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1.  Set-Based Joint Test of Interaction Between SNPs in the VEGF Pathway and Exogenous Estrogen Finds Association With Age-Related Macular Degeneration 
Purpose.
Age-related macular degeneration (AMD) is the leading cause of irreversible visual loss in developed countries. Its etiology includes genetic and environmental factors. Although VEGFA variants are associated with AMD, the joint action of variants within the VEGF pathway and their interaction with nongenetic factors have not been investigated.
Methods.
Affymetrix 6.0 chipsets were used to genotype 668,238 single nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs) in 1207 AMD cases and 686 controls. Environmental exposures were collected by questionnaire. A set-based test was conducted using the χ2 statistic at each SNP derived from Kraft's two degree of freedom (2df) joint test. Pathway- and gene-based test statistics were calculated as the mean of all independent SNP statistics. Phenotype labels were permuted 10,000 times to generate an empirical P value.
Results.
While a main effect of the VEGF pathway was not identified, the pathway was associated with neovascular AMD in women when accounting for birth control pill (BCP) use (P = 0.017). Analysis of VEGF's subpathways showed that SNPs in the proliferation subpathway were associated with neovascular AMD (P = 0.029) when accounting for BCP use. Nominally significant genes within this subpathway were also observed. Stratification by BCP use revealed novel significant genetic effects in women who had taken BCPs.
Conclusions.
These results illustrate that some AMD genetic risk factors may be revealed only when complex relationships among risk factors are considered. This shows the utility of exploring pathways of previously associated genes to find novel effects. It also demonstrates the importance of incorporating environmental exposures in tests of genetic association at the SNP, gene, or pathway level.
Analysis using a set-based joint test of genetic main effects and environmental interaction found that SNPs in VEGF's proliferation subpathway were associated with neovascular AMD when exogenous estrogen use in women was accounted for.
doi:10.1167/iovs.14-14494
PMCID: PMC4126792  PMID: 25015356
age-related macular degeneration; case-control study; epidemiology; statistics; candidate genes
2.  THE ARMS2 A69S VARIANT AND BILATERAL ADVANCED AGE-RELATED MACULAR DEGENERATION 
Retina (Philadelphia, Pa.)  2012;32(8):1486-1491.
Purpose
To identify genetic associations between specific risk genes and bilateral advanced age-related macular degeneration (AMD) in a retrospective, observational case series of 1,003 patients: 173 patients with geographic atrophy in at least 1 eye and 830 patients with choroidal neovascularization in at least 1 eye.
Methods
Patients underwent clinical examination and fundus photography. The images were subsequently graded using a modified grading system adapted from the Age-Related Eye Disease Study. Genetic analysis was performed to identify genotypes at 4 AMD-associated variants (ARMS2 A69S, CFH Y402H, C3 R102G, and CFB R32Q) in these patients.
Results
There were no statistically significant relationships between clinical findings and genotypes at CFH, C3, and CFB. The genotype at ARMS2 correlated with bilateral advanced AMD using a variety of comparisons: unilateral geographic atrophy versus bilateral geographic atrophy (P = 0.08), unilateral choroidal neovascularization versus bilateral choroidal neovascularization (P = 9.0 × 10 −8), and unilateral late AMD versus bilateral late AMD (P = 5.9 × 10 −8).
Conclusion
In this series, in patients with geographic atrophy or choroidal neovascularization in at least 1 eye, the ARMS2 A69S substitution strongly associated with geographic atrophy or choroidal neovascularization in the fellow eye. The ARMS2 A69S substitution may serve as a marker for bilateral advanced AMD.
doi:10.1097/IAE.0b013e318240a540
PMCID: PMC4269218  PMID: 22481475
age-related macular degeneration; ARMS2; choroidal neovascularization; genotypes; geographic atrophy
3.  Examination of Candidate Exonic Variants for Association to Alzheimer Disease in the Amish 
PLoS ONE  2015;10(2):e0118043.
Alzheimer disease (AD) is the most common cause of dementia. As with many complex diseases, the identified variants do not explain the total expected genetic risk that is based on heritability estimates for AD. Isolated founder populations, such as the Amish, are advantageous for genetic studies as they overcome heterogeneity limitations associated with complex population studies. We determined that Amish AD cases harbored a significantly higher burden of the known risk alleles compared to Amish cognitively normal controls, but a significantly lower burden when compared to cases from a dataset of unrelated individuals. Whole-exome sequencing of a selected subset of the overall study population was used as a screening tool to identify variants located in the regions of the genome that are most likely to contribute risk. By then genotyping the top candidate variants from the known AD genes and from linkage regions implicated previous studies in the full dataset, new associations could be confirmed. The most significant result (p = 0.0012) was for rs73938538, a synonymous variant in LAMA1 within the previously identified linkage peak on chromosome 18. However, this association is specific to the Amish and did not generalize when tested in a dataset of unrelated individuals. These results suggest that additional risk variation in the Amish remains to be identified and likely resides outside of the classical protein coding gene regions.
doi:10.1371/journal.pone.0118043
PMCID: PMC4323242  PMID: 25668194
4.  Rare Complement Factor H Variant Associated With Age-Related Macular Degeneration in the Amish 
Purpose.
