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1.  Sustained and Shorter Bouts of Physical Activity are Related to Cardiovascular Health 
Purpose
Whereas greater physical activity (PA) is known to prevent cardiovascular disease (CVD), the relative importance of performing PA in sustained bouts of activity versus shorter bouts of activity on CVD risk is not known. The objective of this study was to investigate the relationship between moderate-to-vigorous physical activity (MVPA), measured in bouts ≥10 minutes and <10 minutes, and CVD risk factors in a well-characterized, community-based sample of white adults.
Methods
We conducted a cross-sectional analysis of 2109 Framingham Heart Study Third Generation participants (mean age 47 years, 55% women) who underwent objective assessment of PA by accelerometry over 5–7 days. Total MVPA, MVPA done in bouts ≥10 minutes (MVPA10+), and MVPA done in bouts <10 minutes (MVPA<10) were calculated. MVPA exposures were related to individual CVD risk factors, including measures of adiposity and blood lipid and glucose levels, using linear and logistic regression.
Results
Total MVPA was significantly associated with higher high-density lipoprotein (HDL) levels, and with lower triglycerides, BMI, waist circumference and Framingham risk score (P <0.0001). MVPA<10 showed similar statistically significant associations with these CVD risk factors (P <0.001). Compliance with national guidelines (≥150 minutes of total MVPA) was significantly related to lower BMI, triglycerides, Framingham risk score, waist circumference, higher HDL, and a lower prevalence of obesity and impaired fasting glucose (P < 0.001 for all).
Conclusions
Our cross-sectional observations on a large middle-aged community-based sample confirm a positive association of MVPA with a healthier CVD risk factor profile, and indicate that accruing physical activity in bouts <10 minutes may favorably influence cardiometabolic risk. Additional investigations are warranted to confirm our findings.
doi:10.1249/MSS.0b013e31826beae5
PMCID: PMC4166425  PMID: 22895372
accelerometer; heart disease; exercise; guidelines
2.  Transforming Growth Factor Beta-1 and Incidence of Heart Failure in Older Adults: The Cardiovascular Health Study 
Cytokine  2012;60(2):341-345.
Context
Transforming growth factor-beta1 (TGF-B1) is a highly pleiotropic cytokine whose functions include a central role in the induction of fibrosis.
Objective
To investigate the hypothesis that elevated plasma levels of TGF-B1 are positively associated with incident heart failure (HF).
Participants and Methods
The hypotheses were tested using a two-phase case-control study design, ancillary to the Cardiovascular Health Study – a longitudinal, population-based cohort study. Cases were defined as having an incident HF event after their 1992-93 exam and controls were free of HF at follow-up. TGF-B1 was measured using plasma collected in 1992-93 and data from 89 cases and 128 controls were used for analysis. The association between TGF-B1 and risk of HF was evaluated using the weighted likelihood method, and odds ratios (OR) for risk of HF were calculated for TGF-B1 as a continuous linear variable and across quartiles of TGF-B1.
Results
The OR for HF was 1.88 (95% confidence intervals [CI] 1.26 to 2.81) for each nanogram increase in TGF-B1, and the OR for the highest quartile (compared to the lowest) of TGF-B1 was 5.79 (95% CI 1.65 – 20.34), after adjustment for age, sex, C-reactive protein, platelet count and digoxin use. Further adjustment with other covariates did not change the results.
Conclusions
Higher levels of plasma TGF-B1 were associated with an increased risk of incident heart failure among older adults. However, further study is needed in larger samples to confirm these findings.
doi:10.1016/j.cyto.2012.07.013
PMCID: PMC4143419  PMID: 22878343
transforming growth factor-beta; heart failure; fibrosis; growth factors; cardiac remodeling
3.  A genome-wide association study for venous thromboembolism: the extended Cohorts for Heart and Aging Research in Genomic Epidemiology (CHARGE) Consortium 
Genetic epidemiology  2013;37(5):512-521.
Venous thromboembolism (VTE) is a common, heritable disease resulting in high rates of hospitalization and mortality. Yet few associations between VTE and genetic variants, all in the coagulation pathway, have been established. To identify additional genetic determinants of VTE, we conducted a 2-stage genome-wide association study (GWAS) among individuals of European ancestry in the extended CHARGE VTE consortium. The discovery GWAS comprised 1,618 incident VTE cases out of 44,499 participants from six community-based studies. Genotypes for genome-wide single-nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs) were imputed to ~2.5 million SNPs in HapMap and association with VTE assessed using study-design appropriate regression methods. Meta-analysis of these results identified two known loci, in F5 and ABO. Top 1,047 tag SNPs (p≤0.0016) from the discovery GWAS were tested for association in an additional 3,231 cases and 3,536 controls from three case-control studies. In the combined data from these two stages, additional genome-wide significant associations were observed on 4q35 at F11 (top SNP rs4253399, intronic to F11) and on 4q28 at FGG (rs6536024, 9.7 kb from FGG) (p<5.0×10−13 for both). The associations at the FGG locus were not completely explained by previously reported variants. Loci at or near SUSD1 and OTUD7A showed borderline yet novel associations (p<5.0×10-6) and constitute new candidate genes. In conclusion, this large GWAS replicated key genetic associations in F5 and ABO, and confirmed the importance of F11 and FGG loci for VTE. Future studies are warranted to better characterize the associations with F11 and FGG and to replicate the new candidate associations.
doi:10.1002/gepi.21731
PMCID: PMC3990406  PMID: 23650146
venous thrombosis; genetics; genome-wide association; genetic epidemiology
4.  Genetic variation associated with circulating monocyte count in the eMERGE Network 
Human Molecular Genetics  2013;22(10):2119-2127.
With white blood cell count emerging as an important risk factor for chronic inflammatory diseases, genetic associations of differential leukocyte types, specifically monocyte count, are providing novel candidate genes and pathways to further investigate. Circulating monocytes play a critical role in vascular diseases such as in the formation of atherosclerotic plaque. We performed a joint and ancestry-stratified genome-wide association analyses to identify variants specifically associated with monocyte count in 11 014 subjects in the electronic Medical Records and Genomics Network. In the joint and European ancestry samples, we identified novel associations in the chromosome 16 interferon regulatory factor 8 (IRF8) gene (P-value = 2.78×10(−16), β = −0.22). Other monocyte associations include novel missense variants in the chemokine-binding protein 2 (CCBP2) gene (P-value = 1.88×10(−7), β = 0.30) and a region of replication found in ribophorin I (RPN1) (P-value = 2.63×10(−16), β = −0.23) on chromosome 3. The CCBP2 and RPN1 region is located near GATA binding protein2 gene that has been previously shown to be associated with coronary heart disease. On chromosome 9, we found a novel association in the prostaglandin reductase 1 gene (P-value = 2.29×10(−7), β = 0.16), which is downstream from lysophosphatidic acid receptor 1. This region has previously been shown to be associated with monocyte count. We also replicated monocyte associations of genome-wide significance (P-value = 5.68×10(−17), β = −0.23) at the integrin, alpha 4 gene on chromosome 2. The novel IRF8 results and further replications provide supporting evidence of genetic regions associated with monocyte count.
doi:10.1093/hmg/ddt010
PMCID: PMC3633369  PMID: 23314186
5.  A Pilot Study Identifying Statin Non-adherence With Visit-to-visit Variability of Low Density Lipoprotein-Cholesterol 
The American journal of cardiology  2013;111(10):1437-1442.
