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author:("Saha, shampay")
1.  Death or Neurodevelopmental Impairment at 18 To 22 Months in a Randomized Trial of Early Dexamethasone to Prevent Death or Chronic Lung Disease in Extremely Low Birth Weight Infants 
The Journal of pediatrics  2013;164(1):34-39.e2.
Objective
To evaluate the incidence of death or neurodevelopmental impairment (NDI) at 18 to 22 months corrected age in subjects enrolled in a trial of early dexamethasone treatment to prevent death or chronic lung disease in extremely low birth weight infants.
Methods
Evaluation of infants at 18 to 22 months corrected age included anthropomorphic measurements, a standard neurological examination, and the Bayley Scales of Infant Development-II, including the Mental Developmental Index (MDI) and the Psychomotor Developmental Index (PDI). NDI was defined as moderate or severe cerebral palsy, MDI or PDI less than 70, blindness, or hearing impairment.
Results
Death or NDI at 18 to 22 months corrected age was similar in the dexamethasone and placebo groups (65 vs 66 percent, p= 0.99 among those with known outcome). The proportion of survivors with NDI was also similar, as were mean values for weight, length, and head circumference and the proportion of infants with poor growth (50 vs 41 percent, p=0.42 for weight less than 10th percentile). Forty nine percent of infants in the placebo group received treatment with corticosteroid compared to 32% in the dexamethasone group (p=0.02).
Conclusion
The risk of death or NDI and rate of poor growth were high but similar in the dexamethasone and placebo groups. The lack of a discernible effect of early dexamethasone on neurodevelopmental outcome may be due to frequent clinical corticosteroid use in the placebo group.
doi:10.1016/j.jpeds.2013.07.027
PMCID: PMC4120744  PMID: 23992673
neurodevelopmental outcome; growth; bronchopulmonary dysplasia; cerebral palsy; neonatal follow-up
2.  Neurodevelopmental Outcomes of Extremely Low Birth Weight Infants with Spontaneous Intestinal Perforation or Surgical Necrotizing Enterocolitis 
Objective
To determine if extremely low birth weight infants with surgical necrotizing enterocolitis have a higher risk of death or neurodevelopmental impairment and neurodevelopmental impairment among survivors (secondary outcome) at 18–22 months corrected age compared to infants with spontaneous intestinal perforation and infants without necrotizing enterocolitis or spontaneous intestinal perforation.
Study Design
Retrospective analysis of the Neonatal Research Network very low birth weight registry, evaluating extremely low birth weight infants born between 2000–2005. The study infants were designated into 3 groups: 1) Spontaneous intestinal perforation without necrotizing enterocolitis; 2) Surgical necrotizing enterocolitis (Bell's stage III); and 3) Neither spontaneous intestinal perforation nor necrotizing enterocolitis. Multivariate logistic regression analysis was performed to evaluate the association between the clinical group and death or neurodevelopmental impairment, controlling for multiple confounding factors including center.
Results
Infants with surgical necrotizing enterocolitis had the highest rate of death prior to hospital discharge (53.5%) and death or neurodevelopmental impairment (82.3%) compared to infants in the spontaneous intestinal perforation group (39.1% and 79.3%) and no necrotizing enterocolitis/no spontaneous intestinal perforation group (22.1% and 53.3%; p<0.001). Similar results were observed for neurodevelopmental impairment among survivors. On logistic regression analysis, both spontaneous intestinal perforation and surgical necrotizing enterocolitis were associated with increased risk of death or neurodevelopmental impairment (adjusted OR 2.21, 95% CI: 1.5, 3.2 and adjusted OR 2.11, 95% CI: 1.5, 2.9 respectively) and neurodevelopmental impairment among survivors (adjusted OR 2.17, 95% CI: 1.4, 3.2 and adjusted OR 1.70, 95% CI: 1.2, 2.4 respectively).
Conclusions
Spontaneous intestinal perforation and surgical necrotizing enterocolitis are associated with a similar increase in the risk of death or neurodevelopmental impairment and neurodevelopmental impairment among extremely low birth weight survivors at 18–22 months corrected age.
doi:10.1038/jp.2013.128
PMCID: PMC3877158  PMID: 24135709
spontaneous intestinal perforation; necrotizing enterocolitis; extremely low birth weight; neurodevelopmental impairment
3.  Spontaneous Intestinal Perforation in Extremely Low Birth Weight Infants: Association with Indometacin Therapy and Effects on Neurodevelopmental Outcomes at 18-22 months Corrected Age 
Background
Spontaneous intestinal perforation (SIP) is associated with the use of postnatal glucocorticoids and indometacin in extremely low birth weight (ELBW) infants. We hypothesized: 1) an association of SIP with the use of antenatal steroids (ANS) and indometacin either as prophylaxis for IVH (P Indo) or for treatment of PDA (Indo/PDA) and 2) an increased risk of death or abnormal neurodevelopmental outcomes in infants with SIP at 18-22 months corrected age.
