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1.  Impact of Viral Activators and Epigenetic Regulators on HIV-1 LTRs Containing Naturally Occurring Single Nucleotide Polymorphisms 
BioMed Research International  2015;2015:320642.
Following human immunodeficiency virus type 1 (HIV-1) integration into host cell DNA, the viral promoter can become transcriptionally silent in the absence of appropriate signals and factors. HIV-1 gene expression is dependent on regulatory elements contained within the long terminal repeat (LTR) that drive the synthesis of viral RNAs and proteins through interaction with multiple host and viral factors. Previous studies identified single nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs) within CCAAT/enhancer binding protein (C/EBP) site I and Sp site III (3T, C-to-T change at position 3, and 5T, C-to-T change at position 5 of the binding site, respectively, when compared to the consensus B sequence) that are low affinity binding sites and correlate with more advanced stages of HIV-1 disease. Stably transfected cell lines containing the wild type, 3T, 5T, and 3T5T LTRs were developed utilizing bone marrow progenitor, T, and monocytic cell lines to explore the LTR phenotypes associated with these genotypic changes from an integrated chromatin-based microenvironment. Results suggest that in nonexpressing cell clones LTR-driven gene expression occurs in a SNP-specific manner in response to LTR activation or treatment with trichostatin A treatment, indicating a possible cell type and SNP-specific mechanism behind the epigenetic control of LTR activation.
doi:10.1155/2015/320642
PMCID: PMC4299542  PMID: 25629043
2.  Epigenetics, drugs of abuse, and the retroviral promoter 
Drug abuse alone has been shown to cause epigenetic changes in brain tissue that have been shown to play roles in addictive behaviors. In conjunction with HIV-1 infection, it can cause epigenetic changes at the viral promoter that can result in altered gene expression, and exacerbate disease progression overall. This review entails an in-depth look at research conducted on the epigenetic effects of three of the most widely abused drugs (cannabinoids, opioids, and cocaine), with a particular focus on the mechanisms through which these drugs interact with HIV-1 infection at the viral promoter. Here we discuss the impact of this interplay on disease progression from the point of view of the nature of gene regulation at the level of chromatin accessibility, chromatin remodeling, and nucleosome repositioning. Given the importance of chromatin remodeling and DNA methylation in controlling the retroviral promoter, and the high susceptibility of the drug abusing population of individuals to HIV infection, it would be beneficial to understand the way in which the host genome is modified and regulated by drugs of abuse.
doi:10.1007/s11481-013-9508-y
PMCID: PMC3878082  PMID: 24218017
drug abuse; epigenetics; chromatin remodeling; HIV-1; LTR
3.  Defining Differential Genetic Signatures in CXCR4- and the CCR5-Utilizing HIV-1 Co-Linear Sequences 
PLoS ONE  2014;9(9):e107389.
The adaptation of human immunodeficiency virus type-1 (HIV-1) to an array of physiologic niches is advantaged by the plasticity of the viral genome, encoded proteins, and promoter. CXCR4-utilizing (X4) viruses preferentially, but not universally, infect CD4+ T cells, generating high levels of virus within activated HIV-1-infected T cells that can be detected in regional lymph nodes and peripheral blood. By comparison, the CCR5-utilizing (R5) viruses have a greater preference for cells of the monocyte-macrophage lineage; however, while R5 viruses also display a propensity to enter and replicate in T cells, they infect a smaller percentage of CD4+ T cells in comparison to X4 viruses. Additionally, R5 viruses have been associated with viral transmission and CNS disease and are also more prevalent during HIV-1 disease. Specific adaptive changes associated with X4 and R5 viruses were identified in co-linear viral sequences beyond the Env-V3. The in silico position-specific scoring matrix (PSSM) algorithm was used to define distinct groups of X4 and R5 sequences based solely on sequences in Env-V3. Bioinformatic tools were used to identify genetic signatures involving specific protein domains or long terminal repeat (LTR) transcription factor sites within co-linear viral protein R (Vpr), trans-activator of transcription (Tat), or LTR sequences that were preferentially associated with X4 or R5 Env-V3 sequences. A number of differential amino acid and nucleotide changes were identified across the co-linear Vpr, Tat, and LTR sequences, suggesting the presence of specific genetic signatures that preferentially associate with X4 or R5 viruses. Investigation of the genetic relatedness between X4 and R5 viruses utilizing phylogenetic analyses of complete sequences could not be used to definitively and uniquely identify groups of R5 or X4 sequences; in contrast, differences in the genetic diversities between X4 and R5 were readily identified within these co-linear sequences in HIV-1-infected patients.
doi:10.1371/journal.pone.0107389
PMCID: PMC4180074  PMID: 25265194
4.  Loci influencing blood pressure identified using a cardiovascular gene-centric array 
Ganesh, Santhi K. | Tragante, Vinicius | Guo, Wei | Guo, Yiran | Lanktree, Matthew B. | Smith, Erin N. | Johnson, Toby | Castillo, Berta Almoguera | Barnard, John | Baumert, Jens | Chang, Yen-Pei Christy | Elbers, Clara C. | Farrall, Martin | Fischer, Mary E. | Franceschini, Nora | Gaunt, Tom R. | Gho, Johannes M.I.H. | Gieger, Christian | Gong, Yan | Isaacs, Aaron | Kleber, Marcus E. | Leach, Irene Mateo | McDonough, Caitrin W. | Meijs, Matthijs F.L. | Mellander, Olle | Molony, Cliona M. | Nolte, Ilja M. | Padmanabhan, Sandosh | Price, Tom S. | Rajagopalan, Ramakrishnan | Shaffer, Jonathan | Shah, Sonia | Shen, Haiqing | Soranzo, Nicole | van der Most, Peter J. | Van Iperen, Erik P.A. | Van Setten, Jessica | Vonk, Judith M. | Zhang, Li | Beitelshees, Amber L. | Berenson, Gerald S. | Bhatt, Deepak L. | Boer, Jolanda M.A. | Boerwinkle, Eric | Burkley, Ben | Burt, Amber | Chakravarti, Aravinda | Chen, Wei | Cooper-DeHoff, Rhonda M. | Curtis, Sean P. | Dreisbach, Albert | Duggan, David | Ehret, Georg B. | Fabsitz, Richard R. | Fornage, Myriam | Fox, Ervin | Furlong, Clement E. | Gansevoort, Ron T. | Hofker, Marten H. | Hovingh, G. Kees | Kirkland, Susan A. | Kottke-Marchant, Kandice | Kutlar, Abdullah | LaCroix, Andrea Z. | Langaee, Taimour Y. | Li, Yun R. | Lin, Honghuang | Liu, Kiang | Maiwald, Steffi | Malik, Rainer | Murugesan, Gurunathan | Newton-Cheh, Christopher | O'Connell, Jeffery R. | Onland-Moret, N. Charlotte | Ouwehand, Willem H. | Palmas, Walter | Penninx, Brenda W. | Pepine, Carl J. | Pettinger, Mary | Polak, Joseph F. | Ramachandran, Vasan S. | Ranchalis, Jane | Redline, Susan | Ridker, Paul M. | Rose, Lynda M. | Scharnag, Hubert | Schork, Nicholas J. | Shimbo, Daichi | Shuldiner, Alan R. | Srinivasan, Sathanur R. | Stolk, Ronald P. | Taylor, Herman A. | Thorand, Barbara | Trip, Mieke D. | van Duijn, Cornelia M. | Verschuren, W. Monique | Wijmenga, Cisca | Winkelmann, Bernhard R. | Wyatt, Sharon | Young, J. Hunter | Boehm, Bernhard O. | Caulfield, Mark J. | Chasman, Daniel I. | Davidson, Karina W. | Doevendans, Pieter A. | FitzGerald, Garret A. | Gums, John G. | Hakonarson, Hakon | Hillege, Hans L. | Illig, Thomas | Jarvik, Gail P. | Johnson, Julie A. | Kastelein, John J.P. | Koenig, Wolfgang | März, Winfried | Mitchell, Braxton D. | Murray, Sarah S. | Oldehinkel, Albertine J. | Rader, Daniel J. | Reilly, Muredach P. | Reiner, Alex P. | Schadt, Eric E. | Silverstein, Roy L. | Snieder, Harold | Stanton, Alice V. | Uitterlinden, André G. | van der Harst, Pim | van der Schouw, Yvonne T. | Samani, Nilesh J. | Johnson, Andrew D. | Munroe, Patricia B. | de Bakker, Paul I.W. | Zhu, Xiaofeng | Levy, Daniel | Keating, Brendan J. | Asselbergs, Folkert W.
Human Molecular Genetics  2013;22(16):3394-3395.
doi:10.1093/hmg/ddt177
PMCID: PMC3888295
5.  Gene-centric association signals for haemostasis and thrombosis traits identified with the HumanCVD BeadChip 
Thrombosis and haemostasis  2013;110(5):995-1003.
Summary
Objective
Coagulation phenotypes show strong intercorrelations, affect cardiovascular disease risk and are influenced by genetic variants. The objective of this study was to search for novel genetic variants influencing the following coagulation phenotypes: factor VII levels, fibrinogen levels, plasma viscosity and platelet count.
