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1.  Serum Levels of Beta2-Microglobulin and Free Light Chains of Immunoglobulins Are Associated with Systemic Disease Activity in Primary Sjögren’s Syndrome. Data at Enrollment in the Prospective ASSESS Cohort 
PLoS ONE  2013;8(5):e59868.
Objectives
To analyze the clinical and immunological characteristics at enrollment in a large prospective cohort of patients with primary Sjögren's syndrome (pSS) and to investigate the association between serum BAFF, beta2-microglobulin and free light chains of immunoglobulins and systemic disease activity at enrollment.
Methods
Three hundred and ninety five patients with pSS according to American-European Consensus Criteria were included from fifteen centers of Rheumatology and Internal Medicine in the “Assessment of Systemic Signs and Evolution of Sjögren's Syndrome” (ASSESS) 5-year prospective cohort. At enrollment, serum markers were assessed as well as activity of the disease measured with the EULAR Sjögren's Syndrome Disease Activity Index (ESSDAI).
Results
Patient median age was 58 (25th–75th: 51–67) and median disease duration was 5 (2–9) years. Median ESSDAI at enrollment was 2 (0–7) with 30.9% of patients having features of systemic involvement. Patients with elevated BAFF, beta2-microglobulin and kappa, lambda FLCS had higher ESSDAI scores at enrollment (4 [2]–[11] vs 2 [0–7], P = 0.03; 4 [1]–[11] vs 2 [0–7], P< 0.0001); 4 [2]–[10] vs 2 [0–6.6], P< 0.0001 and 4 [2–8.2] vs 2 [0–7.0], P = 0.02, respectively). In multivariate analysis, increased beta2-microglobulin, kappa and lambda FLCs were associated with a higher ESSDAI score. Median BAFF and beta2-microglobulin were higher in the 16 patients with history of lymphoma (1173.3(873.1–3665.5) vs 898.9 (715.9–1187.2) pg/ml, P = 0.01 and 2.6 (2.2–2.9) vs 2.1 (1.8–2.6) mg/l, P = 0.04, respectively).
Conclusion
In pSS, higher levels of beta2-microglobulin and free light chains of immunoglobulins are associated with increased systemic disease activity.
doi:10.1371/journal.pone.0059868
PMCID: PMC3663789  PMID: 23717383
2.  Prognostic Utility of Secretory Phospholipase A2 in Patients with Stable Coronary Artery Disease 
Clinical chemistry  2011;57(9):1311-1317.
Background
Secretory phospholipase A2 (sPLA2) may contribute to atherogenesis. To date, few prospective studies have examined the utility of sPLA2 for risk stratification in coronary artery disease (CAD).
Methods
Plasma sPLA2 activity was measured at baseline in 3708 subjects in the PEACE randomized trial of trandolapril versus placebo in stable CAD. Median follow-up was 4.8 years. Cox regression was used to adjust for demographics, clinical risk factors, apolipoprotein B, apolipoprotein A1, and medications.
Results
After multivariable adjustment, sPLA2 was associated with an increased risk of cardiovascular death, myocardial infarction or stroke (adjusted hazard ratio quartile 4:quartile 1 1.55, 95% CI 1.13–2.14) and cardiovascular death or heart failure (adjusted hazard ratio quartile 4:quartile 1 1.91, 95% CI 1.20–3.03). In further multivariable assessment, increased activities of sPLA2 were associated with the risk of cardiovascular death, myocardial infarction or stroke (adjusted hazard ratio 1.47, 95% CI 1.06–2.04) independent of lipoprotein-associated phospholipase A2 mass and C-reactive protein, and modestly improved the area under the curve (AUC) beyond established clinical risk factors (AUC 0.668 to 0.675, P=0.01). sPLA2, NT-pro B-type natriuretic peptide and high-sensitivity cardiac troponin T were all independently associated with cardiovascular death or heart failure and each improved risk discrimination (P=0.02, P<0.001, P<0.001, respectively).
Conclusion
sPLA2 activity provides independent prognostic information beyond established risk markers in patients with stable CAD. These data are encouraging for studies designed to evaluate the role of sPLA2 as a therapeutic target.
doi:10.1373/clinchem.2011.166520
PMCID: PMC3243956  PMID: 21784767
biomarkers; risk stratification; phospholipase A2; stable coronary artery disease
3.  Increased levels of circulating microparticles in primary Sjögren's syndrome, systemic lupus erythematosus and rheumatoid arthritis and relation with disease activity 
Arthritis Research & Therapy  2009;11(5):R156.
Introduction
Cell stimulation leads to the shedding of phosphatidylserine (PS)-rich microparticles (MPs). Because autoimmune diseases (AIDs) are characterized by cell activation, we investigated level of circulating MPs as a possible biomarker in primary Sjögren's syndrome (pSS), systemic lupus erythematosus (SLE) and rheumatoid arthritis (RA).
Methods
We measured plasma levels of total, platelet and leukocyte MPs by prothrombinase capture assay and flow cytometry in 43 patients with pSS, 20 with SLE and 24 with RA and in 44 healthy controls (HCs). Secretory phospholipase A2 (sPLA2) activity was assessed by fluorometry. Soluble CD40 ligand (sCD40L) and soluble P-selectin (sCD62P), reflecting platelet activation, were measured by ELISA.
Results
Patients with pSS showed increased plasma level of total MPs (mean ± SEM 8.49 ± 1.14 nM PS equivalent (Eq), P < 0.0001), as did patients with RA (7.23 ± 1.05 n PS Eq, P = 0.004) and SLE (7.3 ± 1.25 nM PS Eq, P = 0.0004), as compared with HCs (4.13 ± 0.2 nM PS Eq). Patients with AIDs all showed increased level of platelet MPs (P < 0.0001), but only those with pSS showed increased level of leukocyte MPs (P < 0.0001). Results by capture assay and flow cytometry were correlated. In patients with high disease activity according to extra-glandular complications (pSS), DAS28 (RA) or SLEDAI (SLE) compared with low-activity patients, the MP level was only slightly increased in comparison with those having a low disease activity. Platelet MP level was inversely correlated with anti-DNA antibody level in SLE (r = -0.65; P = 0.003) and serum β2 microglobulin level in pSS (r = -0.37; P < 0.03). The levels of total and platelet MPs were inversely correlated with sPLA2 activity (r = -0.37, P = 0.0007; r = -0.36, P = 0.002, respectively). sCD40L and sCD62P concentrations were significantly higher in pSS than in HC (P ≤ 0.006).
Conclusions
Plasma MP level is elevated in pSS, as well as in SLE and RA, and could be used as a biomarker reflecting systemic cell activation. Level of leukocyte-derived MPs is increased in pSS only. The MP level is low in case of more severe AID, probably because of high secretory phospholipase A2 (sPLA2) activity, which leads to consumption of MPs. Increase of platelet-derived MPs, sCD40L and sCD62P, highlights platelet activation in pSS.
doi:10.1186/ar2833
PMCID: PMC2787287  PMID: 19832990

Results 1-3 (3)