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1.  Return of results in the genomic medicine projects of the eMERGE network 
The electronic Medical Records and Genomics (eMERGE) (Phase I) network was established in 2007 to further genomic discovery using biorepositories linked to the electronic health record (EHR). In Phase II, which began in 2011, genomic discovery efforts continue and in addition the network is investigating best practices for implementing genomic medicine, in particular, the return of genomic results in the EHR for use by physicians at point-of-care. To develop strategies for addressing the challenges of implementing genomic medicine in the clinical setting, the eMERGE network is conducting studies that return clinically-relevant genomic results to research participants and their health care providers. These genomic medicine pilot studies include returning individual genetic variants associated with disease susceptibility or drug response, as well as genetic risk scores for common “complex” disorders. Additionally, as part of a network-wide pharmacogenomics-related project, targeted resequencing of 84 pharmacogenes is being performed and select genotypes of pharmacogenetic relevance are being placed in the EHR to guide individualized drug therapy. Individual sites within the eMERGE network are exploring mechanisms to address incidental findings generated by resequencing of the 84 pharmacogenes. In this paper, we describe studies being conducted within the eMERGE network to develop best practices for integrating genomic findings into the EHR, and the challenges associated with such work.
doi:10.3389/fgene.2014.00050
PMCID: PMC3972474  PMID: 24723935
genomics; electronic health records; incidental findings; implementation; genetic counseling; next generation sequencing; pharmacogenetics
2.  Gene-centric meta-analyses of 108 912 individuals confirm known body mass index loci and reveal three novel signals 
Human Molecular Genetics  2012;22(1):184-201.
Recent genetic association studies have made progress in uncovering components of the genetic architecture of the body mass index (BMI). We used the ITMAT-Broad-Candidate Gene Association Resource (CARe) (IBC) array comprising up to 49 320 single nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs) across ∼2100 metabolic and cardiovascular-related loci to genotype up to 108 912 individuals of European ancestry (EA), African-Americans, Hispanics and East Asians, from 46 studies, to provide additional insight into SNPs underpinning BMI. We used a five-phase study design: Phase I focused on meta-analysis of EA studies providing individual level genotype data; Phase II performed a replication of cohorts providing summary level EA data; Phase III meta-analyzed results from the first two phases; associated SNPs from Phase III were used for replication in Phase IV; finally in Phase V, a multi-ethnic meta-analysis of all samples from four ethnicities was performed. At an array-wide significance (P < 2.40E-06), we identify novel BMI associations in loci translocase of outer mitochondrial membrane 40 homolog (yeast) - apolipoprotein E - apolipoprotein C-I (TOMM40-APOE-APOC1) (rs2075650, P = 2.95E-10), sterol regulatory element binding transcription factor 2 (SREBF2, rs5996074, P = 9.43E-07) and neurotrophic tyrosine kinase, receptor, type 2 [NTRK2, a brain-derived neurotrophic factor (BDNF) receptor gene, rs1211166, P = 1.04E-06] in the Phase IV meta-analysis. Of 10 loci with previous evidence for BMI association represented on the IBC array, eight were replicated, with the remaining two showing nominal significance. Conditional analyses revealed two independent BMI-associated signals in BDNF and melanocortin 4 receptor (MC4R) regions. Of the 11 array-wide significant SNPs, three are associated with gene expression levels in both primary B-cells and monocytes; with rs4788099 in SH2B adaptor protein 1 (SH2B1) notably being associated with the expression of multiple genes in cis. These multi-ethnic meta-analyses expand our knowledge of BMI genetics.
doi:10.1093/hmg/dds396
PMCID: PMC3522401  PMID: 23001569
4.  IBC CARe Microarray Allelic Population Prevalences in an American Indian Population 
PLoS ONE  2013;8(9):e75080.
Background
The prevalence of variant alleles among single nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs) is not well known for many minority populations. These population allele frequencies (PAFs) are necessary to guide genetic epidemiology studies and to understand the population specific contribution of these variants to disease risk. Large differences in PAF among certain functional groups of genes could also indicate possible selection pressure or founder effects of interest. The 50K SNP, custom genotyping microarray (CARe) was developed, focusing on about 2,000 candidate genes and pathways with demonstrated pathophysiologic influence on cardiovascular disease (CVD).
Methods
The CARe microarray was used to genotype 216 unaffected controls in a study of pre-eclampsia among a Northern Plains, American Indian tribe. The allelic prevalences of 34,240 SNPs suitable for analysis, were determined and compared with corresponding HapMap prevalences for the Caucasian population. Further analysis was conducted to compare the frequency of statistically different prevalences among functionally related SNPs, as determined by the DAVID Bioinformatics Resource.
Results
Of the SNPs with PAFs in both datasets, 9.8%,37.2% and 47.1% showed allele frequencies among the American Indian population greater than, less than and either greater or less than (respectively) the HapMap Caucasian population. The 2,547 genes were divided into 53 functional groups using the highest stringency criteria. While none of these groups reached the Bonferroni corrected p value of 0.00094, there were 7 of these 53 groups with significantly more or less differing PAFs, each with a probability of less than 0.05 and an overall probability of 0.0046.
Conclusion
In comparison to the HapMap Caucasian population, there are substantial differences in the prevalence among an American Indian community of SNPs related to CVD. Certain functional groups of genes and related SNPs show possible evidence of selection pressure or founder effects.
doi:10.1371/journal.pone.0075080
PMCID: PMC3765406  PMID: 24040389
5.  Intensity of Salt Taste and Prevalence of Hypertension Are Not Related in the Beaver Dam Offspring Study 
Chemosensory perception  2012;5(2):139-145.
BACKGROUND
Standard clinical advice for the prevention and treatment of hypertension includes limitation of salt intake. Previous studies of the association between perception of salt taste and hypertension prevalence have not reported consistent results and have usually been conducted in small study populations.
