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1.  Sugar intake is associated with progression from islet autoimmunity to type 1 diabetes: the Diabetes Autoimmunity Study in the Young 
Diabetologia  2015;58(9):2027-2034.
Aims/hypothesis
Dietary sugar intake may increase insulin production, stress the beta cells and increase the risk for islet autoimmunity (IA) and subsequent type 1 diabetes.
Methods
Since 1993, the Diabetes Autoimmunity Study in the Young (DAISY) has followed children at increased genetic risk for type 1 diabetes for the development of IA (autoantibodies to insulin, GAD or protein tyrosine phosphatase-like protein [IA2] twice or more in succession) and progression to type 1 diabetes. Information on intake of fructose, sucrose, total sugars, sugar-sweetened beverages, beverages with non-nutritive sweetener and juice was collected prospectively throughout childhood via food frequency questionnaires (FFQs). We examined diet records for 1,893 children (mean age at last follow-up 10.2 years); 142 developed IA and 42 progressed to type 1 diabetes. HLA genotype was dichotomised as high risk (HLA-DR3/4,DQB1*0302) or not. All Cox regression models were adjusted for total energy, FFQ type, type 1 diabetes family history, HLA genotype and ethnicity.
Results
In children with IA, progression to type 1 diabetes was significantly associated with intake of total sugars (HR 1.75, 95% CI 1.07–2.85). Progression to type 1 diabetes was also associated with increased intake of sugar-sweetened beverages in those with the high-risk HLA genotype (HR 1.84, 95% CI 1.25–2.71), but not in children without it (interaction p value = 0.02). No sugar variables were associated with IA risk.
Conclusions/interpretation
Sugar intake may exacerbate the later stage of type 1 diabetes development; sugar-sweetened beverages may be especially detrimental to children with the highest genetic risk of developing type 1 diabetes.
doi:10.1007/s00125-015-3657-x
PMCID: PMC4529377  PMID: 26048237
Childhood diet; Islet autoimmunity; Sugars; Sugar-sweetened beverage; Type 1 diabetes
2.  Timing of Solid Food Introduction is Associated with Urinary F2-Isoprostane Concentrations in Childhood 
Pediatric research  2015;78(4):451-456.
BACKGROUND
Timing of solid food introduction in infancy has been associated with several chronic diseases. To explore potential mechanisms, we investigated the relationship between timing of solid food introduction and F2-isoprostanes – a marker of oxidative stress.
METHODS
Urinary F2-isoprostanes were assessed in 336 healthy children
RESULTS
Later solid food introduction was associated with lower F2-isoprostane concentrations in childhood (on average, 0.10 ng/mg per month of age at introduction) (estimate: −0.10, 95% CI: −0.18, −0.02, P-value=0.02). Moreover, childhood F2-isoprostane concentrations were, on average, 0.24 ng/mg lower in individuals breastfed at solid food introduction (estimate: −0.24, 95% CI: −0.47, −0.01, P-value=0.04) compared with those who were not. Associations remained significant after limiting analyses to F2-isoprostanes after age 2 years.
CONCLUSION
Our results suggest a long-term protective effect of later solid food introduction and breastfeeding at solid food introduction against increased F2-isoprostane concentrations throughout childhood.
doi:10.1038/pr.2015.116
PMCID: PMC4589419  PMID: 26083762
JCI Insight  null;1(17):e90045.
A unique feature of rheumatoid arthritis (RA) is the presence of anti-citrullinated protein antibodies (ACPA). Several risk factors for RA are known to increase the expression or activity of peptidyl arginine deiminases (PADs), which catalyze citrullination and, when dysregulated, can result in hypercitrullination. However, the consequence of hypercitrullination is unknown and the function of each PAD has yet to be defined. Th cells of RA patients are hypoglycolytic and hyperproliferative due to impaired expression of PFKFB3 and ATM, respectively. Here, we report that these features are also observed in peripheral blood mononuclear cells (PBMCs) from healthy at-risk individuals (ARIs). PBMCs of ARIs are also hypercitrullinated and produce more IL-2 and Th17 cytokines but fewer Th2 cytokines. These abnormal features are due to impaired induction of PTPN22, a phosphatase that also suppresses citrullination independently of its phosphatase activity. Attenuated phosphatase activity of PTPN22 results in aberrant expression of IL-2, ATM, and PFKFB3, whereas diminished nonphosphatase activity of PTPN22 leads to hypercitrullination mediated by PADs. PAD2- or PAD4-mediated hypercitrullination reduces the expression of Th2 cytokines. By contrast, only PAD2-mediated hypercitrullination can increase the expression of Th17 cytokines. Taken together, our data depict a molecular signature of preclinical RA that is triggered by impaired induction of PTPN22.
PTPN22 regulates the molecular features of preclinical rheumatoid arthritis through its phosphatase and non-phosphatase activities.
doi:10.1172/jci.insight.90045
PMCID: PMC5070957  PMID: 27777982
Pediatric diabetes  2014;16(1):31-38.
Background
Cow's milk intake has been inconsistently associated with islet autoimmunity (IA) and type 1 diabetes (T1D) development. Genetic and environmental factors may modify the effect of cow's milk on IA and T1D risk.