Non-adherence to cardiovascular medications such as statins is a common, important problem. Clinicians currently rely on intuition to identify medication non-adherence. The visit-to-visit variability (VVV) of LDL-C may represent an opportunity to identify statin non-adherence with greater accuracy. We examined the clinical and pharmacy data from 782 members of the Boston Medical Center (BMC) Health Plan, seen at either BMC or its affiliated Community Health Centers, who were taking statins and had at least 3 LDL-C measurements between 2008 and 2011. The LDL-C VVV (defined by the within-patient standard deviation) was categorized into quintiles. Multivariable logistic regression models were generated with statin non-adherence (defined by the standard 80% pharmacy refill based medication possession ratio threshold) as the dependent variable. The proportion of statin non-adherence increased across quintiles of LDL-C VVV (64.3%, 71.2%, 89.2%, 92.3%, 91.7%). Higher quintiles of LDL-C VVV had a strong positive association with statin non-adherence with an adjusted odds ratio of 3.4 (CI: 1.7–7.1) in the highest versus lowest quintile of LDL-C VVV. The age and gender adjusted model had poor discrimination [C-statistic 0.62 (CI: 0.57, 0.67)] while the final adjusted (age, gender, race, mean LDL-C) model demonstrated good discrimination [C-statistic 0.75 (CI: 0.71, 0.79)] between adherent and non-adherent patients. In conclusion, the VVV of LDL-C demonstrated a strong association with statin non-adherence in a clinic setting. Further, a VVV- of LDL-C based model has good discrimination characteristics for statin non-adherence. Research is needed to validate and generalize these findings to other populations and biomarkers.
doi:10.1016/j.amjcard.2013.01.297
PMCID: PMC3644321  PMID: 23433758
Visit-to-visit variability; statins; medication adherence
6.  Genome-Wide Association Study of Cardiac Structure and Systolic Function in African Americans: The Candidate Gene Association Resource (CARe) Study 
Background
Using data from four community-based cohorts of African Americans (AA), we tested the association between genome-wide markers (SNPs) and cardiac phenotypes in the Candidate-gene Association REsource (CARe) study.
Methods and Results
Among 6,765 AA, we related age, sex, height and weight-adjusted residuals for nine cardiac phenotypes (assessed by echocardiogram or MRI) to 2.5 million SNPs genotyped using Genome-Wide Affymetrix Human SNP Array 6.0 (Affy6.0) and the remainder imputed. Within cohort genome-wide association analysis was conducted followed by meta-analysis across cohorts using inverse variance weights (genome-wide significance threshold=4.0 ×10−07). Supplementary pathway analysis was performed. We attempted replication in 3 smaller cohorts of African ancestry and tested look-ups in one consortium of European ancestry (EchoGEN). Across the 9 phenotypes, variants in 4 genetic loci reached genome-wide significance: rs4552931 in UBE2V2 (p=1.43 × 10−07) for left ventricular mass (LVM); rs7213314 in WIPI1 (p=1.68 × 10−07) for LV internal diastolic diameter (LVIDD); rs1571099 in PPAPDC1A (p= 2.57 × 10−08) for interventricular septal wall thickness (IVST); and rs9530176 in KLF5 (p=4.02 × 10−07) for ejection fraction (EF). Associated variants were enriched in three signaling pathways involved in cardiac remodeling. None of the 4 loci replicated in cohorts of African ancestry were confirmed in look-ups in EchoGEN.
Conclusions
In the largest GWAS of cardiac structure and function to date in AA, we identified 4 genetic loci related to LVM, IVST, LVIDD and EF that reached genome-wide significance. Replication results suggest that these loci may represent unique to individuals of African ancestry. Additional large-scale studies are warranted for these complex phenotypes.
doi:10.1161/CIRCGENETICS.111.962365
PMCID: PMC3591479  PMID: 23275298
echocardiography; ethnic; genome-wide association studies; Left atrium genetics; left ventricular mass genetics
7.  Genetic Loci for Retinal Arteriolar Microcirculation 
PLoS ONE  2013;8(6):e65804.
Narrow arterioles in the retina have been shown to predict hypertension as well as other vascular diseases, likely through an increase in the peripheral resistance of the microcirculatory flow. In this study, we performed a genome-wide association study in 18,722 unrelated individuals of European ancestry from the Cohorts for Heart and Aging Research in Genomic Epidemiology consortium and the Blue Mountain Eye Study, to identify genetic determinants associated with variations in retinal arteriolar caliber. Retinal vascular calibers were measured on digitized retinal photographs using a standardized protocol. One variant (rs2194025 on chromosome 5q14 near the myocyte enhancer factor 2C MEF2C gene) was associated with retinal arteriolar caliber in the meta-analysis of the discovery cohorts at genome-wide significance of P-value <5×10−8. This variant was replicated in an additional 3,939 individuals of European ancestry from the Australian Twins Study and Multi-Ethnic Study of Atherosclerosis (rs2194025, P-value = 2.11×10−12 in combined meta-analysis of discovery and replication cohorts). In independent studies of modest sample sizes, no significant association was found between this variant and clinical outcomes including coronary artery disease, stroke, myocardial infarction or hypertension. In conclusion, we found one novel loci which underlie genetic variation in microvasculature which may be relevant to vascular disease. The relevance of these findings to clinical outcomes remains to be determined.