Methods and Results
We genotyped the British Women’s Heart and Health Study (n=3445) and the Whitehall II study (n=5059) using the Illumina HumanCVD BeadArray to investigate genetic associations and pleiotropy. In addition to previously reported associations (SH2B3, F7/F10, PROCR, GCKR, FGA/FGB/FGG, IL5), we identified novel associations at GRK5 (rs10128498, p=1.30×10−6), GCKR (rs1260326, p=1.63×10−6), ZNF259-APOA5 (rs651821, p=7.17×10−6) with plasma viscosity; and at CSF1 (rs333948, p=8.88×10−6) with platelet count. A pleiotropic effect was identified in GCKR which associated with factor VII (p=2.16×10−7) and plasma viscosity (p=1.63×10−6), and, to a lesser extent, ZNF259-APOA5 which associated with factor VII and fibrinogen (p<1.00×10−2) and additionally plasma viscosity (p<1.00×10−5). Triglyceride associated variants were overrepresented in Factor VII and plasma viscosity associations. Adjusting for triglyceride levels resulted in attenuation of associations at the GCKR and ZNF259-APOA5 loci.
Conclusions
In addition to confirming previously reported associations, we identified four SNPs associated with plasma viscosity and platelet count and found evidence of pleiotropic effects with SNPs in GCKR and ZNF259-APOA5. These triglyceride-associated, pleiotropic SNPs suggest a possible causal role for triglycerides in coagulation.
doi:10.1160/TH13-02-0087
PMCID: PMC4067543  PMID: 24178511
Haemostasis; Thrombosis; HumanCVD; Clotting Factors; Genetic Association
6.  Contribution of genetic variation to transgenerational inheritance of DNA methylation 
Genome Biology  2014;15(5):R73.
Background
Despite the important role DNA methylation plays in transcriptional regulation, the transgenerational inheritance of DNA methylation is not well understood. The genetic heritability of DNA methylation has been estimated using twin pairs, although concern has been expressed whether the underlying assumption of equal common environmental effects are applicable due to intrauterine differences between monozygotic and dizygotic twins. We estimate the heritability of DNA methylation on peripheral blood leukocytes using Illumina HumanMethylation450 array using a family based sample of 614 people from 117 families, allowing comparison both within and across generations.
Results
The correlations from the various available relative pairs indicate that on average the similarity in DNA methylation between relatives is predominantly due to genetic effects with any common environmental or zygotic effects being limited. The average heritability of DNA methylation measured at probes with no known SNPs is estimated as 0.187. The ten most heritable methylation probes were investigated with a genome-wide association study, all showing highly statistically significant cis mQTLs. Further investigation of one of these cis mQTL, found in the MHC region of chromosome 6, showed the most significantly associated SNP was also associated with over 200 other DNA methylation probes in this region and the gene expression level of 9 genes.
Conclusions
The majority of transgenerational similarity in DNA methylation is attributable to genetic effects, and approximately 20% of individual differences in DNA methylation in the population are caused by DNA sequence variation that is not located within CpG sites.
doi:10.1186/gb-2014-15-5-r73
PMCID: PMC4072933  PMID: 24887635
7.  Comparison of the Gene Expression Profiles of Human Fetal Cortical Astrocytes with Pluripotent Stem Cell Derived Neural Stem Cells Identifies Human Astrocyte Markers and Signaling Pathways and Transcription Factors Active in Human Astrocytes 
PLoS ONE  2014;9(5):e96139.
Astrocytes are the most abundant cell type in the central nervous system (CNS) and have a multitude of functions that include maintenance of CNS homeostasis, trophic support of neurons, detoxification, and immune surveillance. It has only recently been appreciated that astrocyte dysfunction is a primary cause of many neurological disorders. Despite their importance in disease very little is known about global gene expression for human astrocytes. We have performed a microarray expression analysis of human fetal astrocytes to identify genes and signaling pathways that are important for astrocyte development and maintenance. Our analysis confirmed that the fetal astrocytes express high levels of the core astrocyte marker GFAP and the transcription factors from the NFI family which have been shown to play important roles in astrocyte development. A group of novel markers were identified that distinguish fetal astrocytes from pluripotent stem cell-derived neural stem cells (NSCs) and NSC-derived neurons. As in murine astrocytes, the Notch signaling pathway appears to be particularly important for cell fate decisions between the astrocyte and neuronal lineages in human astrocytes. These findings unveil the repertoire of genes expressed in human astrocytes and serve as a basis for further studies to better understand astrocyte biology, especially as it relates to disease.
doi:10.1371/journal.pone.0096139
PMCID: PMC4029581  PMID: 24848099
8.  Functional properties of the HIV-1 long terminal repeat containing single-nucleotide polymorphisms in Sp site III and CCAAT/enhancer binding protein site I 
Virology Journal  2014;11:92.
Background
HIV-1 gene expression is driven by the long terminal repeat (LTR), which contains many binding sites shown to interact with an array of host and viral factors. Selective pressures within the host as well as the low fidelity of reverse transcriptase lead to changes in the relative prevalence of genetic variants within the HIV-1 genome, including the LTR, resulting in viral quasispecies that can be differentially regulated and can potentially establish niches within specific cell types and tissues.
Methods
Utilizing flow cytometry and electromobility shift assays, specific single-nucleotide sequence polymorphisms (SNPs) were shown to alter both the phenotype of LTR-driven transcription and reactivation. Additional studies also demonstrated differential loading of transcription factors to probes derived from the double-variant LTR as compared to probes from the wild type.
Results
This study has identified specific SNPs within CCAAT/enhancer binding protein (C/EBP) site I and Sp site III (3 T, C-to-T change at position 3, and 5 T, C-to-T change at position 5 of the binding site, respectively) that alter LTR-driven gene transcription and may alter the course of viral latency and reactivation. The HIV-1 LAI LTRs containing the SNPs of interest were coupled to a plasmid encoding green fluorescent protein (GFP), and polyclonal HIV-1 LTR-GFP stable cell lines utilizing bone marrow progenitor, T, and monocytic cell lines were constructed and utilized to explore the LTR phenotype associated with these genotypic changes.
Conclusions
Although the 3 T and 5 T SNPs have been shown to be low-affinity binding sites, the fact that they can still result in effective HIV-1 LTR-driven gene expression, particularly within the TF-1 cell line, has suggested that the low binding site affinities associated with the 3 T C/EBP site I and 5 T Sp site III are potentially compensated for by the interaction of nuclear factor-κB with its corresponding binding sites under selected physiological and cellular conditions. Additionally, tumor necrosis factor-α and Tat can enhance basal transcription of each SNP-specific HIV-1 LTR; however, differential regulation of the LTR is both SNP- and cell type-specific.
doi:10.1186/1743-422X-11-92
PMCID: PMC4047001  PMID: 24886416
HIV-1 genetics; Viral transcription; Integration; Viral latency; Single-nucleotide polymorphisms; C/EBP; Sp
9.  Discovery and Refinement of Loci Associated with Lipid Levels 