Methods
The Diabetes Autoimmunity Study in the Young (DAISY) follows children at increased T1D risk for IA (presence of autoantibodies to insulin, GAD65 or IA-2 twice in succession) and T1D development. We examined 1,835 DAISY children with data on cow's milk intake: 143 developed IA, 40 subsequently developed T1D. Cow's milk protein and lactose intake were calculated from prospectively collected parent- and self-reported food frequency questionnaires (FFQ). High risk HLA-DR genotype: HLA-DR3/4,DQB1*0302; low/moderate risk: all other genotypes. We examined interactions between cow's milk intake, age at cow's milk introduction, and HLA-DR genotype in IA and T1D development. Interaction models contained the base terms (e.g., cow's milk protein and HLA-DR genotype) and an interaction term (cow's milk protein*HLA-DR genotype).
Results
In survival models adjusted for total calories, FFQ type, T1D family history, and ethnicity, greater cow's milk protein intake was associated with increased IA risk in children with low/moderate risk HLA-DR genotypes (Hazard Ratio (HR): 1.41, 95% Confidence Interval (CI): 1.08–1.84), but not in children with high risk HLA-DR genotypes. Cow's milk protein intake was associated with progression to T1D (HR: 1.59, CI: 1.13–2.25) in children with IA.
Conclusions
Greater cow's milk intake may increase risk of IA and progression to T1D. Early in the T1D disease process, cow's milk intake may be more influential in children with low/moderate genetic T1D risk.
doi:10.1111/pedi.12115
PMCID: PMC4104257  PMID: 24444005
cow's milk protein; childhood diet; HLA-DR genotype; Islet Autoimmunity
Abstract
Background: Children with positive islet autoantibodies monitored prospectively avoid metabolic decompensation at type 1 diabetes (T1D) diagnosis. However, the effects of early diagnosis and treatment on preservation of insulin secretion and long-term metabolic control are unknown. We compared characteristics of children detected through research screening (Diabetes Autoimmunity Study in the Young [DAISY]) versus community controls at baseline and, in a subset, 6- and 12-month metabolic outcomes.
Materials and Methods: This was a case-control study comparing DAISY children with T1D to children diagnosed in the general community. All participants underwent mixed-meal tolerance testing; a subset wore a continuous glucose monitoring (CGM) device. Fasting and stimulated C-peptide levels, insulin dose-adjusted hemoglobin A1c (IDAA1c), and CGM variables were compared.
Results: Children (21 DAISY, 21 community) were enrolled and matched by age, time of diagnosis, and diabetes duration; 18 were enrolled within 2 months and 24 within 2.5 years on average from diagnosis. In the overall group and the subgroup of participants enrolled 2.5 years from diagnosis, there were no IDAA1c or C-peptide differences between DAISY versus community children. The subgroup of DAISY versus community children enrolled near diagnosis, however, had lower baseline hemoglobin A1c (6.5±1.4% vs. 9.2±2.9%; P=0.0007) and IDAA1c (7.4±2.1% vs. 11.2±3.5%; P=0.04) and higher stimulated C-peptide (2.5±0.5 vs. 1.6±0.2 ng/mL; P=0.02). In this subgroup, IDAA1c differences persisted at 6 months but not at 1 year. CGM analyses revealed lower minimum overnight glycemia in community children (72 vs. 119 mg/dL; P=0.01).
Conclusions: Favorable patterns of IDAA1c and C-peptide seen in research-screened versus community-diagnosed children with T1D within 2 months of diagnosis are no longer apparent 1 year from diagnosis.
doi:10.1089/dia.2015.0029
PMCID: PMC4555644  PMID: 26317880
Pediatric diabetes  2015;17(6):441-448.
Objective
Type 1 diabetes (T1D) or celiac disease (CD) develops in at least 2% of the general population. Early detection of disease-specific autoimmunity and subsequent monitoring would be possible if screening tests were more widely available. Currently screening for islet autoimmunity is available only in a research setting and CD-specific autoimmunity screening is limited to those in high risk groups. This study assessed the feasibility of incorporating T1D and CD autoantibody screening into a pediatric practice.
Methods
Patient engagement strategies, blood collection preference, blood sample volume, rate of autoantibody detection in the general population, and parental satisfaction were assessed. Over 5 weeks, research staff recruited 200 patients aged 2–6 yr from two pediatric practices in the Denver area to be screened for six islet autoantibodies (IAs) and the transglutaminase antibody.
Results
Of the 765 parents approached, 200 (26%) completed the same day screening. Of the 565 subjects who did not complete the screening, 345 expressed interest, but were unable to make a participation decision. A finger stick, compared to a venous draw, was the preferred method of sample collection. Both methods yielded sufficient volume for autoantibody determination. IAs or the transglutaminase antibody were detected in 11 subjects. Parents expressed satisfaction with all aspects of participation.
Conclusion
The results of this study suggest that it is feasible to conduct this type of screening in a pediatric clinic. Such screening could lead to increased disease awareness and the possible benefits that can result from early detection.
doi:10.1111/pedi.12301
PMCID: PMC4979315  PMID: 26251221
pediatric screening; islet autoantibody; childhood diabetes; celiac disease; feasibility
PLoS ONE  2016;11(7):e0159575.