Design/Methods
We retrospectively identified ELBW infants with SIP in the Neonatal Research Network’s generic database. Unadjusted analysis identified the differences in maternal, neonatal and clinical variables between infants with and without SIP. Logistic regression analysis identified the adjusted odds ratio for SIP with reference to ANS, P Indo and Indo/PDA. Neurodevelopmental outcomes were assessed among survivors at 18 to 22 months corrected age.
Results
Indo/PDA was associated with an increased risk of SIP (adjusted OR 1.61; 95% CI 1.25,2.08), while P Indo and ANS were not. SIP was independently associated with an increased risk of death or NDI (adjusted OR−1.85; 95% CI 1.32,2.60) and NDI among survivors (adjusted OR−1.75, 95% CI 1.20,2.55).
Conclusion
Indometacin used for IVH prophylaxis and ANS were not associated with the occurrence of SIP in ELBW infants. Indometacin used for treatment of symptomatic PDA was however associated with an increased risk of SIP. ELBW infants with SIP have an increased risk of poor neurodevelopmental outcomes.
doi:10.1136/archdischild-2011-300659
PMCID: PMC3753803  PMID: 22684157
extremely low birth weight infant; intestinal perforation; indometacin; cerebral palsy
4.  Cytokine Profiles of Preterm Neonates with Fungal and Bacterial Sepsis 
Pediatric research  2012;72(2):212-220.
Background
Information on cytokine profiles in fungal sepsis (FS), an important cause of mortality in extremely low birthweight infants (ELBW), is lacking. We hypothesized that cytokine profiles in the 1st 21 days of life in ELBW with FS differ from those with bacterial sepsis (BS) or no sepsis (NS).
Methods
In a secondary analyses of the NICHD Cytokine study, three groups were defined - FS (≥1 episode of FS), BS (≥1 episode of BS without FS), and NS. Association between 11 cytokines assayed in dried blood spots obtained on days 0-1, 3±1, 7±2, 14±3, and 21±3 and sepsis group was explored.
Results
Of 1066 infants, 89 had FS and 368 had BS. Compared to BS, FS was more likely to be associated with lower birthweight, vaginal delivery, patent ductus arteriosus, postnatal steroids, multiple central lines, longer respiratory support and hospital stay, and higher mortality (p<0.05). Analyses controlling for covariates showed significant group differences over time for IFN-γ, IL-10, IL-18, TGF-β and TNF-α (p<0.05).
Conclusion
Significant differences in profiles for IFN-γ, IL-10, IL-18, TGF-β and TNF-α in FS, BS or NS in this hypothesis-generating secondary study require validation in rigorously designed prospective studies and may have implications for diagnosis and treatment.
doi:10.1038/pr.2012.56
PMCID: PMC3629907  PMID: 22562288
5.  Perinatal Systemic Inflammatory Response Syndrome and Retinopathy of Prematurity 
Pediatric research  2010;67(4):394-400.
Fetal and neonatal inflammation is associated with several morbidities of prematurity. Its relationship to retinopathy of prematurity (ROP) has not been investigated. Our objective was to determine the relationship between cytokine levels and ROP in the first three postnatal weeks. Data for this study were derived from the NICHD Cytokine Study. Dried blood spots were obtained from infants <1000g on days 0-1, 3±1, 7±2, 14±3, and 21±3. Infants were classified into three groups – No, Mild, and Severe ROP. Multiplex Luminex assay was used to quantify 20 cytokines. Temporal profiles of cytokines were evaluated using mixed effects models after controlling for covariates. Of 1074 infants enrolled, 890 were examined for ROP and 877 included in the analysis. ROP was associated with several clinical characteristics on unadjusted analyses. Eight cytokines remained significantly different across ROP groups in adjusted analyses. IL-6 and IL-17 showed significant effects in early time periods (D0-3); TGF-β, brain derived neurotrophic factor (BDNF), and regulated upon activation, normal T cell expressed and secreted (RANTES) in later time periods (D7-21) and IL-18, C-reactive protein (CRP) and neurotrophin-4 (NT-4) in both early and later time periods. We conclude that perinatal inflammation may be involved in the pathogenesis of ROP.
doi:10.1203/PDR.0b013e3181d01a36
PMCID: PMC2873779  PMID: 20032809
6.  Neonatal Outcomes of Extremely Preterm Infants From the NICHD Neonatal Research Network 
Pediatrics  2010;126(3):443-456.
OBJECTIVE
This report presents data from the Eunice Kennedy Shriver National Institute of Child Health and Human Development Neonatal Research Network on care of and morbidity and mortality rates for very low birth weight infants, according to gestational age (GA).
METHODS
Perinatal/neonatal data were collected for 9575 infants of extremely low GA (22–28 weeks) and very low birth weight (401–1500 g) who were born at network centers between January 1, 2003, and December 31, 2007.