PURPOSE
To determine the cross-sectional relationship between intensity of salt taste, discretionary salt use, and hypertension. METHODS: Subjects (n=2371, mean age=48.8 years) were participants in the Beaver Dam Offspring Study (BOSS), an investigation of sensory loss and aging conducted in 2005–2008. Salt taste intensity was measured using a filter paper disk impregnated with 1.0 M sodium chloride and a general Labeled Magnitude Scale (gLMS). Hypertension was defined as systolic blood pressure ≥ 140 mmHg or diastolic blood pressure ≥ 90 mmHg, or use of high blood pressure medication.
RESULTS
Nearly 32% of the participants rated the salt disk as weak or having no taste while approximately 10% considered it to be very strong or stronger. The intensity was reported to be less strong by males (P < 0.001) and college graduates (P = 0.02) and was inversely associated with frequency of adding salt to foods (P = 0.02). There was no significant association between hypertension and the intensity of salt taste, before and after adjustment for covariates. Exclusion of subjects with a history of physician diagnosed hypertension did not appreciably alter these findings.
CONCLUSIONS
The perception of salt taste was related to the frequency of discretionary salt use but not to hypertension status or mean blood pressure.
doi:10.1007/s12078-012-9118-8
PMCID: PMC3381604  PMID: 22745848
high blood pressure; hypertension; population; salt taste; salt use; taste intensity
6.  A gene-centric association scan for Coagulation Factor VII levels in European and African Americans: the Candidate Gene Association Resource (CARe) Consortium 
Human Molecular Genetics  2011;20(17):3525-3534.
Polymorphisms in several distinct genomic regions, including the F7 gene, were recently associated with factor VII (FVII) levels in European Americans (EAs). The genetic determinants of FVII in African Americans (AAs) are unknown. We used a 50 000 single nucleotide polymorphism (SNP) gene-centric array having dense coverage of over 2 000 candidate genes for cardiovascular disease (CVD) pathways in a community-based sample of 16 324 EA and 3898 AA participants from the Candidate Gene Association Resource (CARe) consortium. Our aim was the discovery of new genomic loci and more detailed characterization of existing loci associated with FVII levels. In EAs, we identified three new loci associated with FVII, of which APOA5 on chromosome 11q23 and HNF4A on chromosome 20q12–13 were replicated in a sample of 4289 participants from the Whitehall II study. We confirmed four previously reported FVII-associated loci (GCKR, MS4A6A, F7 and PROCR) in CARe EA samples. In AAs, the F7 and PROCR regions were significantly associated with FVII. Several of the FVII-associated regions are known to be associated with lipids and other cardiovascular-related traits. At the F7 locus, there was evidence of at least five independently associated SNPs in EAs and three independent signals in AAs. Though the variance in FVII explained by the existing loci is substantial (20% in EA and 10% in AA), larger sample sizes and investigation of lower frequency variants may be required to identify additional FVII-associated loci in EAs and AAs and further clarify the relationship between FVII and other CVD risk factors.
doi:10.1093/hmg/ddr264
PMCID: PMC3153310  PMID: 21676895
7.  Combined admixture mapping and association analysis identifies a novel blood pressure genetic locus on 5p13: contributions from the CARe consortium 
Human Molecular Genetics  2011;20(11):2285-2295.
Admixture mapping based on recently admixed populations is a powerful method to detect disease variants with substantial allele frequency differences in ancestral populations. We performed admixture mapping analysis for systolic blood pressure (SBP) and diastolic blood pressure (DBP), followed by trait-marker association analysis, in 6303 unrelated African-American participants of the Candidate Gene Association Resource (CARe) consortium. We identified five genomic regions (P< 0.001) harboring genetic variants contributing to inter-individual BP variation. In follow-up association analyses, correcting for all tests performed in this study, three loci were significantly associated with SBP and one significantly associated with DBP (P< 10−5). Further analyses suggested that six independent single-nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs) contributed to the phenotypic variation observed in the admixture mapping analysis. These six SNPs were examined for replication in multiple, large, independent studies of African-Americans [Women's Health Initiative (WHI), Maywood, Genetic Epidemiology Network of Arteriopathy (GENOA) and Howard University Family Study (HUFS)] as well as one native African sample (Nigerian study), with a total replication sample size of 11 882. Meta-analysis of the replication set identified a novel variant (rs7726475) on chromosome 5 between the SUB1 and NPR3 genes, as being associated with SBP and DBP (P< 0.0015 for both); in meta-analyses combining the CARe samples with the replication data, we observed P-values of 4.45 × 10−7 for SBP and 7.52 × 10−7 for DBP for rs7726475 that were significant after accounting for all the tests performed. Our study highlights that admixture mapping analysis can help identify genetic variants missed by genome-wide association studies because of drastically reduced number of tests in the whole genome.
doi:10.1093/hmg/ddr113
PMCID: PMC3090198  PMID: 21422096
8.  Dense Genotyping of Candidate Gene Loci Identifies Variants Associated with High-Density Lipoprotein Cholesterol 
Background
Plasma levels of high density lipoprotein cholesterol (HDL-C) are known to be heritable, but only a fraction of the heritability is explained. We used a high density genotyping array containing SNPs from HDL-C candidate genes selected on known biology of HDL-C metabolism, mouse genetic studies, and human genetic association studies. SNP selection was based on tagging-SNPs but also included low-frequency nonsynonymous SNPs.
Methods and Results
Association analysis in a cohort containing extremes of HDL-C (case-control, n=1733) provided a discovery phase, with replication in three additional populations for a total meta-analysis in 7,857 individuals. We replicated the majority of loci identified through genome wide association studies and present on the array (including ABCA1, APOA1/C3/A4/A5, APOB, APOE/C1/C2, CETP, CTCF-PRMT8, FADS1/2/3, GALNT2, LCAT, LILRA3, LIPC, LIPG, LPL, LRP4, SCARB1, TRIB1, ZNF664), and provide evidence suggestive of association in several previously unreported candidate gene loci (including ABCG1, GPR109A/B/81, NFKB1, PON1/2/3/4). There was evidence for multiple, independent association signals in five loci, including association with low frequency nonsynonymous variants.
