PMCC PMCC

Search tips
Search criteria

Advanced
Results 1-25 (248)
 

Clipboard (0)
None

Select a Filter Below

Journals
more »
Year of Publication
more »
1.  Genome-Wide Association Study of a Heart Failure-Related Metabolomic Profile among African Americans in the Atherosclerosis Risk in Communities (ARIC) Study 
Genetic epidemiology  2013;37(8):840-845.
Both the prevalence and incidence of heart failure (HF) are increasing, especially among African-Americans, but no large-scale, genome-wide association study (GWAS) of HF-related metabolites have been reported. We sought to identify novel genetic variants that are associated with metabolites previously reported to relate to HF incidence. GWASs of three metabolites identified previously as risk factors for incident HF (pyroglutamine, dihydroxy docosatrienoic acid and X-11787, being either hydroxy-leucine or hydroxy-isoleucine) were performed in 1260 African-Americans free of HF at the baseline examination of the Atherosclerosis Risk in Communities (ARIC) study. A significant association on chromosome 5q33 (rs10463316, MAF = 0.358, p-value = 1.92×10−10) was identified for pyroglutamine. One region on chromosome 2p13 contained a nonsynonymous substitution in N-acetyltransferase 8 (NAT8) was associated with X-11787 (rs13538, MAF = 0.481, p-value = 1.71×10−23). The smallest p-value for dihydroxy docosatrienoic acid was rs4006531 on chromosome 8q24 (MAF = 0.400, p-value = 6.98×10−7). None of the above SNPs were individually associated with incident HF, but a genetic risk score (GRS) created by summing the most significant risk alleles from each metabolite detected 11% greater risk of HF per allele. In summary, we identified three loci associated with previously reported HF-related metabolites. Further use of metabolomics technology will facilitate replication of these findings in independent samples.
doi:10.1002/gepi.21752
PMCID: PMC4079107  PMID: 23934736
metabolomics; genome-wide association; African-Americans; heart failure
2.  A genome-wide association study for venous thromboembolism: the extended Cohorts for Heart and Aging Research in Genomic Epidemiology (CHARGE) Consortium 
Genetic epidemiology  2013;37(5):512-521.
Venous thromboembolism (VTE) is a common, heritable disease resulting in high rates of hospitalization and mortality. Yet few associations between VTE and genetic variants, all in the coagulation pathway, have been established. To identify additional genetic determinants of VTE, we conducted a 2-stage genome-wide association study (GWAS) among individuals of European ancestry in the extended CHARGE VTE consortium. The discovery GWAS comprised 1,618 incident VTE cases out of 44,499 participants from six community-based studies. Genotypes for genome-wide single-nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs) were imputed to ~2.5 million SNPs in HapMap and association with VTE assessed using study-design appropriate regression methods. Meta-analysis of these results identified two known loci, in F5 and ABO. Top 1,047 tag SNPs (p≤0.0016) from the discovery GWAS were tested for association in an additional 3,231 cases and 3,536 controls from three case-control studies. In the combined data from these two stages, additional genome-wide significant associations were observed on 4q35 at F11 (top SNP rs4253399, intronic to F11) and on 4q28 at FGG (rs6536024, 9.7 kb from FGG) (p<5.0×10−13 for both). The associations at the FGG locus were not completely explained by previously reported variants. Loci at or near SUSD1 and OTUD7A showed borderline yet novel associations (p<5.0×10-6) and constitute new candidate genes. In conclusion, this large GWAS replicated key genetic associations in F5 and ABO, and confirmed the importance of F11 and FGG loci for VTE. Future studies are warranted to better characterize the associations with F11 and FGG and to replicate the new candidate associations.
doi:10.1002/gepi.21731
PMCID: PMC3990406  PMID: 23650146
venous thrombosis; genetics; genome-wide association; genetic epidemiology
3.  Associations of NINJ2 Sequence Variants with Incident Ischemic Stroke in the Cohorts for Heart and Aging in Genomic Epidemiology (CHARGE) Consortium 
PLoS ONE  2014;9(6):e99798.
Background
Stroke, the leading neurologic cause of death and disability, has a substantial genetic component. We previously conducted a genome-wide association study (GWAS) in four prospective studies from the Cohorts for Heart and Aging Research in Genomic Epidemiology (CHARGE) consortium and demonstrated that sequence variants near the NINJ2 gene are associated with incident ischemic stroke. Here, we sought to fine-map functional variants in the region and evaluate the contribution of rare variants to ischemic stroke risk.
Methods and Results
We sequenced 196 kb around NINJ2 on chromosome 12p13 among 3,986 European ancestry participants, including 475 ischemic stroke cases, from the Atherosclerosis Risk in Communities Study, Cardiovascular Health Study, and Framingham Heart Study. Meta-analyses of single-variant tests for 425 common variants (minor allele frequency [MAF] ≥ 1%) confirmed the original GWAS results and identified an independent intronic variant, rs34166160 (MAF = 0.012), most significantly associated with incident ischemic stroke (HR = 1.80, p = 0.0003). Aggregating 278 putatively-functional variants with MAF≤ 1% using count statistics, we observed a nominally statistically significant association, with the burden of rare NINJ2 variants contributing to decreased ischemic stroke incidence (HR = 0.81; p = 0.026).