Age-related macular degeneration is the leading cause of blindness among the adult population in the developed world. To further the understanding of this disease, we have studied the genetically isolated Amish population of Ohio and Indiana.
Methods.
Cumulative genetic risk scores were calculated using the 19 known allelic associations. Exome sequencing was performed in three members of a small Amish family with AMD who lacked the common risk alleles in complement factor H (CFH) and ARMS2/HTRA1. Follow-up genotyping and association analysis was performed in a cohort of 973 Amish individuals, including 95 with self-reported AMD.
Results.
The cumulative genetic risk score analysis generated a mean genetic risk score of 1.12 (95% confidence interval [CI]: 1.10, 1.13) in the Amish controls and 1.18 (95% CI: 1.13, 1.22) in the Amish cases. This mean difference in genetic risk scores is statistically significant (P = 0.0042). Exome sequencing identified a rare variant (P503A) in CFH. Association analysis in the remainder of the Amish sample revealed that the P503A variant is significantly associated with AMD (P = 9.27 × 10−13). Variant P503A was absent when evaluated in a cohort of 791 elderly non-Amish controls, and 1456 non-Amish cases.
Conclusions.
Data from the cumulative genetic risk score analysis suggests that the variants reported by the AMDGene consortium account for a smaller genetic burden of disease in the Amish compared with the non-Amish Caucasian population. Using exome sequencing data, we identified a novel missense mutation that is shared among a densely affected nuclear Amish family and located in a gene that has been previously implicated in AMD risk.
In this study, we describe the analysis of the genetically isolated Amish population of Ohio and Indiana for AMD.
doi:10.1167/iovs.13-13684
PMCID: PMC4107619  PMID: 24906858
age-related macular degeneration; linkage analysis; rare variant; exome sequencing; risk score analysis
6.  C9ORF72 intermediate repeat copies are a significant risk factor for Parkinson Disease 
Annals of human genetics  2013;77(5):351-363.
SUMMARY
We set out to determine whether expansions in the C9ORF72 repeat found in Amyotrophic Lateral Sclerosis (ALS) and Frontotemporal Dementia (FTD) families are associated with Parkinson Disease (PD). We determined the repeat size in a total of 889 clinically ascertained patients (including PD and Essential Tremor plus Parkinsonism (ETP)) and 1144 controls using a repeat-primed PCR assay. We found that large C9ORF72 repeat expansions (>30 repeats) were not contributing to PD risk. However, PD and ETP cases had a significant increase in intermediate (>20 to 30+) repeat copies compared to controls. Overall, 14 cases (13 PD, 1 ETP) and 3 controls had >20 repeat copies (Fisher’s exact test p=0.002). Further, seven cases and no controls had >23 repeat copies (p=0.003). Our results suggest that intermediate copy numbers of the C9ORF72 repeat contribute to risk for PD and ETP. This also suggests that PD, ALS and FTD share some pathophysiologic mechanisms of disease. Further studies are needed to elucidate the contribution of the C9ORF72 repeat in the overall PD population and if other common genetic risk factors exist between these neurodegenerative disorders.
doi:10.1111/ahg.12033
PMCID: PMC3815478  PMID: 23845100
Parkinson Disease; C9ORF72 repeat; association; risk factor
8.  Linkage and association of successful aging to the 6q25 region in large Amish kindreds 
Age  2012;35(4):1467-1477.
Successful aging (SA) is a multidimensional phenotype involving living to older age with high physical function, preserved cognition, and continued social engagement. Several domains underlying SA are heritable, and identifying health-promoting polymorphisms and their interactions with the environment could provide important information regarding the health of older adults. In the present study, we examined 263 cognitively intact Amish individuals age 80 and older (74 SA and 189 “normally aged”) all of whom are part of a single 13-generation pedigree. A genome-wide association study of 630,309 autosomal single nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs) was performed and analyzed for linkage using multipoint analyses and for association using the modified quasi-likelihood score test. There was evidence for linkage on 6q25-27 near the fragile site FRA6E region with a dominant model maximum multipoint heterogeneity LOD score = 3.2. The 1-LOD-down support interval for this linkage contained one SNP for which there was regionally significant evidence of association (rs205990, p = 2.36 × 10−5). This marker survived interval-wide Bonferroni correction for multiple testing and was located between the genes QKI and PDE10A. Other areas of chromosome 6q25-q27 (including the FRA6E region) contained several SNPs associated with SA (minimum p = 2.89 × 10−6). These findings suggest potentially novel genes in the 6q25-q27 region linked and associated with SA in the Amish; however, these findings should be verified in an independent replication cohort.
Electronic supplementary material
The online version of this article (doi:10.1007/s11357-012-9447-1) contains supplementary material, which is available to authorized users.
doi:10.1007/s11357-012-9447-1
PMCID: PMC3705095  PMID: 22773346
Genome-wide association; Longevity; Genetic epidemiology; Family-based study
9.  Variants at chromosome 10q26 locus and the expression of HTRA1 in the retina 
Experimental eye research  2013;112:102-105.