Conclusions
Genetic loci associated with HDL-C are likely to harbor multiple, independent causative variants, frequently with opposite effects on the HDL-C phenotype. Cohorts composed of extreme individuals may be efficiently used in a case-control discovery of quantitative traits.
doi:10.1161/CIRCGENETICS.110.957563
PMCID: PMC3319351  PMID: 21303902
lipids; genetic association; HDL cholesterol; cardiovascular diseases
9.  Candidate Gene Association Resource (CARe): Design, Methods, and Proof of Concept 
Background
. The National Heart, Lung, and Blood Institute’s Candidate Gene Association Resource (CARe), a planned cross-cohort analysis of genetic variation in cardiovascular, pulmonary, hematological, and sleep-related traits, comprises more than 40,000 participants representing four ethnic groups in nine community-based cohorts. The goals of CARe include the discovery of new variants associated with traits using a candidate gene approach and the discovery of new variants using the genome-wide association mapping approach specifically in African Americans.
Methods and Results
. CARe has assembled DNA samples for more than 40,000 individuals self-identified as European-American, African-American, Hispanic, or Chinese-American, with accompanying data on hundreds of phenotypes that have been standardized and deposited in the CARe Phenotype Database. All participants were genotyped for seven single-nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs) selected based on prior association evidence. We performed association analyses relating each of these SNPs to lipid traits, stratified by gender and ethnicity and adjusted for age and age2. In at least two of the ethnic groups, SNPs near CETP, LIPC, and LPL strongly replicated for association with high-density lipoprotein cholesterol concentrations, PCSK9 with low-density lipoprotein cholesterol levels, and LPL and APOA5 with serum triglycerides. Notably, some SNPs showed varying effect sizes and significance of association in different ethnic groups.
Conclusions
. The CARe Pilot Study validates the operational framework for phenotype collection, SNP genotyping, and analytical pipeline of the CARe project and validates the planned candidate gene study of ~2,000 biologic candidate loci in all participants and genome-wide association study in ~8,000 African-American participants. CARe will serve as a valuable resource for the scientific community.
doi:10.1161/CIRCGENETICS.109.882696
PMCID: PMC3048024  PMID: 20400780
Genetics; lipids; diabetes; blood pressure; epidemiology
10.  Association of genetic variation with systolic and diastolic blood pressure among African Americans: the Candidate Gene Association Resource study 
Fox, Ervin R. | Young, J. Hunter | Li, Yali | Dreisbach, Albert W. | Keating, Brendan J. | Musani, Solomon K. | Liu, Kiang | Morrison, Alanna C. | Ganesh, Santhi | Kutlar, Abdullah | Ramachandran, Vasan S. | Polak, Josef F. | Fabsitz, Richard R. | Dries, Daniel L. | Farlow, Deborah N. | Redline, Susan | Adeyemo, Adebowale | Hirschorn, Joel N. | Sun, Yan V. | Wyatt, Sharon B. | Penman, Alan D. | Palmas, Walter | Rotter, Jerome I. | Townsend, Raymond R. | Doumatey, Ayo P. | Tayo, Bamidele O. | Mosley, Thomas H. | Lyon, Helen N. | Kang, Sun J. | Rotimi, Charles N. | Cooper, Richard S. | Franceschini, Nora | Curb, J. David | Martin, Lisa W. | Eaton, Charles B. | Kardia, Sharon L.R. | Taylor, Herman A. | Caulfield, Mark J. | Ehret, Georg B. | Johnson, Toby | Chakravarti, Aravinda | Zhu, Xiaofeng | Levy, Daniel | Munroe, Patricia B. | Rice, Kenneth M. | Bochud, Murielle | Johnson, Andrew D. | Chasman, Daniel I. | Smith, Albert V. | Tobin, Martin D. | Verwoert, Germaine C. | Hwang, Shih-Jen | Pihur, Vasyl | Vollenweider, Peter | O'Reilly, Paul F. | Amin, Najaf | Bragg-Gresham, Jennifer L. | Teumer, Alexander | Glazer, Nicole L. | Launer, Lenore | Zhao, Jing Hua | Aulchenko, Yurii | Heath, Simon | Sõber, Siim | Parsa, Afshin | Luan, Jian'an | Arora, Pankaj | Dehghan, Abbas | Zhang, Feng | Lucas, Gavin | Hicks, Andrew A. | Jackson, Anne U. | Peden, John F. | Tanaka, Toshiko | Wild, Sarah H. | Rudan, Igor | Igl, Wilmar | Milaneschi, Yuri | Parker, Alex N. | Fava, Cristiano | Chambers, John C. | Kumari, Meena | JinGo, Min | van der Harst, Pim | Kao, Wen Hong Linda | Sjögren, Marketa | Vinay, D.G. | Alexander, Myriam | Tabara, Yasuharu | Shaw-Hawkins, Sue | Whincup, Peter H. | Liu, Yongmei | Shi, Gang | Kuusisto, Johanna | Seielstad, Mark | Sim, Xueling | Nguyen, Khanh-Dung Hoang | Lehtimäki, Terho | Matullo, Giuseppe | Wu, Ying | Gaunt, Tom R. | Charlotte Onland-Moret, N. | Cooper, Matthew N. | Platou, Carl G.P. | Org, Elin | Hardy, Rebecca | Dahgam, Santosh | Palmen, Jutta | Vitart, Veronique | Braund, Peter S. | Kuznetsova, Tatiana | Uiterwaal, Cuno S.P.M. | Campbell, Harry | Ludwig, Barbara | Tomaszewski, Maciej | Tzoulaki, Ioanna | Palmer, Nicholette D. | Aspelund, Thor | Garcia, Melissa | Chang, Yen-Pei C. | O'Connell, Jeffrey R. | Steinle, Nanette I. | Grobbee, Diederick E. | Arking, Dan E. | Hernandez, Dena | Najjar, Samer | McArdle, Wendy L. | Hadley, David | Brown, Morris J. | Connell, John M. | Hingorani, Aroon D. | Day, Ian N.M. | Lawlor, Debbie A. | Beilby, John P. | Lawrence, Robert W. | Clarke, Robert | Collins, Rory | Hopewell, Jemma C. | Ongen, Halit | Bis, Joshua C. | Kähönen, Mika | Viikari, Jorma | Adair, Linda S. | Lee, Nanette R. | Chen, Ming-Huei | Olden, Matthias | Pattaro, Cristian | Hoffman Bolton, Judith A. | Köttgen, Anna | Bergmann, Sven | Mooser, Vincent | Chaturvedi, Nish | Frayling, Timothy M. | Islam, Muhammad | Jafar, Tazeen H. | Erdmann, Jeanette | Kulkarni, Smita R. | Bornstein, Stefan R. | Grässler, Jürgen | Groop, Leif | Voight, Benjamin F. | Kettunen, Johannes | Howard, Philip | Taylor, Andrew | Guarrera, Simonetta | Ricceri, Fulvio | Emilsson, Valur | Plump, Andrew | Barroso, Inês | Khaw, Kay-Tee | Weder, Alan B. | Hunt, Steven C. | Bergman, Richard N. | Collins, Francis S. | Bonnycastle, Lori L. | Scott, Laura J. | Stringham, Heather M. | Peltonen, Leena | Perola, Markus | Vartiainen, Erkki | Brand, Stefan-Martin | Staessen, Jan A. | Wang, Thomas J. | Burton, Paul R. | SolerArtigas, Maria | Dong, Yanbin | Snieder, Harold | Wang, Xiaoling | Zhu, Haidong | Lohman, Kurt K. | Rudock, Megan E. | Heckbert, Susan R. | Smith, Nicholas L. | Wiggins, Kerri L. | Shriner, Daniel | Veldre, Gudrun | Viigimaa, Margus | Kinra, Sanjay | Prabhakaran, Dorairajan | Tripathy, Vikal | Langefeld, Carl D. | Rosengren, Annika | Thelle, Dag S. | MariaCorsi, Anna | Singleton, Andrew | Forrester, Terrence | Hilton, Gina | McKenzie, Colin A. | Salako, Tunde | Iwai, Naoharu | Kita, Yoshikuni | Ogihara, Toshio | Ohkubo, Takayoshi | Okamura, Tomonori | Ueshima, Hirotsugu | Umemura, Satoshi | Eyheramendy, Susana | Meitinger, Thomas | Wichmann, H.-Erich | Cho, Yoon Shin | Kim, Hyung-Lae | Lee, Jong-Young | Scott, James | Sehmi, Joban S. | Zhang, Weihua | Hedblad, Bo | Nilsson, Peter | Smith, George Davey | Wong, Andrew | Narisu, Narisu | Stančáková, Alena | Raffel, Leslie J. | Yao, Jie | Kathiresan, Sekar | O'Donnell, Chris | Schwartz, Steven M. | Arfan Ikram, M. | Longstreth, Will T. | Seshadri, Sudha | Shrine, Nick R.G. | Wain, Louise V. | Morken, Mario A. | Swift, Amy J. | Laitinen, Jaana | Prokopenko, Inga | Zitting, Paavo | Cooper, Jackie A. | Humphries, Steve E. | Danesh, John | Rasheed, Asif | Goel, Anuj | Hamsten, Anders | Watkins, Hugh | Bakker, Stephan J.L. | van Gilst, Wiek H. | Janipalli, Charles S. | Radha Mani, K. | Yajnik, Chittaranjan S. | Hofman, Albert | Mattace-Raso, Francesco U.S. | Oostra, Ben A. | Demirkan, Ayse | Isaacs, Aaron | Rivadeneira, Fernando | Lakatta, Edward G. | Orru, Marco | Scuteri, Angelo | Ala-Korpela, Mika | Kangas, Antti J. | Lyytikäinen, Leo-Pekka | Soininen, Pasi | Tukiainen, Taru | Würz, Peter | Twee-Hee Ong, Rick | Dörr, Marcus | Kroemer, Heyo K. | Völker, Uwe | Völzke, Henry | Galan, Pilar | Hercberg, Serge | Lathrop, Mark | Zelenika, Diana | Deloukas, Panos | Mangino, Massimo | Spector, Tim D. | Zhai, Guangju | Meschia, James F. | Nalls, Michael A. | Sharma, Pankaj | Terzic, Janos | Kranthi Kumar, M.J. | Denniff, Matthew | Zukowska-Szczechowska, Ewa | Wagenknecht, Lynne E. | Fowkes, Gerald R. | Charchar, Fadi J. | Schwarz, Peter E.H. | Hayward, Caroline | Guo, Xiuqing | Bots, Michiel L. | Brand, Eva | Samani, Nilesh J. | Polasek, Ozren | Talmud, Philippa J. | Nyberg, Fredrik | Kuh, Diana | Laan, Maris | Hveem, Kristian | Palmer, Lyle J. | van der Schouw, Yvonne T. | Casas, Juan P. | Mohlke, Karen L. | Vineis, Paolo | Raitakari, Olli | Wong, Tien Y. | Shyong Tai, E. | Laakso, Markku | Rao, Dabeeru C. | Harris, Tamara B. | Morris, Richard W. | Dominiczak, Anna F. | Kivimaki, Mika | Marmot, Michael G. | Miki, Tetsuro | Saleheen, Danish | Chandak, Giriraj R. | Coresh, Josef | Navis, Gerjan | Salomaa, Veikko | Han, Bok-Ghee | Kooner, Jaspal S. | Melander, Olle | Ridker, Paul M. | Bandinelli, Stefania | Gyllensten, Ulf B. | Wright, Alan F. | Wilson, James F. | Ferrucci, Luigi | Farrall, Martin | Tuomilehto, Jaakko | Pramstaller, Peter P. | Elosua, Roberto | Soranzo, Nicole | Sijbrands, Eric J.G. | Altshuler, David | Loos, Ruth J.F. | Shuldiner, Alan R. | Gieger, Christian | Meneton, Pierre | Uitterlinden, Andre G. | Wareham, Nicholas J. | Gudnason, Vilmundur | Rettig, Rainer | Uda, Manuela | Strachan, David P. | Witteman, Jacqueline C.M. | Hartikainen, Anna-Liisa | Beckmann, Jacques S. | Boerwinkle, Eric | Boehnke, Michael | Larson, Martin G. | Järvelin, Marjo-Riitta | Psaty, Bruce M. | Abecasis, Gonçalo R. | Elliott, Paul | van Duijn , Cornelia M. | Newton-Cheh, Christopher
Human Molecular Genetics  2011;20(11):2273-2284.