The cellular mechanisms whereby excess maternal nutrition during pregnancy increases adiposity of the offspring are not well understood. However, nicotinamide (NAM), a fundamental micronutrient that is important in energy metabolism, has been shown to regulate adipogenesis through inhibition of SIRT1. Here we tested three novel hypotheses: 1) NAM increases the adipogenic response of human umbilical cord tissue-derived mesenchymal stem cells (MSCs) through a SIRT1 and PPARγ pathway; 2) lipid potentiates the NAM-enhanced adipogenic response; and 3) the adipogenic response to NAM is associated with increased percent fat mass (%FM) among neonates. MSCs were derived from the umbilical cord of 46 neonates born to non-obese mothers enrolled in the Healthy Start study. Neonatal %FM was measured using air displacement plethysmography (Pea Pod) shortly after birth. Adipogenic differentiation was induced for 21 days in the 46 MSC sets under four conditions, +NAM (3mM)/–lipid (200 μM oleate/palmitate mix), +NAM/+lipid, –NAM/+lipid, and vehicle-control (–NAM/–lipid). Cells incubated in the presence of NAM had significantly higher PPARγ protein (+24%, p <0.01), FABP4 protein (+57%, p <0.01), and intracellular lipid content (+51%, p <0.01). Lipid did not significantly increase either PPARγ protein (p = 0.98) or FABP4 protein content (p = 0.82). There was no evidence of an interaction between NAM and lipid on adipogenic response of PPARγ or FABP4 protein (p = 0.99 and p = 0.09). In a subset of 9 MSC, SIRT1 activity was measured in the +NAM/-lipid and vehicle control conditions. SIRT1 enzymatic activity was significantly lower (-70%, p <0.05) in the +NAM/-lipid condition than in vehicle-control. In a linear model with neonatal %FM as the outcome, the percent increase in PPARγ protein in the +NAM/-lipid condition compared to vehicle-control was a significant predictor (β = 0.04, 95% CI 0.01–0.06, p <0.001). These are the first data to support that chronic NAM exposure potentiates adipogenesis in human MSCs in-vitro, and that this process involves PPARγ and SIRT1.
doi:10.1371/journal.pone.0159575
PMCID: PMC4944979  PMID: 27414406
BioMed Research International  2015;2015:708289.
Type 1 diabetes (T1D), a chronic autoimmune disease, is often preceded by a preclinical phase of islet autoimmunity (IA) where the insulin-producing beta cells of the pancreas are destroyed and circulating autoantibodies can be detected. The goal of this study was to demonstrate methods for identifying exposures that differentially influence the disease process at certain ages by assessing age-related heterogeneity. The Diabetes Autoimmunity Study in the Young (DAISY) has followed 2,547 children at increased genetic risk for T1D from birth since 1993 in Denver, Colorado, 188 of whom developed IA. Using the DAISY population, we evaluated putative determinants of IA, including non-Hispanic white (NHW) ethnicity, maternal age at birth, and erythrocyte membrane n-3 fatty acid (FA) levels, for age-related heterogeneity. A supremum test, weighted Schoenfeld residuals, and restricted cubic splines were used to assess nonproportional hazards, that is, an age-related association of the exposure with IA risk. NHW ethnicity, maternal age, and erythrocyte membrane n-3 FA levels demonstrated a significant age-related association with IA risk. Assessing heterogeneity in disease etiology enables researchers to identify associations that may lead to better understanding of complex chronic diseases.
doi:10.1155/2015/708289
PMCID: PMC4389824  PMID: 25883970
BioMed Research International  2015;2015:203947.
Background. The hygiene hypothesis attributes the increased incidence of type 1 diabetes (T1D) to a decrease of immune system stimuli from infections. We evaluated this prospectively in the Diabetes Autoimmunity Study in the Young (DAISY) by examining daycare attendance during the first two years of life (as a proxy for infections) and the risk of T1D. Methods. DAISY is a prospective cohort of children at increased T1D risk. Analyses were limited to 1783 children with complete daycare and breastfeeding data from birth to 2 years of age; 58 children developed T1D. Daycare was defined as supervised time with at least one other child at least 3 times a week. Breastfeeding duration was evaluated as a modifier of the effect of daycare. Cox proportional hazards regression was used for analyses. Results. Attending daycare before the age of 2 years was not associated with T1D risk (HR: 0.89; CI: 0.54–1.47) after adjusting for HLA, first degree relative with T1D, ethnicity, and breastfeeding duration. Breastfeeding duration modified this association, where daycare attendance was associated with increased T1D risk in nonbreastfed children and a decreasing T1D risk with increasing breastfeeding duration (interaction P value = 0.02). Conclusions. These preliminary data suggest breastfeeding may modify the effect of daycare on T1D risk.
doi:10.1155/2015/203947
PMCID: PMC4389988  PMID: 25883944
Annals of the Rheumatic Diseases  2006;66(2):267-269.
Objectives
To examine whether oral contraceptive use is associated with the presence of serum rheumatoid factor in women of reproductive age without rheumatoid arthritis.