doi:10.1371/journal.pone.0065804
PMCID: PMC3680438  PMID: 23776548
8.  No Interactions Between Previously Associated 2-Hour Glucose Gene Variants and Physical Activity or BMI on 2-Hour Glucose Levels 
Scott, Robert A. | Chu, Audrey Y. | Grarup, Niels | Manning, Alisa K. | Hivert, Marie-France | Shungin, Dmitry | Tönjes, Anke | Yesupriya, Ajay | Barnes, Daniel | Bouatia-Naji, Nabila | Glazer, Nicole L. | Jackson, Anne U. | Kutalik, Zoltán | Lagou, Vasiliki | Marek, Diana | Rasmussen-Torvik, Laura J. | Stringham, Heather M. | Tanaka, Toshiko | Aadahl, Mette | Arking, Dan E. | Bergmann, Sven | Boerwinkle, Eric | Bonnycastle, Lori L. | Bornstein, Stefan R. | Brunner, Eric | Bumpstead, Suzannah J. | Brage, Soren | Carlson, Olga D. | Chen, Han | Chen, Yii-Der Ida | Chines, Peter S. | Collins, Francis S. | Couper, David J. | Dennison, Elaine M. | Dowling, Nicole F. | Egan, Josephine S. | Ekelund, Ulf | Erdos, Michael R. | Forouhi, Nita G. | Fox, Caroline S. | Goodarzi, Mark O. | Grässler, Jürgen | Gustafsson, Stefan | Hallmans, Göran | Hansen, Torben | Hingorani, Aroon | Holloway, John W. | Hu, Frank B. | Isomaa, Bo | Jameson, Karen A. | Johansson, Ingegerd | Jonsson, Anna | Jørgensen, Torben | Kivimaki, Mika | Kovacs, Peter | Kumari, Meena | Kuusisto, Johanna | Laakso, Markku | Lecoeur, Cécile | Lévy-Marchal, Claire | Li, Guo | Loos, Ruth J.F. | Lyssenko, Valeri | Marmot, Michael | Marques-Vidal, Pedro | Morken, Mario A. | Müller, Gabriele | North, Kari E. | Pankow, James S. | Payne, Felicity | Prokopenko, Inga | Psaty, Bruce M. | Renström, Frida | Rice, Ken | Rotter, Jerome I. | Rybin, Denis | Sandholt, Camilla H. | Sayer, Avan A. | Shrader, Peter | Schwarz, Peter E.H. | Siscovick, David S. | Stančáková, Alena | Stumvoll, Michael | Teslovich, Tanya M. | Waeber, Gérard | Williams, Gordon H. | Witte, Daniel R. | Wood, Andrew R. | Xie, Weijia | Boehnke, Michael | Cooper, Cyrus | Ferrucci, Luigi | Froguel, Philippe | Groop, Leif | Kao, W.H. Linda | Vollenweider, Peter | Walker, Mark | Watanabe, Richard M. | Pedersen, Oluf | Meigs, James B. | Ingelsson, Erik | Barroso, Inês | Florez, Jose C. | Franks, Paul W. | Dupuis, Josée | Wareham, Nicholas J. | Langenberg, Claudia
Diabetes  2012;61(5):1291-1296.
Gene–lifestyle interactions have been suggested to contribute to the development of type 2 diabetes. Glucose levels 2 h after a standard 75-g glucose challenge are used to diagnose diabetes and are associated with both genetic and lifestyle factors. However, whether these factors interact to determine 2-h glucose levels is unknown. We meta-analyzed single nucleotide polymorphism (SNP) × BMI and SNP × physical activity (PA) interaction regression models for five SNPs previously associated with 2-h glucose levels from up to 22 studies comprising 54,884 individuals without diabetes. PA levels were dichotomized, with individuals below the first quintile classified as inactive (20%) and the remainder as active (80%). BMI was considered a continuous trait. Inactive individuals had higher 2-h glucose levels than active individuals (β = 0.22 mmol/L [95% CI 0.13–0.31], P = 1.63 × 10−6). All SNPs were associated with 2-h glucose (β = 0.06–0.12 mmol/allele, P ≤ 1.53 × 10−7), but no significant interactions were found with PA (P > 0.18) or BMI (P ≥ 0.04). In this large study of gene–lifestyle interaction, we observed no interactions between genetic and lifestyle factors, both of which were associated with 2-h glucose. It is perhaps unlikely that top loci from genome-wide association studies will exhibit strong subgroup-specific effects, and may not, therefore, make the best candidates for the study of interactions.
doi:10.2337/db11-0973
PMCID: PMC3331745  PMID: 22415877
9.  A genome-wide approach accounting for body mass index identifies genetic variants influencing fasting glycemic traits and insulin resistance 
Manning, Alisa K. | Hivert, Marie-France | Scott, Robert A. | Grimsby, Jonna L. | Bouatia-Naji, Nabila | Chen, Han | Rybin, Denis | Liu, Ching-Ti | Bielak, Lawrence F. | Prokopenko, Inga | Amin, Najaf | Barnes, Daniel | Cadby, Gemma | Hottenga, Jouke-Jan | Ingelsson, Erik | Jackson, Anne U. | Johnson, Toby | Kanoni, Stavroula | Ladenvall, Claes | Lagou, Vasiliki | Lahti, Jari | Lecoeur, Cecile | Liu, Yongmei | Martinez-Larrad, Maria Teresa | Montasser, May E. | Navarro, Pau | Perry, John R. B. | Rasmussen-Torvik, Laura J. | Salo, Perttu | Sattar, Naveed | Shungin, Dmitry | Strawbridge, Rona J. | Tanaka, Toshiko | van Duijn, Cornelia M. | An, Ping | de Andrade, Mariza | Andrews, Jeanette S. | Aspelund, Thor | Atalay, Mustafa | Aulchenko, Yurii | Balkau, Beverley | Bandinelli, Stefania | Beckmann, Jacques S. | Beilby, John P. | Bellis, Claire | Bergman, Richard N. | Blangero, John | Boban, Mladen | Boehnke, Michael | Boerwinkle, Eric | Bonnycastle, Lori L. | Boomsma, Dorret I. | Borecki, Ingrid B. | Böttcher, Yvonne | Bouchard, Claude | Brunner, Eric | Budimir, Danijela | Campbell, Harry | Carlson, Olga | Chines, Peter S. | Clarke, Robert | Collins, Francis S. | Corbatón-Anchuelo, Arturo | Couper, David | de Faire, Ulf | Dedoussis, George V | Deloukas, Panos | Dimitriou, Maria | Egan, Josephine M | Eiriksdottir, Gudny | Erdos, Michael R. | Eriksson, Johan G. | Eury, Elodie | Ferrucci, Luigi | Ford, Ian | Forouhi, Nita G. | Fox, Caroline S | Franzosi, Maria Grazia | Franks, Paul W | Frayling, Timothy M | Froguel, Philippe | Galan, Pilar | de Geus, Eco | Gigante, Bruna | Glazer, Nicole L. | Goel, Anuj | Groop, Leif | Gudnason, Vilmundur | Hallmans, Göran | Hamsten, Anders | Hansson, Ola | Harris, Tamara B. | Hayward, Caroline | Heath, Simon | Hercberg, Serge | Hicks, Andrew A. | Hingorani, Aroon | Hofman, Albert | Hui, Jennie | Hung, Joseph | Jarvelin, Marjo Riitta | Jhun, Min A. | Johnson, Paul C.D. | Jukema, J Wouter | Jula, Antti | Kao, W.H. | Kaprio, Jaakko | Kardia, Sharon L. R. | Keinanen-Kiukaanniemi, Sirkka | Kivimaki, Mika | Kolcic, Ivana | Kovacs, Peter | Kumari, Meena | Kuusisto, Johanna | Kyvik, Kirsten Ohm | Laakso, Markku | Lakka, Timo | Lannfelt, Lars | Lathrop, G Mark | Launer, Lenore J. | Leander, Karin | Li, Guo | Lind, Lars | Lindstrom, Jaana | Lobbens, Stéphane | Loos, Ruth J. F. | Luan, Jian’an | Lyssenko, Valeriya | Mägi, Reedik | Magnusson, Patrik K. E. | Marmot, Michael | Meneton, Pierre | Mohlke, Karen L. | Mooser, Vincent | Morken, Mario A. | Miljkovic, Iva | Narisu, Narisu | O’Connell, Jeff | Ong, Ken K. | Oostra, Ben A. | Palmer, Lyle J. | Palotie, Aarno | Pankow, James S. | Peden, John F. | Pedersen, Nancy L. | Pehlic, Marina | Peltonen, Leena | Penninx, Brenda | Pericic, Marijana | Perola, Markus | Perusse, Louis | Peyser, Patricia A | Polasek, Ozren | Pramstaller, Peter P. | Province, Michael A. | Räikkönen, Katri | Rauramaa, Rainer | Rehnberg, Emil | Rice, Ken | Rotter, Jerome I. | Rudan, Igor | Ruokonen, Aimo | Saaristo, Timo | Sabater-Lleal, Maria | Salomaa, Veikko | Savage, David B. | Saxena, Richa | Schwarz, Peter | Seedorf, Udo | Sennblad, Bengt | Serrano-Rios, Manuel | Shuldiner, Alan R. | Sijbrands, Eric J.G. | Siscovick, David S. | Smit, Johannes H. | Small, Kerrin S. | Smith, Nicholas L. | Smith, Albert Vernon | Stančáková, Alena | Stirrups, Kathleen | Stumvoll, Michael | Sun, Yan V. | Swift, Amy J. | Tönjes, Anke | Tuomilehto, Jaakko | Trompet, Stella | Uitterlinden, Andre G. | Uusitupa, Matti | Vikström, Max | Vitart, Veronique | Vohl, Marie-Claude | Voight, Benjamin F. | Vollenweider, Peter | Waeber, Gerard | Waterworth, Dawn M | Watkins, Hugh | Wheeler, Eleanor | Widen, Elisabeth | Wild, Sarah H. | Willems, Sara M. | Willemsen, Gonneke | Wilson, James F. | Witteman, Jacqueline C.M. | Wright, Alan F. | Yaghootkar, Hanieh | Zelenika, Diana | Zemunik, Tatijana | Zgaga, Lina | Wareham, Nicholas J. | McCarthy, Mark I. | Barroso, Ines | Watanabe, Richard M. | Florez, Jose C. | Dupuis, Josée | Meigs, James B. | Langenberg, Claudia
Nature genetics  2012;44(6):659-669.
Recent genome-wide association studies have described many loci implicated in type 2 diabetes (T2D) pathophysiology and beta-cell dysfunction, but contributed little to our understanding of the genetic basis of insulin resistance. We hypothesized that genes implicated in insulin resistance pathways may be uncovered by accounting for differences in body mass index (BMI) and potential interaction between BMI and genetic variants. We applied a novel joint meta-analytical approach to test associations with fasting insulin (FI) and glucose (FG) on a genome-wide scale. We present six previously unknown FI loci at P<5×10−8 in combined discovery and follow-up analyses of 52 studies comprising up to 96,496non-diabetic individuals. Risk variants were associated with higher triglyceride and lower HDL cholesterol levels, suggestive of a role for these FI loci in insulin resistance pathways. The localization of these additional loci will aid further characterization of the role of insulin resistance in T2D pathophysiology.
doi:10.1038/ng.2274
PMCID: PMC3613127  PMID: 22581228
10.  Genome-Wide Association Study of Retinopathy in Individuals without Diabetes 
PLoS ONE  2013;8(2):e54232.
Background
Mild retinopathy (microaneurysms or dot-blot hemorrhages) is observed in persons without diabetes or hypertension and may reflect microvascular disease in other organs. We conducted a genome-wide association study (GWAS) of mild retinopathy in persons without diabetes.
Methods
A working group agreed on phenotype harmonization, covariate selection and analytic plans for within-cohort GWAS. An inverse-variance weighted fixed effects meta-analysis was performed with GWAS results from six cohorts of 19,411 Caucasians. The primary analysis included individuals without diabetes and secondary analyses were stratified by hypertension status. We also singled out the results from single nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs) previously shown to be associated with diabetes and hypertension, the two most common causes of retinopathy.
Results
No SNPs reached genome-wide significance in the primary analysis or the secondary analysis of participants with hypertension. SNP, rs12155400, in the histone deacetylase 9 gene (HDAC9) on chromosome 7, was associated with retinopathy in analysis of participants without hypertension, −1.3±0.23 (beta ± standard error), p = 6.6×10−9. Evidence suggests this was a false positive finding. The minor allele frequency was low (∼2%), the quality of the imputation was moderate (r2 ∼0.7), and no other common variants in the HDAC9 gene were associated with the outcome. SNPs found to be associated with diabetes and hypertension in other GWAS were not associated with retinopathy in persons without diabetes or in subgroups with or without hypertension.
Conclusions
This GWAS of retinopathy in individuals without diabetes showed little evidence of genetic associations. Further studies are needed to identify genes associated with these signs in order to help unravel novel pathways and determinants of microvascular diseases.
doi:10.1371/journal.pone.0054232
PMCID: PMC3564946  PMID: 23393555
11.  Genome-wide Association Study for Coronary Artery Calcification with Follow-up in Myocardial Infarction 
Circulation  2011;124(25):2855-2864.
Background
Coronary artery calcification (CAC) detected by computed tomography is a non-invasive measure of coronary atherosclerosis, that underlies most cases of myocardial infarction (MI). We aimed to identify common genetic variants associated with CAC and further investigate their associations with MI.
Methods and Results
Computed tomography was used to assess quantity of CAC. A meta-analysis of genome-wide association studies for CAC was carried out in 9,961 men and women from five independent community-based cohorts, with replication in three additional independent cohorts (n=6,032). We examined the top single nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs) associated with CAC quantity for association with MI in multiple large genome-wide association studies of MI. Genome-wide significant associations with CAC for SNPs on chromosome 9p21 near CDKN2A and CDKN2B (top SNP: rs1333049, P=7.58×10−19) and 6p24 (top SNP: rs9349379, within the PHACTR1 gene, P=2.65×10−11) replicated for CAC and for MI. Additionally, there is evidence for concordance of SNP associations with both CAC and with MI at a number of other loci, including 3q22 (MRAS gene), 13q34 (COL4A1/COL4A2 genes), and 1p13 (SORT1 gene).