Variations in a locus at chromosome 10q26 are strongly associated with the risk of age-related macular degeneration (AMD). The most significantly associated haplotype includes a nonsynonymous SNP rs10490924 in the exon 1 of ARMS2 and rs11200638 in the promoter region of HTRA1. It is under debate which gene(s), ARMS2, HTRA1 or some other genes are functionally responsible for the genetic association. To verify whether the associated variants correlate with a higher HTRA1 expression level as previously reported, HTRA1 mRNA and protein were measured in a larger human retina-RPE-choroid samples (n = 82). Results show there is no significant change of HTRA1 mRNA level among genotypes at rs11200638, rs10490924 or an indel variant of ARMS2. Furthermore, two AMD-associated synonymous SNPs rs1049331 and rs2293870 in HTRA1 exon 1 do not change its protein level either. These results suggest that the AMD-associated variants in the chromosome 10q26 locus do not significantly affect the expression of HTRA1.
doi:10.1016/j.exer.2013.04.019
PMCID: PMC4070217  PMID: 23644223
10.  Successful aging shows linkage to chromosomes 6, 7, and 14 in the Amish 
Annals of human genetics  2011;75(4):516-528.
SUMMARY
Successful aging (SA) is a multi-dimensional phenotype involving preservation of cognitive ability, physical function, and social engagement throughout life. Multiple components of SA are heritable, supporting a genetic component. The Old Order Amish are genetically and socially isolated with homogeneous lifestyles, making them a suitable population for studying the genetics of SA. DNA and measures of SA were collected on 214 cognitively intact Amish individuals over age 80. Individuals were grouped into a 13-generation pedigree using the Anabaptist Genealogy Database. A linkage screen of 5,944 single nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs) was performed using 12 informative sub-pedigrees with an affected-only 2-point and multipoint linkage analysis. Eleven SNPs produced 2-point LOD scores >2, suggestive of linkage. Multipoint linkage analyses, allowing for heterogeneity, detected significant lod scores on chromosomes 6 (HLOD = 4.50), 7 (LOD* = 3.11), and 14 (HLOD = 4.17), suggesting multiple new loci underlying SA.
doi:10.1111/j.1469-1809.2011.00658.x
PMCID: PMC3756593  PMID: 21668908
Amish; longevity; genetic epidemiology; family-based study; population isolate
11.  Dusp3 and Psme3 Are Associated with Murine Susceptibility to Staphylococcus aureus Infection and Human Sepsis 
PLoS Pathogens  2014;10(6):e1004149.
Using A/J mice, which are susceptible to Staphylococcus aureus, we sought to identify genetic determinants of susceptibility to S. aureus, and evaluate their function with regard to S. aureus infection. One QTL region on chromosome 11 containing 422 genes was found to be significantly associated with susceptibility to S. aureus infection. Of these 422 genes, whole genome transcription profiling identified five genes (Dcaf7, Dusp3, Fam134c, Psme3, and Slc4a1) that were significantly differentially expressed in a) S. aureus –infected susceptible (A/J) vs. resistant (C57BL/6J) mice and b) humans with S. aureus blood stream infection vs. healthy subjects. Three of these genes (Dcaf7, Dusp3, and Psme3) were down-regulated in susceptible vs. resistant mice at both pre- and post-infection time points by qPCR. siRNA-mediated knockdown of Dusp3 and Psme3 induced significant increases of cytokine production in S. aureus-challenged RAW264.7 macrophages and bone marrow derived macrophages (BMDMs) through enhancing NF-κB signaling activity. Similar increases in cytokine production and NF-κB activity were also seen in BMDMs from CSS11 (C57BL/6J background with chromosome 11 from A/J), but not C57BL/6J. These findings suggest that Dusp3 and Psme3 contribute to S. aureus infection susceptibility in A/J mice and play a role in human S. aureus infection.
Author Summary
Staphylococcus aureus causes life-threatening infections in humans. Host genetic determinants influence the outcome of S. aureus infection, yet are poorly understood. Susceptible A/J and resistant C57BL/6J mice provide a unique platform to study the genetic difference responsible for variable host response to S. aureus infection. We showed that chromosome 11 in A/J was responsible for susceptibility to S. aureus. We further identified a QTL locus on Chromosome 11 significantly associated with S. aureus susceptibility. Five genes in the QTL (Dcaf7, Dusp3, Fam134c, Psme3, and Slc4a1) were significantly differently expressed in a) susceptible vs. resistant mice, and b) humans with S. aureus blood stream infection vs. healthy human subjects. Three genes (Dusp3, Psme3, and Dcaf7) were down-regulated in susceptible A/J mice. siRNA-mediated knockdown of Dusp3 and Psme3 in bone marrow derived macrophage (BMDMs) significantly enhanced cytokine responses through NF-κB activity upon S. aureus challenge in a pattern that was also present in S. aureus-challenged BMDMs from susceptible CSS11 (chr. 11 from A/J but otherwise C57BL/6J) mice, but not resistant C57BL/6J mice. These findings suggest that Dusp3 and Psme3 contribute to S. aureus infection susceptibility in A/J mice and play a role in human S. aureus infection.
doi:10.1371/journal.ppat.1004149
PMCID: PMC4047107  PMID: 24901344
12.  Genetic Factors In Non-smokers with Age-related Macular Degeneration Revealed Through Genome-wide Gene-Environment Interaction Analysis 
Annals of human genetics  2013;77(3):215-231.
