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1.  Osteoblastoma of C2 Corpus: 4 Years Follow-up 
Asian Spine Journal  2012;6(2):136-139.
Osteoblastomas are rare neoplasms of the spine. The majority of the spinal lesions arise from the posterior elements and involvement of the corpus is usually by extension through the pedicles. An extremely rare case of isolated C2 corpus osteoblastoma is presented herein. A 9-year-old boy who presented with neck pain and spasmodic torticollis was shown to have a lesion within the corpus of C2. He underwent surgery via an anterior cervical approach and the completely-resected mass was reported to be an osteoblastoma. The pain resolved immediately after surgery and he had radiologic assessments on a yearly basis. He was symptom-free 4 years post-operatively with benign radiologic findings. Although rare, an osteoblastoma should be considered in the differential diagnosis of neck pain and torticollis, especially in patients during the first two decades of life. The standard treatment for osteoblastomas is radical surgical excision because the recurrence rate is high following incomplete resection.
doi:10.4184/asj.2012.6.2.136
PMCID: PMC3372549  PMID: 22708018
Osteoblastoma; Osteoid osteoma; C2 corpus; Anterior cervical approach
2.  Pleural effusion following ventriculopleural shunt: Case reports and review of the literature 
Annals of Thoracic Medicine  2010;5(3):166-170.
Ventriculo-pleural shunt (VPLS) is an acceptable alternative in the management of hydrocephalus. Imbalance between the production and absorption of cerebrospinal fluid an lead to formation of pleural effusion in patient with VPLS and on occasion produce symptoms. Pleural effusion could be a transudate or a non-specific exudate. We report our experience with this modality in relation to formation of pleural effusion and review the literature to make recommendation for its management. Information related to patients’ demographics, smoking history, prior pulmonary and occupational history, indication, duration and complications of the VPLS and their management was gathered to substantiate current recommendation with our experience.
doi:10.4103/1817-1737.65048
PMCID: PMC2930656  PMID: 20835312
Hydrocephalus; pleural effusion; ventriculo-pleural shunt
3.  Spontaneous supratentorial intracerebral hemorrhage: Does surgery benefit comatose patients? 
Introduction:
Treatment of spontaneous supratentorial intracerebral hemorrhage (SICH) is still controversial. We therefore analyzed the comatose patients diagnosed as having spontaneous SICH and treated by surgery.
Materials and Methods:
We retrospectively analyzed the collected data of 25 comatose patients with initial Glasgow Coma Scale (GCS) ≤ 8 diagnosed as having spontaneous SICH and they had been treated by surgical evacuation between 1996 and 2008. The outcome was assessed using Glasgow outcome scale (GOS). The side and location of the hematoma and ventricular extension of the hematoma were recorded. The hematoma volume was graded as mild (<30 cc), moderate (30–60 cc) and massive (>60 cc).
Results:
Age of the patients ranged from 25 to 78 years (mean: 59.6 ± 15.14 years). Among the 25 patients studied, 11 (44%) were females and 14 (56%) were males. GCS before surgery was <5 in 8 (32%) patients and between 5 and 8 in 17 (68%) patients. The hematoma volume was less than 30 cc in 2 patients, between 30 and 60 cc in 9 patients and more than 60 cc in 14 patients. Fourteen of the patients had no ventricular connection and 11 of the hematomas were connected to ventricle. All the 25 patients were treated with craniotomy and evacuation of the hematoma was done within an average of 2 hours on admission to the emergency department. Postoperatively, no rebleeding occurred in our patients. The most important complication was infection in 14 of the patients. The mortality of our surgical series was 56%. GCS before surgery was one of the strongest factors affecting outcome GCS (oGCS) (P = 0.017). Income GCS (iGCS), however, did not affect GOS (P = 0.64). The volume of the hematoma also affected the outcome (P = 0.037). Ventricular extension of the hematoma did affect the oGCS and GOS (P = 0.002), but not the iGCS of the patients (P = 0.139).
Conclusion:
Our data suggest that being surgically oriented is very important to achieve successful outcomes in a select group of patients with SICH.
doi:10.4103/0972-2327.70881
PMCID: PMC2981755  PMID: 21085528
Mortality; outcome; spontaneous supratentorial intracerebral hemorrhage; surgery; treatment
4.  Cerebellar mutism syndrome and its relation to cerebellar cognitive and affective function: Review of the literature 
Tumors of the cerebellum and brainstem account for half of all brain tumors in children. The realization that cerebellar lesions produce clinically relevant intellectual disability makes it important to determine whether neuropsychological abnormalities occur in long-term survivors of pediatric cerebellar tumors. Little is known about the neurobehavioral sequale resulting specifically from the resection of these tumors in this population. We therefore reviewed neuropsychological findings associated with postoperative cerebellar mutism syndrome and discuss the further implications for cerebellar cognitive function.
doi:10.4103/0972-2327.61272
PMCID: PMC2859583  PMID: 20436742
Cerebellar cognitive function; cerebellar mutism syndrome; neuropsychology
5.  Traumatic Acute Subdural Hematoma Extending from the Posterior Cranial Fossa to the Cerebellopontine Angle 
Posterior cranial fossa subdural hematomas and extension of the subdural hematoma to the cerebellopontine angle is rarely seen and the concurrent development of acute peripheral facial palsy and the management strategy have not previously been reported in this pathology because of its rarity. We present this case to emphasize that minor head trauma may lead to a posterior cranial fossa hematoma extending to the cerebellopontine angle and cause peripheral facial palsy in patients using aspirin (acetylsalicylic acid). In addition, partial evacuation and waiting for the resorption of the hematoma may help to prevent damage to the 7th and 8th cranial nerves.
doi:10.3340/jkns.2009.46.3.277
PMCID: PMC2764031  PMID: 19844633
Antiplatelet agent; Cerebellopontine angle; Facial nerve; Head injury; Posterior fossa; Subdural hematoma

Results 1-5 (5)