PMCC PMCC

Search tips
Search criteria

Advanced
Results 1-16 (16)
 

Clipboard (0)
None

Select a Filter Below

Journals
Year of Publication
Document Types
1.  Genome-wide Association Study of Obsessive-Compulsive Disorder 
Stewart, S Evelyn | Yu, Dongmei | Scharf, Jeremiah M | Neale, Benjamin M | Fagerness, Jesen A | Mathews, Carol A | Arnold, Paul D | Evans, Patrick D | Gamazon, Eric R | Osiecki, Lisa | McGrath, Lauren | Haddad, Stephen | Crane, Jacquelyn | Hezel, Dianne | Illman, Cornelia | Mayerfeld, Catherine | Konkashbaev, Anuar | Liu, Chunyu | Pluzhnikov, Anna | Tikhomirov, Anna | Edlund, Christopher K | Rauch, Scott L | Moessner, Rainald | Falkai, Peter | Maier, Wolfgang | Ruhrmann, Stephan | Grabe, Hans-Jörgen | Lennertz, Leonard | Wagner, Michael | Bellodi, Laura | Cavallini, Maria Cristina | Richter, Margaret A | Cook, Edwin H | Kennedy, James L | Rosenberg, David | Stein, Dan J | Hemmings, Sian MJ | Lochner, Christine | Azzam, Amin | Chavira, Denise A | Fournier, Eduardo | Garrido, Helena | Sheppard, Brooke | Umaña, Paul | Murphy, Dennis L | Wendland, Jens R | Veenstra-VanderWeele, Jeremy | Denys, Damiaan | Blom, Rianne | Deforce, Dieter | Van Nieuwerburgh, Filip | Westenberg, Herman GM | Walitza, Susanne | Egberts, Karin | Renner, Tobias | Miguel, Euripedes Constantino | Cappi, Carolina | Hounie, Ana G | Conceição do Rosário, Maria | Sampaio, Aline S | Vallada, Homero | Nicolini, Humberto | Lanzagorta, Nuria | Camarena, Beatriz | Delorme, Richard | Leboyer, Marion | Pato, Carlos N | Pato, Michele T | Voyiaziakis, Emanuel | Heutink, Peter | Cath, Danielle C | Posthuma, Danielle | Smit, Jan H | Samuels, Jack | Bienvenu, O Joseph | Cullen, Bernadette | Fyer, Abby J | Grados, Marco A | Greenberg, Benjamin D | McCracken, James T | Riddle, Mark A | Wang, Ying | Coric, Vladimir | Leckman, James F | Bloch, Michael | Pittenger, Christopher | Eapen, Valsamma | Black, Donald W | Ophoff, Roel A | Strengman, Eric | Cusi, Daniele | Turiel, Maurizio | Frau, Francesca | Macciardi, Fabio | Gibbs, J Raphael | Cookson, Mark R | Singleton, Andrew | Hardy, John | Crenshaw, Andrew T | Parkin, Melissa A | Mirel, Daniel B | Conti, David V | Purcell, Shaun | Nestadt, Gerald | Hanna, Gregory L | Jenike, Michael A | Knowles, James A | Cox, Nancy | Pauls, David L
Molecular psychiatry  2012;18(7):788-798.
Obsessive-compulsive disorder (OCD) is a common, debilitating neuropsychiatric illness with complex genetic etiology. The International OCD Foundation Genetics Collaborative (IOCDF-GC) is a multi-national collaboration established to discover the genetic variation predisposing to OCD. A set of individuals affected with DSM-IV OCD, a subset of their parents, and unselected controls, were genotyped with several different Illumina SNP microarrays. After extensive data cleaning, 1,465 cases, 5,557 ancestry-matched controls and 400 complete trios remained, with a common set of 469,410 autosomal and 9,657 X-chromosome SNPs. Ancestry-stratified case-control association analyses were conducted for three genetically-defined subpopulations and combined in two meta-analyses, with and without the trio-based analysis. In the case-control analysis, the lowest two p-values were located within DLGAP1 (p=2.49×10-6 and p=3.44×10-6), a member of the neuronal postsynaptic density complex. In the trio analysis, rs6131295, near BTBD3, exceeded the genome-wide significance threshold with a p-value=3.84 × 10-8. However, when trios were meta-analyzed with the combined case-control samples, the p-value for this variant was 3.62×10-5, losing genome-wide significance. Although no SNPs were identified to be associated with OCD at a genome-wide significant level in the combined trio-case-control sample, a significant enrichment of methylation-QTLs (p<0.001) and frontal lobe eQTLs (p=0.001) was observed within the top-ranked SNPs (p<0.01) from the trio-case-control analysis, suggesting these top signals may have a broad role in gene expression in the brain, and possibly in the etiology of OCD.
doi:10.1038/mp.2012.85
PMCID: PMC4218751  PMID: 22889921
Obsessive-compulsive disorder; GWAS; Genetic; Genomic; Neurodevelopmental disorder; DLGAP
2.  Sequence analysis of mutations and translocations across breast cancer subtypes 
Nature  2012;486(7403):405-409.