SUMMARY
Relatively little is known about the interaction between genes and environment in the complex etiology of age-related macular degeneration (AMD). This study aimed to identify novel factors associated with AMD by analyzing gene-smoking interactions in a genome-wide association study of 1207 AMD cases and 686 controls of Caucasian background with genotype data on 668,238 single nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs) after quality control. Participants’ history of smoking at least 100 cigarettes lifetime was determined by a self-administered questionnaire. SNP associations modeled the effect of the minor allele additively on AMD using logistic regression, with adjustment for age, sex, and ever/never smoking. Joint effects of SNPs and smoking were examined comparing a null model containing only age, sex, and smoking against an extended model including genotypic and interaction terms. Genome-wide significant main effects were detected at three known AMD loci: CFH (P=7.51×10−30), ARMS2 (P=1.94×10−23), and RDBP/CFB/C2 (P=4.37×10−10), while joint effects analysis revealed three genomic regions with P<10−5. Analyses stratified by smoking found genetic associations largely restricted to non-smokers, with one notable exception: the chromosome 18q22.1 intergenic SNP rs17073641 (between SERPINB8 and CDH7), more strongly associated in non-smokers (OR=0.57, P=2.73×10−5), with an inverse association among smokers (OR=1.42, P=0.00228), suggesting that smoking modifies the effect of some genetic polymorphisms on AMD risk.
doi:10.1111/ahg.12011
PMCID: PMC3625984  PMID: 23577725
Age-related macular degeneration; age-related maculopathy; genome wide association studies (GWAS); gene-environment interaction; genome wide gene-environment interaction studies; smoking; smoking-gene interactions
13.  Association of Single-Nucleotide Polymorphisms of the Tau Gene With Late-Onset Parkinson Disease 
Context
The human tau gene, which promotes assembly of neuronal microtubules, has been associated with several rare neurologic diseases that clinically include parkinsonian features. We recently observed linkage in idiopathic Parkinson disease (PD) to a region on chromosome 17q21 that contains the tau gene. These factors make tau a good candidate for investigation as a susceptibility gene for idiopathic PD, the most common form of the disease.
Objective
To investigate whether the tau gene is involved in idiopathic PD.
Design, Setting, and Participants
Among a sample of 1056 individuals from 235 families selected from 13 clinical centers in the United States and Australia and from a family ascertainment core center, we tested 5 single-nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs) within the tau gene for association with PD, using family-based tests of association. Both affected (n = 426) and unaffected (n = 579) family members were included; 51 individuals had unclear PD status. Analyses were conducted to test individual SNPs and SNP haplotypes within the tau gene.
Main Outcome Measure
Family-based tests of association, calculated using asymptotic distributions.
Results
Analysis of association between the SNPs and PD yielded significant evidence of association for 3 of the 5 SNPs tested: SNP 3, P = .03; SNP 9i, P = .04; and SNP 11, P = .04. The 2 other SNPs did not show evidence of significant association (SNP 9ii, P = .11, and SNP 9iii, P = .87). Strong evidence of association was found with haplotype analysis, with a positive association with one haplotype (P = .009) and a negative association with another haplotype (P = .007). Substantial linkage disequilibrium (P<.001) was detected between 4 of the 5 SNPs (SNPs 3,9i, 9ii, and 11).
Conclusions
This integrated approach of genetic linkage and positional association analyses implicates tau as a susceptibility gene for idiopathic PD.
PMCID: PMC3973175  PMID: 11710889
14.  A genome-wide association study of variants associated with acquisition of Staphylococcus aureus bacteremia in a healthcare setting 
Background
Humans vary in their susceptibility to acquiring Staphylococcus aureus infection, and research suggests that there is a genetic basis for this variability. Several recent genome-wide association studies (GWAS) have identified variants that may affect susceptibility to infectious diseases, demonstrating the potential value of GWAS in this arena.
Methods
We conducted a GWAS to identify common variants associated with acquisition of S. aureus bacteremia (SAB) resulting from healthcare contact. We performed a logistic regression analysis to compare patients with healthcare contact who developed SAB (361 cases) to patients with healthcare contact in the same hospital who did not develop SAB (699 controls), testing 542,410 SNPs and adjusting for age (by decade), sex, and 6 significant principal components from our EIGENSTRAT analysis. Additionally, we evaluated the joint effect of the host and pathogen genomes in association with severity of SAB infection via logistic regression, including an interaction of host SNP with bacterial genotype, and adjusting for age (by decade), sex, the 6 significant principal components, and dialysis status. Bonferroni corrections were applied in both analyses to control for multiple comparisons.