Conclusions
SNPs in the 9p21 and PHACTR1 gene loci were strongly associated with CAC and MI, and there are suggestive associations with both CAC and MI of SNPs in additional loci. Multiple genetic loci are associated with development of both underlying coronary atherosclerosis and clinical events.
doi:10.1161/CIRCULATIONAHA.110.974899
PMCID: PMC3397173  PMID: 22144573
cardiac computed tomography; coronary artery calcification; coronary atherosclerosis; genome-wide association studies; myocardial infarction
12.  Plasma symmetric dimethylarginine reference limits from the Framingham Offspring Cohort 
BACKGROUND
Symmetric dimethylarginine (SDMA) is a by-product of protein methylation. Once released from proteins, SDMA is eliminated by the kidneys; consequently, plasma concentration has been suggested as a sensitive marker of renal function. Furthermore, recent work implicates SDMA in the pathogenesis of cardiovascular disease. To date, reference limits for SDMA plasma concentrations in healthy individuals are lacking.
METHODS
We defined reference limits for plasma SDMA concentrations in 840 relatively healthy individuals of the Offspring Cohort from Framingham Heart Study (mean age 56 years, 61 % women). Plasma SDMA concentrations were determined by LC-MS/MS using a stable isotope dilution assay.
RESULTS
The median SDMA concentration in the reference sample was 0.37 μmol/L [Q1, Q3: 0.32, 0.43 μmol/L], and the reference limits were 0.225 and 0.533 (2.5th and 97.5th percentile). In a multivariable regression model, serum creatinine, age, and total homocysteine were positively associated with SDMA (p<0.001 for all), whereas the body mass index and diastolic blood pressure were inversely related to SDMA (p-values <0.01 and 0.03 respectively).
CONCLUSIONS
We report plasma SDMA reference limits from the community-based Framingham Heart Study. Plasma SDMA concentration was related positively to advancing age, but inversely to renal function. These reference limits may allow the identification of individuals with raised plasma SDMA concentrations.
doi:10.1515/CCLM.2011.679
PMCID: PMC3235736  PMID: 21864208
Framingham Heart Study; LC-MS/MS; symmetric dimethylarginine
13.  Genetic variability within the cholesterol lowering pathway and the effectiveness of statins in reducing the risk of MI 
Atherosclerosis  2011;217(2):458-464.
Genetic variability has been shown to affect statin responsiveness. Participants from the Utrecht Cardiovascular Pharmacogenetics (UCP) studies were enrolled from a population-based registry of pharmacy records linked to hospital discharge records (PHARMO) to investigate tagging SNPs within candidate genes involved in the cholesterol lowering pathway for modification of the effectiveness of statins in reducing the risk of myocardial infarction (MI). Patients who received a prescription for an antihypertensive drug and/or had hypercholesterolemia were selected from the PHARMO database. We designed a nested case-control study in which cases were hospitalized for MI and controls were not. Patients were contacted through their community pharmacies. For this study, only hypercholesterolemic participants were selected. Logistic regression analysis was used to investigate pharmacogenetic interactions. The Heart and Vascular Health Study (HVH) was used to replicate findings from UCP.
The study population included 668 cases and 1217 controls. We selected 231 SNPs of which 209 SNPs in 27 genes passed quality control. Ten SNPs in eight genes were found to influence the effectiveness of statins in UCP, of which the most significant interaction was found with SCARB1 rs4765615. Other genes that reached statistical significance (p<0.05) included two SNPs in PCSK9 (rs10888896 and rs505151 (E670G)), two SNPs in ABCG5 (rs4245786 and rs1864815), LIPC rs16940379, ABCA1 rs4149264, PPARG rs2972164, LRP1 rs715948, and SOAT1 rs2493121. None of the total of 5 SNPs that were available for replication in HVH reached statistical significance.
In conclusion, ten SNPs were found to modify the effectiveness of statins in reducing the risk of MI in the UCP study. Five were also tested in the HVH study, but no interactions reached statistical significance.
doi:10.1016/j.atherosclerosis.2011.06.023
PMCID: PMC3465613  PMID: 21741043
pharmacogenetics; statin; case-control study; cholesterol; myocardial infarction; PCSK9; SCARB1
14.  Large-Scale Candidate Gene Analysis in Whites and African-Americans Identifies IL6R Polymorphism in Relation to Atrial Fibrillation: The NHLBI CARe Project 
Background
The genetic background of atrial fibrillation (AF) in whites and African Americans is largely unknown. Genes in cardiovascular pathways have not been systematically investigated.
Methods and Results
We examined a panel of approximately 50,000 common single nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs) in 2,095 cardiovascular candidate genes and AF in three cohorts with participants of European (n=18,524; 2,260 cases) or African American descent (n=3,662; 263 cases) in the National Heart Lung and Blood Institute's Candidate Gene Association Resource. Results in whites were followed up in the German Competence Network for AF (n=906, 468 cases). The top result was assessed in relation to incident ischemic stroke in the Cohorts for Heart and Aging Research in Genomic Epidemiology Stroke Consortium (n= 19,602 whites, 1544 incident strokes). SNP rs4845625 in the IL6R gene was associated with AF (relative risk (RR) C allele, 0.90; 95% confidence interval (CI), 0.85–0.95; P=0.0005) in whites, but did not reach statistical significance in African Americans (RR, 0.86; 95% CI, 0.72–1.03; P=0.09). The results were comparable in the German AF Network replication, (RR, 0.71; 95% CI, 0.57–0.89; P=0.003). No association between rs4845625 and stroke was observed in whites. The known chromosome 4 locus near PITX2 in whites also was associated with AF in African Americans (rs4611994, hazard ratio, 1.40; 95% CI, 1.16–1.69; P=0.0005).
Conclusions
In a community-based cohort meta-analysis, we identified genetic association in IL6R with AF in whites. Additionally, we demonstrated that the chromosome 4 locus known from recent genome-wide association studies in whites is associated with AF in African Americans.