Breast carcinoma is the leading cause of cancer-related mortality in women worldwide with an estimated 1.38 million new cases and 458,000 deaths in 2008 alone1. This malignancy represents a heterogeneous group of tumours with characteristic molecular features, prognosis, and responses to available therapy2–4. Recurrent somatic alterations in breast cancer have been described including mutations and copy number alterations, notably ERBB2 amplifications, the first successful therapy target defined by a genomic aberration5. Prior DNA sequencing studies of breast cancer genomes have revealed additional candidate mutations and gene rearrangements 6–10. Here we report the whole-exome sequences of DNA from 103 human breast cancers of diverse subtypes from patients in Mexico and Vietnam compared to matched-normal DNA, together with whole-genome sequences of 22 breast cancer/normal pairs. Beyond confirming recurrent somatic mutations in PIK3CA11, TP536, AKT112, GATA313, and MAP3K110, we discovered recurrent mutations in the CBFB transcription factor gene and deletions of its partner RUNX1. Furthermore, we have identified a recurrent MAGI3-AKT3 fusion enriched in triple-negative breast cancer lacking estrogen and progesterone receptors and ERBB2 expression. The Magi3-Akt3 fusion leads to constitutive activation of Akt kinase, which is abolished by treatment with an ATP-competitive Akt small-molecule inhibitor.
doi:10.1038/nature11154
PMCID: PMC4148686  PMID: 22722202
3.  Mutational heterogeneity in cancer and the search for new cancer genes 
Nature  2013;499(7457):214-218.
Major international projects are now underway aimed at creating a comprehensive catalog of all genes responsible for the initiation and progression of cancer. These studies involve sequencing of matched tumor–normal samples followed by mathematical analysis to identify those genes in which mutations occur more frequently than expected by random chance. Here, we describe a fundamental problem with cancer genome studies: as the sample size increases, the list of putatively significant genes produced by current analytical methods burgeons into the hundreds. The list includes many implausible genes (such as those encoding olfactory receptors and the muscle protein titin), suggesting extensive false positive findings that overshadow true driver events. Here, we show that this problem stems largely from mutational heterogeneity and provide a novel analytical methodology, MutSigCV, for resolving the problem. We apply MutSigCV to exome sequences from 3,083 tumor-normal pairs and discover extraordinary variation in (i) mutation frequency and spectrum within cancer types, which shed light on mutational processes and disease etiology, and (ii) mutation frequency across the genome, which is strongly correlated with DNA replication timing and also with transcriptional activity. By incorporating mutational heterogeneity into the analyses, MutSigCV is able to eliminate most of the apparent artefactual findings and allow true cancer genes to rise to attention.
doi:10.1038/nature12213
PMCID: PMC3919509  PMID: 23770567
4.  Mutations causing medullary cystic kidney disease type 1 (MCKD1) lie in a large VNTR in MUC1 missed by massively parallel sequencing 
Nature genetics  2013;45(3):299-303.
While genetic lesions responsible for some Mendelian disorders can be rapidly discovered through massively parallel sequencing (MPS) of whole genomes or exomes, not all diseases readily yield to such efforts. We describe the illustrative case of the simple Mendelian disorder medullary cystic kidney disease type 1 (MCKD1), mapped more than a decade ago to a 2-Mb region on chromosome 1. Ultimately, only by cloning, capillary sequencing, and de novo assembly, we found that each of six MCKD1 families harbors an equivalent, but apparently independently arising, mutation in sequence dramatically underrepresented in MPS data: the insertion of a single C in one copy (but a different copy in each family) of the repeat unit comprising the extremely long (~1.5-5 kb), GC-rich (>80%), coding VNTR in the mucin 1 gene. The results provide a cautionary tale about the challenges in identifying genes responsible for Mendelian, let alone more complex, disorders through MPS.
doi:10.1038/ng.2543
PMCID: PMC3901305  PMID: 23396133
5.  Genome-wide association study of Tourette Syndrome 
Scharf, Jeremiah M. | Yu, Dongmei | Mathews, Carol A. | Neale, Benjamin M. | Stewart, S. Evelyn | Fagerness, Jesen A | Evans, Patrick | Gamazon, Eric | Edlund, Christopher K. | Service, Susan | Tikhomirov, Anna | Osiecki, Lisa | Illmann, Cornelia | Pluzhnikov, Anna | Konkashbaev, Anuar | Davis, Lea K | Han, Buhm | Crane, Jacquelyn | Moorjani, Priya | Crenshaw, Andrew T. | Parkin, Melissa A. | Reus, Victor I. | Lowe, Thomas L. | Rangel-Lugo, Martha | Chouinard, Sylvain | Dion, Yves | Girard, Simon | Cath, Danielle C | Smit, Jan H | King, Robert A. | Fernandez, Thomas | Leckman, James F. | Kidd, Kenneth K. | Kidd, Judith R. | Pakstis, Andrew J. | State, Matthew | Herrera, Luis Diego | Romero, Roxana | Fournier, Eduardo | Sandor, Paul | Barr, Cathy L | Phan, Nam | Gross-Tsur, Varda | Benarroch, Fortu | Pollak, Yehuda | Budman, Cathy L. | Bruun, Ruth D. | Erenberg, Gerald | Naarden, Allan L | Lee, Paul C | Weiss, Nicholas | Kremeyer, Barbara | Berrío, Gabriel Bedoya | Campbell, Desmond | Silgado, Julio C. Cardona | Ochoa, William Cornejo | Restrepo, Sandra C. Mesa | Muller, Heike | Duarte, Ana V. Valencia | Lyon, Gholson J | Leppert, Mark | Morgan, Jubel | Weiss, Robert | Grados, Marco A. | Anderson, Kelley | Davarya, Sarah | Singer, Harvey | Walkup, John | Jankovic, Joseph | Tischfield, Jay A. | Heiman, Gary A. | Gilbert, Donald L. | Hoekstra, Pieter J. | Robertson, Mary M. | Kurlan, Roger | Liu, Chunyu | Gibbs, J. Raphael | Singleton, Andrew | Hardy, John | Strengman, Eric | Ophoff, Roel | Wagner, Michael | Moessner, Rainald | Mirel, Daniel B. | Posthuma, Danielle | Sabatti, Chiara | Eskin, Eleazar | Conti, David V. | Knowles, James A. | Ruiz-Linares, Andres | Rouleau, Guy A. | Purcell, Shaun | Heutink, Peter | Oostra, Ben A. | McMahon, William | Freimer, Nelson | Cox, Nancy J. | Pauls, David L.