Conclusion
Common and rare variants in the NINJ2 region were nominally associated with incident ischemic stroke among a subset of CHARGE participants. Allelic heterogeneity at this locus, caused by multiple rare, low frequency, and common variants with disparate effects on risk, may explain the difficulties in replicating the original GWAS results. Additional studies that take into account the complex allelic architecture at this locus are needed to confirm these findings.
doi:10.1371/journal.pone.0099798
PMCID: PMC4069013  PMID: 24959832
4.  Genome-wide Association Study Identified the Human Leukocyte Antigen Region as a Novel Locus for Plasma Beta-2 Microglobulin 
Human genetics  2013;132(6):619-627.
Beta-2 microglobulin (B2M) is a component of the major histocompatibility complex (MHC) class I molecule and has been studied as a biomarker of kidney function, cardiovascular diseases and mortality. Little is known about the genes influencing its levels directly or through glomerular filtration rate (GFR). We conducted a genome-wide association study of plasma B2M levels in 6738 European Americans from the Atherosclerosis Risk in Communities (ARIC) study to identify novel loci for B2M and assessed its association with known estimated GFR (eGFR) loci. We identified 2 genome-wide significant loci. One was in the human leukocyte antigen (HLA) region on chromosome 6 (lowest p-value=1.8×10−23 for rs9264638). At this locus, 6 index SNPs accounted for 3.2% of log(B2M) variance, and their association with B2M could largely be explained by imputed classical alleles of the MHC class I genes: HLA-A, HLA-B, or HLA-C. The index SNPs at this locus were not associated with eGFR based on serum creatinine (eGFRcr). The other locus of B2M was on chromosome 12 (rs3184504 at SH2B3, beta=0.02, p-value=3.1×10−8), which was previously implicated as an eGFR locus. In conclusion, although B2M is known to be a component of MHC class I molecule, the association between HLA class I alleles and plasma B2M levels in a community-based population is novel. The identification of the two novel loci for B2M extends our understanding of its metabolism and informs its use as a kidney filtration biomarker.
doi:10.1007/s00439-013-1274-7
PMCID: PMC3656139  PMID: 23417110
kidney function biomarker; chronic kidney disease; genetic; genome-wide association study; GWAS
5.  Genome-wide significant locus of beta-trace protein, a novel kidney function biomarker, identified in European and African Americans 
Nephrology Dialysis Transplantation  2013;28(6):1497-1504.
Background
Beta-trace protein (BTP), measured in serum or plasma, has potential as a novel biomarker for kidney function. Little is known about the genes influencing BTP levels.
Methods
We conducted a genome-wide association study of log-transformed plasma BTP levels in 6720 European Americans (EAs) and replicated the significant associations in 1734 African Americans (AAs) from the Atherosclerosis Risk in Communities (ARIC) study.
Results
We identified a genome-wide significant locus in EA upstream of Prostaglandin D2 synthase (PTGDS), the gene encoding BTP. Each copy of the A allele at rs57024841 was associated with 5% higher BTP levels (P = 1.2 × 10−23). The association at PTGDS was confirmed in AAs (6% higher BTP for each A allele at rs57024841, P = 1.9 × 10−7). The index single nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs) in EAs and AAs explained ∼1.1% of the log(BTP) variance within each population and explained over 30% of the difference in log(BTP) levels between EAs and AAs. The index SNPs at the PTGDS locus in the two populations were not associated with the estimated glomerular filtration rate (eGFR) or the urine albumin creatinine ratio (P > 0.05). We further tested for the associations of BTP with 16 known loci of the eGFR in EA, and BTP was associated with 3 of 16 tested.
Conclusions
The identification of a novel BTP-specific (non-renal related) locus and the confirmation of several genetic loci of the eGFR with BTP extend our understanding of the metabolism of BTP and inform its use as a kidney filtration biomarker.
doi:10.1093/ndt/gfs591
PMCID: PMC3685304  PMID: 23328707
chronic kidney disease; genome-wide association study; glomerular filtration rate; GWAS; kidney function biomarker
6.  Mutations in VRK1 Associated With Complex Motor and Sensory Axonal Neuropathy Plus Microcephaly 
JAMA neurology  2013;70(12):1491-1498.
IMPORTANCE
Patients with rare diseases and complex clinical presentations represent a challenge for clinical diagnostics. Genomic approaches are allowing the identification of novel variants in genes for very rare disorders, enabling a molecular diagnosis. Genomics is also revealing a phenotypic expansion whereby the full spectrum of clinical expression conveyed by mutant alleles at a locus can be better appreciated.
OBJECTIVE
To elucidate the molecular cause of a complex neuropathy phenotype in 3 patients by applying genomic sequencing strategies.
DESIGN, SETTING, AND PARTICIPANTS
Three affected individuals from 2 unrelated families presented with a complex neuropathy phenotype characterized by axonal sensorimotor neuropathy and microcephaly. They were recruited into the Centers for Mendelian Genomics research program to identify the molecular cause of their phenotype. Whole-genome, targeted whole-exome sequencing, and high-resolution single-nucleotide polymorphism arrays were performed in genetics clinics of tertiary care pediatric hospitals and biomedical research institutions.
MAIN OUTCOMES AND MEASURES
Whole-genome and whole-exome sequencing identified the variants responsible for the patients’ clinical phenotype.
RESULTS
We identified compound heterozygous alleles in 2 affected siblings from 1 family and a homozygous nonsense variant in the third unrelated patient in the vaccinia-related kinase 1 gene (VRK1). In the latter subject, we found a common haplotype on which the nonsense mutation occurred and that segregates in the Ashkenazi Jewish population.