Results
Ours is the first study that has attempted to evaluate the entire human genome for variants potentially involved in the acquisition or severity of SAB. Although this study identified no common variant of large effect size to have genome-wide significance for association with either the risk of acquiring SAB or severity of SAB, the variant (rs2043436) most significantly associated with severity of infection is located in a biologically plausible candidate gene (CDON, a member of the immunoglobulin family) and may warrant further study.
Conclusions
The genetic architecture underlying SAB is likely to be complex. Future investigations using larger samples, narrowed phenotypes, and advances in both genotyping and analytical methodologies will be important tools for identifying causative variants for this common and serious cause of healthcare-associated infection.
doi:10.1186/1471-2334-14-83
PMCID: PMC3928605  PMID: 24524581
Genomics; Genome-wide association study; Case–control study; Staphylococcus aureus; Bacteremia; Gram-positive bacterial infections; Polymorphism, single-nucleotide; Infections; Nosocomial; Cross infection
15.  Genome-wide association and linkage study in the Amish detects a novel candidate late-onset Alzheimer disease gene 
Annals of human genetics  2012;76(5):342-351.
Summary
To identify novel late-onset Alzheimer disease (LOAD) risk genes, we have analyzed Amish populations of Ohio and Indiana. We performed genome-wide SNP linkage and association studies on 798 individuals (109 with LOAD). We tested association using the Modified Quasi-Likelihood Score (MQLS) test and also performed two-point and multipoint linkage analyses. We found that LOAD was significantly associated with APOE (P=9.0×10-6) in all our ascertainment regions except for the Adams County, Indiana, community (P=0.55). Genome-wide, the most strongly associated SNP was rs12361953 (P=7.92×10-7). A very strong, genome-wide significant multipoint peak (recessive HLOD=6.14, dominant HLOD=6.05) was detected on 2p12. Three additional loci with multipoint HLOD scores >3 were detected on 3q26, 9q31, and 18p11. Converging linkage and association results, the most significantly associated SNP under the 2p12 peak was at rs2974151 (P=1.29×10-4). This SNP is located in CTNNA2, which encodes catenin alpha 2, a neuronal-specific catenin known to have function in the developing brain. These results identify CTNNA2 as a novel candidate LOAD gene, and implicate three other regions of the genome as novel LOAD loci. These results underscore the utility of using family-based linkage and association analysis in isolated populations to identify novel loci for traits with complex genetic architecture.
doi:10.1111/j.1469-1809.2012.00721.x
PMCID: PMC3419486  PMID: 22881374
GWAS; Linkage; founder population; Amish; Alzheimer
16.  Analysis of single nucleotide polymorphisms in the NOS2A gene and interaction with smoking in age-related macular degeneration 
Annals of human genetics  2010;74(3):195-201.
SUMMARY
Age-related macular degeneration (AMD) is a complex degenerative retinal disease influenced by both genetic and environmental risk factors. We assessed whether single nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs) in the NOS2A gene increase risk and modulate the effect of smoking in AMD. 998 Caucasian subjects (712 AMD cases and 286 controls) were genotyped for 17 SNPs in NOS2A. Multivariable logistic regression models containing SNP genotypes, age, sex, smoking status and genotype/smoking interaction were constructed. SNP rs8072199 was significantly associated with AMD (OR = 1.3; 95% CI : 1.02, 1.65; P = 0.035). A significant interaction with smoking was detected at rs2248814 (P = 0.037). Stratified data by genotypes demonstrated that the association between AMD and smoking was stronger in carriers of AA genotypes (OR = 35.98; 95% CI: 3.19, 405.98) than in carriers of the AG genotype (OR=3.05; 95% CI: 1.36, 6.74) or GG genotype (OR=2.1; 95% CI: 0.91, 4.84). The results suggest a possible synergistic interaction of AA genotype with smoking, although the result bears replication in larger samples. Our data suggests that SNPs in the NOS2A gene are associated with increased risk for AMD and might modulate the effect of smoking on AMD.
doi:10.1111/j.1469-1809.2010.00570.x
PMCID: PMC2882995  PMID: 20374233
association; age-related macular degeneration; polymorphism; gene-environment interaction
17.  Functional genomics identifies type I interferon pathway as central for host defense against Candida albicans 
Nature communications  2013;4:1342.
Candida albicans is the most common human fungal pathogen causing mucosal and systemic infections. However, human antifungal immunity remains poorly defined. Here, by integrating transcriptional analysis and functional genomics, we identified Candida-specific host defense mechanisms in humans. Candida induced significant expression of genes from the type I interferon (IFN) pathway in human peripheral blood mononuclear cells. This unexpectedly prominent role of type I IFN pathway in anti-Candida host defense was supported by additional evidence. Polymorphisms in type I IFN genes modulated Candida-induced cytokine production and were correlated with susceptibility to systemic candidiasis. In in-vitro experiments, type I IFNs skewed Candida-induced inflammation from a Th17-response toward a Th1-response. Patients with chronic mucocutaneaous candidiasis displayed defective expression of genes in the type I IFN pathway. These findings indicate that the type I IFN pathway is a main signature of Candida-induced inflammation and plays a crucial role in anti-Candida host defense in humans.
doi:10.1038/ncomms2343
PMCID: PMC3625375  PMID: 23299892
18.  Overall diet quality and age-related macular degeneration 
Ophthalmic epidemiology  2010;17(1):58-65.