Methods
304 women selected from parents of children who were at increased risk of developing type 1 diabetes were studied, because they were enriched with the human leucocyte antigen‐DR4 allele, a susceptibility marker for both type 1 diabetes and rheumatoid arthritis. Participants visited a clinic where blood was drawn for rheumatoid factor testing, and exposure data were collected via questionnaires. A medical history and joint examination were performed to rule out rheumatoid arthritis. Participants and examiners were unaware of the participants' rheumatoid factor status at the time of examination and questionnaire.
Results
Use of oral contraceptives at any time was inversely associated with rheumatoid factor positivity (adjusted odds ratio (OR) 0.2, 95% confidence interval (CI) 0.07 to 0.52) independent of age, education and smoking. Smoking ⩾20 pack‐years was also associated with rheumatoid factor positivity (adjusted OR 56.38, 95% CI 4.31 to 736.98) compared with never smoking. Smoking 1–19 pack‐years was not associated with a positive rheumatoid factor.
Conclusions
Our results suggest that oral contraceptive use, and possibly cigarette smoking, act early in the development of the immune dysregulation that occurs in rheumatoid arthritis.
doi:10.1136/ard.2006.060004
PMCID: PMC1798510  PMID: 16868018
Annals of the rheumatic diseases  2013;72(12):10.1136/annrheumdis-2012-202949.
Introduction
Studies suggest that respiratory exposures including smoking, proximity to traffic and air pollution might be associated with development of rheumatoid arthritis (RA). RA-related autoantibodies are predictive of the development of RA.
Objective
We evaluated the relationship between RA-related autoantibodies and exposure to particulate matter (PM), a measure of air pollution of interest to health, in individuals without RA.
Methods
The Studies of the Etiology of Rheumatoid Arthritis (SERA) is a multicentre study following first-degree relatives (FDRs) of a proband with RA. FDRs are without the 1987 ACR (American College of Rheumatology) classifiable RA at enrolment and are followed for the development of RA-related autoimmunity. RA-related autoantibody outcomes as well as tender and swollen joint outcomes were assessed. Exposure to PM was assigned using ambient air pollution monitoring data and interpolated with inverse distance weighting spatial analyses using Geographic Information Systems. PM exposures were linked to FDR’s residential zip codes.
Results
RA-related autoantibodies as well as tender or swollen joints are not associated with ambient PM concentrations.
Discussion
While other respiratory exposures may be associated with increased risk of RA, our data suggest that ambient PM is not associated with autoantibodies and joint signs among individuals without RA, but at increased risk of developing RA.
doi:10.1136/annrheumdis-2012-202949
PMCID: PMC3818364  PMID: 23572338
Diabetes  2014;64(5):1853-1866.
Insulin sensitivity, insulin secretion, insulin clearance, and glucose effectiveness exhibit strong genetic components, although few studies have examined their genetic architecture or influence on type 2 diabetes (T2D) risk. We hypothesized that loci affecting variation in these quantitative traits influence T2D. We completed a multicohort genome-wide association study to search for loci influencing T2D-related quantitative traits in 4,176 Mexican Americans. Quantitative traits were measured by the frequently sampled intravenous glucose tolerance test (four cohorts) or euglycemic clamp (three cohorts), and random-effects models were used to test the association between loci and quantitative traits, adjusting for age, sex, and admixture proportions (Discovery). Analysis revealed a significant (P < 5.00 × 10−8) association at 11q14.3 (MTNR1B) with acute insulin response. Loci with P < 0.0001 among the quantitative traits were examined for translation to T2D risk in 6,463 T2D case and 9,232 control subjects of Mexican ancestry (Translation). Nonparametric meta-analysis of the Discovery and Translation cohorts identified significant associations at 6p24 (SLC35B3/TFAP2A) with glucose effectiveness/T2D, 11p15 (KCNQ1) with disposition index/T2D, and 6p22 (CDKAL1) and 11q14 (MTNR1B) with acute insulin response/T2D. These results suggest that T2D and insulin secretion and sensitivity have both shared and distinct genetic factors, potentially delineating genomic components of these quantitative traits that drive the risk for T2D.
doi:10.2337/db14-0732
PMCID: PMC4407862  PMID: 25524916
Arthritis and rheumatism  2013;65(8):1995-2004.
Objective
Examine anti-citrullinated protein/peptide antibodies (ACPA) reactivity and determine associations between ACPA and other rheumatoid arthritis (RA)-related autoantibodies and clinically-assessed swollen or tender joints in first-degree relatives (FDRs) without 1987 and 2010 American College of Rheumatology classified RA.
Methods
A bead-based assay measured 16 separate ACPA in sera from 111 FDRs (Ab+) who were positive on at least one visit for any of 5 RA-related autoantibodies (RF, anti-CCP2, and RF isotypes), and 99 FDRs (Ab−) who were never autoantibody positive. Cut-offs for positivity for each ACPA were determined using receiver operating characteristic curves of data from 200 RA cases and 98 blood-bank controls, wherein positivity for ≥ 9 ACPA had 92% specificity and 62% sensitivity for RA. In FDRs, we assessed ACPA reactivity and examined associations between ACPA (number positive and positivity for ≥ 9 ACPA) and RA-related characteristics.