CONCLUSIONS AND RELEVANCE
We report the identification of disease-causing alleles in 3 children from 2 unrelated families with a previously uncharacterized complex axonal motor and sensory neuropathy accompanied by severe nonprogressive microcephaly and cerebral dysgenesis. Our data raise the question of whether VRK1 mutations disturb cell cycle progression and may result in apoptosis of cells in the nervous system. The application of unbiased genomic approaches allows the identification of potentially pathogenic mutations in unsuspected genes in highly genetically heterogeneous and uncharacterized neurological diseases.
doi:10.1001/jamaneurol.2013.4598
PMCID: PMC4039291  PMID: 24126608
7.  Whole Genome Sequence-Based Analysis of a Model Complex Trait, High Density Lipoprotein Cholesterol 
Nature genetics  2013;45(8):899-901.
We describe initial steps for interrogating whole genome sequence (WGS) data to characterize the genetic architecture of a complex trait, such as high density lipoprotein cholesterol (HDL-C). We estimate that common variation contributes more to HDL-C heritability than rare variation, and screening for Mendelian dyslipidemia variants identified individuals with extreme HDL-C. WGS analyses highlight the value of regulatory and non-protein coding regions of the genome in addition to protein coding regions.
doi:10.1038/ng.2671
PMCID: PMC4030301  PMID: 23770607
8.  Common polymorphisms of ALOX5 and ALOX5AP and risk of coronary artery disease 
Human genetics  2008;123(4):399-408.
Recent human genetic studies suggest that allelic variants of leukotriene pathway genes influence the risk of clinical and subclinical atherosclerosis. We sequenced the promoter, exonic, and splice site regions of ALOX5 and ALOX5AP and then genotyped 7 SNPs in ALOX5 and 6 SNPs in ALOX5AP in 1,552 cases with clinically significant coronary artery disease (CAD) and 1,583 controls from Kaiser Permanente including a subset of participants of the coronary artery risk development in young adults study. A nominally significant association was detected between a promoter SNP in ALOX5 (rs12762303) and CAD in our subset of white/European subjects (adjusted odds ratio per minor allele, log-additive model, 1.32; P = 0.002). In this race/ethnic group, rs12762303 has a minor allele frequency of 15% and is tightly linked to variation at the SP1 variable tandem repeat promoter polymorphism. However, the association between CAD and rs12762303 could not be reproduced in the atherosclerosis risk in communities study (hazard rate ratio per minor allele; 1.08, P = 0.1). Assuming a recessive mode of inheritance, the association was not significant in either population study but our power to detect modest effects was limited. No significant associations were observed between all other SNPs and the risk of CAD. Overall, our findings do not support a link between common allelic variation in or near ALOX5 or ALOX5AP and the risk of CAD. However, additional studies are needed to exclude modest effects of promoter variation in ALOX5 on the risk of CAD assuming a recessive mode of inheritance.
doi:10.1007/s00439-008-0489-5
PMCID: PMC4023692  PMID: 18369664
9.  Genetic predisposition to higher blood pressure increases coronary artery disease risk 
Hypertension  2013;61(5):10.1161/HYPERTENSIONAHA.111.00275.
Hypertension is a risk factor for coronary artery disease. Recent genome-wide association studies have identified 30 genetic variants associated with higher blood pressure at genome-wide significance (p<5×10−8). If elevated blood pressure is a causative factor for coronary artery disease, these variants should also increase coronary artery disease risk. Analyzing genome-wide association data from 22,233 coronary artery disease cases and 64,762 controls, we observed in the Coronary artery disease Genome-Wide Replication And Meta-Analysis (CARDIoGRAM) consortium that 88% of these blood pressure-associated polymorphisms were likewise positively associated with coronary artery disease, i.e. they had an odds ratio >1 for coronary artery disease, a proportion much higher than expected by chance (p=4.10−5). The average relative coronary artery disease risk increase per each of the multiple blood pressure-raising alleles observed in the consortium was 3.0% for systolic blood pressure-associated polymorphisms (95% confidence interval, 1.8 to 4.3%) and 2.9% for diastolic blood pressure-associated polymorphisms (95% confidence interval, 1.7 to 4.1%). In sub-studies, individuals carrying most systolic blood pressure- and diastolic blood pressure-related risk alleles (top quintile of a genetic risk score distribution) had 70% (95% confidence interval, 50-94%) and 59% (95% confidence interval, 40-81%) higher odds of having coronary artery disease, respectively, as compared to individuals in the bottom quintile. In conclusion, most blood pressure-associated polymorphisms also confer an increased risk for coronary artery disease. These findings are consistent with a causal relationship of increasing blood pressure to coronary artery disease. Genetic variants primarily affecting blood pressure contribute to the genetic basis of coronary artery disease.
doi:10.1161/HYPERTENSIONAHA.111.00275
PMCID: PMC3855241  PMID: 23478099
Blood pressure; polymorphism; genetics; coronary artery disease
10.  Association of variants in NEDD4L with blood pressure response and adverse cardiovascular outcomes in hypertensive patients treated with thiazide diuretics 
Journal of hypertension  2013;31(4):698-704.
Objective
Single-nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs) in NEDD4L may influence the ability of the NEDD4L protein to reduce epithelial sodium channel expression. A variant in NEDD4L, rs4149601, was associated with antihypertensive response and cardiovascular outcomes during treatment with thiazide diuretics and β-blockers in a Swedish population. We sought to further evaluate associations between NEDD4L polymorphisms, blood pressure response and cardiovascular outcomes with thiazide diuretics and β-blockers.