The prevalence of hypertension in African Americans (AAs) is higher than in other US groups; yet, few have performed genome-wide association studies (GWASs) in AA. Among people of European descent, GWASs have identified genetic variants at 13 loci that are associated with blood pressure. It is unknown if these variants confer susceptibility in people of African ancestry. Here, we examined genome-wide and candidate gene associations with systolic blood pressure (SBP) and diastolic blood pressure (DBP) using the Candidate Gene Association Resource (CARe) consortium consisting of 8591 AAs. Genotypes included genome-wide single-nucleotide polymorphism (SNP) data utilizing the Affymetrix 6.0 array with imputation to 2.5 million HapMap SNPs and candidate gene SNP data utilizing a 50K cardiovascular gene-centric array (ITMAT-Broad-CARe [IBC] array). For Affymetrix data, the strongest signal for DBP was rs10474346 (P= 3.6 × 10−8) located near GPR98 and ARRDC3. For SBP, the strongest signal was rs2258119 in C21orf91 (P= 4.7 × 10−8). The top IBC association for SBP was rs2012318 (P= 6.4 × 10−6) near SLC25A42 and for DBP was rs2523586 (P= 1.3 × 10−6) near HLA-B. None of the top variants replicated in additional AA (n = 11 882) or European-American (n = 69 899) cohorts. We replicated previously reported European-American blood pressure SNPs in our AA samples (SH2B3, P= 0.009; TBX3-TBX5, P= 0.03; and CSK-ULK3, P= 0.0004). These genetic loci represent the best evidence of genetic influences on SBP and DBP in AAs to date. More broadly, this work supports that notion that blood pressure among AAs is a trait with genetic underpinnings but also with significant complexity.
doi:10.1093/hmg/ddr092
PMCID: PMC3090190  PMID: 21378095
11.  An integrated expression phenotype mapping approach defines common variants in LEP, ALOX15 and CAPNS1 associated with induction of IL-6 
Human Molecular Genetics  2009;19(4):720-730.
Interleukin-6 (IL-6) is an important modulator of inflammation and immunity whose dysregulation is associated with a number of disease states. There is evidence of significant heritability in inter-individual variation in IL6 gene expression but the genetic variants responsible for this remain to be defined. We adopted a combined approach of mapping protein and expression quantitative trait loci in peripheral blood mononuclear cells using high-density single-nucleotide polymorphism (SNP) typing for ∼2000 loci implicated in cardiovascular, metabolic and inflammatory syndromes to show that common SNP markers and haplotypes of LEP (encoding leptin) associate with a 1.7- to 2-fold higher level of lipopolysaccharide (LPS)-induced IL-6 expression. We subsequently demonstrate that basal leptin expression significantly correlates with LPS-induced IL-6 expression and that the same variants at LEP which associate with IL-6 expression are also major determinants of leptin expression in these cells. We find that variation involving two other genomic regions, CAPNS1 (encoding calpain small subunit 1) and ALOX15 (encoding arachidonate 15-lipoxygenase), show significant association with IL-6 expression. Although this may be a subset of all such trans-acting effects, we find that the same ALOX15 variants are associated with induced expression of tumour necrosis factor and IL-1beta consistent with a broader role in acute inflammation for ALOX15. This study provides evidence of novel genetic determinants of IL-6 production with implications for understanding susceptibility to inflammatory disease processes and insight into cross talk between metabolic and inflammatory pathways. It also provides proof of concept for use of an integrated expression phenotype mapping approach.
doi:10.1093/hmg/ddp530
PMCID: PMC2807371  PMID: 19942621
12.  Concept, Design and Implementation of a Cardiovascular Gene-Centric 50 K SNP Array for Large-Scale Genomic Association Studies 
PLoS ONE  2008;3(10):e3583.
A wealth of genetic associations for cardiovascular and metabolic phenotypes in humans has been accumulating over the last decade, in particular a large number of loci derived from recent genome wide association studies (GWAS). True complex disease-associated loci often exert modest effects, so their delineation currently requires integration of diverse phenotypic data from large studies to ensure robust meta-analyses. We have designed a gene-centric 50 K single nucleotide polymorphism (SNP) array to assess potentially relevant loci across a range of cardiovascular, metabolic and inflammatory syndromes. The array utilizes a “cosmopolitan” tagging approach to capture the genetic diversity across ∼2,000 loci in populations represented in the HapMap and SeattleSNPs projects. The array content is informed by GWAS of vascular and inflammatory disease, expression quantitative trait loci implicated in atherosclerosis, pathway based approaches and comprehensive literature searching. The custom flexibility of the array platform facilitated interrogation of loci at differing stringencies, according to a gene prioritization strategy that allows saturation of high priority loci with a greater density of markers than the existing GWAS tools, particularly in African HapMap samples. We also demonstrate that the IBC array can be used to complement GWAS, increasing coverage in high priority CVD-related loci across all major HapMap populations. DNA from over 200,000 extensively phenotyped individuals will be genotyped with this array with a significant portion of the generated data being released into the academic domain facilitating in silico replication attempts, analyses of rare variants and cross-cohort meta-analyses in diverse populations. These datasets will also facilitate more robust secondary analyses, such as explorations with alternative genetic models, epistasis and gene-environment interactions.
doi:10.1371/journal.pone.0003583
PMCID: PMC2571995  PMID: 18974833
13.  Novel Loci Associated with PR Interval in a Genome-Wide Association Study of Ten African American Cohorts 
Background
The PR interval (PR) as measured by the resting, standard 12-lead electrocardiogram (ECG) reflects the duration of atrial/atrioventricular nodal depolarization. Substantial evidence exists for a genetic contribution to PR, including genome-wide association studies that have identified common genetic variants at nine loci influencing PR in populations of European and Asian descent. However, few studies have examined loci associated with PR in African Americans.