Molecular psychiatry  2012;18(6):721-728.
Tourette Syndrome (TS) is a developmental disorder that has one of the highest familial recurrence rates among neuropsychiatric diseases with complex inheritance. However, the identification of definitive TS susceptibility genes remains elusive. Here, we report the first genome-wide association study (GWAS) of TS in 1285 cases and 4964 ancestry-matched controls of European ancestry, including two European-derived population isolates, Ashkenazi Jews from North America and Israel, and French Canadians from Quebec, Canada. In a primary meta-analysis of GWAS data from these European ancestry samples, no markers achieved a genome-wide threshold of significance (p<5 × 10−8); the top signal was found in rs7868992 on chromosome 9q32 within COL27A1 (p=1.85 × 10−6). A secondary analysis including an additional 211 cases and 285 controls from two closely-related Latin-American population isolates from the Central Valley of Costa Rica and Antioquia, Colombia also identified rs7868992 as the top signal (p=3.6 × 10−7 for the combined sample of 1496 cases and 5249 controls following imputation with 1000 Genomes data). This study lays the groundwork for the eventual identification of common TS susceptibility variants in larger cohorts and helps to provide a more complete understanding of the full genetic architecture of this disorder.
doi:10.1038/mp.2012.69
PMCID: PMC3605224  PMID: 22889924
Tourette Syndrome; tics; genetics; GWAS; neurodevelopmental disorder
6.  Genomic sequencing of colorectal adenocarcinomas identifies a recurrent VTI1A-TCF7L2 fusion 
Nature genetics  2011;43(10):964-968.
Prior studies have identified recurrent oncogenic mutations in colorectal adenocarcinoma1 and have surveyed exons of protein-coding genes for mutations in 11 affected individuals2,3. Here we report whole-genome sequencing from nine individuals with colorectal cancer, including primary colorectal tumors and matched adjacent non-tumor tissues, at an average of 30.7× and 31.9× coverage, respectively. We identify an average of 75 somatic rearrangements per tumor, including complex networks of translocations between pairs of chromosomes. Eleven rearrangements encode predicted in-frame fusion proteins, including a fusion of VTI1A and TCF7L2 found in 3 out of 97 colorectal cancers. Although TCF7L2 encodes TCF4, which cooperates with β-catenin4 in colorectal carcinogenesis5,6, the fusion lacks the TCF4 β-catenin–binding domain. We found a colorectal carcinoma cell line harboring the fusion gene to be dependent on VTI1A-TCF7L2 for anchorage-independent growth using RNA interference-mediated knockdown. This study shows previously unidentified levels of genomic rearrangements in colorectal carcinoma that can lead to essential gene fusions and other oncogenic events.