Methods
Four SNPs, rs4149601, rs292449, rs1008899 and rs75982813, were genotyped in 767 patients from the Pharmacogenomic Evaluation of Antihypertensive Responses (PEAR) clinical trial and association was assessed with blood pressure response to hydrochlorothiazide and atenolol. One SNP, rs4149601, was also genotyped in 1345 patients from the International Verapmil SR Trandolapril Study (INVEST), and association was examined with adverse cardiovascular outcomes relative to hydrochlorothiazide treatment.
Results
Significant associations or trends were found between rs4149601, rs292449, rs75982813 and rs1008899 and decreases in blood pressure in whites on hydrochlorothiazide, and a significant association was observed with increasing copies of the GC rs4149601-rs292449 haplotype and greater blood pressure response to hydrochlorothiazide in whites (P = 0.0006 and 0.006, SBP and DBP, respectively). Significant associations were also seen with rs4149601 and an increased risk for adverse cardiovascular outcomes in whites not treated with hydrochlorothiazide [P = 0.022, odds ratio (95% confidence interval) = 10.65 (1.18–96.25)].
Conclusion
NEDD4L rs4149601, rs292449 and rs75982813 may be predictors for blood pressure response to hydrochlorothiazide in whites, and NEDD4L rs4149601 may be a predictor for adverse cardiovascular outcomes in whites not treated with hydrochlorothiazide.
doi:10.1097/HJH.0b013e32835e2a71
PMCID: PMC3756535  PMID: 23353631
epithelial sodium channel; hypertension; International Verapamil SR Trandolapril Study; neural precursor cell expressed developmentally down-regulated 4 like; Pharmacogenomic Evaluation of Antihypertensive Responses; pharmacogenetics
11.  Seafood Consumption and Blood Mercury Concentrations in Jamaican Children With and Without Autism Spectrum Disorders 
Neurotoxicity research  2012;23(1):22-38.
Mercury is a toxic metal shown to have harmful effects on human health. Several studies have reported high blood mercury concentrations as a risk factor for autism spectrum disorders (ASDs), while other studies have reported no such association. The goal of this study was to investigate the association between blood mercury concentrations in children and ASDs. Moreover, we investigated the role of seafood consumption in relation to blood mercury concentrations in Jamaican children. Based on data for 65 sex- and age-matched pairs (2–8 years), we used a General Linear Model to test whether there is an association between blood mercury concentrations and ASDs. After controlling for the child’s frequency of seafood consumption, maternal age, and parental education, we did not find a significant difference (P = 0.61) between blood mercury concentrations and ASDs. However, in both cases and control groups, children who ate certain types of seafood (i.e., salt water fish, sardine, or mackerel fish) had significantly higher (all P <0.05) geometric means blood mercury concentration which were about 3.5 times that of children living in the US or Canada. Our findings also indicate that Jamaican children with parents who both had education up to high school are at a higher risk of exposure to mercury compared to children with at least one parent who had education beyond high school. Based on our findings, we recommend additional education to Jamaican parents regarding potential hazards of elevated blood mercury concentrations, and its association with seafood consumption and type of seafood.
doi:10.1007/s12640-012-9321-z
PMCID: PMC3969434  PMID: 22488160
Autism spectrum disorders; Blood mercury concentrations; Seafood consumption; Confounding; Parental education; Jamaica
12.  Genetic Determinants Influencing Human Serum Metabolome among African Americans 
PLoS Genetics  2014;10(3):e1004212.
Phenotypes proximal to gene action generally reflect larger genetic effect sizes than those that are distant. The human metabolome, a result of multiple cellular and biological processes, are functional intermediate phenotypes proximal to gene action. Here, we present a genome-wide association study of 308 untargeted metabolite levels among African Americans from the Atherosclerosis Risk in Communities (ARIC) Study. Nineteen significant common variant-metabolite associations were identified, including 13 novel loci (p<1.6×10−10). These loci were associated with 7–50% of the difference in metabolite levels per allele, and the variance explained ranged from 4% to 20%. Fourteen genes were identified within the nineteen loci, and four of them contained non-synonymous substitutions in four enzyme-encoding genes (KLKB1, SIAE, CPS1, and NAT8); the other significant loci consist of eight other enzyme-encoding genes (ACE, GATM, ACY3, ACSM2B, THEM4, ADH4, UGT1A, TREH), a transporter gene (SLC6A13) and a polycystin protein gene (PKD2L1). In addition, four potential disease-associated paths were identified, including two direct longitudinal predictive relationships: NAT8 with N-acetylornithine, N-acetyl-1-methylhistidine and incident chronic kidney disease, and TREH with trehalose and incident diabetes. These results highlight the value of using endophenotypes proximal to gene function to discover new insights into biology and disease pathology.