Willer, Cristen J. | Schmidt, Ellen M. | Sengupta, Sebanti | Peloso, Gina M. | Gustafsson, Stefan | Kanoni, Stavroula | Ganna, Andrea | Chen, Jin | Buchkovich, Martin L. | Mora, Samia | Beckmann, Jacques S. | Bragg-Gresham, Jennifer L. | Chang, Hsing-Yi | Demirkan, Ayşe | Den Hertog, Heleen M. | Do, Ron | Donnelly, Louise A. | Ehret, Georg B. | Esko, Tõnu | Feitosa, Mary F. | Ferreira, Teresa | Fischer, Krista | Fontanillas, Pierre | Fraser, Ross M. | Freitag, Daniel F. | Gurdasani, Deepti | Heikkilä, Kauko | Hyppönen, Elina | Isaacs, Aaron | Jackson, Anne U. | Johansson, Åsa | Johnson, Toby | Kaakinen, Marika | Kettunen, Johannes | Kleber, Marcus E. | Li, Xiaohui | Luan, Jian’an | Lyytikäinen, Leo-Pekka | Magnusson, Patrik K.E. | Mangino, Massimo | Mihailov, Evelin | Montasser, May E. | Müller-Nurasyid, Martina | Nolte, Ilja M. | O’Connell, Jeffrey R. | Palmer, Cameron D. | Perola, Markus | Petersen, Ann-Kristin | Sanna, Serena | Saxena, Richa | Service, Susan K. | Shah, Sonia | Shungin, Dmitry | Sidore, Carlo | Song, Ci | Strawbridge, Rona J. | Surakka, Ida | Tanaka, Toshiko | Teslovich, Tanya M. | Thorleifsson, Gudmar | Van den Herik, Evita G. | Voight, Benjamin F. | Volcik, Kelly A. | Waite, Lindsay L. | Wong, Andrew | Wu, Ying | Zhang, Weihua | Absher, Devin | Asiki, Gershim | Barroso, Inês | Been, Latonya F. | Bolton, Jennifer L. | Bonnycastle, Lori L | Brambilla, Paolo | Burnett, Mary S. | Cesana, Giancarlo | Dimitriou, Maria | Doney, Alex S.F. | Döring, Angela | Elliott, Paul | Epstein, Stephen E. | Ingi Eyjolfsson, Gudmundur | Gigante, Bruna | Goodarzi, Mark O. | Grallert, Harald | Gravito, Martha L. | Groves, Christopher J. | Hallmans, Göran | Hartikainen, Anna-Liisa | Hayward, Caroline | Hernandez, Dena | Hicks, Andrew A. | Holm, Hilma | Hung, Yi-Jen | Illig, Thomas | Jones, Michelle R. | Kaleebu, Pontiano | Kastelein, John J.P. | Khaw, Kay-Tee | Kim, Eric | Klopp, Norman | Komulainen, Pirjo | Kumari, Meena | Langenberg, Claudia | Lehtimäki, Terho | Lin, Shih-Yi | Lindström, Jaana | Loos, Ruth J.F. | Mach, François | McArdle, Wendy L | Meisinger, Christa | Mitchell, Braxton D. | Müller, Gabrielle | Nagaraja, Ramaiah | Narisu, Narisu | Nieminen, Tuomo V.M. | Nsubuga, Rebecca N. | Olafsson, Isleifur | Ong, Ken K. | Palotie, Aarno | Papamarkou, Theodore | Pomilla, Cristina | Pouta, Anneli | Rader, Daniel J. | Reilly, Muredach P. | Ridker, Paul M. | Rivadeneira, Fernando | Rudan, Igor | Ruokonen, Aimo | Samani, Nilesh | Scharnagl, Hubert | Seeley, Janet | Silander, Kaisa | Stančáková, Alena | Stirrups, Kathleen | Swift, Amy J. | Tiret, Laurence | Uitterlinden, Andre G. | van Pelt, L. Joost | Vedantam, Sailaja | Wainwright, Nicholas | Wijmenga, Cisca | Wild, Sarah H. | Willemsen, Gonneke | Wilsgaard, Tom | Wilson, James F. | Young, Elizabeth H. | Zhao, Jing Hua | Adair, Linda S. | Arveiler, Dominique | Assimes, Themistocles L. | Bandinelli, Stefania | Bennett, Franklyn | Bochud, Murielle | Boehm, Bernhard O. | Boomsma, Dorret I. | Borecki, Ingrid B. | Bornstein, Stefan R. | Bovet, Pascal | Burnier, Michel | Campbell, Harry | Chakravarti, Aravinda | Chambers, John C. | Chen, Yii-Der Ida | Collins, Francis S. | Cooper, Richard S. | Danesh, John | Dedoussis, George | de Faire, Ulf | Feranil, Alan B. | Ferrières, Jean | Ferrucci, Luigi | Freimer, Nelson B. | Gieger, Christian | Groop, Leif C. | Gudnason, Vilmundur | Gyllensten, Ulf | Hamsten, Anders | Harris, Tamara B. | Hingorani, Aroon | Hirschhorn, Joel N. | Hofman, Albert | Hovingh, G. Kees | Hsiung, Chao Agnes | Humphries, Steve E. | Hunt, Steven C. | Hveem, Kristian | Iribarren, Carlos | Järvelin, Marjo-Riitta | Jula, Antti | Kähönen, Mika | Kaprio, Jaakko | Kesäniemi, Antero | Kivimaki, Mika | Kooner, Jaspal S. | Koudstaal, Peter J. | Krauss, Ronald M. | Kuh, Diana | Kuusisto, Johanna | Kyvik, Kirsten O. | Laakso, Markku | Lakka, Timo A. | Lind, Lars | Lindgren, Cecilia M. | Martin, Nicholas G. | März, Winfried | McCarthy, Mark I. | McKenzie, Colin A. | Meneton, Pierre | Metspalu, Andres | Moilanen, Leena | Morris, Andrew D. | Munroe, Patricia B. | Njølstad, Inger | Pedersen, Nancy L. | Power, Chris | Pramstaller, Peter P. | Price, Jackie F. | Psaty, Bruce M. | Quertermous, Thomas | Rauramaa, Rainer | Saleheen, Danish | Salomaa, Veikko | Sanghera, Dharambir K. | Saramies, Jouko | Schwarz, Peter E.H. | Sheu, Wayne H-H | Shuldiner, Alan R. | Siegbahn, Agneta | Spector, Tim D. | Stefansson, Kari | Strachan, David P. | Tayo, Bamidele O. | Tremoli, Elena | Tuomilehto, Jaakko | Uusitupa, Matti | van Duijn, Cornelia M. | Vollenweider, Peter | Wallentin, Lars | Wareham, Nicholas J. | Whitfield, John B. | Wolffenbuttel, Bruce H.R. | Ordovas, Jose M. | Boerwinkle, Eric | Palmer, Colin N.A. | Thorsteinsdottir, Unnur | Chasman, Daniel I. | Rotter, Jerome I. | Franks, Paul W. | Ripatti, Samuli | Cupples, L. Adrienne | Sandhu, Manjinder S. | Rich, Stephen S. | Boehnke, Michael | Deloukas, Panos | Kathiresan, Sekar | Mohlke, Karen L. | Ingelsson, Erik | Abecasis, Gonçalo R.
Nature genetics  2013;45(11):10.1038/ng.2797.
Low-density lipoprotein (LDL) cholesterol, high-density lipoprotein (HDL) cholesterol, triglycerides, and total cholesterol are heritable, modifiable, risk factors for coronary artery disease. To identify new loci and refine known loci influencing these lipids, we examined 188,578 individuals using genome-wide and custom genotyping arrays. We identify and annotate 157 loci associated with lipid levels at P < 5×10−8, including 62 loci not previously associated with lipid levels in humans. Using dense genotyping in individuals of European, East Asian, South Asian, and African ancestry, we narrow association signals in 12 loci. We find that loci associated with blood lipids are often associated with cardiovascular and metabolic traits including coronary artery disease, type 2 diabetes, blood pressure, waist-hip ratio, and body mass index. Our results illustrate the value of genetic data from individuals of diverse ancestries and provide insights into biological mechanisms regulating blood lipids to guide future genetic, biological, and therapeutic research.
doi:10.1038/ng.2797
PMCID: PMC3838666  PMID: 24097068
10.  Common variants associated with plasma triglycerides and risk for coronary artery disease 
Do, Ron | Willer, Cristen J. | Schmidt, Ellen M. | Sengupta, Sebanti | Gao, Chi | Peloso, Gina M. | Gustafsson, Stefan | Kanoni, Stavroula | Ganna, Andrea | Chen, Jin | Buchkovich, Martin L. | Mora, Samia | Beckmann, Jacques S. | Bragg-Gresham, Jennifer L. | Chang, Hsing-Yi | Demirkan, Ayşe | Den Hertog, Heleen M. | Donnelly, Louise A. | Ehret, Georg B. | Esko, Tõnu | Feitosa, Mary F. | Ferreira, Teresa | Fischer, Krista | Fontanillas, Pierre | Fraser, Ross M. | Freitag, Daniel F. | Gurdasani, Deepti | Heikkilä, Kauko | Hyppönen, Elina | Isaacs, Aaron | Jackson, Anne U. | Johansson, Åsa | Johnson, Toby | Kaakinen, Marika | Kettunen, Johannes | Kleber, Marcus E. | Li, Xiaohui | Luan, Jian'an | Lyytikäinen, Leo-Pekka | Magnusson, Patrik K.E. | Mangino, Massimo | Mihailov, Evelin | Montasser, May E. | Müller-Nurasyid, Martina | Nolte, Ilja M. | O'Connell, Jeffrey R. | Palmer, Cameron D. | Perola, Markus | Petersen, Ann-Kristin | Sanna, Serena | Saxena, Richa | Service, Susan K. | Shah, Sonia | Shungin, Dmitry | Sidore, Carlo | Song, Ci | Strawbridge, Rona J. | Surakka, Ida | Tanaka, Toshiko | Teslovich, Tanya M. | Thorleifsson, Gudmar | Van den Herik, Evita G. | Voight, Benjamin F. | Volcik, Kelly A. | Waite, Lindsay L. | Wong, Andrew | Wu, Ying | Zhang, Weihua | Absher, Devin | Asiki, Gershim | Barroso, Inês | Been, Latonya F. | Bolton, Jennifer L. | Bonnycastle, Lori L | Brambilla, Paolo | Burnett, Mary S. | Cesana, Giancarlo | Dimitriou, Maria | Doney, Alex S.F. | Döring, Angela | Elliott, Paul | Epstein, Stephen E. | Eyjolfsson, Gudmundur Ingi | Gigante, Bruna | Goodarzi, Mark O. | Grallert, Harald | Gravito, Martha L. | Groves, Christopher J. | Hallmans, Göran | Hartikainen, Anna-Liisa | Hayward, Caroline | Hernandez, Dena | Hicks, Andrew A. | Holm, Hilma | Hung, Yi-Jen | Illig, Thomas | Jones, Michelle R. | Kaleebu, Pontiano | Kastelein, John J.P. | Khaw, Kay-Tee | Kim, Eric | Klopp, Norman | Komulainen, Pirjo | Kumari, Meena | Langenberg, Claudia | Lehtimäki, Terho | Lin, Shih-Yi | Lindström, Jaana | Loos, Ruth J.F. | Mach, François | McArdle, Wendy L | Meisinger, Christa | Mitchell, Braxton D. | Müller, Gabrielle | Nagaraja, Ramaiah | Narisu, Narisu | Nieminen, Tuomo V.M. | Nsubuga, Rebecca N. | Olafsson, Isleifur | Ong, Ken K. | Palotie, Aarno | Papamarkou, Theodore | Pomilla, Cristina | Pouta, Anneli | Rader, Daniel J. | Reilly, Muredach P. | Ridker, Paul M. | Rivadeneira, Fernando | Rudan, Igor | Ruokonen, Aimo | Samani, Nilesh | Scharnagl, Hubert | Seeley, Janet | Silander, Kaisa | Stančáková, Alena | Stirrups, Kathleen | Swift, Amy J. | Tiret, Laurence | Uitterlinden, Andre