doi:10.1161/CIRCGENETICS.110.959197
PMCID: PMC3224824  PMID: 21846873
atrial fibrillation; single nucleotide polymorphism; epidemiology; cohort study; race/ethnicity
15.  Genome-wide association study identifies six new loci influencing pulse pressure and mean arterial pressure 
Wain, Louise V | Verwoert, Germaine C | O’Reilly, Paul F | Shi, Gang | Johnson, Toby | Johnson, Andrew D | Bochud, Murielle | Rice, Kenneth M | Henneman, Peter | Smith, Albert V | Ehret, Georg B | Amin, Najaf | Larson, Martin G | Mooser, Vincent | Hadley, David | Dörr, Marcus | Bis, Joshua C | Aspelund, Thor | Esko, Tõnu | Janssens, A Cecile JW | Zhao, Jing Hua | Heath, Simon | Laan, Maris | Fu, Jingyuan | Pistis, Giorgio | Luan, Jian’an | Arora, Pankaj | Lucas, Gavin | Pirastu, Nicola | Pichler, Irene | Jackson, Anne U | Webster, Rebecca J | Zhang, Feng | Peden, John F | Schmidt, Helena | Tanaka, Toshiko | Campbell, Harry | Igl, Wilmar | Milaneschi, Yuri | Hotteng, Jouke-Jan | Vitart, Veronique | Chasman, Daniel I | Trompet, Stella | Bragg-Gresham, Jennifer L | Alizadeh, Behrooz Z | Chambers, John C | Guo, Xiuqing | Lehtimäki, Terho | Kühnel, Brigitte | Lopez, Lorna M | Polašek, Ozren | Boban, Mladen | Nelson, Christopher P | Morrison, Alanna C | Pihur, Vasyl | Ganesh, Santhi K | Hofman, Albert | Kundu, Suman | Mattace-Raso, Francesco US | Rivadeneira, Fernando | Sijbrands, Eric JG | Uitterlinden, Andre G | Hwang, Shih-Jen | Vasan, Ramachandran S | Wang, Thomas J | Bergmann, Sven | Vollenweider, Peter | Waeber, Gérard | Laitinen, Jaana | Pouta, Anneli | Zitting, Paavo | McArdle, Wendy L | Kroemer, Heyo K | Völker, Uwe | Völzke, Henry | Glazer, Nicole L | Taylor, Kent D | Harris, Tamara B | Alavere, Helene | Haller, Toomas | Keis, Aime | Tammesoo, Mari-Liis | Aulchenko, Yurii | Barroso, Inês | Khaw, Kay-Tee | Galan, Pilar | Hercberg, Serge | Lathrop, Mark | Eyheramendy, Susana | Org, Elin | Sõber, Siim | Lu, Xiaowen | Nolte, Ilja M | Penninx, Brenda W | Corre, Tanguy | Masciullo, Corrado | Sala, Cinzia | Groop, Leif | Voight, Benjamin F | Melander, Olle | O’Donnell, Christopher J | Salomaa, Veikko | d’Adamo, Adamo Pio | Fabretto, Antonella | Faletra, Flavio | Ulivi, Sheila | Del Greco, M Fabiola | Facheris, Maurizio | Collins, Francis S | Bergman, Richard N | Beilby, John P | Hung, Joseph | Musk, A William | Mangino, Massimo | Shin, So-Youn | Soranzo, Nicole | Watkins, Hugh | Goel, Anuj | Hamsten, Anders | Gider, Pierre | Loitfelder, Marisa | Zeginigg, Marion | Hernandez, Dena | Najjar, Samer S | Navarro, Pau | Wild, Sarah H | Corsi, Anna Maria | Singleton, Andrew | de Geus, Eco JC | Willemsen, Gonneke | Parker, Alex N | Rose, Lynda M | Buckley, Brendan | Stott, David | Orru, Marco | Uda, Manuela | van der Klauw, Melanie M | Zhang, Weihua | Li, Xinzhong | Scott, James | Chen, Yii-Der Ida | Burke, Gregory L | Kähönen, Mika | Viikari, Jorma | Döring, Angela | Meitinger, Thomas | Davies, Gail | Starr, John M | Emilsson, Valur | Plump, Andrew | Lindeman, Jan H | ’t Hoen, Peter AC | König, Inke R | Felix, Janine F | Clarke, Robert | Hopewell, Jemma C | Ongen, Halit | Breteler, Monique | Debette, Stéphanie | DeStefano, Anita L | Fornage, Myriam | Mitchell, Gary F | Smith, Nicholas L | Holm, Hilma | Stefansson, Kari | Thorleifsson, Gudmar | Thorsteinsdottir, Unnur | Samani, Nilesh J | Preuss, Michael | Rudan, Igor | Hayward, Caroline | Deary, Ian J | Wichmann, H-Erich | Raitakari, Olli T | Palmas, Walter | Kooner, Jaspal S | Stolk, Ronald P | Jukema, J Wouter | Wright, Alan F | Boomsma, Dorret I | Bandinelli, Stefania | Gyllensten, Ulf B | Wilson, James F | Ferrucci, Luigi | Schmidt, Reinhold | Farrall, Martin | Spector, Tim D | Palmer, Lyle J | Tuomilehto, Jaakko | Pfeufer, Arne | Gasparini, Paolo | Siscovick, David | Altshuler, David | Loos, Ruth JF | Toniolo, Daniela | Snieder, Harold | Gieger, Christian | Meneton, Pierre | Wareham, Nicholas J | Oostra, Ben A | Metspalu, Andres | Launer, Lenore | Rettig, Rainer | Strachan, David P | Beckmann, Jacques S | Witteman, Jacqueline CM | Erdmann, Jeanette | van Dijk, Ko Willems | Boerwinkle, Eric | Boehnke, Michael | Ridker, Paul M | Jarvelin, Marjo-Riitta | Chakravarti, Aravinda | Abecasis, Goncalo R | Gudnason, Vilmundur | Newton-Cheh, Christopher | Levy, Daniel | Munroe, Patricia B | Psaty, Bruce M | Caulfield, Mark J | Rao, Dabeeru C | Tobin, Martin D | Elliott, Paul | van Duijn, Cornelia M
Nature genetics  2011;43(10):1005-1011.
Numerous genetic loci influence systolic blood pressure (SBP) and diastolic blood pressure (DBP) in Europeans 1-3. We now report genome-wide association studies of pulse pressure (PP) and mean arterial pressure (MAP). In discovery (N=74,064) and follow-up studies (N=48,607), we identified at genome-wide significance (P= 2.7×10-8 to P=2.3×10-13) four novel PP loci (at 4q12 near CHIC2/PDGFRAI, 7q22.3 near PIK3CG, 8q24.12 in NOV, 11q24.3 near ADAMTS-8), two novel MAP loci (3p21.31 in MAP4, 10q25.3 near ADRB1) and one locus associated with both traits (2q24.3 near FIGN) which has recently been associated with SBP in east Asians. For three of the novel PP signals, the estimated effect for SBP was opposite to that for DBP, in contrast to the majority of common SBP- and DBP-associated variants which show concordant effects on both traits. These findings indicate novel genetic mechanisms underlying blood pressure variation, including pathways that may differentially influence SBP and DBP.
doi:10.1038/ng.922
PMCID: PMC3445021  PMID: 21909110
16.  Multiple Genetic Loci Influence Serum Urate and Their Relationship with Gout and Cardiovascular Disease Risk Factors 
Background
Elevated serum urate levels can lead to gout and are associated with cardiovascular risk factors. We performed genome-wide association to search for genetic susceptibility loci for serum urate and gout, and investigated the causal nature of the associations of serum urate with gout and selected cardiovascular risk factors and coronary heart disease (CHD).
