis with CNS involvement can be appropriately diagnosed and treated, despite negative CSF and serology studies.
doi:10.1093/neuonc/nou257.7
PMCID: PMC4218224
3.  Histoplasmosis with Deep CNS Involvement: Case Presentation with Discussion and Literature Review 
Central nervous system (CNS) histoplasmosis is rare and difficult to diagnose because it is often overlooked or mistaken for other pathologies due to its nonspecific symptoms. A 32-year-old Hispanic man with advanced acquired immunodeficiency virus presented with altered mental status and reported confusion for the past 3 months. He had a Glasgow Coma Scale of 12, repetitive nonfluent speech, and a disconjugate gaze with a right gaze preference. Lung computed tomography (CT) findings indicated a pulmonary histoplasmosis infection. Magnetic resonance imaging of the brain revealed a ring-enhancing lesion in the left caudate nucleus. A CT-guided left retroperitoneal node biopsy was performed and indicated a benign inflammatory process with organisms compatible with fungal yeast. Treatment with amphotericin B followed by itraconazole was initiated in spite of negative cerebrospinal fluid (CSF) cultures and proved effective in mitigating associated CNS lesions and resolving neurologic deficits. The patient was discharged 3 weeks later in stable condition. Six weeks later, his left basal ganglia mass decreased. Early recognition of symptoms and proper steps is key in improving outcomes of CNS histoplasmosis. Aggressive medical management is possible in the treatment of intracranial deep mass lesions, and disseminated histoplasmosis with CNS involvement can be appropriately diagnosed and treated, despite negative CSF and serology studies.
doi:10.1055/s-0035-1554932
PMCID: PMC4520962  PMID: 26251798
Histoplasma capsulatum; disseminated histoplasmosis; CNS infection; fungal yeast; CSF culture; ring-enhancing lesion; immunocompromised; human immunodeficiency virus
4.  Supratentorial primitive neuroectodermal tumor in an adult: a case report and review of the literature 
Introduction
Supratentorial primitive neuroectodermal tumors predominantly occur in children, and are rare in the adult population. Less than 100 cases of supratentorial primitive neuroectodermal tumor have been reported in adults internationally. Our case study reports this rare incident.
Case presentation
A 22-year-old Hispanic man presented with headaches, blurry vision, diplopia, intermittent vomiting, and grossly decreased vision. A magnetic resonance image showed a left posterior parietal heterogeneously enhancing mass measuring 4.2cm × 7.2cm × 7.0cm. After craniotomy for resection and decompression, the mass was histologically revealed to be a supratentorial primitive neuroectodermal tumor. Standardized immunohistochemical studies for this mass were carried out.
Conclusion
We have concluded that immunohistochemical and genetic workup should be included in the standardized pathological workup for primitive neuroectodermal tumors in order to provide more prognostic information. Based on our current literature review, we propose an immunohistochemical panel.
doi:10.1186/1752-1947-6-361
PMCID: PMC3492070  PMID: 23095172
5.  Discovery-Based Science Education: Functional Genomic Dissection in Drosophila by Undergraduate Researchers 
Chen, Jiong | Call, Gerald B | Beyer, Elsa | Bui, Chris | Cespedes, Albert | Chan, Amy | Chan, Jenny | Chan, Stacy | Chhabra, Akanksha | Dang, Peter | Deravanesian, Artemis | Hermogeno, Brenda | Jen, James | Kim, Eunha | Lee, Eric | Lewis, Gemma | Marshall, Jamie | Regalia, Kirsten | Shadpour, Farnaz | Shemmassian, Aram | Spivey, Kristin | Wells, Maggie | Wu, Joy | Yamauchi, Yuki | Yavari, Amir | Abrams, Anna | Abramson, Amanda | Amado, Latiffe | Anderson, Jenny | Bashour, Keenan | Bibikova, Elena | Bookatz, Allen | Brewer, Sarah | Buu, Natalie | Calvillo, Stephanie | Cao, Joseph | Chang, Aileen | Chang, Daniel | Chang, Yuli | Chen, Yibing | Choi, Joo | Chou, Jeyling | Datta, Sumit | Davarifar, Ardy | Desai, Poonam | Fabrikant, Jordan | Farnad, Shahbaz | Fu, Katherine | Garcia, Eddie | Garrone, Nick | Gasparyan, Srpouhi | Gayda, Phyllis | Goffstein, Chad | Gonzalez, Courtney | Guirguis, Mariam | Hassid, Ryan | Hong, Aria | Hong, Julie | Hovestreydt, Lindsay | Hu, Charles | Jamshidian, Farid | Kahen, Katrin | Kao, Linda | Kelley, Melissa | Kho, Thomas | Kim, Sarah | Kim, Yein | Kirkpatrick, Brian | Kohan, Emil | Kwak, Robert | Langenbacher, Adam | Laxamana, Santino | Lee, Chris | Lee, Janet | Lee, So-Youn | Lee, To Hang S | Lee, Toni | Lezcano, Sheila | Lin, Henry | Lin, Peter | Luu, Julie | Luu, Thanh | Marrs, Will | Marsh, Erin | Min, Sarah | Minasian, Tanya | Misra, Amit | Morimoto, Miles | Moshfegh, Yasaman | Murray, Jessica | Nguyen, Cynthia | Nguyen, Kha | Nodado, Ernesto | O'Donahue, Amanda | Onugha, Ndidi | Orjiakor, Nneka | Padhiar, Bhavin | Pavel-Dinu, Mara | Pavlenko, Alex | Paz, Edwin | Phaklides, Sarah | Pham, Lephong | Poulose, Preethi | Powell, Russell | Pusic, Aya | Ramola, Divi | Ribbens, Meghann | Rifai, Bassel | Rosselli, Desiree | Saakyan, Manyak | Saarikoski, Pamela | Segura, Miriam | Singh, Ramnik | Singh, Vivek | Skinner, Emily | Solomin, Daniel | Soneji, Kosha | Stageberg, Erika | Stavchanskiy, Marina | Tekchandani, Leena | Thai, Leo | Thiyanaratnam, Jayantha | Tong, Maurine | Toor, Aneet | Tovar, Steve | Trangsrud, Kelly | Tsang, Wah-Yung | Uemura, Marc | Unkovic, Mary | Vollmer, Emily | Weiss, Emily | Wood, Damien | Wu, Sophia | Wu, Winston | Xu, Qing | Yackle, Kevin | Yarosh, Will | Yee, Laura | Yen, George | Alkin, Grant | Go, Sheryllene | Huff, Devon M | Minye, Helena | Paul, Eric | Villarasa, Nikki | Milchanowski, Allison | Banerjee, Utpal
PLoS Biology  2005;3(2):e59.
How can you combine professional-quality research with discovery-based undergraduate education? The UCLA Undergraduate Consortium for Functional Genomics provides the answer
doi:10.1371/journal.pbio.0030059
PMCID: PMC548953  PMID: 15719063

Results 1-5 (5)