doi:10.1038/ng.936
PMCID: PMC3802528  PMID: 21892161
7.  Large-scale association analysis provides insights into the genetic architecture and pathophysiology of type 2 diabetes 
Morris, Andrew P | Voight, Benjamin F | Teslovich, Tanya M | Ferreira, Teresa | Segrè, Ayellet V | Steinthorsdottir, Valgerdur | Strawbridge, Rona J | Khan, Hassan | Grallert, Harald | Mahajan, Anubha | Prokopenko, Inga | Kang, Hyun Min | Dina, Christian | Esko, Tonu | Fraser, Ross M | Kanoni, Stavroula | Kumar, Ashish | Lagou, Vasiliki | Langenberg, Claudia | Luan, Jian'an | Lindgren, Cecilia M | Müller-Nurasyid, Martina | Pechlivanis, Sonali | Rayner, N William | Scott, Laura J | Wiltshire, Steven | Yengo, Loic | Kinnunen, Leena | Rossin, Elizabeth J | Raychaudhuri, Soumya | Johnson, Andrew D | Dimas, Antigone S | Loos, Ruth J F | Vedantam, Sailaja | Chen, Han | Florez, Jose C | Fox, Caroline | Liu, Ching-Ti | Rybin, Denis | Couper, David J | Kao, Wen Hong L | Li, Man | Cornelis, Marilyn C | Kraft, Peter | Sun, Qi | van Dam, Rob M | Stringham, Heather M | Chines, Peter S | Fischer, Krista | Fontanillas, Pierre | Holmen, Oddgeir L | Hunt, Sarah E | Jackson, Anne U | Kong, Augustine | Lawrence, Robert | Meyer, Julia | Perry, John RB | Platou, Carl GP | Potter, Simon | Rehnberg, Emil | Robertson, Neil | Sivapalaratnam, Suthesh | Stančáková, Alena | Stirrups, Kathleen | Thorleifsson, Gudmar | Tikkanen, Emmi | Wood, Andrew R | Almgren, Peter | Atalay, Mustafa | Benediktsson, Rafn | Bonnycastle, Lori L | Burtt, Noël | Carey, Jason | Charpentier, Guillaume | Crenshaw, Andrew T | Doney, Alex S F | Dorkhan, Mozhgan | Edkins, Sarah | Emilsson, Valur | Eury, Elodie | Forsen, Tom | Gertow, Karl | Gigante, Bruna | Grant, George B | Groves, Christopher J | Guiducci, Candace | Herder, Christian | Hreidarsson, Astradur B | Hui, Jennie | James, Alan | Jonsson, Anna | Rathmann, Wolfgang | Klopp, Norman | Kravic, Jasmina | Krjutškov, Kaarel | Langford, Cordelia | Leander, Karin | Lindholm, Eero | Lobbens, Stéphane | Männistö, Satu | Mirza, Ghazala | Mühleisen, Thomas W | Musk, Bill | Parkin, Melissa | Rallidis, Loukianos | Saramies, Jouko | Sennblad, Bengt | Shah, Sonia | Sigurðsson, Gunnar | Silveira, Angela | Steinbach, Gerald | Thorand, Barbara | Trakalo, Joseph | Veglia, Fabrizio | Wennauer, Roman | Winckler, Wendy | Zabaneh, Delilah | Campbell, Harry | van Duijn, Cornelia | Uitterlinden89-, Andre G | Hofman, Albert | Sijbrands, Eric | Abecasis, Goncalo R | Owen, Katharine R | Zeggini, Eleftheria | Trip, Mieke D | Forouhi, Nita G | Syvänen, Ann-Christine | Eriksson, Johan G | Peltonen, Leena | Nöthen, Markus M | Balkau, Beverley | Palmer, Colin N A | Lyssenko, Valeriya | Tuomi, Tiinamaija | Isomaa, Bo | Hunter, David J | Qi, Lu | Shuldiner, Alan R | Roden, Michael | Barroso, Ines | Wilsgaard, Tom | Beilby, John | Hovingh, Kees | Price, Jackie F | Wilson, James F | Rauramaa, Rainer | Lakka, Timo A | Lind, Lars | Dedoussis, George | Njølstad, Inger | Pedersen, Nancy L | Khaw, Kay-Tee | Wareham, Nicholas J | Keinanen-Kiukaanniemi, Sirkka M | Saaristo, Timo E | Korpi-Hyövälti, Eeva | Saltevo, Juha | Laakso, Markku | Kuusisto, Johanna | Metspalu, Andres | Collins, Francis S | Mohlke, Karen L | Bergman, Richard N | Tuomilehto, Jaakko | Boehm, Bernhard O | Gieger, Christian | Hveem, Kristian | Cauchi, Stephane | Froguel, Philippe | Baldassarre, Damiano | Tremoli, Elena | Humphries, Steve E | Saleheen, Danish | Danesh, John | Ingelsson, Erik | Ripatti, Samuli | Salomaa, Veikko | Erbel, Raimund | Jöckel, Karl-Heinz | Moebus, Susanne | Peters, Annette | Illig, Thomas | de Faire, Ulf | Hamsten, Anders | Morris, Andrew D | Donnelly, Peter J | Frayling, Timothy M | Hattersley, Andrew T | Boerwinkle, Eric | Melander, Olle | Kathiresan, Sekar | Nilsson, Peter M | Deloukas, Panos | Thorsteinsdottir, Unnur | Groop, Leif C | Stefansson, Kari | Hu, Frank | Pankow, James S | Dupuis, Josée | Meigs, James B | Altshuler, David | Boehnke, Michael | McCarthy, Mark I
Nature genetics  2012;44(9):981-990.