RESULTS
Rates of survival to discharge increased with increasing GA (6% at 22 weeks and 92% at 28 weeks); 1060 infants died at ≤ 12 hours, with most early deaths occurring at 22 and 23 weeks (85% and 43%, respectively). Rates of prenatal steroid use (13% and 53%, respectively), cesarean section (7% and 24%, respectively), and delivery room intubation (19% and 68%, respectively) increased markedly between 22 and 23 weeks. Infants at the lowest GAs were at greatest risk for morbidities. Overall, 93% had respiratory distress syndrome, 46% patent ductus arteriosus, 16% severe intraventricular hemorrhage, 11% necrotizing enterocolitis, and 36% late-onset sepsis. The new severity-based definition of bronchopulmonary dysplasia classified more infants as having bronchopulmonary dysplasia than did the traditional definition of supplemental oxygen use at 36 weeks (68%, compared with 42%). More than one-half of infants with extremely low GAs had undetermined retinopathy status at the time of discharge. Center differences in management and outcomes were identified.
CONCLUSION
Although the majority of infants with GAs of ≥24 weeks survive, high rates of morbidity among survivors continue to be observed.
doi:10.1542/peds.2009-2959
PMCID: PMC2982806  PMID: 20732945
extremely low gestation; very low birth weight; morbidity; death
7.  SYNCHRONIZED NASAL INTERMITTENT POSITIVE PRESSURE VENTILATION AND NEONATAL OUTCOMES: A RETROSPECTIVE STUDY 
Pediatrics  2009;124(2):517-526.
Background
Current literature suggests that use of synchronized nasal intermittent positive pressure ventilation (SNIPPV), following extubation, reduces the rate of reintubation compared to nasal continuous positive airway pressure (NCPAP). However, there is limited information available on the outcomes of infants managed with SNIPPV.
Objectives
To compare the outcomes of infants managed with SNIPPV (postextubation or for apnea) to infants not treated with SNIPPV at 2 sites.
Methods
Clinical retrospective data was used to evaluate the use of SNIPPV in infants ≤1250 g birth weight (BW); and 3 BW subgroups (500 –750, 751–1000, and 1001–1250 g, decided a priori). SNIPPV was not assigned randomly. Bronchopulmonary dysplasia (BPD) was defined as treatment with supplemental oxygen at 36 weeks’ postmenstrual age.
Results
Overall, infants who were treated with SNIPPV had significantly lower mean BW (863g vs. 964g) and gestational age (26.4 weeks vs. 27.9 weeks), more frequently received surfactant (85% vs. 68%), and had a higher incidence of BPD or death (39% vs. 27%) (all p<0.01), compared to infants treated with NCPAP. In the subgroup analysis, SNIPPV was associated with lower rates of BPD (43% vs 67%, P = .03) and BPD/death (51% vs 76%, P = .02) in the 500- to 750g infants, with no significant differences in the other BW groups. Logistic regression analysis, adjusting for significant covariates, revealed infants with 500 –700-g BW who received SNIPPV were significantly less likely to have the outcomes of BPD (OR: 0.29 [95% CI: 0.11– 0.77]; P = .01), BPD/death (OR: 0.30 [95% CI: 0.11– 0.79]; P = .01), neurodevelopmental impairment (NDI) (OR: 0.29 [95% CI: 0.09–0.94]; P = .04), and NDI/death (OR: 0.18 [95% CI: 0.05– 0.62]; P = .006).
Conclusion
SNIPPV use in infants at greatest risk of BPD or death (500-750g) was associated with decreased BPD, BPD/death, NDI, and NDI/death when compared to infants managed with NCPAP.
doi:10.1542/peds.2008-1302
PMCID: PMC2924622  PMID: 19651577
premature newborn; respiratory distress syndrome; non-invasive ventilation
8.  Indomethacin Prophylaxis for Preterm Infants: the Impact of Two Multicentered Randomized Controlled Trials on Clinical Practice 
The Journal of pediatrics  2007;150(1):46-50.e2.
Objectives
Two multicentered RCTs in premature infants (Ment et al, 1994 and TIPP, 2001) found beneficial effects of indomethacin prophylaxis on the incidences of patent ductus arteriosus (PDA), PDA ligation, and severe intracranial hemorrhage (ICH). The Ment-trial recommended its use. The TIPP-trial failed to find a benefit in its primary outcome (improved survival/neurodevelopmental outcome). This negative result may have discouraged prophylactic indomethacin use.
Study Design
We used the NICHD Neonatal Network Registry to determine the association between the two trials and the use of prophylactic indomethacin. We also statistically assessed the assumptions that led to the TIPP trial’s negative results.
Results
Use of prophylactic indomethacin among Network clinicians increased after publication of the Ment-trial and decreased after the TIPP-trial. Analysis of the TIPP-trial showed that the primary outcome’s anticipated effect size (≥20%) was too large; a smaller effect size (<3%) would have been more appropriate based on the incidence of ICH in their population, and its association with neurodevelopmental outcome..
Conclusions
Two multicentered RCTs were associated with changes in indomethacin prophylaxis. Following the Ment-trial, its use increased. Following the TIPP-trial, which reported negative results based on too large an anticipated effect size, its use decreased.
doi:10.1016/j.jpeds.2006.09.001
PMCID: PMC1849955  PMID: 17188612
patent ductus arteriosus; intraccranial hemorrhage

Results 1-8 (8)