Methods and Results
We present results from the largest genome-wide association study to date of PR in 13,415 adults of African descent from ten cohorts. We tested for association between PR (ms) and approximately 2.8 million genotyped and imputed single nucleotide polymorphisms. Imputation was performed using HapMap 2 YRI and CEU panels. Study-specific results, adjusted for global ancestry and clinical correlates of PR, were meta-analyzed using the inverse variance method. Variation in genome-wide test statistic distributions was noted within studies (lambda range: 0.9–1.1), although not after genomic control correction was applied to the overall meta-analysis (lambda: 1.008). In addition to generalizing previously reported associations with MEIS1, SCN5A, ARHGAP24, CAV1, and TBX5 to African American populations at the genome-wide significance level (P<5.0×10−8), we also identified a novel locus: ITGA9, located in a region previously implicated in SCN5A expression. The 3p21 region harboring SCN5A also contained two additional independent secondary signals influencing PR (P<5.0×10−8).
Conclusions
This study demonstrates the ability to map novel loci in African Americans as well as the generalizability of loci associated with PR across populations of African, European and Asian descent.
doi:10.1161/CIRCGENETICS.112.963991
PMCID: PMC3560365  PMID: 23139255
electrocardiography; epidemiology; GWAS; single nucleotide polymorphism genetics; PR interval
14.  Two Variants of the C-Reactive Protein Gene Are Associated with Risk of Pre-Eclampsia in an American Indian Population 
PLoS ONE  2013;8(8):e71231.
Background
The etiology of pre-eclampsia (PE) is unknown; but it is accepted that normal pregnancy represents a distinctive challenge to the maternal immune system. C-reactive protein is a prominent component of the innate immune system; and we previously reported an association between PE and the CRP polymorphism, rs1205. Our aim was to explore the effects of additional CRP variants. The IBC (Cardiochip) genotyping microarray focuses on candidate genes and pathways related to the pathophysiology of cardiovascular disease.
Methods
This study recruited 140 cases of PE and 270 matched controls, of which 95 cases met criteria as severe PE, from an American Indian community. IBC array genotypes from 10 suitable CRP SNPs were analyzed. A replication sample of 178 cases and 427 controls of European ancestry was also genotyped.
Results
A nominally significant difference (p value <0.05) was seen in the distribution of discordant matched pairs for rs3093068; and Bonferroni corrected differences (P<0.005) were seen for rs876538, rs2794521, and rs3091244. Univariate conditional logistic regression odds ratios (OR) were nominally significant for rs3093068 and rs876538 models only. Multivariate logistic models with adjustment for mother's age, nulliparity and BMI attenuated the effect (OR 1.58, P = 0.066, 95% CI 0.97–2.58) for rs876538 and (OR 2.59, P = 0.050, 95% CI 1.00–6.68) for rs3093068. An additive risk score of the above two risk genotypes shows a multivariate adjusted OR of 2.04 (P = 0.013, 95% CI 1.16–3.56). The replication sample also demonstrated significant association between PE and the rs876538 allele (OR = 1.55, P = 0.01, 95% CI 2.16–1.10). We also show putative functionality for the rs876538 and rs3093068 CRP variants.
Conclusion
The CRP variants, rs876538 and rs3093068, previously associated with other cardiovascular disease phenotypes, show suggestive association with PE in this American Indian population, further supporting a possible role for CRP in PE.
doi:10.1371/journal.pone.0071231
PMCID: PMC3733916  PMID: 23940726
15.  Genetic association analysis highlights new loci that modulate hematological trait variation in Caucasians and African Americans 
Human genetics  2010;129(3):307-317.
Red blood cell, white blood cell, and platelet measures, including their count, sub-type and volume, are important diagnostic and prognostic clinical parameters for several human diseases. To identify novel loci associated with hematological traits, and compare the architecture of these phenotypes between ethnic groups, the CARe Project genotyped 49,094 single nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs) that capture variation in ~2,100 candidate genes in DNA of 23,439 Caucasians and 7,112 African Americans from five population-based cohorts. We found strong novel associations between erythrocyte phenotypes and the glucose-6 phosphate dehydrogenase (G6PD) A-allele in African Americans (rs1050828, P < 2.0 × 10−13, T-allele associated with lower red blood cell count, hemoglobin, and hematocrit, and higher mean corpuscular volume), and between platelet count and a SNP at the tropomyosin-4 (TPM4) locus (rs8109288, P = 3.0 × 10−7 in Caucasians; P = 3.0 × 10−7 in African Americans, T-allele associated with lower platelet count). We strongly replicated many genetic associations to blood cell phenotypes previously established in Caucasians. A common variant of the α-globin (HBA2-HBA1) locus was associated with red blood cell traits in African Americans, but not in Caucasians (rs1211375, P < 7 × 10−8, A-allele associated with lower hemoglobin, mean corpuscular hemoglobin, and mean corpuscular volume). Our results show similarities but also differences in the genetic regulation of hematological traits in European- and African-derived populations, and highlight the role of natural selection in shaping these differences.
doi:10.1007/s00439-010-0925-1
PMCID: PMC3442357  PMID: 21153663
16.  Association of the vitamin D metabolism gene CYP24A1 with coronary artery calcification 
Objective
The Vitamin D endocrine system is essential for calcium homeostasis, and low levels of vitamin D metabolites have been associated with cardiovascular disease risk. We hypothesized that DNA sequence variation in genes regulating vitamin D metabolism and signaling pathways might influence variation in coronary artery calcification (CAC).
