Search tips
Search criteria

Results 1-5 (5)

Clipboard (0)

Select a Filter Below

Year of Publication
more »
Document Types
author:("carpten, oli")
1.  Actin-associated protein palladin promotes tumor cell invasion by linking extracellular matrix degradation to cell cytoskeleton 
Molecular Biology of the Cell  2014;25(17):2556-2570.
This study identifies a novel protein interaction between the key cell-surface collagenase MT1-MMP and the dynamic actin-binding protein palladin, which links extracellular matrix degradation to cytoskeletal dynamics and migration signaling, thus promoting mesenchymal invasion of breast carcinoma cells.
Basal-like breast carcinomas, characterized by unfavorable prognosis and frequent metastases, are associated with epithelial-to-mesenchymal transition. During this process, cancer cells undergo cytoskeletal reorganization and up-regulate membrane-type 1 matrix metalloproteinase (MT1-MMP; MMP14), which functions in actin-based pseudopods to drive invasion by extracellular matrix degradation. However, the mechanisms that couple matrix proteolysis to the actin cytoskeleton in cell invasion have remained unclear. On the basis of a yeast two-hybrid screen for the MT1-MMP cytoplasmic tail-binding proteins, we identify here a novel Src-regulated protein interaction between the dynamic cytoskeletal scaffold protein palladin and MT1-MMP. These proteins were coexpressed in invasive human basal-like breast carcinomas and corresponding cell lines, where they were associated in the same matrix contacting and degrading membrane complexes. The silencing and overexpression of the 90-kDa palladin isoform revealed the functional importance of the interaction with MT1-MMP in pericellular matrix degradation and mesenchymal tumor cell invasion, whereas in MT1-MMP–negative cells, palladin overexpression was insufficient for invasion. Moreover, this invasion was inhibited in a dominant-negative manner by an immunoglobulin domain–containing palladin fragment lacking the dynamic scaffold and Src-binding domains. These results identify a novel protein interaction that links matrix degradation to cytoskeletal dynamics and migration signaling in mesenchymal cell invasion.
PMCID: PMC4148246  PMID: 24989798
2.  Neurofibromatosis 2011: a report of the Children’s Tumor Foundation Annual Meeting 
Acta Neuropathologica  2011;123(3):369-380.
The 2011 annual meeting of the Children’s Tumor Foundation, the annual gathering of the neurofibromatosis (NF) research and clinical communities, was attended by 330 participants who discussed integration of new signaling pathways into NF research, the appreciation for NF mutations in sporadic cancers, and an expanding pre-clinical and clinical agenda. NF1, NF2, and schwannomatosis collectively affect approximately 100,000 persons in US, and result from mutations in different genes. Benign tumors of NF1 (neurofibroma and optic pathway glioma) and NF2 (schwannoma, ependymoma, and meningioma) and schwannomatosis (schwannoma) can cause significant morbidity, and there are no proven drug treatments for any form of NF. Each disorder is associated with additional manifestations causing morbidity. The research presentations described in this review covered basic science, preclinical testing, and results from clinical trials, and demonstrate the remarkable strides being taken toward understanding of and progress toward treatments for these disorders based on the close interaction among scientists and clinicians.
PMCID: PMC3282898  PMID: 22083253
3.  A Class III PDZ Binding Motif in the Myotilin and FATZ Families Binds Enigma Family Proteins: a Common Link for Z-Disc Myopathies▿  
Molecular and Cellular Biology  2008;29(3):822-834.