G. | van Pelt, L. Joost | Vedantam, Sailaja | Wainwright, Nicholas | Wijmenga, Cisca | Wild, Sarah H. | Willemsen, Gonneke | Wilsgaard, Tom | Wilson, James F. | Young, Elizabeth H. | Zhao, Jing Hua | Adair, Linda S. | Arveiler, Dominique | Assimes, Themistocles L. | Bandinelli, Stefania | Bennett, Franklyn | Bochud, Murielle | Boehm, Bernhard O. | Boomsma, Dorret I. | Borecki, Ingrid B. | Bornstein, Stefan R. | Bovet, Pascal | Burnier, Michel | Campbell, Harry | Chakravarti, Aravinda | Chambers, John C. | Chen, Yii-Der Ida | Collins, Francis S. | Cooper, Richard S. | Danesh, John | Dedoussis, George | de Faire, Ulf | Feranil, Alan B. | Ferrières, Jean | Ferrucci, Luigi | Freimer, Nelson B. | Gieger, Christian | Groop, Leif C. | Gudnason, Vilmundur | Gyllensten, Ulf | Hamsten, Anders | Harris, Tamara B. | Hingorani, Aroon | Hirschhorn, Joel N. | Hofman, Albert | Hovingh, G. Kees | Hsiung, Chao Agnes | Humphries, Steve E. | Hunt, Steven C. | Hveem, Kristian | Iribarren, Carlos | Järvelin, Marjo-Riitta | Jula, Antti | Kähönen, Mika | Kaprio, Jaakko | Kesäniemi, Antero | Kivimaki, Mika | Kooner, Jaspal S. | Koudstaal, Peter J. | Krauss, Ronald M. | Kuh, Diana | Kuusisto, Johanna | Kyvik, Kirsten O. | Laakso, Markku | Lakka, Timo A. | Lind, Lars | Lindgren, Cecilia M. | Martin, Nicholas G. | März, Winfried | McCarthy, Mark I. | McKenzie, Colin A. | Meneton, Pierre | Metspalu, Andres | Moilanen, Leena | Morris, Andrew D. | Munroe, Patricia B. | Njølstad, Inger | Pedersen, Nancy L. | Power, Chris | Pramstaller, Peter P. | Price, Jackie F. | Psaty, Bruce M. | Quertermous, Thomas | Rauramaa, Rainer | Saleheen, Danish | Salomaa, Veikko | Sanghera, Dharambir K. | Saramies, Jouko | Schwarz, Peter E.H. | Sheu, Wayne H-H | Shuldiner, Alan R. | Siegbahn, Agneta | Spector, Tim D. | Stefansson, Kari | Strachan, David P. | Tayo, Bamidele O. | Tremoli, Elena | Tuomilehto, Jaakko | Uusitupa, Matti | van Duijn, Cornelia M. | Vollenweider, Peter | Wallentin, Lars | Wareham, Nicholas J. | Whitfield, John B. | Wolffenbuttel, Bruce H.R. | Altshuler, David | Ordovas, Jose M. | Boerwinkle, Eric | Palmer, Colin N.A. | Thorsteinsdottir, Unnur | Chasman, Daniel I. | Rotter, Jerome I. | Franks, Paul W. | Ripatti, Samuli | Cupples, L. Adrienne | Sandhu, Manjinder S. | Rich, Stephen S. | Boehnke, Michael | Deloukas, Panos | Mohlke, Karen L. | Ingelsson, Erik | Abecasis, Goncalo R. | Daly, Mark J. | Neale, Benjamin M. | Kathiresan, Sekar
Nature genetics  2013;45(11):1345-1352.
Triglycerides are transported in plasma by specific triglyceride-rich lipoproteins; in epidemiologic studies, increased triglyceride levels correlate with higher risk for coronary artery disease (CAD). However, it is unclear whether this association reflects causal processes. We used 185 common variants recently mapped for plasma lipids (P<5×10−8 for each) to examine the role of triglycerides on risk for CAD. First, we highlight loci associated with both low-density lipoprotein cholesterol (LDL-C) and triglycerides, and show that the direction and magnitude of both are factors in determining CAD risk. Second, we consider loci with only a strong magnitude of association with triglycerides and show that these loci are also associated with CAD. Finally, in a model accounting for effects on LDL-C and/or high-density lipoprotein cholesterol, a polymorphism's strength of effect on triglycerides is correlated with the magnitude of its effect on CAD risk. These results suggest that triglyceride-rich lipoproteins causally influence risk for CAD.
doi:10.1038/ng.2795
PMCID: PMC3904346  PMID: 24097064
11.  Loci influencing blood pressure identified using a cardiovascular gene-centric array 
Ganesh, Santhi K. | Tragante, Vinicius | Guo, Wei | Guo, Yiran | Lanktree, Matthew B. | Smith, Erin N. | Johnson, Toby | Castillo, Berta Almoguera | Barnard, John | Baumert, Jens | Chang, Yen-Pei Christy | Elbers, Clara C. | Farrall, Martin | Fischer, Mary E. | Franceschini, Nora | Gaunt, Tom R. | Gho, Johannes M.I.H. | Gieger, Christian | Gong, Yan | Isaacs, Aaron | Kleber, Marcus E. | Leach, Irene Mateo | McDonough, Caitrin W. | Meijs, Matthijs F.L. | Mellander, Olle | Molony, Cliona M. | Nolte, Ilja M. | Padmanabhan, Sandosh | Price, Tom S. | Rajagopalan, Ramakrishnan | Shaffer, Jonathan | Shah, Sonia | Shen, Haiqing | Soranzo, Nicole | van der Most, Peter J. | Van Iperen, Erik P.A. | Van Setten, Jessic A. | Vonk, Judith M. | Zhang, Li | Beitelshees, Amber L. | Berenson, Gerald S. | Bhatt, Deepak L. | Boer, Jolanda M.A. | Boerwinkle, Eric | Burkley, Ben | Burt, Amber | Chakravarti, Aravinda | Chen, Wei | Cooper-DeHoff, Rhonda M. | Curtis, Sean P. | Dreisbach, Albert | Duggan, David | Ehret, Georg B. | Fabsitz, Richard R. | Fornage, Myriam | Fox, Ervin | Furlong, Clement E. | Gansevoort, Ron T. | Hofker, Marten H. | Hovingh, G. Kees | Kirkland, Susan A. | Kottke-Marchant, Kandice | Kutlar, Abdullah | LaCroix, Andrea Z. | Langaee, Taimour Y. | Li, Yun R. | Lin, Honghuang | Liu, Kiang | Maiwald, Steffi | Malik, Rainer | Murugesan, Gurunathan | Newton-Cheh, Christopher | O'Connell, Jeffery R. | Onland-Moret, N. Charlotte | Ouwehand, Willem H. | Palmas, Walter | Penninx, Brenda W. | Pepine, Carl J. | Pettinger, Mary | Polak, Joseph F. | Ramachandran, Vasan S. | Ranchalis, Jane | Redline, Susan | Ridker, Paul M. | Rose, Lynda M. | Scharnag, Hubert | Schork, Nicholas J. | Shimbo, Daichi | Shuldiner, Alan R. | Srinivasan, Sathanur R. | Stolk, Ronald P. | Taylor, Herman A. | Thorand, Barbara | Trip, Mieke D. | van Duijn, Cornelia M. | Verschuren, W. Monique | Wijmenga, Cisca | Winkelmann, Bernhard R. | Wyatt, Sharon | Young, J. Hunter | Boehm, Bernhard O. | Caulfield, Mark J. | Chasman, Daniel I. | Davidson, Karina W. | Doevendans, Pieter A. | FitzGerald, Garret A. | Gums, John G. | Hakonarson, Hakon | Hillege, Hans L. | Illig, Thomas | Jarvik, Gail P. | Johnson, Julie A. | Kastelein, John J.P. | Koenig, Wolfgang | März, Winfried | Mitchell, Braxton D. | Murray, Sarah S. | Oldehinkel, Albertine J. | Rader, Daniel J. | Reilly, Muredach P. | Reiner, Alex P. | Schadt, Eric E. | Silverstein, Roy L. | Snieder, Harold | Stanton, Alice V. | Uitterlinden, André G. | van der Harst, Pim | van der Schouw, Yvonne T. | Samani, Nilesh J. | Johnson, Andrew D. | Munroe, Patricia B. | de Bakker, Paul I.W. | Zhu, Xiaofeng | Levy, Daniel | Keating, Brendan J. | Asselbergs, Folkert W.
Human Molecular Genetics  2013;22(8):1663-1678.
Blood pressure (BP) is a heritable determinant of risk for cardiovascular disease (CVD). To investigate genetic associations with systolic BP (SBP), diastolic BP (DBP), mean arterial pressure (MAP) and pulse pressure (PP), we genotyped ∼50 000 single-nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs) that capture variation in ∼2100 candidate genes for cardiovascular phenotypes in 61 619 individuals of European ancestry from cohort studies in the USA and Europe. We identified novel associations between rs347591 and SBP (chromosome 3p25.3, in an intron of HRH1) and between rs2169137 and DBP (chromosome1q32.1 in an intron of MDM4) and between rs2014408 and SBP (chromosome 11p15 in an intron of SOX6), previously reported to be associated with MAP. We also confirmed 10 previously known loci associated with SBP, DBP, MAP or PP (ADRB1, ATP2B1, SH2B3/ATXN2, CSK, CYP17A1, FURIN, HFE, LSP1, MTHFR, SOX6) at array-wide significance (P < 2.4 × 10−6). We then replicated these associations in an independent set of 65 886 individuals of European ancestry. The findings from expression QTL (eQTL) analysis showed associations of SNPs in the MDM4 region with MDM4 expression. We did not find any evidence of association of the two novel SNPs in MDM4 and HRH1 with sequelae of high BP including coronary artery disease (CAD), left ventricular hypertrophy (LVH) or stroke. In summary, we identified two novel loci associated with BP and confirmed multiple previously reported associations. Our findings extend our understanding of genes involved in BP regulation, some of which may eventually provide new targets for therapeutic intervention.
doi:10.1093/hmg/dds555
PMCID: PMC3657476  PMID: 23303523
12.  Meta analysis of candidate gene variants outside the LPA locus with Lp(a) plasma levels in 14,500 participants of six White European cohorts 
Atherosclerosis  2011;217(2):447-451.