Author Summary
Most contemporary GWAS studies have achieved increased power by increasing the size of the discovery sample to tens of thousands of individuals. An alternative approach for detecting the effects of novel loci is to measure phenotypes that more immediately reflect the effects of gene function. The metabolome consists of a collection of small molecules resulting from a variety of cellular and biologic processes, which can be considered intermediate phenotypes proximal to gene function. Here, we report a genome-wide association study identifying nineteen genetic loci influencing untargeted metabolomes traits among African Americans in the Atherosclerosis Risk in Communities (ARIC) Study. Fourteen genes mapped within nineteen loci, including twelve enzyme-encoding genes (KLKB1, SIAE, CPS1, NAT8, ACE, GATM, ACY3, ACSM2B, THEM4, ADH4, UGT1A and TREH), a transporter gene (SLC6A13) and a polycystin protein gene (PKD2L1). In addition, four potential disease-associated paths were identified, including two direct longitudinal predictive relationships: NAT8 with N-acetylornithine, N-acetyl-1-methylhistidine and incident chronic kidney disease, and TREH with trehalose and incident diabetes. These results highlight the value of using phenotypes proximal to gene function to promote novel gene discovery.
doi:10.1371/journal.pgen.1004212
PMCID: PMC3952826  PMID: 24625756
13.  A Matrix Gla Protein Gene Polymorphism is Associated with Increased Coronary Artery Calcification Progression 
Objective
Matrix gla protein (MGP) inhibits arterial and cartilaginous calcification. A Threonine to Alanine (Thr83Ala) polymorphism (codon 83) in MGP is associated with myocardial infarction (MI) and femoral artery calcification. We examined the association of the MGP Thr83Ala polymorphism with quantity and progression of coronary artery calcification (CAC), a non-invasive measure of subclinical coronary atherosclerosis.
Methods and Results
In 605 Epidemiology of Coronary Artery Calcification Study participants, generalized linear mixed models were fit to determine the association of MGP Thr83Ala with CAC quantity and progression. There was a significant additive relationship between MGP Thr83Ala and CAC progression (P=0.001). In the fully-adjusted model, every one Ala83 allele increase was associated with an estimated 1.9% (95% CI: 0.7%, 3.0%) per one-year since baseline larger increase in CAC quantity. A proxy SNP for MGP Thr83Ala (rs6488724) was similarly associated with CAC progression in an independent cohort from the Genetic Epidemiology Network of Arteriopathy (GENOA) Study.
Conclusions
Increased risk of MI associated with MGP ThrAla83 genotype observed elsewhere may be related to faster progression of subclinical coronary atherosclerosis. MGP genotype could be a potential candidate for identifying individuals at increased risk of atherosclerotic disease who would benefit from aggressive primary prevention strategies.
doi:10.1161/ATVBAHA.112.300491
PMCID: PMC3586431  PMID: 23307874
Population; Genetics; Atherosclerosis; Calcium; Imaging
14.  RYR3 gene polymorphisms and cardiovascular disease outcomes in the context of antihypertensive treatment 
The pharmacogenomics journal  2012;13(4):330-334.
Nearly one-third of adults in the U.S. have hypertension, which is associated with increased cardiovascular disease (CVD) morbidity and mortality. The goal of antihypertensive pharmacogenetic research is to enhance understanding of drug response based on the interaction of individual genetic architecture and antihypertensive therapy to improve blood pressure control and ultimately prevent CVD outcomes. In the context of the Genetics of Hypertension Associated Treatment (GenHAT) study and using a case-only design, we examined whether single nucleotide polymorphisms in RYR3 interact with four classes of antihypertensive drugs, particularly the calcium channel blocker amlodipine versus other classes, to modify the risk of coronary heart disease (CHD; fatal CHD and non-fatal myocardial infarction combined) and heart failure in high-risk hypertensive individuals. RYR3 mediates the mobilization of stored Ca+2 in cardiac and skeletal muscle to initiate muscle contraction. There was suggestive evidence of pharmacogenetic effects on heart failure, the strongest of which was for rs877087, with the smallest p-value =.0005 for the codominant model when comparing amlodipine versus all other treatments. There were no pharmacogenetic effects observed for CHD. The findings reported here for the case-only analysis of the antihypertensive pharmacogenetic effect of RYR3 among 3,058 CHD cases and 1,940 heart failure cases show that a hypertensive patient’s genetic profile may help predict which medication(s) might better lower cardiovascular disease risk.
doi:10.1038/tpj.2012.22
PMCID: PMC3435442  PMID: 22664477
RYR3 gene; calcium channel blocker; hypertension; coronary heart disease; heart failure; genetic interaction
15.  Launching genomics into the cloud: deployment of Mercury, a next generation sequence analysis pipeline 
BMC Bioinformatics  2014;15:30.
Background
Massively parallel DNA sequencing generates staggering amounts of data. Decreasing cost, increasing throughput, and improved annotation have expanded the diversity of genomics applications in research and clinical practice. This expanding scale creates analytical challenges: accommodating peak compute demand, coordinating secure access for multiple analysts, and sharing validated tools and results.
Results
To address these challenges, we have developed the Mercury analysis pipeline and deployed it in local hardware and the Amazon Web Services cloud via the DNAnexus platform. Mercury is an automated, flexible, and extensible analysis workflow that provides accurate and reproducible genomic results at scales ranging from individuals to large cohorts.
Conclusions
By taking advantage of cloud computing and with Mercury implemented on the DNAnexus platform, we have demonstrated a powerful combination of a robust and fully validated software pipeline and a scalable computational resource that, to date, we have applied to more than 10,000 whole genome and whole exome samples.
doi:10.1186/1471-2105-15-30
PMCID: PMC3922167  PMID: 24475911
NGS data; Variant calling; Annotation; Clinical sequencing; Cloud computing
16.  Rare complete knockouts in humans: population distribution and significant role in autism spectrum disorders 
Neuron  2013;77(2):235-242.