Methods and Results
Meta-analyses of genome-wide association studies (GWAS) were performed in 5 population-based cohorts of the CHARGE consortium for serum urate and gout in 28,283 white individuals. The effect of the most significant SNP at all genome-wide significant loci on serum urate was added to create a genetic urate score. Findings were replicated in the Women’s Genome Health Study (WGHS; n=22,054). SNPs at 8 genetic loci achieved genome-wide significance with serum urate levels (p-values 4×10−8 to 2×10−242; SLC22A11, GCKR, R3HDM2-INHBC region, RREB1, PDZK1, SLC2A9, ABCG2, SLC17A1). Only two loci [SLC2A9, ABCG2] showed genome-wide significant association with gout. The genetic urate score was strongly associated with serum urate and gout (odds ratio 12.4 per 100 umol/L; p-value=3×10−39), but not with blood pressure, glucose, eGFR, chronic kidney disease, or CHD. The lack of association between the genetic score and the latter phenotypes was also observed in WGHS.
Conclusions
The genetic urate score analysis suggested a causal relationship between serum urate and gout but did not provide evidence for one between serum urate and cardiovascular risk factors and CHD.
doi:10.1161/CIRCGENETICS.109.934455
PMCID: PMC3371395  PMID: 20884846
urate; gout; cardiovascular disease risk factors; genome-wide association study; Mendelian randomization
17.  Meta-analysis identifies six new susceptibility loci for atrial fibrillation 
Ellinor, Patrick T | Lunetta, Kathryn L | Albert, Christine M | Glazer, Nicole L | Ritchie, Marylyn D | Smith, Albert V | Arking, Dan E | Müller-Nurasyid, Martina | Krijthe, Bouwe P | Lubitz, Steven A | Bis, Joshua C | Chung, Mina K | Dörr, Marcus | Ozaki, Kouichi | Roberts, Jason D | Smith, J Gustav | Pfeufer, Arne | Sinner, Moritz F | Lohman, Kurt | Ding, Jingzhong | Smith, Nicholas L | Smith, Jonathan D | Rienstra, Michiel | Rice, Kenneth M | Van Wagoner, David R | Magnani, Jared W | Wakili, Reza | Clauss, Sebastian | Rotter, Jerome I | Steinbeck, Gerhard | Launer, Lenore J | Davies, Robert W | Borkovich, Matthew | Harris, Tamara B | Lin, Honghuang | Völker, Uwe | Völzke, Henry | Milan, David J | Hofman, Albert | Boerwinkle, Eric | Chen, Lin Y | Soliman, Elsayed Z | Voight, Benjamin F | Li, Guo | Chakravarti, Aravinda | Kubo, Michiaki | Tedrow, Usha B | Rose, Lynda M | Ridker, Paul M | Conen, David | Tsunoda, Tatsuhiko | Furukawa, Tetsushi | Sotoodehnia, Nona | Xu, Siyan | Kamatani, Naoyuki | Levy, Daniel | Nakamura, Yusuke | Parvez, Babar | Mahida, Saagar | Furie, Karen L | Rosand, Jonathan | Muhammad, Raafia | Psaty, Bruce M | Meitinger, Thomas | Perz, Siegfried | Wichmann, H-Erich | Witteman, Jacqueline C M | Kao, W H Linda | Kathiresan, Sekar | Roden, Dan M | Uitterlinden, Andre G | Rivadeneira, Fernando | McKnight, Barbara | Sjögren, Marketa | Newman, Anne B | Liu, Yongmei | Gollob, Michael H | Melander, Olle | Tanaka, Toshihiro | Ch Stricker, Bruno H | Felix, Stephan B | Alonso, Alvaro | Darbar, Dawood | Barnard, John | Chasman, Daniel I | Heckbert, Susan R | Benjamin, Emelia J | Gudnason, Vilmundur | Kääb, Stefan
Nature Genetics  2012;44(6):670-675.
Atrial fibrillation is a highly prevalent arrhythmia and a major risk factor for stroke, heart failure and death1. We conducted a genome-wide association study (GWAS) in individuals of European ancestry, including 6,707 with and 52,426 without atrial fibrillation. Six new atrial fibrillation susceptibility loci were identified and replicated in an additional sample of individuals of European ancestry, including 5,381 subjects with and 1 0,030 subjects without atrial fibrillation (P < 5 × 10−8). Four of the loci identified in Europeans were further replicated in silico in a GWAS of Japanese individuals, including 843 individuals with and 3,350 individuals without atrial fibrillation. The identified loci implicate candidate genes that encode transcription factors related to cardiopulmonary development, cardiac-expressed ion channels and cell signaling molecules.
doi:10.1038/ng.2261
PMCID: PMC3366038  PMID: 22544366
18.  Genome-wide association studies of cerebral white matter lesion burden: the CHARGE Consortium 
Annals of neurology  2011;69(6):928-939.
Objective
White matter hyperintensities (WMH) detectable by magnetic resonance imaging (MRI)are part of the spectrum of vascular injury associated with aging of the brain and are thought to reflect ischemic damage to the small deep cerebral vessels. WMH are associated with an increased risk of cognitive and motor dysfunction, dementia, depression, and stroke. Despite a significant heritability, few genetic loci influencing WMH burden have been identified.
Methods
We performed a meta-analysis of genome-wide association studies (GWAS) for WMH burden in 9,361 stroke-free individuals of European descent from 7 community-based cohorts. Significant findings were tested for replication in 3,024 individuals from 2 additional cohorts.
Results
We identified 6 novel risk-associated single nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs)in one locus on chromosome 17q25 encompassing 6 known genes including WBP2, TRIM65, TRIM47, MRPL38, FBF1, and ACOX1. The most significant association was for rs3744028 (Pdiscovery= 4.0×10−9; Preplication =1.3×10−7; Pcombined =4.0×10−15). Other SNPs in this region also reaching genome-wide significance are rs9894383 (P=5.3×10−9), rs11869977 (P=5.7×10−9), rs936393 (P=6.8×10−9), rs3744017 (P=7.3×10−9), and rs1055129 (P=4.1×10−8). Variant alleles at these loci conferred a small increase in WMH burden (4–8% of the overall mean WMH burden in the sample).
Interpretation
This large GWAS of WMH burden in community-based cohorts of individuals of European descent identifies a novel locus on chromosome 17. Further characterization of this locus may provide novel insights into the pathogenesis of cerebral WMH.
doi:10.1002/ana.22403
PMCID: PMC3122147  PMID: 21681796
19.  Multi-Ethnic Analysis of Lipid-Associated Loci: The NHLBI CARe Project 
PLoS ONE  2012;7(5):e36473.
Background
Whereas it is well established that plasma lipid levels have substantial heritability within populations, it remains unclear how many of the genetic determinants reported in previous studies (largely performed in European American cohorts) are relevant in different ethnicities.