Background
Both genome-wide association studies and candidate gene studies have reported that the major determinant of plasma levels of the Lipoprotein (a) [Lp(a)] reside within the LPA locus on chromosome 6. We have used data from the Human CVD bead chip to explore the contribution of other candidate genes determining Lp(a) levels.
Methods
48,032 single nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs) from the Illumina Human CVD bead chip were genotyped in 5,059 participants of the Whitehall II study (WHII) of randomly ascertained healthy men and women. SNPs showing association with Lp(a) levels of p< 10−4 outside the LPA locus were selected for replication in a total of an additional 9,463 participants of five European based studies (EAS, EPIC-Norfolk, NPHSII, PROCARDIS, and SAPHIR)
Results
In Whitehall II, apart from the LPA locus (where p values for several SNPs were < 10−30) there was significant association at four loci GALNT2, FABP1, PPARGC1A and TNFRSFF11A. However, a meta-analysis of the six studies did not confirm any of these findings.
Conclusion
Results from this meta analysis of 14,522 participants revealed no candidate genes from the Human CVD bead chip outside the LPA locus to have an effect on Lp(a) levels. Further studies with genome-wide and denser SNP coverage are required to confirm or refute this finding.
doi:10.1016/j.atherosclerosis.2011.04.015
PMCID: PMC3972487  PMID: 21592478
Lipoprotein(a); LPA; Illumina Human CVD bead chip; genetic association
13.  Influence of common genetic variation on blood lipid levels, cardiovascular risk, and coronary events in two British prospective cohort studies 
European Heart Journal  2012;34(13):972-981.
Aims
The aim of this study was to quantify the collective effect of common lipid-associated single nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs) on blood lipid levels, cardiovascular risk, use of lipid-lowering medication, and risk of coronary heart disease (CHD) events.
Methods and results
Analysis was performed in two prospective cohorts: Whitehall II (WHII; N = 5059) and the British Women’s Heart and Health Study (BWHHS; N = 3414). For each participant, scores were calculated based on the cumulative effect of multiple genetic variants influencing total cholesterol (TC), low-density lipoprotein cholesterol (LDL-C), high-density lipoprotein cholesterol (HDL-C), and triglycerides (TG). Compared with the bottom quintile, individuals in the top quintile of the LDL-C genetic score distribution had higher LDL-C {mean difference of 0.85 [95% confidence interval, (CI) = 0.76–0.94] and 0.63 [95% CI = 0.50–0.76] mmol/l in WHII and BWHHS, respectively}. They also tended to have greater odds of having ‘high-risk’ status (Framingham 10-year cardiovascular disease risk >20%) [WHII: odds ratio (OR) = 1.36 (0.93–1.98), BWHHS: OR = 1.49 (1.14–1.94)]; receiving lipid-lowering treatment [WHII: OR = 2.38 (1.57–3.59), BWHHS: OR = 2.24 (1.52–3.29)]; and CHD events [WHII: OR = 1.43 (1.02–2.00), BWHHS: OR = 1.31 (0.99–1.72)]. Similar associations were observed for the TC score in both studies. The TG score was associated with high-risk status and medication use in both studies. Neither HDL nor TG scores were associated with the risk of coronary events. The genetic scores did not improve discrimination over the Framingham risk score.
Conclusion
At the population level, common SNPs associated with LDL-C and TC contribute to blood lipid variation, cardiovascular risk, use of lipid-lowering medications and coronary events. However, their effects are too small to discriminate future lipid-lowering medication requirements or coronary events.
doi:10.1093/eurheartj/ehs243
PMCID: PMC3612774  PMID: 22977227
Lipid genetic score; Lipid medication; Framingham
14.  Population Genomics of Cardiometabolic Traits: Design of the University College London-London School of Hygiene and Tropical Medicine-Edinburgh-Bristol (UCLEB) Consortium 
PLoS ONE  2013;8(8):e71345.
Substantial advances have been made in identifying common genetic variants influencing cardiometabolic traits and disease outcomes through genome wide association studies. Nevertheless, gaps in knowledge remain and new questions have arisen regarding the population relevance, mechanisms, and applications for healthcare. Using a new high-resolution custom single nucleotide polymorphism (SNP) array (Metabochip) incorporating dense coverage of genomic regions linked to cardiometabolic disease, the University College-London School-Edinburgh-Bristol (UCLEB) consortium of highly-phenotyped population-based prospective studies, aims to: (1) fine map functionally relevant SNPs; (2) precisely estimate individual absolute and population attributable risks based on individual SNPs and their combination; (3) investigate mechanisms leading to altered risk factor profiles and CVD events; and (4) use Mendelian randomisation to undertake studies of the causal role in CVD of a range of cardiovascular biomarkers to inform public health policy and help develop new preventative therapies.
doi:10.1371/journal.pone.0071345
PMCID: PMC3748096  PMID: 23977022
15.  Laser Resurfacing Pearls 
Seminars in Plastic Surgery  2012;26(3):131-136.
Ablative skin resurfacing using the carbon dioxide laser was long considered the gold standard for treatment of photoaging, acne scars, and rhytids. However, conventional full-face carbon dioxide resurfacing is associated with significant risk of side effects and a prolonged postoperative recovery period. Fractional resurfacing has recently revolutionized laser surgery by offering close to comparable results with minimal side effects and a more rapid recovery. Although fractional devices have grown in popularity, and have essentially replaced traditional resurfacing, fractional resurfacing can still be a challenging modality to control precisely due to hardware variations across comparable devices, the range of settings that can be used, and patient-specific considerations. Certain precautions and rules of thumb can reduce the risk associated with fractional resurfacing, and increase the likelihood of a good outcome.
doi:10.1055/s-0032-1329417
PMCID: PMC3580978  PMID: 23904821
skin resurfacing; ablative; nonablative; fractional lasers
16.  Large-scale association analyses identify new loci influencing glycemic traits and provide insight into the underlying biological pathways 
Scott, Robert A | Lagou, Vasiliki | Welch, Ryan P | Wheeler, Eleanor | Montasser, May E | Luan, Jian’an | Mägi, Reedik | Strawbridge, Rona J | Rehnberg, Emil | Gustafsson, Stefan | Kanoni, Stavroula | Rasmussen-Torvik, Laura J | Yengo, Loïc | Lecoeur, Cecile | Shungin, Dmitry | Sanna, Serena | Sidore, Carlo | Johnson, Paul C D | Jukema, J Wouter | Johnson, Toby | Mahajan, Anubha | Verweij, Niek | Thorleifsson, Gudmar | Hottenga, Jouke-Jan | Shah, Sonia | Smith, Albert V | Sennblad, Bengt | Gieger, Christian | Salo, Perttu | Perola, Markus | Timpson, Nicholas J | Evans, David M | Pourcain, Beate St | Wu, Ying | Andrews, Jeanette S | Hui, Jennie | Bielak, Lawrence F | Zhao, Wei | Horikoshi, Momoko | Navarro, Pau | Isaacs, Aaron | O’Connell, Jeffrey R | Stirrups, Kathleen | Vitart, Veronique | Hayward, Caroline | Esko, Tönu | Mihailov, Evelin | Fraser, Ross M | Fall, Tove | Voight, Benjamin F | Raychaudhuri, Soumya | Chen, Han | Lindgren, Cecilia M | Morris, Andrew P | Rayner, Nigel W | Robertson, Neil | Rybin, Denis | Liu, Ching-Ti | Beckmann, Jacques S | Willems, Sara M | Chines, Peter S | Jackson, Anne U | Kang, Hyun Min | Stringham, Heather M | Song, Kijoung | Tanaka, Toshiko | Peden, John F | Goel, Anuj | Hicks, Andrew A | An, Ping | Müller-Nurasyid, Martina | Franco-Cereceda, Anders | Folkersen, Lasse | Marullo, Letizia | Jansen, Hanneke | Oldehinkel, Albertine J | Bruinenberg, Marcel | Pankow, James S | North, Kari E | Forouhi, Nita G | Loos, Ruth J F | Edkins, Sarah | Varga, Tibor V | Hallmans, Göran | Oksa, Heikki | Antonella, Mulas | Nagaraja, Ramaiah | Trompet, Stella | Ford, Ian | Bakker, Stephan J L | Kong, Augustine | Kumari, Meena | Gigante, Bruna | Herder, Christian | Munroe, Patricia B | Caulfield, Mark | Antti, Jula | Mangino, Massimo | Small, Kerrin | Miljkovic, Iva | Liu, Yongmei | Atalay, Mustafa | Kiess, Wieland | James, Alan L | Rivadeneira, Fernando | Uitterlinden, Andre G | Palmer, Colin N A | Doney, Alex S F | Willemsen, Gonneke | Smit, Johannes H | Campbell, Susan | Polasek, Ozren | Bonnycastle, Lori L | Hercberg, Serge | Dimitriou, Maria | Bolton, Jennifer L | Fowkes, Gerard R | Kovacs, Peter | Lindström, Jaana | Zemunik, Tatijana | Bandinelli, Stefania | Wild, Sarah H | Basart, Hanneke V | Rathmann, Wolfgang | Grallert, Harald | Maerz, Winfried | Kleber, Marcus E | Boehm, Bernhard O | Peters, Annette | Pramstaller, Peter P | Province, Michael A | Borecki, Ingrid B | Hastie, Nicholas D | Rudan, Igor | Campbell, Harry | Watkins, Hugh | Farrall, Martin | Stumvoll, Michael | Ferrucci, Luigi | Waterworth, Dawn M | Bergman, Richard N | Collins, Francis S | Tuomilehto, Jaakko | Watanabe, Richard M | de Geus, Eco J C | Penninx, Brenda W | Hofman, Albert | Oostra, Ben A | Psaty, Bruce M | Vollenweider, Peter | Wilson, James F | Wright, Alan F | Hovingh, G Kees | Metspalu, Andres | Uusitupa, Matti | Magnusson, Patrik K E | Kyvik, Kirsten O | Kaprio, Jaakko | Price, Jackie F | Dedoussis, George V | Deloukas, Panos | Meneton, Pierre | Lind, Lars | Boehnke, Michael | Shuldiner, Alan R | van Duijn, Cornelia M | Morris, Andrew D | Toenjes, Anke | Peyser, Patricia A | Beilby, John P | Körner, Antje | Kuusisto, Johanna | Laakso, Markku | Bornstein, Stefan R | Schwarz, Peter E H | Lakka, Timo A | Rauramaa, Rainer | Adair, Linda S | Smith, George Davey | Spector, Tim D | Illig, Thomas | de Faire, Ulf | Hamsten, Anders | Gudnason, Vilmundur | Kivimaki, Mika | Hingorani, Aroon | Keinanen-Kiukaanniemi, Sirkka M | Saaristo, Timo E | Boomsma, Dorret I | Stefansson, Kari | van der Harst, Pim | Dupuis, Josée | Pedersen, Nancy L | Sattar, Naveed | Harris, Tamara B | Cucca, Francesco | Ripatti, Samuli | Salomaa, Veikko | Mohlke, Karen L | Balkau, Beverley | Froguel, Philippe | Pouta, Anneli | Jarvelin, Marjo-Riitta | Wareham, Nicholas J | Bouatia-Naji, Nabila | McCarthy, Mark I | Franks, Paul W | Meigs, James B | Teslovich, Tanya M | Florez, Jose C | Langenberg, Claudia | Ingelsson, Erik | Prokopenko, Inga | Barroso, Inês
Nature genetics  2012;44(9):991-1005.