Interactions between Z-disc proteins regulate muscle functions and disruption of these interactions results in muscle disorders. Mutations in Z-disc components myotilin, ZASP/Cypher, and FATZ-2 (calsarcin-1/myozenin-2) are associated with myopathies. We report here that the myotilin and the FATZ (calsarcin/myozenin) families share high homology at their final C-terminal five amino acids. This C-terminal E[ST][DE][DE]L motif is present almost exclusively in these families and is evolutionary conserved. We show by in vitro and in vivo studies that proteins from the myotilin and FATZ (calsarcin/myozenin) families interact via this novel type of class III PDZ binding motif with the PDZ domains of ZASP/Cypher and other Enigma family members: ALP, CLP-36, and RIL. We show that the interactions can be modulated by phosphorylation. Calmodulin-dependent kinase II phosphorylates the C terminus of FATZ-3 (calsarcin-3/myozenin-3) and myotilin, whereas PKA phosphorylates that of FATZ-1 (calsarcin-2/myozenin-1) and FATZ-2 (calsarcin-1/myozenin-1). This is the first report of a binding motif common to both the myotilin and the FATZ (calsarcin/myozenin) families that is specific for interactions with Enigma family members.
PMCID: PMC2630697  PMID: 19047374
4.  Analysis of cyclins A, B1, D1 and E in breast cancer in relation to tumour grade and other prognostic factors 
BMC Research Notes  2009;2:140.
The cell cycle is promoted by activation of cyclin dependent kinases (Cdks), which are regulated positively by cyclins and negatively by Cdk inhibitors. Proliferation of carcinoma is associated with altered regulation of the cell cycle. Little is known on the combined alterations of cyclins A, B1, D1 and E in breast cancer in relation to the tumour grade and other prognostic factors.
Immunohistochemical analysis of cyclins A, B1, D1 and E, estrogen receptor, progesterone receptor, Ki-67, Her-2/neu and CK5/6 was performed on 53 breast carcinomas. mRNA levels of the cyclins were analysed of 12 samples by RT-PCR. The expression of cyclins A, B1 and E correlated with each other, while cyclin D1 correlated with none of these cyclins. Cyclins A, B1 and E showed association with tumour grade, Her-2/neu and Ki-67. Cyclin E had a negative correlation with hormone receptors and a positive correlation with triple negative carcinomas. Cyclin D1 had a positive correlation with ER, PR and non-basal breast carcinomas.
Cyclin A, B1 and E overexpression correlates to grade, Ki-67 and Her2/neu expression. Overexpression of cyclin D1 has a positive correlation with receptor status and non-basal carcinomas suggesting that cyclin D1 expression might be a marker of good prognosis. Combined analysis of cyclins indicates that cyclin A, B and E expression is similarly regulated, while other factors regulate cyclin D1 expression. The results suggest that the combined immunoreactivity of cyclins A, B1, D and E might be a useful prognostic factor in breast cancer.
PMCID: PMC2716358  PMID: 19615042
5.  Palladin interacts with SH3 domains of SPIN90 and Src and is required for Src-induced cytoskeletal remodeling 
Experimental cell research  2007;313(12):2575-2585.
Palladin and SPIN90 are widely expressed proteins, which participate in modulation of actin cytoskeleton by binding to a variety of scaffold and signaling molecules. Cytoskeletal reorganization can induced by activation of signaling pathways, including the PDGF receptor and Src tyrosine kinase pathways. In this study we have analyzed the interplay between palladin, SPIN90 and Src, and characterized the role of palladin and SPIN90 in PDGF and Src-induced cytoskeletal remodeling. We show that the SH3 domains of SPIN90 and Src directly bind palladin’s poly-proline sequence and the interaction controls intracellular targeting of SPIN90. In PDGF-treated cells, palladin and SPIN90 co-localize in actin rich membrane ruffles and lamellipodia. The effect of PDGF on the cytoskeleton is at least partly mediated by the Src kinase, since PP2, a selective Src kinase family inhibitor, blocked PDGF-induced changes. Furthermore, expression of active Src kinase resulted in coordinated translocation of both palladin and SPIN90 to membrane protrusions. Knock-down of endogenous SPIN90 did not inhibit Src-induced cytoskeletal rearrangement, whereas knock-down of palladin resulted in cytoskeletal disorganization and inhibition of remodeling. Further studies showed that palladin is tyrosine phosphorylated in cells expressing active Src indicating bidirectional interplay between palladin and Src. These results may have implications in understanding the invasive and metastatic phenotype of neoplastic cells induced by Src.
PMCID: PMC2000818  PMID: 17537434
Palladin; SPIN90; Src; cytoskeleton

Results 1-5 (5)