SUMMARY
To characterize the role of rare complete human knockouts in autism spectrum disorders (ASD), we identify genes with homozygous or compound heterozygous loss-of-function (LoF) variants (defined as nonsense and essential splice sites) from exome sequencing of 933 cases and 869 controls. We identify a two-fold increase in complete knockouts of autosomal genes with low rates of LoF variation (≤5% frequency) in cases and estimate a 3% contribution to ASD risk by these events, confirming this observation in an independent set of 563 probands and 4,605 controls. Outside the pseudo-autosomal regions on the X-chromosome, we similarly observe a significant 1.5-fold increase in rare hemizygous knockouts in males, contributing to another 2% of ASDs in males. Taken together these results provide compelling evidence that rare autosomal and X-chromosome complete gene knockouts are important inherited risk factors for ASD.
doi:10.1016/j.neuron.2012.12.029
PMCID: PMC3613849  PMID: 23352160
17.  Effects of Rare and Common Blood Pressure Gene Variants on Essential Hypertension: Results from the FBPP, CLUE and ARIC Studies 
Circulation research  2012;112(2):318-326.
Rationale
Hypertension (HTN) affects ~30% of adults in industrialized countries and is the major risk factor for cardiovascular disease.
Objective
We sought to study the genetic effect of coding and conserved non-coding variants in syndromic HTN genes on systolic (SBP) and diastolic (DBP) blood pressure to assess their overall impact on essential hypertension (EH).
Methods and Results
We resequenced 11 genes (AGT, CYP11B1, CYP17A1, HSD11B2, NR3C1, NR3C2, SCNN1A, SCNN1B, SCNN1G, WNK1 and WNK4) in 560 European (EA) and African (AA) ancestry GenNet participants with extreme SBP. We investigated genetic associations of 2,535 variants with BP in 19,997 EAs and 6,069 AAs in three types of analyses. First, we studied the combined effects of all variants in GenNet. Second, we studied 1000 Genomes imputed polymorphic variants in 9,747 EA and 3,207 AA ARIC subjects. Lastly, we genotyped 37 missense and common noncoding variants in 6,591 EAs and 6,521 individuals (3,659 EA/2,862 AA) from the CLUE and FBPP studies. None of the variants individually reached significant false-discovery rates (FDR≤0.05) for SBP and DBP. However, upon pooling all coding and non-coding variants we identified at least 5 loci (AGT, CYP11B1, NR3C2, SCNN1G and WNK1), with higher association at evolutionary conserved sites.
Conclusions
Both rare and common variants at these genes affect BP in the general population with modest effects sizes (<0.05 standard deviation units) and much larger sample sizes are required to assess the impact of individual genes. Collectively, conserved noncoding variants affect BP to a greater extent than missense mutations.
doi:10.1161/CIRCRESAHA.112.276725
PMCID: PMC3548950  PMID: 23149595
essential hypertension; blood pressure; population genetics; sequencing; genotype
18.  Possible Race and Gender Divergence in Association of Genetic Variations with Plasma von Willebrand Factor: A Study of ARIC and 1000 Genome Cohorts 
PLoS ONE  2014;9(1):e84810.
The synthesis, secretion and clearance of von Willebrand factor (VWF) are regulated by genetic variations in coding and promoter regions of the VWF gene. We have previously identified 19 single nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs), primarily in introns that are associated with VWF antigen levels in subjects of European descent. In this study, we conducted race by gender analyses to compare the association of VWF SNPs with VWF antigen among 10,434 healthy Americans of European (EA) or African (AA) descent from the Atherosclerosis Risk in Communities (ARIC) study. Among 75 SNPs analyzed, 13 and 10 SNPs were associated with VWF antigen levels in EA male and EA female subjects, respectively. However, only one SNP (RS1063857) was significantly associated with VWF antigen in AA females and none was in AA males. Haplotype analysis of the ARIC samples and studying racial diversities in the VWF gene from the 1000 genomes database suggest a greater degree of variations in the VWF gene in AA subjects as compared to EA subjects. Together, these data suggest potential race and gender divergence in regulating VWF expression by genetic variations.
doi:10.1371/journal.pone.0084810
PMCID: PMC3894939  PMID: 24465435
19.  Fat mass and obesity gene and cognitive decline 
Neurology  2013;80(1):92-99.
ABSTRACT
Objective:
To determine whether 4 genetic variants in the fat mass and obesity associated gene (FTO) identified in genome-wide association studies of diabetes and obesity are associated with cognitive change in midlife in the Atherosclerosis Risk in Communities (ARIC) Study.
Methods:
ARIC is a prospective cohort study of the development of atherosclerosis in 15,792 individuals aged 45 to 64 years at baseline from 1986 to 1989. FTO is highly expressed in human fetal and adult brain, and a single nucleotide polymorphism in FTO has previously been associated with reduced brain volume in cognitively normal subjects. Since a relationship between brain atrophy and diminished cognitive function has been demonstrated in ARIC participants, general linear models were used to evaluate the association between 6-year change in scores on 3 neuropsychological tests and FTO genotype.
Results:
In a sample of 8,364 white and 2,083 African American men and women with no clinical history of stroke, significantly greater mean change in performance on the Delayed Word Recall Test was associated with 2 of 4 FTO single nucleotide polymorphisms examined (rs9939609, rs805136, rs17817449, and rs1421085) in whites but not in African Americans (p ≤ 0.002). The association of the FTO polymorphisms with cognitive change was independent of potential confounding clinical and demographic variables including age, gender, education, diabetes, hypertension, and body mass index.