Objective
To examine overall diet quality in relation to advanced age-related macular degeneration (AMD).
Methods
This case-control study identified 437 advanced AMD patients and 259 unrelated controls using stereoscopic color fundus photographs. Participants were predominantly non-Hispanic white men and women from North Carolina and Tennessee. A 97-item Block food frequency questionnaire was used to gather diet information, and overall diet quality was measured using the Healthy Eating Index (HEI) and Alternate Healthy Eating Index (AHEI).
Results
Participants in the highest quartile of diet quality had significantly reduced odds of AMD according to the AHEI score (0.54, 95% confidence interval 0.30 – 0.99) and non-significantly reduced odds of AMD according to the HEI (0.75, 0.41 – 1.38). Odds of AMD were also 51% lower in the highest quartile of fish intake compared to the lowest quartile (odds ratio = 0.49, 0.26 – 0.90).
Conclusions
We found that advanced AMD was significantly related to overall diet quality. The AHEI score may be a useful instrument for assessing AMD risk due to diet, and it could potentially be improved by incorporating more specific information regarding micronutrient intake.
doi:10.3109/09286580903450353
PMCID: PMC3685322  PMID: 20100101
19.  Variants in toll-like receptors 2 and 9 influence susceptibility to pulmonary tuberculosis in Caucasians, African-Americans, and West Africans 
Human genetics  2009;127(1):65-73.
Tuberculosis (TB) is a global public health problem and a source of preventable deaths each year, with 8.8 million new cases of TB and 1.6 million deaths worldwide in 2005. Approximately, 10% of infected individuals develop pulmonary or extrapulmonary TB, suggesting that host defense factors influence development of active disease. Toll-like receptor’ (TLR) polymorphisms have been associated with regulation of TLR expression and development of active TB. In the present study, 71 polymorphisms in TLR1, TLR2, TLR4, TLR6, and TLR9 were examined from 474 (295 cases and 179 controls) African-Americans, 381 (237 cases and 144 controls) Caucasians, and from 667 (321 cases and 346 controls) Africans from Guinea-Bissau for association with pulmonary TB using generalized estimating equations and logistic regression. Statistically significant associations were observed across populations at TLR9 and TLR2. The strongest evidence for association came at an insertion (I)/deletion (D) polymorphism (−196 to −174) in TLR2 that associated with TB in both Caucasians (II vs. ID&DD, OR=0.41 [95% CI 0.24–0.68], p=0.0007) and Africans (II vs. ID&DD, OR=0.70 [95% CI 0.51–0.95], p=0.023). Our findings in three independent population samples indicate that variations in TLR2 and TLR9 might play important roles in determining susceptibility to TB.
doi:10.1007/s00439-009-0741-7
PMCID: PMC2902366  PMID: 19771452
tuberculosis; toll-like receptors; polymorphism; innate immunity
20.  NOS2A, TLR4, and IFNGR1 interactions influence pulmonary tuberculosis susceptibility in African-Americans 
Human genetics  2009;126(5):643-653.
Tuberculosis (TB) has substantial mortality worldwide with 5-10% of those exposed progressing to active TB disease. Studies in mice and humans indicate that the inducible nitric oxide synthase (iNOS) molecule plays an important role in immune response to TB. A mixed case-control association study of individuals with TB, relatives, or close contact controls was performed in 726 individuals (279 case and 166 control African-Americans; 198 case and 123 control Caucasians). Thirty-nine single nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs) were selected from the NOS2A gene for single SNP, haplotype, and multilocus interaction analyses with other typed candidate genes using generalized estimating equations. In African-Americans, ten NOS2A SNPs were associated with TB. The strongest associations were observed at rs2274894 (odds ratio (OR) = 1.84, 95% confidence interval (CI) [1.23-2.77], p = 0.003) and rs7215373 (OR 1.67, 95% CI [1.17-2.37], p = 0.004), both of which passed a false discovery rate (FDR) correction for multiple comparisons (q*=0.20). The strongest gene-gene interactions were observed between NOS2A rs2248814 and IFNGR1 rs1327474 (p = 0.0004) and NOS2A rs944722 and IFNGR1 rs1327474 (p = 0.0006). Three other SNPs in NOS2A interacted with TLR4 rs5030729 and five other NOS2A SNPs interacted with IFNGR1 rs1327474. No significant associations were observed in Caucasians. These results suggest that NOS2A variants may contribute to TB susceptibility, particularly in individuals of African descent, and may act synergistically with SNPs in TLR4 and IFNGR1.
doi:10.1007/s00439-009-0713-y
PMCID: PMC2881538  PMID: 19575238
tuberculosis; epistasis; complex disease; infectious disease; genetic epidemiology
21.  Inverse Association of Female Hormone Replacement Therapy with Age-Related Macular Degeneration and Interactions with ARMS2 Polymorphisms 
The findings of this study provide the first evidence suggesting that ARMS2 interacts with hormone replacement therapy (HRT) to modulate AMD risk and are consistent with previous reports demonstrating a protective relationship between exogenous estrogen use and neovascular AMD. These results highlight the genetic and environmental complexity of the etiologic architecture of AMD.