Results
Four of 7 anti-CCP2 positive and 8% of anti-CCP2 negative FDRs were positive for ≥ 9 ACPA. After adjusting for age, gender, ethnicity and pack-years of smoking, increasing number of ACPA was directly associated with having ≥ 1 tender joint on exam (OR=1.18, 95% CI 1.04–1.34), with the greatest risk seen in FDRs positive for ≥ 9 ACPA (OR=5.00, 95% CI 1.37–18.18).
Conclusions
RA-free FDRs demonstrate reactivity to multiple ACPA, even in those negative for rheumatoid factor and anti-CCP2, and increasing ACPA may be associated with signs of joint inflammation. Prospective evaluation of the relationship between these findings and progression of classifiable RA is warranted.
doi:10.1002/art.38022
PMCID: PMC3729718  PMID: 23754702
pre-clinical RA; autoantibodies; ACPA; rheumatoid arthritis
Public health nutrition  2015;19(5):804-813.
Objective
Non-compliance with food record submission can induce bias in nutritional epidemiological analysis and make it difficult to draw inference from study findings. We examined the impact of demographic, lifestyle and psychosocial factors on such non-compliance during the first 3 years of participation in a multidisciplinary prospective paediatric study.
Design
The Environmental Determinants of Diabetes in the Young (TEDDY) study collects a 3 d food record quarterly during the first year of life and semi-annually thereafter. High compliance with food record completion was defined as the participating families submitting one or more days of food record at every scheduled clinic visit.
Setting
Three centres in the USA (Colorado, Georgia/Florida and Washington) and three in Europe (Finland, Germany and Sweden).
Subjects
Families who finished the first 3 years of TEDDY participation (n 8096).
Results
High compliance was associated with having a single child, older maternal age, higher maternal education and father responding to study questionnaires. Families showing poor compliance were more likely to be living far from the study centres, from ethnic minority groups, living in a crowded household and not attending clinic visits regularly. Postpartum depression, maternal smoking behaviour and mother working outside the home were also independently associated with poor compliance.
Conclusions
These findings identified specific groups for targeted strategies to encourage completion of food records, thereby reducing potential bias in multidisciplinary collaborative research.
doi:10.1017/S1368980015001883
PMCID: PMC4684805  PMID: 26088478
Dietary assessment; Food record compliance; Longitudinal study; Paediatrics; TEDDY
Annals of the rheumatic diseases  2012;72(6):901-907.
Objective
We investigated whether rheumatoid arthritis (RA)-related autoantibodies were associated with systemic inflammation in a prospective cohort of first-degree relatives (FDRs) of RA probands, a population without RA but at increased risk for its future development.
Methods
We studied 44 autoantibody positive FDRs, of whom 29 were rheumatoid factor (RF) positive, 25 were positive for the high risk autoantibody profile (HRP), that is, positive for anti-cyclic citrullinated peptide and/or for at least two RF IgM, IgG or IgA isotypes, and nine FDRs who were positive for both; and 62 FDRs who were never autoantibody positive. Twenty-five cytokines/chemokines were measured using a bead-based assay in serum. As a comprehensive measure of inflammation, we calculated a Cytokine Score by summing all cytokine/chemokine levels, weighted by their regression coefficients for RA-autoantibody association. We compared C-reactive protein, individual cytokines/chemokines and Cytokine Score to the outcomes: positivity for RF and for the HRP using logistic regression.
Results
Adjusting for age, sex, ethnicity and ever smoking, the Cytokine Score and levels of IL-6 and IL-9 were associated with both RF and HRP. IL-2, granulocyte macrophage-colony stimulating factor (GM-CSF), and interferon (IFN)-γ were associated with HRP only. Associations between the Cytokine Score and RF and HRP positivity were replicated in an independent military personnel cohort.
Conclusions
In first-degree relatives of patients with RA, RA-related autoimmunity is associated with inflammation, as evidenced by associations with multiple cytokines and chemokines.
doi:10.1136/annrheumdis-2012-201505
PMCID: PMC3726193  PMID: 22915618
JAMA pediatrics  2013;167(9):808-815.
IMPORTANCE
The incidence of type 1 diabetes mellitus (T1DM) is increasing worldwide, with the most rapid increase among children younger than 5 years of age.
OBJECTIVE
To examine the associations between perinatal and infant exposures, especially early infant diet, and the development of T1DM.
DESIGN
The Diabetes Autoimmunity Study in the Young (DAISY) is a longitudinal, observational study.
SETTING
Newborn screening for human leukocyte antigen (HLA) was done at St. Joseph’s Hospital in Denver, Colorado. First-degree relatives of individuals with T1DM were recruited from the Denver metropolitan area.
PARTICIPANTS
A total of 1835 children at increased genetic risk for T1DM followed up from birth with complete prospective assessment of infant diet. Fifty-three children developed T1DM.
EXPOSURES
Early (<4 months of age) and late (≥6 months of age) first exposure to solid foods compared with first exposures at 4 to 5 months of age (referent).