To extend understanding of the genetic architecture and molecular basis of type 2 diabetes (T2D), we conducted a meta-analysis of genetic variants on the Metabochip involving 34,840 cases and 114,981 controls, overwhelmingly of European descent. We identified ten previously unreported T2D susceptibility loci, including two demonstrating sex-differentiated association. Genome-wide analyses of these data are consistent with a long tail of further common variant loci explaining much of the variation in susceptibility to T2D. Exploration of the enlarged set of susceptibility loci implicates several processes, including CREBBP-related transcription, adipocytokine signalling and cell cycle regulation, in diabetes pathogenesis.
doi:10.1038/ng.2383
PMCID: PMC3442244  PMID: 22885922
8.  Large-scale association analysis provides insights into the genetic architecture and pathophysiology of type 2 diabetes 
Morris, Andrew P | Voight, Benjamin F | Teslovich, Tanya M | Ferreira, Teresa | Segré, Ayellet V | Steinthorsdottir, Valgerdur | Strawbridge, Rona J | Khan, Hassan | Grallert, Harald | Mahajan, Anubha | Prokopenko, Inga | Kang, Hyun Min | Dina, Christian | Esko, Tonu | Fraser, Ross M | Kanoni, Stavroula | Kumar, Ashish | Lagou, Vasiliki | Langenberg, Claudia | Luan, Jian’an | Lindgren, Cecilia M | Müller-Nurasyid, Martina | Pechlivanis, Sonali | Rayner, N William | Scott, Laura J | Wiltshire, Steven | Yengo, Loic | Kinnunen, Leena | Rossin, Elizabeth J | Raychaudhuri, Soumya | Johnson, Andrew D | Dimas, Antigone S | Loos, Ruth J F | Vedantam, Sailaja | Chen, Han | Florez, Jose C | Fox, Caroline | Liu, Ching-Ti | Rybin, Denis | Couper, David J | Kao, Wen Hong L | Li, Man | Cornelis, Marilyn C | Kraft, Peter | Sun, Qi | van Dam, Rob M | Stringham, Heather M | Chines, Peter S | Fischer, Krista | Fontanillas, Pierre | Holmen, Oddgeir L | Hunt, Sarah E | Jackson, Anne U | Kong, Augustine | Lawrence, Robert | Meyer, Julia | Perry, John R B | Platou, Carl G P | Potter, Simon | Rehnberg, Emil | Robertson, Neil | Sivapalaratnam, Suthesh | Stančáková, Alena | Stirrups, Kathleen | Thorleifsson, Gudmar | Tikkanen, Emmi | Wood, Andrew R | Almgren, Peter | Atalay, Mustafa | Benediktsson, Rafn | Bonnycastle, Lori L | Burtt, Noël | Carey, Jason | Charpentier, Guillaume | Crenshaw, Andrew T | Doney, Alex S F | Dorkhan, Mozhgan | Edkins, Sarah | Emilsson, Valur | Eury, Elodie | Forsen, Tom | Gertow, Karl | Gigante, Bruna | Grant, George B | Groves, Christopher J | Guiducci, Candace | Herder, Christian | Hreidarsson, Astradur B | Hui, Jennie | James, Alan | Jonsson, Anna | Rathmann, Wolfgang | Klopp, Norman | Kravic, Jasmina | Krjutškov, Kaarel | Langford, Cordelia | Leander, Karin | Lindholm, Eero | Lobbens, Stéphane | Männistö, Satu | Mirza, Ghazala | Mühleisen, Thomas W | Musk, Bill | Parkin, Melissa | Rallidis, Loukianos | Saramies, Jouko | Sennblad, Bengt | Shah, Sonia | Sigurðsson, Gunnar | Silveira, Angela | Steinbach, Gerald | Thorand, Barbara | Trakalo, Joseph | Veglia, Fabrizio | Wennauer, Roman | Winckler, Wendy | Zabaneh, Delilah | Campbell, Harry | van Duijn, Cornelia | Uitterlinden, Andre G | Hofman, Albert | Sijbrands, Eric | Abecasis, Goncalo R | Owen, Katharine R | Zeggini, Eleftheria | Trip, Mieke D | Forouhi, Nita G | Syvänen, Ann-Christine | Eriksson, Johan G | Peltonen, Leena | Nöthen, Markus M | Balkau, Beverley | Palmer, Colin N A | Lyssenko, Valeriya | Tuomi, Tiinamaija | Isomaa, Bo | Hunter, David J | Qi, Lu | Shuldiner, Alan R | Roden, Michael | Barroso, Ines | Wilsgaard, Tom | Beilby, John | Hovingh, Kees | Price, Jackie F | Wilson, James F | Rauramaa, Rainer | Lakka, Timo A | Lind, Lars | Dedoussis, George | Njølstad, Inger | Pedersen, Nancy L | Khaw, Kay-Tee | Wareham, Nicholas J | Keinanen-Kiukaanniemi, Sirkka M | Saaristo, Timo E | Korpi-Hyövälti, Eeva | Saltevo, Juha | Laakso, Markku | Kuusisto, Johanna | Metspalu, Andres | Collins, Francis S | Mohlke, Karen L | Bergman, Richard N | Tuomilehto, Jaakko | Boehm, Bernhard O | Gieger, Christian | Hveem, Kristian | Cauchi, Stephane | Froguel, Philippe | Baldassarre, Damiano | Tremoli, Elena | Humphries, Steve E | Saleheen, Danish | Danesh, John | Ingelsson, Erik | Ripatti, Samuli | Salomaa, Veikko | Erbel, Raimund | Jöckel, Karl-Heinz | Moebus, Susanne | Peters, Annette | Illig, Thomas | de Faire, Ulf | Hamsten, Anders | Morris, Andrew D | Donnelly, Peter J | Frayling, Timothy M | Hattersley, Andrew T | Boerwinkle, Eric | Melander, Olle | Kathiresan, Sekar | Nilsson, Peter M | Deloukas, Panos | Thorsteinsdottir, Unnur | Groop, Leif C | Stefansson, Kari | Hu, Frank | Pankow, James S | Dupuis, Josée | Meigs, James B | Altshuler, David | Boehnke, Michael | McCarthy, Mark I
Nature genetics  2012;44(9):981-990.