Methods and Results
We genotyped single nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs) in GC, CYP27B1, CYP24A1, and VDR and tested their association with CAC quantity, as measured by electron beam computed tomography. Initial association studies were carried out in a discovery sample comprised of 697 Amish subjects and SNPs nominally associated with CAC quantity (4 SNPs in CYP24A1, P = 0.008-0.00003) were then tested for association with CAC quantity in two independent cohorts of subjects of European Caucasian ancestry (Genetic Epidemiology Network of Arteriopathy (GENOA) Study (n = 916) and The Penn Coronary Artery Calcification (PennCAC) sample (n = 2,061)). One of the four SNPs, rs2762939, was associated with CAC quantity in both GENOA (P = 0.007) and PennCAC (P = 0.01). In all three populations the rs2762939 C allele was associated with lower CAC quantity. Meta-analysis for the association of this SNP with CAC quantity across all three studies yielded a P value of 2.9 × 10-6.
Conclusion
A common SNP in the CYP24A1 gene was associated with CAC quantity in three independent populations. This result suggests a role for vitamin D metabolism in the development of CAC quantity.
doi:10.1161/ATVBAHA.110.211805
PMCID: PMC2988112  PMID: 20847308
17.  Genome-Wide Association Study of White Blood Cell Count in 16,388 African Americans: the Continental Origins and Genetic Epidemiology Network (COGENT) 
PLoS Genetics  2011;7(6):e1002108.
Total white blood cell (WBC) and neutrophil counts are lower among individuals of African descent due to the common African-derived “null” variant of the Duffy Antigen Receptor for Chemokines (DARC) gene. Additional common genetic polymorphisms were recently associated with total WBC and WBC sub-type levels in European and Japanese populations. No additional loci that account for WBC variability have been identified in African Americans. In order to address this, we performed a large genome-wide association study (GWAS) of total WBC and cell subtype counts in 16,388 African-American participants from 7 population-based cohorts available in the Continental Origins and Genetic Epidemiology Network. In addition to the DARC locus on chromosome 1q23, we identified two other regions (chromosomes 4q13 and 16q22) associated with WBC in African Americans (P<2.5×10−8). The lead SNP (rs9131) on chromosome 4q13 is located in the CXCL2 gene, which encodes a chemotactic cytokine for polymorphonuclear leukocytes. Independent evidence of the novel CXCL2 association with WBC was present in 3,551 Hispanic Americans, 14,767 Japanese, and 19,509 European Americans. The index SNP (rs12149261) on chromosome 16q22 associated with WBC count is located in a large inter-chromosomal segmental duplication encompassing part of the hydrocephalus inducing homolog (HYDIN) gene. We demonstrate that the chromosome 16q22 association finding is most likely due to a genotyping artifact as a consequence of sequence similarity between duplicated regions on chromosomes 16q22 and 1q21. Among the WBC loci recently identified in European or Japanese populations, replication was observed in our African-American meta-analysis for rs445 of CDK6 on chromosome 7q21 and rs4065321 of PSMD3-CSF3 region on chromosome 17q21. In summary, the CXCL2, CDK6, and PSMD3-CSF3 regions are associated with WBC count in African American and other populations. We also demonstrate that large inter-chromosomal duplications can result in false positive associations in GWAS.
Author Summary
Although recent genome-wide association studies have identified common genetic variants associated with total white blood cell (WBC) and WBC sub-type counts in European and Japanese ancestry populations, whether these or other loci account for differences in WBC count among African Americans is unknown. By examining >16,000 African Americans, we show that, in addition to the previously identified Duffy Antigen Receptor for Chemokines (DARC) locus on chromosome 1, another variant, rs9131, and other nearby variants on human chromosome 4 are associated with total WBC count in African Americans. The variants span the CXCL2 gene, which encodes an inflammatory mediator involved in WBC production and migration. We show that the association is not restricted to African Americans but is also present in independent samples of European Americans, Hispanic Americans, and Japanese. This finding is potentially important because WBC mediate or have altered counts in a variety of acute and chronic disorders.
doi:10.1371/journal.pgen.1002108
PMCID: PMC3128101  PMID: 21738479
18.  Genome-Wide Association of Bipolar Disorder Suggests an Enrichment of Replicable Associations in Regions near Genes 
PLoS Genetics  2011;7(6):e1002134.
Although a highly heritable and disabling disease, bipolar disorder's (BD) genetic variants have been challenging to identify. We present new genotype data for 1,190 cases and 401 controls and perform a genome-wide association study including additional samples for a total of 2,191 cases and 1,434 controls. We do not detect genome-wide significant associations for individual loci; however, across all SNPs, we show an association between the power to detect effects calculated from a previous genome-wide association study and evidence for replication (P = 1.5×10−7). To demonstrate that this result is not likely to be a false positive, we analyze replication rates in a large meta-analysis of height and show that, in a large enough study, associations replicate as a function of power, approaching a linear relationship. Within BD, SNPs near exons exhibit a greater probability of replication, supporting an enrichment of reproducible associations near functional regions of genes. These results indicate that there is likely common genetic variation associated with BD near exons (±10 kb) that could be identified in larger studies and, further, provide a framework for assessing the potential for replication when combining results from multiple studies.
Author Summary
Bipolar disorder (BD) is a highly heritable disease that has been difficult to characterize genetically. We have genotyped 1,190 BD cases and 401 controls to find regions of the genome associated with BD. After combining these data with previously existing genotyped samples, we did not find any genome-wide significant associations. However, when we used an additional study to prioritize loci for replication and meta-analysis purposes, we found that we were more likely to see an association in our sample with variants for which we had the highest power. We quantified this effect using logistic regression and saw a strong association between power to detect an effect based on an initial study's results and replication P-value in a second study (P = 1.5×10−7), supporting the presence of shared genetic risk factors across the studies. Moreover, this association was stronger when we restricted analysis to SNPs near coding regions, and it was further enriched when SNPs had the same direction of effect in both studies. This result supports the presence of genetic factors underlying BD near exons whose collective effect results in a detectable signal and provides a framework for assessing the potential for replication when combining results from multiple studies.
doi:10.1371/journal.pgen.1002134
PMCID: PMC3128104  PMID: 21738484
19.  Genome-Wide Association Study of Coronary Heart Disease and Its Risk Factors in 8,090 African Americans: The NHLBI CARe Project 
PLoS Genetics  2011;7(2):e1001300.