Through genome-wide association meta-analyses of up to 133,010 individuals of European ancestry without diabetes, including individuals newly genotyped using the Metabochip, we have raised the number of confirmed loci influencing glycemic traits to 53, of which 33 also increase type 2 diabetes risk (q < 0.05). Loci influencing fasting insulin showed association with lipid levels and fat distribution, suggesting impact on insulin resistance. Gene-based analyses identified further biologically plausible loci, suggesting that additional loci beyond those reaching genome-wide significance are likely to represent real associations. This conclusion is supported by an excess of directionally consistent and nominally significant signals between discovery and follow-up studies. Functional follow-up of these newly discovered loci will further improve our understanding of glycemic control.
doi:10.1038/ng.2385
PMCID: PMC3433394  PMID: 22885924
17.  Large-scale association analysis provides insights into the genetic architecture and pathophysiology of type 2 diabetes 
Morris, Andrew P | Voight, Benjamin F | Teslovich, Tanya M | Ferreira, Teresa | Segrè, Ayellet V | Steinthorsdottir, Valgerdur | Strawbridge, Rona J | Khan, Hassan | Grallert, Harald | Mahajan, Anubha | Prokopenko, Inga | Kang, Hyun Min | Dina, Christian | Esko, Tonu | Fraser, Ross M | Kanoni, Stavroula | Kumar, Ashish | Lagou, Vasiliki | Langenberg, Claudia | Luan, Jian'an | Lindgren, Cecilia M | Müller-Nurasyid, Martina | Pechlivanis, Sonali | Rayner, N William | Scott, Laura J | Wiltshire, Steven | Yengo, Loic | Kinnunen, Leena | Rossin, Elizabeth J | Raychaudhuri, Soumya | Johnson, Andrew D | Dimas, Antigone S | Loos, Ruth J F | Vedantam, Sailaja | Chen, Han | Florez, Jose C | Fox, Caroline | Liu, Ching-Ti | Rybin, Denis | Couper, David J | Kao, Wen Hong L | Li, Man | Cornelis, Marilyn C | Kraft, Peter | Sun, Qi | van Dam, Rob M | Stringham, Heather M | Chines, Peter S | Fischer, Krista | Fontanillas, Pierre | Holmen, Oddgeir L | Hunt, Sarah E | Jackson, Anne U | Kong, Augustine | Lawrence, Robert | Meyer, Julia | Perry, John RB | Platou, Carl GP | Potter, Simon | Rehnberg, Emil | Robertson, Neil | Sivapalaratnam, Suthesh | Stančáková, Alena | Stirrups, Kathleen | Thorleifsson, Gudmar | Tikkanen, Emmi | Wood, Andrew R | Almgren, Peter | Atalay, Mustafa | Benediktsson, Rafn | Bonnycastle, Lori L | Burtt, Noël | Carey, Jason | Charpentier, Guillaume | Crenshaw, Andrew T | Doney, Alex S F | Dorkhan, Mozhgan | Edkins, Sarah | Emilsson, Valur | Eury, Elodie | Forsen, Tom | Gertow, Karl | Gigante, Bruna | Grant, George B | Groves, Christopher J | Guiducci, Candace | Herder, Christian | Hreidarsson, Astradur B | Hui, Jennie | James, Alan | Jonsson, Anna | Rathmann, Wolfgang | Klopp, Norman | Kravic, Jasmina | Krjutškov, Kaarel | Langford, Cordelia | Leander, Karin | Lindholm, Eero | Lobbens, Stéphane | Männistö, Satu | Mirza, Ghazala | Mühleisen, Thomas W | Musk, Bill | Parkin, Melissa | Rallidis, Loukianos | Saramies, Jouko | Sennblad, Bengt | Shah, Sonia | Sigurðsson, Gunnar | Silveira, Angela | Steinbach, Gerald | Thorand, Barbara | Trakalo, Joseph | Veglia, Fabrizio | Wennauer, Roman | Winckler, Wendy | Zabaneh, Delilah | Campbell, Harry | van Duijn, Cornelia | Uitterlinden89-, Andre G | Hofman, Albert | Sijbrands, Eric | Abecasis, Goncalo R | Owen, Katharine R | Zeggini, Eleftheria | Trip, Mieke D | Forouhi, Nita G | Syvänen, Ann-Christine | Eriksson, Johan G | Peltonen, Leena | Nöthen, Markus M | Balkau, Beverley | Palmer, Colin N A | Lyssenko, Valeriya | Tuomi, Tiinamaija | Isomaa, Bo | Hunter, David J | Qi, Lu | Shuldiner, Alan R | Roden, Michael | Barroso, Ines | Wilsgaard, Tom | Beilby, John | Hovingh, Kees | Price, Jackie F | Wilson, James F | Rauramaa, Rainer | Lakka, Timo A | Lind, Lars | Dedoussis, George | Njølstad, Inger | Pedersen, Nancy L | Khaw, Kay-Tee | Wareham, Nicholas J | Keinanen-Kiukaanniemi, Sirkka M | Saaristo, Timo E | Korpi-Hyövälti, Eeva | Saltevo, Juha | Laakso, Markku | Kuusisto, Johanna | Metspalu, Andres | Collins, Francis S | Mohlke, Karen L | Bergman, Richard N | Tuomilehto, Jaakko | Boehm, Bernhard O | Gieger, Christian | Hveem, Kristian | Cauchi, Stephane | Froguel, Philippe | Baldassarre, Damiano | Tremoli, Elena | Humphries, Steve E | Saleheen, Danish | Danesh, John | Ingelsson, Erik | Ripatti, Samuli | Salomaa, Veikko | Erbel, Raimund | Jöckel, Karl-Heinz | Moebus, Susanne | Peters, Annette | Illig, Thomas | de Faire, Ulf | Hamsten, Anders | Morris, Andrew D | Donnelly, Peter J | Frayling, Timothy M | Hattersley, Andrew T | Boerwinkle, Eric | Melander, Olle | Kathiresan, Sekar | Nilsson, Peter M | Deloukas, Panos | Thorsteinsdottir, Unnur | Groop, Leif C | Stefansson, Kari | Hu, Frank | Pankow, James S | Dupuis, Josée | Meigs, James B | Altshuler, David | Boehnke, Michael | McCarthy, Mark I
Nature genetics  2012;44(9):981-990.