MAIN OUTCOME AND MEASURE
Risk for T1DM diagnosed by a physician.
RESULTS
Both early and late first exposure to any solid food predicted development of T1DM (hazard ratio [HR], 1.91; 95% CI, 1.04–3.51, and HR, 3.02; 95% CI, 1.26–7.24, respectively), adjusting for the HLA-DR genotype, first-degree relative with T1DM, maternal education, and delivery type. Specifically, early exposure to fruit and late exposure to rice/oat predicted T1DM (HR, 2.23; 95% CI, 1.14–4.39, and HR, 2.88; 95% CI, 1.36–6.11, respectively), while breastfeeding at the time of introduction to wheat/barley conferred protection (HR, 0.47; 95% CI, 0.26–0.86). Complicated vaginal delivery was also a predictor of T1DM (HR, 1.93; 95% CI, 1.03–3.61).
CONCLUSIONS AND RELEVANCE
These results suggest the safest age to introduce solid foods in children at increased genetic risk for T1DM is between 4 and 5 months of age. Breastfeeding while introducing new foods may reduce T1DM risk.
doi:10.1001/jamapediatrics.2013.317
PMCID: PMC4038357  PMID: 23836309
JAMA pediatrics  2016;170(1):20-28.
IMPORTANCE
Probiotics have been hypothesized to affect immunologic responses to environmental exposures by supporting healthy gut microbiota and could therefore theoretically be used to prevent the development of type 1 diabetes mellitus (T1DM)–associated islet autoimmunity.
OBJECTIVE
To examine the association between supplemental probiotic use during the first year of life and islet autoimmunity among children at increased genetic risk of T1DM.
DESIGN, SETTING, AND PARTICIPANTS
In this ongoing prospective cohort study that started September 1, 2004, children from 6 clinical centers, 3 in the United States (Colorado, Georgia/Florida, and Washington) and 3 in Europe (Finland, Germany, and Sweden), were followed up for T1DM-related autoantibodies. Blood samples were collected every 3 months between 3 and 48 months of age and every 6 months thereafter to determine persistent islet autoimmunity. Details of infant feeding, including probiotic supplementation and infant formula use, were monitored from birth using questionnaires and diaries. We applied time-to-event analysis to study the association between probiotic use and islet autoimmunity, stratifying by country and adjusting for family history of type 1 diabetes, HLA-DR-DQ genotypes, sex, birth order, mode of delivery, exclusive breastfeeding, birth year, child’s antibiotic use, and diarrheal history, as well as maternal age, probiotic use, and smoking. Altogether 8676 infants with an eligible genotype were enrolled in the follow-up study before the age of 4 months. The final sample consisted of 7473 children with the age range of 4 to 10 years (as of October 31, 2014).
EXPOSURES
Early intake of probiotics.
MAIN OUTCOMES AND MEASURES
Islet autoimmunity revealed by specific islet autoantibodies.
RESULTS
Early probiotic supplementation (at the age of 0-27 days) was associated with a decreased risk of islet autoimmunity when compared with probiotic supplementation after 27 days or no probiotic supplementation (hazard ratio [HR], 0.66; 95% CI, 0.46-0.94). The association was accounted for by children with the DR3/4 genotype (HR, 0.40; 95% CI, 0.21-0.74) and was absent among other genotypes (HR, 0.97; 95% CI, 0.62-1.54).
CONCLUSIONS AND RELEVANCE
Early probiotic supplementation may reduce the risk of islet autoimmunity in children at the highest genetic risk of T1DM. The result needs to be confirmed in further studies before any recommendation of probiotics use is made.
doi:10.1001/jamapediatrics.2015.2757
PMCID: PMC4803028  PMID: 26552054
Ethnicity & disease  2012;22(1):65-71.
Objective
The census classification of Hispanic origin is used in epidemiological studies to group individuals, even though there is geographical, cultural, and genetic diversity within Hispanic Americans of purportedly similar backgrounds. We observed differences in our measures of adiposity between our two Mexican American populations, and examined whether these differences were attributed to social, behavioral, physiologic or genetic differences between the two populations.
Research Design and Methods
In the IRAS Family Study, we examined 478 Hispanics from San Antonio, Texas and 447 Hispanics from the San Luis Valley, Colorado. Associations with body mass index (BMI), visceral adipose tissue area (VAT), and subcutaneous adipose tissue area (SAT) using social, behavioral, physiologic and genetic variables were examined.
Results
Hispanics of Mexican origin in our clinic population in San Antonio had significantly higher mean BMI (31.09 vs 28.35 kg/m2), VAT (126.3 vs 105.5 cm2), and SAT (391.6 vs 336.9 cm2), than Hispanics of Mexican origin in the San Luis Valley. The amount of variation in adiposity explained by clinic population was 4.5% for BMI, 2.8% for VAT, and 2.7% for SAT. After adjustment, clinic population was no longer associated with VAT and SAT, but remained associated with BMI, although the amount of variation explained by population was substantially less (1.0% for BMI).