Purpose.
To investigate whether female reproductive history and hormone replacement therapy (HRT) or birth control pills (BCPs) influence risk for age-related macular degeneration (AMD) and whether genetic factors interact with HRT to modulate AMD risk.
Methods.
Related and unrelated female participants (n = 799) were examined and data were analyzed with generalized estimating equations with adjustment for age and smoking. Individuals with AMD grades 1 to 2 were considered to be unaffected (n = 239) and those with grades 3 to 5 were considered affected (n = 560).
Results.
When comparing all cases with controls, significant inverse associations were observed for HRT (odds ratio [OR] = 0.65, 95% CI 0.48–0.90, P = 0.008) and BCPs (OR = 0.60, 95% CI 0.36–0.10, P = 0.048). When analyses were stratified by AMD severity (early versus geographic atrophy versus neovascular), the inverse association remained significant (HRT OR = 0.45, 95% CI 0.30–0.66, P < 0.0001; BCP OR = 0.55, 95% CI 0.32–0.96, P = 0.036) only when comparing neovascular AMD with the control. All pair-wise HRT-genotype and BCP-genotype interactions were examined, to determine whether HRT or BCP modifies the effect of established genetic risk factors. The strongest interactions were observed for HRT x ARMS2 coding SNP (R73H) rs10490923 (P = 0.007) and HRT x ARMS2 intronic SNP rs17623531 (P = 0.019).
Conclusions.
These findings provide the first evidence suggesting that ARMS2 interacts with HRT to modulate AMD risk and are consistent with previous reports demonstrating a protective relationship between exogenous estrogen use and neovascular AMD. These results highlight the genetic and environmental complexity of the etiologic architecture of AMD; however, further replication is necessary to validate them.
doi:10.1167/iovs.09-4000
PMCID: PMC2868389  PMID: 19933179
22.  Toll-like Receptor 1 Polymorphisms Increase Susceptibility to Candidemia 
The Journal of Infectious Diseases  2012;205(6):934-943.
(See the editorial commentary by Bagni and Whitby, on pages 873–4.)
Background. Candidemia is a severe invasive fungal infection with high mortality. Recognition of Candida species is mediated through pattern recognition receptors such as Toll-like receptors (TLRs). This study assessed whether genetic variation in TLR signaling influences susceptibility to candidemia.
Methods. Thirteen mostly nonsynonymous single nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs) in genes encoding TLRs and signaling adaptors MyD88 and Mal/TIRAP were genotyped in 338 patients (237 white, 93 African American, 8 other race) with candidemia and 351 noninfected controls (263 white, 88 African American). The SNPs significant in univariate analysis were further analyzed with multivariable logistic regression to determine association with clinical outcomes. Functional consequences of these polymorphisms were assessed via in vitro stimulation assays.
Results. Analyses of TLR SNPs revealed that 3 TLR1 SNPs (R80T, S248N, I602S) were significantly associated with candidemia susceptibility in whites. This association was not found in African Americans, likely due to lower power in this smaller study population. Furthermore, these TLR1 polymorphisms displayed impaired cytokine release by primary monocytes. No associations with susceptibility to candidemia were observed for SNPs in TLR2, TLR4, TLR6, TLR9, MyD88, or TIRAP.
Conclusions. Nonsynonymous SNPs in TLR1 are associated with impaired TLR1 function, decreased cytokine responses, and predisposition to candidemia in whites.
doi:10.1093/infdis/jir867
PMCID: PMC3282566  PMID: 22301633
23.  Meta-analysis of Parkinson disease: Identification of a novel locus, RIT2 
Annals of Neurology  2012;71(3):370-384.
Objective
Genome-wide association (GWAS) methods have identified genes contributing to Parkinson disease (PD); we sought to identify additional genes associated with PD susceptibility.
Methods
A two stage design was used. First, individual level genotypic data from five recent PD GWAS (Discovery Sample: 4,238 PD cases and 4,239 controls) were combined. Following imputation, a logistic regression model was employed in each dataset to test for association with PD susceptibility and results from each dataset were meta-analyzed. Second, 768 SNPs were genotyped in an independent Replication Sample (3,738 cases and 2,111 controls).