To extend understanding of the genetic architecture and molecular basis of type 2 diabetes (T2D), we conducted a meta-analysis of genetic variants on the Metabochip involving 34,840 cases and 114,981 controls, overwhelmingly of European descent. We identified ten previously unreported T2D susceptibility loci, including two demonstrating sex-differentiated association. Genome-wide analyses of these data are consistent with a long tail of further common variant loci explaining much of the variation in susceptibility to T2D. Exploration of the enlarged set of susceptibility loci implicates several processes, including CREBBP-related transcription, adipocytokine signalling and cell cycle regulation, in diabetes pathogenesis.
doi:10.1038/ng.2383
PMCID: PMC3442244  PMID: 22885922
18.  Large-scale association analysis provides insights into the genetic architecture and pathophysiology of type 2 diabetes 
Morris, Andrew P | Voight, Benjamin F | Teslovich, Tanya M | Ferreira, Teresa | Segré, Ayellet V | Steinthorsdottir, Valgerdur | Strawbridge, Rona J | Khan, Hassan | Grallert, Harald | Mahajan, Anubha | Prokopenko, Inga | Kang, Hyun Min | Dina, Christian | Esko, Tonu | Fraser, Ross M | Kanoni, Stavroula | Kumar, Ashish | Lagou, Vasiliki | Langenberg, Claudia | Luan, Jian’an | Lindgren, Cecilia M | Müller-Nurasyid, Martina | Pechlivanis, Sonali | Rayner, N William | Scott, Laura J | Wiltshire, Steven | Yengo, Loic | Kinnunen, Leena | Rossin, Elizabeth J | Raychaudhuri, Soumya | Johnson, Andrew D | Dimas, Antigone S | Loos, Ruth J F | Vedantam, Sailaja | Chen, Han | Florez, Jose C | Fox, Caroline | Liu, Ching-Ti | Rybin, Denis | Couper, David J | Kao, Wen Hong L | Li, Man | Cornelis, Marilyn C | Kraft, Peter | Sun, Qi | van Dam, Rob M | Stringham, Heather M | Chines, Peter S | Fischer, Krista | Fontanillas, Pierre | Holmen, Oddgeir L | Hunt, Sarah E | Jackson, Anne U | Kong, Augustine | Lawrence, Robert | Meyer, Julia | Perry, John R B | Platou, Carl G P | Potter, Simon | Rehnberg, Emil | Robertson, Neil | Sivapalaratnam, Suthesh | Stančáková, Alena | Stirrups, Kathleen | Thorleifsson, Gudmar | Tikkanen, Emmi | Wood, Andrew R | Almgren, Peter | Atalay, Mustafa | Benediktsson, Rafn | Bonnycastle, Lori L | Burtt, Noël | Carey, Jason | Charpentier, Guillaume | Crenshaw, Andrew T | Doney, Alex S F | Dorkhan, Mozhgan | Edkins, Sarah | Emilsson, Valur | Eury, Elodie | Forsen, Tom | Gertow, Karl | Gigante, Bruna | Grant, George B | Groves, Christopher J | Guiducci, Candace | Herder, Christian | Hreidarsson, Astradur B | Hui, Jennie | James, Alan | Jonsson, Anna | Rathmann, Wolfgang | Klopp, Norman | Kravic, Jasmina | Krjutškov, Kaarel | Langford, Cordelia | Leander, Karin | Lindholm, Eero | Lobbens, Stéphane | Männistö, Satu | Mirza, Ghazala | Mühleisen, Thomas W | Musk, Bill | Parkin, Melissa | Rallidis, Loukianos | Saramies, Jouko | Sennblad, Bengt | Shah, Sonia | Sigurðsson, Gunnar | Silveira, Angela | Steinbach, Gerald | Thorand, Barbara | Trakalo, Joseph | Veglia, Fabrizio | Wennauer, Roman | Winckler, Wendy | Zabaneh, Delilah | Campbell, Harry | van Duijn, Cornelia | Uitterlinden, Andre G | Hofman, Albert | Sijbrands, Eric | Abecasis, Goncalo R | Owen, Katharine R | Zeggini, Eleftheria | Trip, Mieke D | Forouhi, Nita G | Syvänen, Ann-Christine | Eriksson, Johan G | Peltonen, Leena | Nöthen, Markus M | Balkau, Beverley | Palmer, Colin N A | Lyssenko, Valeriya | Tuomi, Tiinamaija | Isomaa, Bo | Hunter, David J | Qi, Lu | Shuldiner, Alan R | Roden, Michael | Barroso, Ines | Wilsgaard, Tom | Beilby, John | Hovingh, Kees | Price, Jackie F | Wilson, James F | Rauramaa, Rainer | Lakka, Timo A | Lind, Lars | Dedoussis, George | Njølstad, Inger | Pedersen, Nancy L | Khaw, Kay-Tee | Wareham, Nicholas J | Keinanen-Kiukaanniemi, Sirkka M | Saaristo, Timo E | Korpi-Hyövälti, Eeva | Saltevo, Juha | Laakso, Markku | Kuusisto, Johanna | Metspalu, Andres | Collins, Francis S | Mohlke, Karen L | Bergman, Richard N | Tuomilehto, Jaakko | Boehm, Bernhard O | Gieger, Christian | Hveem, Kristian | Cauchi, Stephane | Froguel, Philippe | Baldassarre, Damiano | Tremoli, Elena | Humphries, Steve E | Saleheen, Danish | Danesh, John | Ingelsson, Erik | Ripatti, Samuli | Salomaa, Veikko | Erbel, Raimund | Jöckel, Karl-Heinz | Moebus, Susanne | Peters, Annette | Illig, Thomas | de Faire, Ulf | Hamsten, Anders | Morris, Andrew D | Donnelly, Peter J | Frayling, Timothy M | Hattersley, Andrew T | Boerwinkle, Eric | Melander, Olle | Kathiresan, Sekar | Nilsson, Peter M | Deloukas, Panos | Thorsteinsdottir, Unnur | Groop, Leif C | Stefansson, Kari | Hu, Frank | Pankow, James S | Dupuis, Josée | Meigs, James B | Altshuler, David | Boehnke, Michael | McCarthy, Mark I
Nature genetics  2012;44(9):981-990.
To extend understanding of the genetic architecture and molecular basis of type 2 diabetes (T2D), we conducted a meta-analysis of genetic variants on the Metabochip involving 34,840 cases and 114,981 controls, overwhelmingly of European descent. We identified ten previously unreported T2D susceptibility loci, including two demonstrating sex-differentiated association. Genome-wide analyses of these data are consistent with a long tail of further common variant loci explaining much of the variation in susceptibility to T2D. Exploration of the enlarged set of susceptibility loci implicates several processes, including CREBBP-related transcription, adipocytokine signalling and cell cycle regulation, in diabetes pathogenesis.
doi:10.1038/ng.2383
PMCID: PMC3442244  PMID: 22885922
19.  A gene-centric study of common carotid artery remodelling 
Atherosclerosis  2013;226(2):440-446.
Background
Expansive remodelling is the process of compensatory arterial enlargement in response to atherosclerotic stimuli. The genetic determinants of this process are poorly characterized.
Methods
Genetic association analyses of inter-adventitial common carotid artery diameter (ICCAD) in the IMPROVE study (n = 3427) using the Illumina 200k Metabochip was performed. Single nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs) that met array-wide significance were taken forward for analysis in three further studies (n = 5704), and tested for association with Abdominal Aortic Aneurysm (AAA).
Results
rs3768445 on Chromosome 1q24.3, in a cluster of protein coding genes (DNM3, PIGC, C1orf105) was associated with larger ICCAD in the IMPROVE study. For each copy of the rare allele carried, ICCAD was on average 0.13 mm greater (95% CI 0.08–0.18 mm, P = 8.2 × 10−8). A proxy SNP (rs4916251, R2 = 0.99) did not, however, show association with ICCAD in three follow-up studies (P for replication = 0.29). There was evidence of interaction between carotid intima-media thickness (CIMT) and rs4916251 on ICCAD in two of the cohorts studies suggesting that it plays a role in the remodelling response to atherosclerosis. In meta-analysis of 5 case–control studies pooling data from 5007 cases and 43,630 controls, rs4916251 was associated with presence of AAA 1.10, 95% CI 1.03–1.17, p = 2.8 × 10−3, I2 = 18.8, Q = 0.30). A proxy SNP, rs4916251 was also associated with increased expression of PIGC in aortic tissue, suggesting that this may the mechanism by which this locus affects vascular remodelling.
Conclusions
Common variation at 1q24.3 is associated with expansive vascular remodelling and risk of AAA. These findings support a hypothesis that pathways involved in systemic vascular remodelling play a role in AAA development.
Highlights
► In the IMPROVE study (n > 3000) variants at 1q24.3 were strongly associated with larger carotid diameters. ► The lead variant was associated with Abdominal Aortic Aneurysm (AAA) in meta-analysis of 5 studies (n > 50,000). ► Variants at 1q24.3 appear to be associated with vascular remodelling and risk of AAA.
doi:10.1016/j.atherosclerosis.2012.11.002
PMCID: PMC3573227  PMID: 23246012
Abdominal aortic aneurysm; Genome-wide association studies; Vascular remodelling; Carotid artery
20.  Use of Allele-Specific FAIRE to Determine Functional Regulatory Polymorphism Using Large-Scale Genotyping Arrays 
PLoS Genetics  2012;8(8):e1002908.
Following the widespread use of genome-wide association studies (GWAS), focus is turning towards identification of causal variants rather than simply genetic markers of diseases and traits. As a step towards a high-throughput method to identify genome-wide, non-coding, functional regulatory variants, we describe the technique of allele-specific FAIRE, utilising large-scale genotyping technology (FAIRE-gen) to determine allelic effects on chromatin accessibility and regulatory potential. FAIRE-gen was explored using lymphoblastoid cells and the 50,000 SNP Illumina CVD BeadChip. The technique identified an allele-specific regulatory polymorphism within NR1H3 (coding for LXR-α), rs7120118, coinciding with a previously GWAS-identified SNP for HDL-C levels. This finding was confirmed using FAIRE-gen with the 200,000 SNP Illumina Metabochip and verified with the established method of TaqMan allelic discrimination. Examination of this SNP in two prospective Caucasian cohorts comprising 15,000 individuals confirmed the association with HDL-C levels (combined beta = 0.016; p = 0.0006), and analysis of gene expression identified an allelic association with LXR-α expression in heart tissue. Using increasingly comprehensive genotyping chips and distinct tissues for examination, FAIRE-gen has the potential to aid the identification of many causal SNPs associated with disease from GWAS.