To extend understanding of the genetic architecture and molecular basis of type 2 diabetes (T2D), we conducted a meta-analysis of genetic variants on the Metabochip involving 34,840 cases and 114,981 controls, overwhelmingly of European descent. We identified ten previously unreported T2D susceptibility loci, including two demonstrating sex-differentiated association. Genome-wide analyses of these data are consistent with a long tail of further common variant loci explaining much of the variation in susceptibility to T2D. Exploration of the enlarged set of susceptibility loci implicates several processes, including CREBBP-related transcription, adipocytokine signalling and cell cycle regulation, in diabetes pathogenesis.
doi:10.1038/ng.2383
PMCID: PMC3442244  PMID: 22885922
9.  Melanoma genome sequencing reveals frequent PREX2 mutations 
Nature  2012;485(7399):502-506.
Melanoma is notable for its metastatic propensity, lethality in the advanced setting, and association with ultraviolet (UV) exposure early in life1. To obtain a comprehensive genomic view of melanoma, we sequenced the genomes of 25 metastatic melanomas and matched germline DNA. A wide range of point mutation rates was observed: lowest in melanomas whose primaries arose on non-UV exposed hairless skin of the extremities (3 and 14 per Mb genome), intermediate in those originating from hair-bearing skin of the trunk (range = 5 to 55 per Mb), and highest in a patient with a documented history of chronic sun exposure (111 per Mb). Analysis of whole-genome sequence data identified PREX2 - a PTEN-interacting protein and negative regulator of PTEN in breast cancer2 - as a significantly mutated gene with a mutation frequency of approximately 14% in an independent extension cohort of 107 human melanomas. PREX2 mutations are biologically relevant, as ectopic expression of mutant PREX2 accelerated tumor formation of immortalized human melanocytes in vivo. Thus, whole-genome sequencing of human melanoma tumors revealed genomic evidence of UV pathogenesis and discovered a new recurrently mutated gene in melanoma.
doi:10.1038/nature11071
PMCID: PMC3367798  PMID: 22622578
10.  The Mutational Landscape of Head and Neck Squamous Cell Carcinoma 
Science (New York, N.Y.)  2011;333(6046):1157-1160.
Head and neck squamous cell carcinoma (HNSCC) is a common, morbid, and frequently lethal malignancy. To uncover its mutational spectrum, we analyzed whole-exome sequencing data from 74 tumor-normal pairs. The majority exhibited a mutational profile consistent with tobacco exposure; human papilloma virus was detectable by sequencing of DNA from infected tumors. In addition to identifying previously known HNSCC genes (TP53, CDKN2A, PTEN, PIK3CA, and HRAS), the analysis revealed many genes not previously implicated in this malignancy. At least 30% of cases harbored mutations in genes that regulate squamous differentiation (e.g., NOTCH1, IRF6, and TP63), implicating its dysregulation as a major driver of HNSCC carcinogenesis. More generally, the results indicate the ability of large-scale sequencing to reveal fundamental tumorigenic mechanisms.
doi:10.1126/science.1208130
PMCID: PMC3415217  PMID: 21798893
11.  The Metabochip, a Custom Genotyping Array for Genetic Studies of Metabolic, Cardiovascular, and Anthropometric Traits 
PLoS Genetics  2012;8(8):e1002793.
Genome-wide association studies have identified hundreds of loci for type 2 diabetes, coronary artery disease and myocardial infarction, as well as for related traits such as body mass index, glucose and insulin levels, lipid levels, and blood pressure. These studies also have pointed to thousands of loci with promising but not yet compelling association evidence. To establish association at additional loci and to characterize the genome-wide significant loci by fine-mapping, we designed the “Metabochip,” a custom genotyping array that assays nearly 200,000 SNP markers. Here, we describe the Metabochip and its component SNP sets, evaluate its performance in capturing variation across the allele-frequency spectrum, describe solutions to methodological challenges commonly encountered in its analysis, and evaluate its performance as a platform for genotype imputation. The metabochip achieves dramatic cost efficiencies compared to designing single-trait follow-up reagents, and provides the opportunity to compare results across a range of related traits. The metabochip and similar custom genotyping arrays offer a powerful and cost-effective approach to follow-up large-scale genotyping and sequencing studies and advance our understanding of the genetic basis of complex human diseases and traits.