Results
Genome-wide significance was reached for SNPs in SNCA (rs356165, G: odds ratio (OR)=1.37; p=9.3 × 10−21), MAPT (rs242559, C: OR=0.78; p=1.5 × 10−10), GAK/DGKQ (rs11248051, T:OR=1.35; p=8.2 × 10−9/ rs11248060, T: OR=1.35; p=2.0×10−9), and the HLA region (rs3129882, A: OR=0.83; p=1.2 × 10−8), which were previously reported. The Replication Sample confirmed the associations with SNCA, MAPT, and the HLA region and also with GBA (E326K OR=1.71; p=5 × 10−8 Combined Sample) (N370 OR=3.08; p=7 × 10−5 Replication sample). A novel PD susceptibility locus, RIT2, on chromosome 18 (rs12456492; p=5 × 10−5 Discovery Sample; p=1.52 × 10−7 Replication sample; p=2 × 10−10 Combined Sample) was replicated. Conditional analyses within each of the replicated regions identified distinct SNP associations within GBA and SNCA, suggesting that there may be multiple risk alleles within these genes.
Interpretation
We identified a novel PD susceptibility locus, RIT2, replicated several previously identified loci, and identified more than one risk allele within SNCA and GBA.
doi:10.1002/ana.22687
PMCID: PMC3354734  PMID: 22451204
24.  Cytokine Gene Polymorphisms and the Outcome of Invasive Candidiasis: A Prospective Cohort Study 
We assessed the role of genetic variation in cytokine and cytokine receptor genes in susceptibility and severity of bloodstream infections with Candida species, which revealed a major role for functional polymorphisms in interleukin-10 and interleukin-12p40 in predisposing to persistent fungemia.
Background. Candida bloodstream infections cause significant morbidity and mortality among hospitalized patients. Although clinical and microbiological factors affecting prognosis have been identified, the impact of genetic variation in the innate immune responses mediated by cytokines on outcomes of infection remains to be studied.
Methods. A cohort of 338 candidemia patients and 351 noninfected controls were genotyped for single-nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs) in 6 cytokine genes (IFNG, IL10, IL12B, IL18, IL1β, IL8) and 1 cytokine receptor gene (IL12RB1). The association of SNPs with both candidemia susceptibility and outcome were assessed. Concentrations of pro- and antiinflammatory cytokines were measured in in vitro peripheral blood mononuclear cell stimulation assays and in serum from infected patients.
Results. None of the cytokine SNPs studied were associated with susceptibility to candidemia. Persistent fungemia occurred in 13% of cases. In the multivariable model, persistent candidemia was significantly associated with (odds ratio [95% confidence interval]): total parenteral nutrition (2.79 [1.26–6.17]), dialysis dependence (3.76 [1.46–8.64]), and the SNPs IL10 rs1800896 (3.45 [1.33–8.93]) and IL12B rs41292470 (5.36 [1.51–19.0]). In vitro production capacity of interleukin-10 and interferon-γ was influenced by these polymorphisms, and significantly lower proinflammatory cytokine concentrations were measured in serum from patients with persistent fungemia.
Conclusions. Polymorphisms in IL10 and IL12B that result in low production of proinflammatory cytokines are associated with persistent fungemia in candidemia patients. This provides insights for future targeted management strategies for patients with Candida bloodstream infections.
doi:10.1093/cid/cir827
PMCID: PMC3269308  PMID: 22144535
25.  Nitric oxide synthase genes and their interactions with environmental factors in Parkinson’s disease 
Neurogenetics  2008;9(4):249-262.
Nitric oxide synthase (NOS) genes (NOS1, NOS2A, and NOS3) may create excess nitric oxide that contributes to neurodegeneration in Parkinson’s disease (PD). NOS genes might also interact with one another or with environmental factors in PD. Coding and tagging single nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs) (27 NOS1, 18 NOS2A, and 5 NOS3 SNPs) were genotyped in families with PD (1,065 cases and 1,180 relative and other controls) and were tested for allelic associations with PD using the association in the presence of linkage test and the pedigree disequilibrium test (PDT), allelic associations with age-at-onset (AAO) using the quantitative transmission disequilibrium test, and interactions using the multifactor dimensionality reduction-PDT. Gene-environment interactions involving cigarette smoking, caffeine, nonsteroidal anti-inflammatory drugs, and pesticides were examined using generalized estimating equations in participants with environmental data available. Significant associations with PD were detected for the NOS1 SNPs rs3782218, rs11068447, rs7295972, rs2293052, rs12829185, rs1047735, rs3741475, and rs2682826 (range of p=0.00083–0.046) and the NOS2A SNPs rs2072324, rs944725, rs12944039, rs2248814, rs2297516, rs1060826, and rs2255929 (range of p=0.0000040–0.047) in earlier-onset families with sporadic PD, and some SNPs were also associated with earlier AAO. There was no compelling statistical evidence for gene-gene interactions. However, of the significantly associated SNPs, interactions were found between pesticides and the NOS1 SNPs rs12829185, rs1047735, and rs2682826 (range of p=0.012–0.034) and between smoking and the NOS2A SNPs rs2248814 (p=0.021) and rs1060826 (p=0.013). These data implicate NOS1 and NOS2A as genetic risk factors for PD and demonstrate that their interactions with established environmental factors may modulate the environmental effects.
doi:10.1007/s10048-008-0137-1
PMCID: PMC2630458  PMID: 18663495
Parkinson disease; nitric oxide synthase; case-control studies; risk factors

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