Conclusion
Adiposity differences within this population of Mexican origin can be largely explained by social, behavioral, physiologic and genetic differences. (Ethn Dis. 2012;22(1):65–71)
PMCID: PMC4020784  PMID: 22774311
Hispanics; Adiposity; Admixture; Environmental Differences; Social Factors; Behavior; Genetics
Previously, we examined 20 non-HLA SNPs for association with islet autoimmunity (IA) and/or progression to type 1 diabetes (T1D). Our objective was to investigate fourteen additional non-HLA T1D candidate SNPs for stage- and age-related heterogeneity in the etiology of T1D. Of 1634 non-Hispanic white DAISY children genotyped, 132 developed IA (positive for GAD, insulin, or IA-2 autoantibodies at two or more consecutive visits); 50 IA positive children progressed to T1D. Cox regression was used to analyze risk of IA and progression to T1D in IA positive children. Restricted cubic splines were used to model SNPs when there was evidence that risk was not constant with age. C1QTNF6 (rs229541) predicted increased IA risk (HR: 1.57, CI: 1.20–2.05) but not progression to T1D (HR: 1.13, CI: 0.75–1.71). SNP (rs10517086) appears to exhibit an age-related effect on risk of IA, with increased risk before age 2 years (age 2 HR: 1.67, CI: 1.08–2.56) but not older ages (age 4 HR: 0.84, CI: 0.43–1.62). C1QTNF6 (rs229541), SNP (rs10517086), and UBASH3A (rs3788013) were associated with development of T1D. This prospective investigation of non-HLA T1D candidate loci shows that some SNPs may exhibit stage- and age-related heterogeneity in the etiology of T1D.
doi:10.1155/2013/417657
PMCID: PMC3866813  PMID: 24367383
Human genetics  2014;134(2):203-213.
We previously identified a low frequency (1.1%) coding variant (G45R; rs200573126) in the adiponectin gene (ADIPOQ) which was the basis for a multipoint microsatellite linkage signal (LOD=8.2) for plasma adiponectin levels in Hispanic families. We have empirically evaluated the ability of data from targeted common variants, exome chip genotyping, and genome-wide association study (GWAS) data to detect linkage and association to adiponectin protein levels at this locus. Simple two-point linkage and association analyses were performed in 88 Hispanic families (1150 individuals) using 10,958 SNPs on chromosome 3. Approaches were compared for their ability to map the functional variant, G45R, which was strongly linked (two-point LOD=20.98) and powerfully associated (p-value=8.1×10−50). Over 450 SNPs within a broad 61 Mb interval around rs200573126 showed nominal evidence of linkage (LOD>3) but only four other SNPs in this region were associated with p-values<1.0×10−4. When G45R was accounted for, the maximum LOD score across the interval dropped to 4.39 and the best p-value was 1.1×10−5. Linked and/or associated variants ranged in frequency (0.0018 to 0.50) and type (coding, non-coding) and had little detectable linkage disequilibrium with rs200573126 (r2<0.20). In addition, the two-point linkage approach empirically outperformed multipoint microsatellite and multipoint SNP analysis. In the absence of data for rs200573126, family-based linkage analysis using a moderately dense SNP dataset, including both common and low frequency variants, resulted in stronger evidence for an adiponectin locus than association data alone. Thus, linkage analysis can be a useful tool to facilitate identification of high impact genetic variants.
doi:10.1007/s00439-014-1511-8
PMCID: PMC4293344  PMID: 25447270
Pediatrics  2015;135(2):239-245.
OBJECTIVES:
The goal of this study was to determine whether age at introduction to gluten was associated with risk for celiac disease (CD) in genetically predisposed children.
METHODS:
TEDDY (The Environmental Determinants of Diabetes in the Young) is a prospective birth cohort study. Newborn infants (N = 6436) screened for high-risk HLA-genotypes for CD were followed up in Finland, Germany, Sweden, and the United States. Information about infant feeding was collected at clinical visits every third month. The first outcome was persistent positive for tissue transglutaminase autoantibodies (tTGA), the marker for CD. The second outcome was CD, defined as either a diagnosis based on intestinal biopsy results or on persistently high levels of tTGA.
RESULTS:
Swedish children were introduced to gluten earlier (median: 21.7 weeks) compared with children from Finland (median: 26.1 weeks), Germany, and the United States (both median: 30.4 weeks) (P < .0001). During a median follow-up of 5.0 years (range: 1.7–8.8 years), 773 (12%) children developed tTGA and 307 (5%) developed CD. Swedish children were at increased risk for tTGA (hazard ratio: 1.74 [95% CI: 1.47–2.06]) and CD (hazard ratio: 1.76 [95% CI: 1.34–2.24]) compared with US children, respectively (P < .0001).Gluten introduction before 17 weeks or later than 26 weeks was not associated with increased risk for tTGA or CD, adjusted for country, HLA, gender, and family history of CD, neither in the overall analysis nor on a country-level comparison.
CONCLUSIONS:
In TEDDY, the time to first introduction to gluten introduction was not an independent risk factor for developing CD.
doi:10.1542/peds.2014-1787
PMCID: PMC4306795  PMID: 25601977
breastfeeding; celiac disease; gluten; infant feeding
BMC Palliative Care  2016;15:6.