Author Summary
Recent genetic studies have identified hundreds of regions of the human genome that contribute to risk for type 2 diabetes, coronary artery disease and myocardial infarction, and to related quantitative traits such as body mass index, glucose and insulin levels, blood lipid levels, and blood pressure. These results motivate two central questions: (1) can further genetic investigation identify additional associated regions?; and (2) can more detailed genetic investigation help us identify the causal variants (or variants more strongly correlated with the causal variants) in the regions identified so far? Addressing these questions requires assaying many genetic variants in DNA samples from thousands of individuals, which is expensive and timeconsuming when done a few SNPs at a time. To facilitate these investigations, we designed the “Metabochip,” a custom genotyping array that assays variation in nearly 200,000 sites in the human genome. Here we describe the Metabochip, evaluate its performance in assaying human genetic variation, and describe solutions to methodological challenges commonly encountered in its analysis.
doi:10.1371/journal.pgen.1002793
PMCID: PMC3410907  PMID: 22876189
12.  Lack of association between the Trp719Arg polymorphism in kinesin-like protein 6 and coronary artery disease in 19 case-control studies 
Assimes, Themistocles L | Hólm, Hilma | Kathiresan, Sekar | Reilly, Muredach P | Thorleifsson, Gudmar | Voight, Benjamin F | Erdmann, Jeanette | Willenborg, Christina | Vaidya, Dhananjay | Xie, Changchun | Patterson, Chris C | Morgan, Thomas M | Burnett, Mary Susan | Li, Mingyao | Hlatky, Mark A | Knowles, Joshua W | Thompson, John R | Absher, Devin | Iribarren, Carlos | Go, Alan | Fortmann, Stephen P | Sidney, Stephen | Risch, Neil | Tang, Hua | Myers, Richard M | Berger, Klaus | Stoll, Monika | Shah, Svati H. | Thorgeirsson, Gudmundur | Andersen, Karl | Havulinna, Aki S | Herrera, J. Enrique | Faraday, Nauder | Kim, Yoonhee | Kral, Brian G. | Mathias, Rasika | Ruczinski, Ingo | Suktitipat, Bhoom | Wilson, Alexander F | Yanek, Lisa R. | Becker, Lewis C | Linsel-Nitschke, Patrick | Lieb, Wolfgang | König, Inke R | Hengstenberg, Christian | Fischer, Marcus | Stark, Klaus | Reinhard, Wibke | Winogradow, Janina | Grassl, Martina | Grosshennig, Anika | Preuss, Michael | Eifert, Sandra | Schreiber, Stefan | Wichmann, H-Erich | Meisinger, Christa | Yee, Jean | Friedlander, Yechiel | Do, Ron | Meigs, James B | Williams, Gordon | Nathan, David M | MacRae, Calum A | Qu, Liming | Wilensky, Robert L | Matthai, William H. | Qasim, Atif N | Hakonarson, Hakon | Pichard, Augusto D | Kent, Kenneth M | Satler, Lowell | Lindsay, Joseph M | Waksman, Ron | Knouff, Christopher W | Waterworth, Dawn M | Walker, Max C | Mooser, Vincent | Marrugat, Jaume | Lucas, Gavin | Subirana, Isaac | Sala, Joan | Ramos, Rafael | Martinelli, Nicola | Olivieri, Oliviero | Trabetti, Elisabetta | Malerba, Giovanni | Pignatti, Pier Franco | Guiducci, Candace | Mirel, Daniel | Parkin, Melissa | Hirschhorn, Joel N | Asselta, Rosanna | Duga, Stefano | Musunuru, Kiran | Daly, Mark J | Purcell, Shaun | Braund, Peter S | Wright, Benjamin J | Balmforth, Anthony J | Ball, Stephen G | Ouwehand, Willem H | Deloukas, Panos | Scholz, Michael | Cambien, Francois | Huge, Andreas | Scheffold, Thomas | Salomaa, Veikko | Girelli, Domenico | Granger, Christopher B. | Peltonen, Leena | McKeown, Pascal P | Altshuler, David | Melander, Olle | Devaney, Joseph M | Epstein, Stephen E | Rader, Daniel J | Elosua, Roberto | Engert, James C | Anand, Sonia S | Hall, Alistair S | Ziegler, Andreas | O’Donnell, Christopher J | Spertus, John A | Siscovick, David | Schwartz, Stephen M | Becker, Diane | Thorsteinsdottir, Unnur | Stefansson, Kari | Schunkert, Heribert | Samani, Nilesh J | Quertermous, Thomas
Objectives
We sought to replicate the association between the kinesin-like protein 6 (KIF6) Trp719Arg polymorphism (rs20455) and clinical coronary artery disease (CAD).
Background
Recent prospective studies suggest that carriers of the 719Arg allele in KIF6 are at increased risk of clinical CAD compared with non-carriers.
Methods
The KIF6 Trp719Arg polymorphism (rs20455) was genotyped in nineteen case-control studies of non-fatal CAD either as part of a genome-wide association study or in a formal attempt to replicate the initial positive reports.
Results
Over 17 000 cases and 39 000 controls of European descent as well as a modest number of South Asians, African Americans, Hispanics, East Asians, and admixed cases and controls were successfully genotyped. None of the nineteen studies demonstrated an increased risk of CAD in carriers of the 719Arg allele compared with non-carriers. Regression analyses and fixed effect meta-analyses ruled out with high degree of confidence an increase of ≥2% in the risk of CAD among European 719Arg carriers. We also observed no increase in the risk of CAD among 719Arg carriers in the subset of Europeans with early onset disease (<50 years of age for males and <60 years for females) compared with similarly aged controls as well as all non-European subgroups.