Conclusions:
Further studies will be needed to clarify the biological mechanisms and genetic pathways through which variants in FTO can increase susceptibility to decline in verbal memory detectable in middle-aged, community-dwelling adults.
doi:10.1212/WNL.0b013e3182768910
PMCID: PMC3589198  PMID: 23136261
20.  Pharmacogenetic effect of the stromelysin (MMP3) polymorphism on stroke risk in relation to antihypertensive treatment: The GenHAT Study 
Stroke; a journal of cerebral circulation  2010;42(2):10.1161/STROKEAHA.110.593798.
Background and Purpose
Atherothrombotic diseases including stroke share a common etiology of atherosclerosis, and susceptibility to atherosclerosis has a genetic component. Stromelysin-1 (MMP3) regulates arterial matrix composition and is a candidate gene for atherothrombosis. A common polymorphism of MMP3 alters expression levels and affects atherosclerotic progression and plaque stability. As part of the GenHAT study, ancillary to ALLHAT, we evaluated the 5A/6A polymorphism in MMP3 to determine its association with stroke and determine if it modifies clinical outcome response to blood pressure lowering drugs.
Methods
The effect of the MMP3 5A/6A polymorphism on stroke rates were examined using multivariate-adjusted Cox regression models including testing interactions between genotype and antihypertensive drug class.
Results
Compared to participants treated with chlorthalidone with the 6A/6A genotype, individuals with the 6A/6A genotype randomized to lisinopril had higher stroke rates (HR, 1.32; 95% CI, 1.08-1.61; P = 0.007), 5A/6A individuals taking lisinopril had lower stroke rates (HRinteraction = 0.74; Pinteraction = 0.08; 95% CI, 0.53-1.04), while 5A/5A individuals taking lisinopril had the lowest stroke rate (HRinteraction=0.51; Pinteraction=0.009; 95% CI, 0.31-0.85). There were no pharmacogenetic differences in stroke rate by genotype in patients taking amlodipine or doxazosin versus chlorthalidone.
Conclusions
The MMP3 6A/6A genotype is associated with an increased risk of stroke in hypertensive subjects taking lisinopril compared to patients treated with chlorthalidone, while a protective effect was found for 5A/5A individuals treated with lisinopril. Genetic screening for the MMP3 5A/6A genotype might be a useful tool to select optimal antihypertensive therapy if this finding is replicated.
doi:10.1161/STROKEAHA.110.593798
PMCID: PMC3859235  PMID: 21183746
hypertension; pharmacogenetics; genetic polymorphism; cardiovascular; Stroke; Matrix Metalloproteinase 3; Antihypertensive Agents
21.  Maternal and Paternal Age are Jointly Associated with Childhood Autism in Jamaica 
Journal of autism and developmental disorders  2012;42(9):10.1007/s10803-011-1438-z.
Several studies have reported maternal and paternal age as risk factors for having a child with Autism Spectrum Disorder (ASD), yet the results remain inconsistent. We used data for 68 age- and sex-matched case–control pairs collected from Jamaica. Using Multivariate General Linear Models (MGLM) and controlling for parity, gestational age, and parental education, we found a significant (p < 0.0001) joint effect of parental ages on having children with ASD indicating an adjusted mean paternal age difference between cases and controls of [5.9 years; 95% CI (2.6, 9.1)] and a difference for maternal age of [6.5 years; 95% CI (4.0, 8.9)]. To avoid multicollinearity in logistic regression, we recommend joint modeling of parental ages as a vector of outcome variables using MGLM.
doi:10.1007/s10803-011-1438-z
PMCID: PMC3858006  PMID: 22230961
Autism spectrum disorders; Maternal age; Paternal age; Multivariate General Linear Models; Multicollinearity
22.  Hypertension Susceptibility Loci and Blood Pressure Response to Antihypertensives – Results from the Pharmacogenomic Evaluation of Antihypertensive Responses (PEAR) Study 
Background
To date, 39 SNPs have been associated with blood pressure (BP) or hypertension (HTN) in genome-wide association studies (GWAS) in Caucasians. Our hypothesis is that the loci/SNPs associated with BP/HTN are also associated with BP response to antihypertensive drugs.
Methods and Results
We assessed the association of these loci with BP response to atenolol or hydrochlorothiazide monotherapy in 768 hypertensive participants in the Pharmacogenomics Responses of Antihypertensive Responses (PEAR) study. Linear regression analysis was performed in Caucasians for each SNP in an additive model adjusting for baseline BP, age, gender and principal components for ancestry. Genetic scores were constructed to include SNPs with nominal associations and empirical p values were determined by permutation test. Genotypes of 37 loci were obtained from Illumina 50K cardiovascular or Omni1M GWAS chips. In Caucasians, no SNPs reached Bonferroni-corrected alpha of 0.0014, six reached nominal significance (p<0.05) and 3 were associated with atenolol BP response at p < 0.01. The genetic score of the atenolol BP lowering alleles was associated with response to atenolol (p =3.3*10−6 for SBP; p=1.6*10−6 for DBP). The genetic score of the HCTZ BP lowering alleles was associated with response to HCTZ (p = 0.0006 for SBP; p = 0.0003 for DBP). Both risk score p values were < 0.01 based on the empirical distribution from the permutation test.
Conclusions
These findings suggest selected signals from hypertension GWAS may predict BP response to atenolol and HCTZ when assessed through risk scoring.
doi:10.1161/CIRCGENETICS.112.964080
PMCID: PMC3529147  PMID: 23087401
beta-blocker; diuretics; hypertension; pharmacogenetics; polymorphisms blood pressure
23.  Association of Chromosome 12 locus with antihypertensive response to hydrochlorothiazide may involve differential YEATS4 expression 
The pharmacogenomics journal  2012;13(3):257-263.