Coronary heart disease (CHD) is the leading cause of mortality in African Americans. To identify common genetic polymorphisms associated with CHD and its risk factors (LDL- and HDL-cholesterol (LDL-C and HDL-C), hypertension, smoking, and type-2 diabetes) in individuals of African ancestry, we performed a genome-wide association study (GWAS) in 8,090 African Americans from five population-based cohorts. We replicated 17 loci previously associated with CHD or its risk factors in Caucasians. For five of these regions (CHD: CDKN2A/CDKN2B; HDL-C: FADS1-3, PLTP, LPL, and ABCA1), we could leverage the distinct linkage disequilibrium (LD) patterns in African Americans to identify DNA polymorphisms more strongly associated with the phenotypes than the previously reported index SNPs found in Caucasian populations. We also developed a new approach for association testing in admixed populations that uses allelic and local ancestry variation. Using this method, we discovered several loci that would have been missed using the basic allelic and global ancestry information only. Our conclusions suggest that no major loci uniquely explain the high prevalence of CHD in African Americans. Our project has developed resources and methods that address both admixture- and SNP-association to maximize power for genetic discovery in even larger African-American consortia.
Author Summary
To date, most large-scale genome-wide association studies (GWAS) carried out to identify risk factors for complex human diseases and traits have focused on population of European ancestry. It is currently unknown whether the same loci associated with complex diseases and traits in Caucasians will replicate in population of African ancestry. Here, we conducted a large GWAS to identify common DNA polymorphisms associated with coronary heart disease (CHD) and its risk factors (type-2 diabetes, hypertension, smoking status, and LDL- and HDL-cholesterol) in 8,090 African Americans as part of the NHLBI Candidate gene Association Resource (CARe) Project. We replicated 17 associations previously reported in Caucasians, suggesting that the same loci carry common DNA sequence variants associated with CHD and its risk factors in Caucasians and African Americans. At five of these 17 loci, we used the different patterns of linkage disequilibrium between populations of European and African ancestry to identify DNA sequence variants more strongly associated with phenotypes than the index SNPs found in Caucasians, suggesting smaller genomic intervals to search for causal alleles. We also used the CARe data to develop new statistical methods to perform association studies in admixed populations. The CARe Project data represent an extraordinary resource to expand our understanding of the genetics of complex diseases and traits in non-European-derived populations.
doi:10.1371/journal.pgen.1001300
PMCID: PMC3037413  PMID: 21347282
20.  Leprosy and the Adaptation of Human Toll-Like Receptor 1 
PLoS Pathogens  2010;6(7):e1000979.
Leprosy is an infectious disease caused by the obligate intracellular pathogen Mycobacterium leprae and remains endemic in many parts of the world. Despite several major studies on susceptibility to leprosy, few genomic loci have been replicated independently. We have conducted an association analysis of more than 1,500 individuals from different case-control and family studies, and observed consistent associations between genetic variants in both TLR1 and the HLA-DRB1/DQA1 regions with susceptibility to leprosy (TLR1 I602S, case-control P = 5.7×10−8, OR = 0.31, 95% CI = 0.20–0.48, and HLA-DQA1 rs1071630, case-control P = 4.9×10−14, OR = 0.43, 95% CI = 0.35–0.54). The effect sizes of these associations suggest that TLR1 and HLA-DRB1/DQA1 are major susceptibility genes in susceptibility to leprosy. Further population differentiation analysis shows that the TLR1 locus is extremely differentiated. The protective dysfunctional 602S allele is rare in Africa but expands to become the dominant allele among individuals of European descent. This supports the hypothesis that this locus may be under selection from mycobacteria or other pathogens that are recognized by TLR1 and its co-receptors. These observations provide insight into the long standing host-pathogen relationship between human and mycobacteria and highlight the key role of the TLR pathway in infectious diseases.
Author Summary
Mycobacterium leprae is an obligate intracellular pathogen that causes leprosy, a disease that shares a long history with the human population but which remains endemic in many parts of the world. Despite the fact that the genome of M. leprae has been sequenced, our understanding of its pathogenesis and interaction with the human host is limited, in part due to the inability to culture the bacterium in vitro. In this gene-centric microarray study, we have genotyped SNPs in over 2,000 genes and identified TLR1 and HLA-DRB1/DQA1 as major leprosy susceptibility genes. Studying the geographical distribution of this hypo-functional TLR1 variant demonstrated extreme population differentiation at this locus. These results suggest that leprosy may have contributed to the evolution of this genomic region, and provide insight into the long history of the host-pathogen relationship between humans and M. leprae.
doi:10.1371/journal.ppat.1000979
PMCID: PMC2895660  PMID: 20617178
21.  The role of height-associated loci identified in genome wide association studies in the determination of pediatric stature 
BMC Medical Genetics  2010;11:96.
Background
Human height is considered highly heritable and correlated with certain disorders, such as type 2 diabetes and cancer. Despite environmental influences, genetic factors are known to play an important role in stature determination. A number of genetic determinants of adult height have already been established through genome wide association studies.
Methods
To examine 51 single nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs) corresponding to the 46 previously reported genomic loci for height in 8,184 European American children with height measurements. We leveraged genotyping data from our ongoing GWA study of height variation in children in order to query the 51 SNPs in this pediatric cohort.
Results
Sixteen of these SNPs yielded at least nominally significant association to height, representing fifteen different loci including EFEMP1-PNPT1, GPR126, C6orf173, SPAG17, Histone class 1, HLA class III and GDF5-UQCC. Other loci revealed no evidence for association, including HMGA1 and HMGA2. For the 16 associated variants, the genotype score explained 1.64% of the total variation for height z-score.
Conclusion
Among 46 loci that have been reported to associate with adult height to date, at least 15 also contribute to the determination of height in childhood.
doi:10.1186/1471-2350-11-96
PMCID: PMC2894790  PMID: 20546612

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