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1.  Intracytoplasmic Trapping of Influenza Virus by a Lipophilic Derivative of Aglycoristocetin 
Journal of Virology  2012;86(17):9416-9431.
We report on a new anti-influenza virus agent, SA-19, a lipophilic glycopeptide derivative consisting of aglycoristocetin coupled to a phenylbenzyl-substituted cyclobutenedione. In Madin-Darby canine kidney cells infected with influenza A/H1N1, A/H3N2, or B virus, SA-19 displayed a 50% antivirally effective concentration of 0.60 μM and a selectivity index (ratio of cytotoxic versus antiviral concentration) of 112. SA-19 was 11-fold more potent than unsubstituted aglycoristocetin and was active in human and nonhuman cell lines. Virus yield at 72 h p.i. was reduced by 3.6 logs at 0.8 μM SA-19. In contrast to amantadine and oseltamivir, SA-19 did not select for resistance upon prolonged virus exposure. SA-19 was shown to inhibit an early postbinding step in virus replication. The compound had no effect on hemagglutinin (HA)-mediated membrane fusion in an HA-polykaryon assay and did not inhibit the low-pH-induced refolding of the HA in a tryptic digestion assay. However, a marked inhibitory effect on the transduction exerted by retroviral pseudoparticles carrying an HA or vesicular stomatitis virus glycoprotein (VSV-G) fusion protein was noted, suggesting that SA-19 targets a cellular factor with a role in influenza virus and VSV entry. Using confocal microscopy with antinucleoprotein staining, SA-19 was proven to completely prevent the influenza virus nuclear entry. This virus arrest was characterized by the formation of cytoplasmic aggregates. SA-19 appeared to disturb the endocytic uptake and trap the influenza virus in vesicles distinct from early, late, or recycling endosomes. The aglycoristocetin derivative SA-19 represents a new class of potent and broad-acting influenza virus inhibitors with potential clinical relevance.
doi:10.1128/JVI.07032-11
PMCID: PMC3416158  PMID: 22740402
2.  Preservation of the Immunogenicity of Dry-powder Influenza H5N1 Whole Inactivated Virus Vaccine at Elevated Storage Temperatures 
The AAPS Journal  2010;12(2):215-222.
Stockpiling of pre-pandemic influenza vaccines guarantees immediate vaccine availability to counteract an emerging pandemic. Generally, influenza vaccines need to be stored and handled refrigerated to prevent thermal degradation of the antigenic component. Requirement of a cold-chain, however, complicates stockpiling and the logistics of vaccine distribution. We, therefore, investigated the effect of elevated storage temperatures on the immunogenicity of a pre-pandemic influenza A H5N1 whole inactivated virus vaccine. Either suspended in liquid or kept as a freeze-dried powder, vaccines could be stored for 1 year at ambient temperature (20°C) with minimal loss of immunogenicity in mice. Elevation of the storage temperature to 40°C, however, resulted in a significant loss of immunogenic potency within 3 months if vaccines were stored in liquid suspension. In sharp contrast, freeze-dried powder formulations were stable at 40°C for at least 3 months. The presence of inulin or trehalose sugar excipients during freeze-drying of the vaccine proved to be critical to maintain its immunogenic potency during storage, and to preserve the characteristic Th1-type response to whole inactivated virus vaccine. These results indicate that whole inactivated virus vaccines may be stored and handled at room temperature in moderate climate zones for over a year with minimal decline and, if converted to dry-powder, even in hot climate zones for at least 3 months. The increased stability of dry-powder vaccine at 40°C may also point to an extended shelf-life when stored at 4°C. Use of the more stable dry-powder formulation could simplify stockpiling and thereby facilitating successful pandemic intervention.
doi:10.1208/s12248-010-9179-z
PMCID: PMC2844510  PMID: 20195930
freeze-drying; inulin; pandemic influenza; vaccine stockpiling; whole inactivated influenza vaccine (H5N1)
3.  Preservation of the Immunogenicity of Dry-powder Influenza H5N1 Whole Inactivated Virus Vaccine at Elevated Storage Temperatures 
The AAPS Journal  2010;12(2):215-222.
Stockpiling of pre-pandemic influenza vaccines guarantees immediate vaccine availability to counteract an emerging pandemic. Generally, influenza vaccines need to be stored and handled refrigerated to prevent thermal degradation of the antigenic component. Requirement of a cold-chain, however, complicates stockpiling and the logistics of vaccine distribution. We, therefore, investigated the effect of elevated storage temperatures on the immunogenicity of a pre-pandemic influenza A H5N1 whole inactivated virus vaccine. Either suspended in liquid or kept as a freeze-dried powder, vaccines could be stored for 1 year at ambient temperature (20°C) with minimal loss of immunogenicity in mice. Elevation of the storage temperature to 40°C, however, resulted in a significant loss of immunogenic potency within 3 months if vaccines were stored in liquid suspension. In sharp contrast, freeze-dried powder formulations were stable at 40°C for at least 3 months. The presence of inulin or trehalose sugar excipients during freeze-drying of the vaccine proved to be critical to maintain its immunogenic potency during storage, and to preserve the characteristic Th1-type response to whole inactivated virus vaccine. These results indicate that whole inactivated virus vaccines may be stored and handled at room temperature in moderate climate zones for over a year with minimal decline and, if converted to dry-powder, even in hot climate zones for at least 3 months. The increased stability of dry-powder vaccine at 40°C may also point to an extended shelf-life when stored at 4°C. Use of the more stable dry-powder formulation could simplify stockpiling and thereby facilitating successful pandemic intervention.
doi:10.1208/s12248-010-9179-z
PMCID: PMC2844510  PMID: 20195930
freeze-drying; inulin; pandemic influenza; vaccine stockpiling; whole inactivated influenza vaccine (H5N1)

Results 1-3 (3)