A recent genome-wide analysis discovered an association between a haplotype (from rs317689/rs315135/rs7297610) on Chromosome 12q15 and blood pressure response to hydrochlorothiazide in African-Americans. Our aim was to replicate this association and investigate possible functional mechanisms. We observed similar associations between this haplotype and hydrochlorothiazide response in an independent sample of 746 Caucasians and African-Americans randomized to hydrochlorothiazide or atenolol treatment. The haplotype association was driven by variation at rs7297610, where C/C genotypes were associated with greater mean (systolic: 3.4mmHg, P=0.0275; diastolic: 2.5mmHg, P=0.0196) responses to hydrochlorothiazide vs. T-allele carriers. Such an association was absent in atenolol-treated participants, supporting this as hydrochlorothiazide-specific. Expression analyses in hydrochlorothiazide-treated African-Americans showed differential leukocyte YEATS4 expression between rs7297610 genotype groups at baseline (P=0.024), and reduced expression in C/C genotypes (P=0.009), but not in T-carriers. Our data confirm previous genome-wide findings at 12q15 and suggest differential YEATS4 expression could underpin rs7297610-associated HCTZ response variability, which may have future implications for guiding thiazide treatment.
doi:10.1038/tpj.2012.4
PMCID: PMC3360116  PMID: 22350108
hydrochlorothiazide; hypertension; pharmacogenomics; blood pressure; YEATS4; diuretics
24.  Association of SERPINA9 gene variants with carotid artery atherosclerosis: the Atherosclerosis Risk in Communities (ARIC) Carotid MRI Study 
The SNP rs11628722 in the SERPINA9 gene was previously associated with incident ischemic stroke in the Atherosclerosis Risk in Communities (ARIC) study. Centerin, the protein encoded by SERPINA9, is involved in maturation and maintenance of naïve B cells, which play a role in atherogenesis. We investigated whether 21 tag SNPs in the SERPINA9 gene are associated with features of carotid artery atherosclerotic plaque measured by magnetic resonance imaging (MRI). Carotid MRI data were obtained from 1,282 European Americans and 341 African Americans of the ARIC Carotid MRI study, which recruited participants from ARIC by a stratified sampling plan that over-sampled participants with carotid intima-media thickening. Five MRI measures, focused on carotid wall volume, wall thickness, and lipid core, were analyzed. Genetic associations between the MRI measurements and each of the 21 SNPs were analyzed in linear regression models with adjustment for sample weights and traditional risk factors. Rs11628722 was tested a priori. In African Americans, rs11628722 was significantly associated with carotid wall volume (p < 0.05). Among the other 20 SNPs, adjusted for multiple testing, rs4905204, which encodes an Ala to Val amino acid change, was significantly associated with maximum wall thickness (p < 0.000625) and suggestively associated with total wall volume (p < 0.0026) in European Americans. In conclusion, SNPs in the SERPINA9 gene showed race-specific associations with characteristics of carotid atherosclerotic plaques. Replications in other populations are needed to validate findings of this study and to establish the SERPINA9 gene as a candidate in the etiology of carotid atherosclerosis.
PMCID: PMC3852645  PMID: 24319541
SERPINA9 gene; carotid atherosclerosis; MRI; genetic association
25.  Chromosome 9p21 Single Nucleotide Polymorphisms are Not Associated with Recurrent Myocardial Infarction in Patients with Established Coronary Artery Disease 
Background
Chromosome 9p21 single-nucleotide-polymorphisms (SNPs) have shown to be associated with coronary heart disease in multiple studies. We aimed to identify whether these SNPs are associated with recurrent myocardial infarction (MI), revascularization, or death in acute-coronary-syndromes (ACS) patients or those undergoing coronary artery bypass grafting (CABG).
Methods and Results
TexGen registry participants with ACS (n=2,067) or CABG (n=1,176) were evaluated. We assessed whether 9p21 SNPs (rs1333049, rs2383206, rs10757278, rs10757274) were associated with recurrent MI (primary outcome), recurrent revascularization, or death (secondary outcomes) at ≈ 3.2 years of follow-up. Carriers of risk allele (C) for rs1333049 presented at an earlier age (62 vs. 63.5 years in non-carriers, p=0.0004) with more extensive disease (number of vessels with significant stenosis =1.9 vs. 1.7 in non-carriers, p=0.001) in the ACS group. In adjusted models, C allele was not associated with recurrent MI (HR 1.01, 95%CI 0.74–1.38), recurrent revascularization (HR 0.98, 95%CI 0.78–1.23), or death (HR 0.91, 95%CI 0.69–1.18) in ACS or CABG group (HR 0.64, 95%CI 0.40–1.05 for recurrent MI; HR 0.98, 95%CI 0.61–1.55 for recurrent revascularization; and HR 0.89, 95%CI 0.61–1.30 for death). Results were similar for the other 3 SNPs.
Conclusions
9p21 SNPs were not associated with recurrent MI, revascularization, or mortality after ACS or CABG. However, individuals with the rs1333049 C allele may present with earlier and more extensive disease.
PMCID: PMC3837386  PMID: 22322877
9p21 locus; recurrent myocardial infarction; recurrent revascularization; mortality

Results 1-25 (248)