Background
Recent concerns about suboptimal patient care and a lack of compassion have prompted policymakers to question the preparedness of clinicians for the challenging environment in which they practice. Compassionate care is expected by patients and is a professional obligation of clinicians; however, little is known about the state of research on clinical compassion. The purpose of this scoping review was to map the literature on compassion in clinical healthcare.
Methods
Searches of eight electronic databases and the grey literature were conducted to identify empirical studies published over the last 25 years. Eligible studies explored perceptions or interventions of compassionate care in clinical populations, healthcare professionals, and healthcare students. Following the title and abstract review, two reviewers independently screened full-texts articles, and extracted study data. A narrative approach to synthesizing and mapping the literature was used.
Results and discussion
Of 36,637 records, 648 studies were retrieved and 44 studies were included in the review. Less than one third of studies included patients. Six themes emerged from studies that explored perceptions of compassionate care: nature of compassion, development of compassion, interpersonal factors related to compassion, action and practical compassion, barriers and enablers of compassion, and outcomes of compassion. Intervention studies included two compassionate care trials with patients and eight educational programs that aimed to improve compassionate care in clinicians and students.
Conclusions
This review identifies the limited empirical understanding of compassion in healthcare, highlighting the lack of patient and family voices in compassion research. A deeper understanding of the key behaviors and attitudes that lead to improved patient-reported outcomes through compassionate care is necessary.
doi:10.1186/s12904-016-0080-0
PMCID: PMC4717626  PMID: 26786417
Compassion; Healthcare; Patients; Scoping review; Intervention
Obesity (Silver Spring, Md.)  2011;19(7):1433-1438.
Recently, a genome-wide association scan was completed in the IRAS (Insulin Resistance Atherosclerosis Study) Family Study (IRASFS) Hispanic-American cohort. Multiple single-nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs) in the G-protein signaling 6 (RGS6) gene were found to be associated with adiposity phenotypes. RGS6 has shown downstream antagonistic interplay with opioid receptors, targets of fatty/sugary food agonists. The possibility that RGS6 promotes tolerance and tachyphylaxis among the opioid receptor is a plausible pathway for overconsuming fat/sugar-laden food. Therefore, we hypothesized that RGS6 variants are associated with intake of fatty/sugary foods. In 932 Hispanics from San Antonio and San Luis Valley, CO, the following dietary intake variables were assessed using the Block Brief 2000 food frequency questionnaire: total calories, total fat, % calories from fat, % calories from saturated fat, protein, % calories from protein, carbohydrates, % calories from carbohydrates, and daily frequency of servings of fats/oils/sweets. We tested for association between 23 SNPs in RGS6 and dietary intake using a variance components measured genotype approach. All models were adjusted for gender, recruitment site, admixture, BMI, and age. Using an additive genetic model, rs1402064 was associated with higher intake of fats/oils/sweets, total calories, total fat and saturated fat (P = 0.0007, 0.026, 0.023, and 0.024). SNPs rs847330 and rs847354 were associated with higher intake of fats/oils/sweets (P = 0.002 and 0.018), total fat (P = 0.040 and 0.048) and saturated fat (P = 0.044 and 0.041). Finally, rs769148 was associated with higher intake of fats/oils/sweets (P = 0.002). RGS6 is a new candidate gene for adiposity traits that may be associated with a behavioral tendency toward fat-laden food intake.
doi:10.1038/oby.2010.333
PMCID: PMC3683650  PMID: 21233807
Pediatric diabetes  2011;12(8):669-675.
Aim
We investigated whether omega-3 fatty acid intake and erythrocyte membrane omega-3 fatty acid levels are associated with conversion to type 1 diabetes in children with islet autoimmunity (IA).
Methods
The Diabetes Autoimmunity Study in the Young is following children at increased genetic risk for type 1 diabetes for the development of persistent IA, as defined as being positive for glutamic acid decarboxylase 65, i, or insulin autoantibodies on two consecutive visits, and then for the development of type 1 diabetes, as diagnosed by a physician. One hundred and sixty-seven children with persistent IA were followed for a mean of 4.8 yr, and 45 of these developed type 1 diabetes at a mean age of 8.7 yr. Erythrocyte membrane fatty acids (as a percent of total lipid) and dietary fatty acid intake (estimated via food frequency questionnaire) were analyzed as time-varying covariates in proportional hazards survival analysis, with follow-up time starting at detection of the first autoantibody.
Results
Neither dietary intake of omega-3 fatty acids nor omega-6 fatty acids were associated with conversion to type 1 diabetes, adjusting for human leukocyte antigen (HLA)-DR, family history of type 1 diabetes, age at first IA positivity, maternal age, maternal education, and maternal ethnicity. Adjusting for HLA-DR, family history of type 1 diabetes and age at first IA positivity, omega-3 and omega-6 fatty acid levels of erythrocyte membranes were not associated with conversion to type 1 diabetes.
Conclusions
In this observational study, omega-3 fatty acid intake and status are not associated with conversion to type 1 diabetes in children with IA.
doi:10.1111/j.1399-5448.2011.00760.x
PMCID: PMC3475955  PMID: 21435137
dietary intake; IA; omega-3 fatty acids; type 1 diabetes mellitus

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