Conclusions
The KIF6 Trp719Arg polymorphism was not associated with the risk of clinical CAD in this large replication study.
doi:10.1016/j.jacc.2010.06.022
PMCID: PMC3084526  PMID: 20933357
kinesin-like protein 6; KIF6; coronary artery disease; myocardial infarction; polymorphism
13.  The genomic complexity of primary human prostate cancer 
Nature  2011;470(7333):214-220.
Prostate cancer is the second most common cause of male cancer deaths in the United States. Here we present the complete sequence of seven primary prostate cancers and their paired normal counterparts. Several tumors contained complex chains of balanced rearrangements that occurred within or adjacent to known cancer genes. Rearrangement breakpoints were enriched near open chromatin, androgen receptor and ERG DNA binding sites in the setting of the ETS gene fusion TMPRSS2-ERG, but inversely correlated with these regions in tumors lacking ETS fusions. This observation suggests a link between chromatin or transcriptional regulation and the genesis of genomic aberrations. Three tumors contained rearrangements that disrupted CADM2, and four harbored events disrupting either PTEN (unbalanced events), a prostate tumor suppressor, or MAGI2 (balanced events), a PTEN interacting protein not previously implicated in prostate tumorigenesis. Thus, genomic rearrangements may arise from transcriptional or chromatin aberrancies to engage prostate tumorigenic mechanisms.
doi:10.1038/nature09744
PMCID: PMC3075885  PMID: 21307934
14.  Feasibility of High-Throughput Genome-Wide Genotyping using DNA from Stored Buccal Cell Samples 
Biomarker Insights  2010;5:49-55.
It is unclear if buccal cell samples contain sufficient human DNA with adequately sized fragments for high throughput genetic bioassays. Yet buccal cell sample collection is an attractive alternative to gathering blood samples for genetic epidemiologists engaged in large-scale genetic biomarker studies. We assessed the genotyping efficiency (GE) and genotyping concordance (GC) of buccal cell DNA samples compared to corresponding blood DNA samples, from 32 Nurses’ Health Study (NHS) participants using the Illumina Infinium 660W-Quad platform. We also assessed how GE and GC accuracy varied as a function of DNA concentration using serial dilutions of buccal DNA samples. Finally we determined the nature and genomic distribution of discordant genotypes in buccal DNA samples. The mean GE of undiluted buccal cell DNA samples was high (99.32%), as was the GC between the paired buccal and blood samples (99.29%). GC between the dilutions versus the undiluted buccal DNA was also very high (>97%), though both GE and GC notably declined at DNA concentrations less than 5 ng/μl. Most (>95%) genotype determinations in buccal cell samples were of the “missing call” variety (as opposed to the “alternative genotype call” variety) across the spectrum of buccal DNA concentrations studied. Finally, for buccal DNA concentration above 1.7 ng/ul, discordant genotyping calls did not cluster in any particular chromosome. Buccal cell-derived DNA represents a viable alternative to blood DNA for genotyping on a high-density platform.
PMCID: PMC2879226  PMID: 20520743
buccal cell DNA; saliva DNA; GWAS; genotyping; low concentration DNA
15.  Genetic Variants Near TNFAIP3 on 6q23 are Associated with Systemic Lupus Erythematosus (SLE) 
Nature genetics  2008;40(9):1059-1061.
SLE is an autoimmune disease influenced by genetic and environmental components. We performed a genome-wide association scan (GWAS) and observed novel association evidence with a variant inTNFAIP3(rs5029939, P = 2.89×10−12, OR = 2.29). We also found evidence of two independent signals of association to SLE risk, including one described in Rheumatoid Arthritis. These results establish that genetic variation inTNFAIP3contributes to differential risk for SLE and RA.
doi:10.1038/ng.200
PMCID: PMC2772171  PMID: 19165918
16.  Two independent alleles at 6q23 associated with risk of rheumatoid arthritis 
Nature genetics  2007;39(12):1477-1482.
To identify susceptibility alleles associated with rheumatoid arthritis, we genotyped 397 individuals with rheumatoid arthritis for 116,204 SNPs and carried out an association analysis in comparison to publicly available genotype data for 1,211 related individuals from the Framingham Heart Study1. After evaluating and adjusting for technical and population biases, we identified a SNP at 6q23 (rs10499194, ∼150 kb from TNFAIP3 and OLIG3) that was reproducibly associated with rheumatoid arthritis both in the genome-wide association (GWA) scan and in 5,541 additional case-control samples (P = 10−3, GWA scan; P < 10−6, replication; P = 10−9, combined). In a concurrent study, the Wellcome Trust Case Control Consortium (WTCCC) has reported strong association of rheumatoid arthritis susceptibility to a different SNP located 3.8 kb from rs10499194 (rs6920220; P = 5 × 10−6 in WTCCC)2. We show that these two SNP associations are statistically independent, are each reproducible in the comparison of our data and WTCCC data, and define risk and protective haplotypes for rheumatoid arthritis at 6q23.
doi:10.1038/ng.2007.27
PMCID: PMC2652744  PMID: 17982456

Results 1-16 (16)