Author Summary
The identification of genetic variants associated with complex diseases has rapidly grown through lowering costs of genome sequencing and the use of large-scale genotyping chips based on this sequencing data. There have not been corresponding advances in the identification of causal genetic variants compared to variants simply associated with diseases or traits. Most of these causal variants are thought to be located not within regions coding for proteins, but within genomic regions that regulate the level of protein. We have combined the use of large-scale gene chips with functional analysis, to determine regions of the genome that confer a greater potential for controlling gene regulation dependent on the genotype of that individual. Combining this data with population data and gene expression data, we identify a potential causal variant that alters regulation of LXR-α, a key mediator in lipid metabolism, and show that this variant is associated with HDL-C levels. This methodology provides a model for future analyses to identify further causal variants for disease.
doi:10.1371/journal.pgen.1002908
PMCID: PMC3420950  PMID: 22916038
21.  Cholesteryl Ester Transfer Protein (CETP) Polymorphisms Affect mRNA Splicing, HDL Levels, and Sex-Dependent Cardiovascular Risk 
PLoS ONE  2012;7(3):e31930.
Polymorphisms in and around the Cholesteryl Ester Transfer Protein (CETP) gene have been associated with HDL levels, risk for coronary artery disease (CAD), and response to therapy. The mechanism of action of these polymorphisms has yet to be defined. We used mRNA allelic expression and splice isoform measurements in human liver tissues to identify the genetic variants affecting CETP levels. Allelic CETP mRNA expression ratios in 56 human livers were strongly associated with several variants 2.5–7 kb upstream of the transcription start site (e.g., rs247616 p = 6.4×10−5, allele frequency 33%). In addition, a common alternatively spliced CETP isoform lacking exon 9 (Δ9), has been shown to prevent CETP secretion in a dominant-negative manner. The Δ 9 expression ranged from 10 to 48% of total CETP mRNA in 94 livers. Increased formation of this isoform was exclusively associated with an exon 9 polymorphism rs5883-C>T (p = 6.8×10−10) and intron 8 polymorphism rs9930761-T>C (5.6×10−8) (in high linkage disequilibrium with allele frequencies 6–7%). rs9930761 changes a key splicing branch point nucleotide in intron 8, while rs5883 alters an exonic splicing enhancer sequence in exon 9.
The effect of these polymorphisms was evaluated in two clinical studies. In the Whitehall II study of 4745 subjects, both rs247616 and rs5883T/rs9930761C were independently associated with increased HDL-C levels in males with similar effect size (rs247616 p = 9.6×10−28 and rs5883 p = 8.6×10−10, adjusted for rs247616). In an independent multiethnic US cohort of hypertensive subjects with CAD (INVEST-GENE), rs5883T/rs9930761C alone were significantly associated with increased incidence of MI, stroke, and all-cause mortality in males (rs5883: OR 2.36 (CI 1.29–4.30), p = 0.005, n = 866). These variants did not reach significance in females in either study. Similar to earlier results linking low CETP activity with poor outcomes in males, our results suggest genetic, sex-dependent CETP splicing effects on cardiovascular risk by a mechanism independent of circulating HDL-C levels.
doi:10.1371/journal.pone.0031930
PMCID: PMC3293889  PMID: 22403620
22.  Comparative analysis of genome-wide association studies signals for lipids, diabetes, and coronary heart disease: Cardiovascular Biomarker Genetics Collaboration 
European Heart Journal  2011;33(3):393-407.
Aims
To evaluate the associations of emergent genome-wide-association study-derived coronary heart disease (CHD)-associated single nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs) with established and emerging risk factors, and the association of genome-wide-association study-derived lipid-associated SNPs with other risk factors and CHD events.
Methods and results
Using two case–control studies, three cross-sectional, and seven prospective studies with up to 25 000 individuals and 5794 CHD events we evaluated associations of 34 genome-wide-association study-identified SNPs with CHD risk and 16 CHD-associated risk factors or biomarkers. The Ch9p21 SNPs rs1333049 (OR 1.17; 95% confidence limits 1.11–1.24) and rs10757274 (OR 1.17; 1.09–1.26), MIA3 rs17465637 (OR 1.10; 1.04–1.15), Ch2q36 rs2943634 (OR 1.08; 1.03–1.14), APC rs383830 (OR 1.10; 1.02, 1.18), MTHFD1L rs6922269 (OR 1.10; 1.03, 1.16), CXCL12 rs501120 (OR 1.12; 1.04, 1.20), and SMAD3 rs17228212 (OR 1.11; 1.05, 1.17) were all associated with CHD risk, but not with the CHD biomarkers and risk factors measured. Among the 20 blood lipid-related SNPs, LPL rs17411031 was associated with a lower risk of CHD (OR 0.91; 0.84–0.97), an increase in Apolipoprotein AI and HDL-cholesterol, and reduced triglycerides. SORT1 rs599839 was associated with CHD risk (OR 1.20; 1.15–1.26) as well as total- and LDL-cholesterol, and apolipoprotein B. ANGPTL3 rs12042319 was associated with CHD risk (OR 1.11; 1.03, 1.19), total- and LDL-cholesterol, triglycerides, and interleukin-6.
Conclusion
Several SNPs predicting CHD events appear to involve pathways not currently indexed by the established or emerging risk factors; others involved changes in blood lipids including triglycerides or HDL-cholesterol as well as LDL-cholesterol. The overlapping association of SNPs with multiple risk factors and biomarkers supports the existence of shared points of regulation for these phenotypes.
doi:10.1093/eurheartj/ehr225
PMCID: PMC3270041  PMID: 21804106
Coronary disease; Lipids; Genes; Risk factors
23.  ChIP-on-chip analysis reveals angiopoietin 2 (Ang2, ANGPT2) as a novel target of steroidogenic factor-1 (SF-1, NR5A1) in the human adrenal gland 
The FASEB Journal  2011;25(4):1166-1175.
The nuclear receptor steroidogenic factor-1 (SF-1, NR5A1) is a key regulator of adrenal and gonadal biology. Disruption of SF-1 can lead to disorders of adrenal development, while increased SF-1 dosage has been associated with adrenocortical tumorigenesis. We aimed to identify a novel subset of SF-1 target genes in the adrenal by using chromatin immunoprecipitation (ChIP) microarrays (ChIP-on-chip) combined with systems analysis. SF-1 ChIP-on-chip was performed in NCI-H295R human adrenocortical cells using promoter tiling arrays, leading to the identification of 445 gene loci where SF-1-binding regions were located from 10 kb upstream to 3 kb downstream of a transcriptional start. Network analysis of genes identified as putative SF-1 targets revealed enrichment for angiogenic process networks. A 1.1-kb SF-1-binding region was identified in the angiopoietin 2 (Ang2, ANGPT2) promoter in a highly repetitive region, and SF-1-dependent activation was confirmed in luciferase assays. Angiogenesis is paramount in adrenal development and tumorigenesis, but until now a direct link between SF-1 and vascular remodeling has not been established. We have identified Ang2 as a potentially important novel target of SF-1 in the adrenal gland, indicating that regulation of angiogenesis might be an important additional mechanism by which SF-1 exerts its actions in the adrenal gland.—Ferraz-de-Souza, B., Lin, L., Shah, S., Jina, N., Hubank, M., Dattani, M. T., Achermann, J. C. ChIP-on-chip analysis reveals angiopoietin 2 (Ang2, ANGPT2) as a novel target of steroidogenic factor-1 (SF-1, NR5A1) in the human adrenal gland.
doi:10.1096/fj.10-170522
PMCID: PMC3058709  PMID: 21163858
adrenal development; adrenal tumorigenesis; transcriptional regulation; angiogenesis; NCI-H295R adrenocortical cells
24.  Innate and Adaptive Factors Regulating Human Immunodeficiency Virus Type 1 Genomic Activation 
Over the past decade, antiretroviral therapy targeting the viral entry process, reverse transcriptase, integrase, and protease, has prolonged the lives of people infected with human immunodeficiency virus type 1 (HIV-1). However, despite the development of more effective therapeutic strategies, reservoirs of viral infection remain. This review discusses molecular mechanisms surrounding the development of latency from the site of integration to pre- and post-integration maintenance of latency, including epigenetic factors. In addition, an overview of innate and adaptive cells important to HIV-1 infection are examined from the viewpoint of cytokines released and cytokines that act on these cells to explore an overall understanding of HIV-1 proviral genome activation. Finally, this review is discussed from the viewpoint of how an understanding of the interplay of all of these factors will help guide the next generation of therapies.
doi:10.1007/s11481-010-9207-x
PMCID: PMC3057210  PMID: 20387125
HIV-1; transcription; latency; immune factors
25.  Complex disease genetics: present and future translational applications 
Genome Medicine  2009;1(11):104.
A report on the British Atherosclerosis Society autumn meeting 'Genetics of Complex Diseases', Cambridge, UK, 17-18 September 2009.
doi:10.1186/gm104
PMCID: PMC2808739  PMID: 19891794

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