Methodology/Principal Findings
We tested a set of ∼50,000 polymorphisms from ∼2,000 candidate genes and genetic loci from genome-wide association studies (GWAS) for association with low-density lipoprotein cholesterol (LDL-C), high-density lipoprotein cholesterol (HDL-C), and triglycerides (TG) in 25,000 European Americans and 9,000 African Americans in the National Heart, Lung, and Blood Institute (NHLBI) Candidate Gene Association Resource (CARe). We replicated associations for a number of genes in one or both ethnicities and identified a novel lipid-associated variant in a locus harboring ICAM1. We compared the architecture of genetic loci associated with lipids in both African Americans and European Americans and found that the same genes were relevant across ethnic groups but the specific associated variants at each gene often differed.
Conclusions/Significance
We identify or provide further evidence for a number of genetic determinants of plasma lipid levels through population association studies. In many loci the determinants appear to differ substantially between African Americans and European Americans.
doi:10.1371/journal.pone.0036473
PMCID: PMC3357427  PMID: 22629316
20.  Cerivastatin, Genetic Variants, and the Risk of Rhabdomyolysis 
Pharmacogenetics and genomics  2011;21(5):280-288.
Objective
The withdrawal of cerivastatin involved an uncommon but serious adverse reaction, rhabdomyolysis. The bimodal response--rhabdomyolysis in a small proportion of users-- points to genetic factors as a potential cause. We conducted a case-control study to evaluate genetic markers for cerivastatin-associated rhabdomyolysis.
Methods
The study had two components: a candidate gene study to evaluate variants in CYP2C8, UGT1A1, UGT1A3, and SLCO1B1; and a genome-wide association (GWA) study to identify risk factors in other regions of the genome. 185 rhabdomyolysis cases were frequency matched to statin-using controls from the Cardiovascular Health Study (n=374) and the Heart and Vascular Health Study (n=358). Validation relied on functional studies.
Results
Permutation test results suggested an association between cerivastatin-associated rhabdomyolysis and variants in SLCO1B1 (p = 0.002), but not variants in CYP2C8 (p = 0.073) or the UGTs (p = 0.523). An additional copy of the minor allele of SLCO1B1 rs4149056 (p.Val174Ala) was associated with the risk of rhabdomyolysis (OR: 1.89, 95% CI: 1.40 to 2.56). In transfected cells, this variant reduced cerivastatin transport by 40% compared with the reference transporter (p < 0.001). The GWA identified an intronic variant (rs2819742) in the ryanodine receptor 2 gene (RYR2) as significant (p=1.74E-07). An additional copy of the minor allele of the RYR2 variant was associated with a reduced risk of rhabdomyolysis (OR: 0.48; 95% CI: 0.36 to 0.63).
Conclusion
We identified modest genetic risk factors for an extreme response to cerivastatin. Disabling genetic variants in the candidate genes were not responsible for the bimodal response to cerivastatin.
doi:10.1097/FPC.0b013e328343dd7d
PMCID: PMC3076530  PMID: 21386754
Genetics; drugs; epidemiology; rhabdomyolysis
21.  New gene functions in megakaryopoiesis and platelet formation 
Gieger, Christian | Radhakrishnan, Aparna | Cvejic, Ana | Tang, Weihong | Porcu, Eleonora | Pistis, Giorgio | Serbanovic-Canic, Jovana | Elling, Ulrich | Goodall, Alison H. | Labrune, Yann | Lopez, Lorna M. | Mägi, Reedik | Meacham, Stuart | Okada, Yukinori | Pirastu, Nicola | Sorice, Rossella | Teumer, Alexander | Voss, Katrin | Zhang, Weihua | Ramirez-Solis, Ramiro | Bis, Joshua C. | Ellinghaus, David | Gögele, Martin | Hottenga, Jouke-Jan | Langenberg, Claudia | Kovacs, Peter | O’Reilly, Paul F. | Shin, So-Youn | Esko, Tõnu | Hartiala, Jaana | Kanoni, Stavroula | Murgia, Federico | Parsa, Afshin | Stephens, Jonathan | van der Harst, Pim | van der Schoot, C. Ellen | Allayee, Hooman | Attwood, Antony | Balkau, Beverley | Bastardot, François | Basu, Saonli | Baumeister, Sebastian E. | Biino, Ginevra | Bomba, Lorenzo | Bonnefond, Amélie | Cambien, François | Chambers, John C. | Cucca, Francesco | D’Adamo, Pio | Davies, Gail | de Boer, Rudolf A. | de Geus, Eco J. C. | Döring, Angela | Elliott, Paul | Erdmann, Jeanette | Evans, David M. | Falchi, Mario | Feng, Wei | Folsom, Aaron R. | Frazer, Ian H. | Gibson, Quince D. | Glazer, Nicole L. | Hammond, Chris | Hartikainen, Anna-Liisa | Heckbert, Susan R. | Hengstenberg, Christian | Hersch, Micha | Illig, Thomas | Loos, Ruth J. F. | Jolley, Jennifer | Khaw, Kay Tee | Kühnel, Brigitte | Kyrtsonis, Marie-Christine | Lagou, Vasiliki | Lloyd-Jones, Heather | Lumley, Thomas | Mangino, Massimo | Maschio, Andrea | Leach, Irene Mateo | McKnight, Barbara | Memari, Yasin | Mitchell, Braxton D. | Montgomery, Grant W. | Nakamura, Yusuke | Nauck, Matthias | Navis, Gerjan | Nöthlings, Ute | Nolte, Ilja M. | Porteous, David J. | Pouta, Anneli | Pramstaller, Peter P. | Pullat, Janne | Ring, Susan M. | Rotter, Jerome I. | Ruggiero, Daniela | Ruokonen, Aimo | Sala, Cinzia | Samani, Nilesh J. | Sambrook, Jennifer | Schlessinger, David | Schreiber, Stefan | Schunkert, Heribert | Scott, James | Smith, Nicholas L. | Snieder, Harold | Starr, John M. | Stumvoll, Michael | Takahashi, Atsushi | Tang, W. H. Wilson | Taylor, Kent | Tenesa, Albert | Thein, Swee Lay | Tönjes, Anke | Uda, Manuela | Ulivi, Sheila | van Veldhuisen, Dirk J. | Visscher, Peter M. | Völker, Uwe | Wichmann, H.-Erich | Wiggins, Kerri L. | Willemsen, Gonneke | Yang, Tsun-Po | Zhao, Jing Hua | Zitting, Paavo | Bradley, John R. | Dedoussis, George V. | Gasparini, Paolo | Hazen, Stanley L. | Metspalu, Andres | Pirastu, Mario | Shuldiner, Alan R. | van Pelt, L. Joost | Zwaginga, Jaap-Jan | Boomsma, Dorret I. | Deary, Ian J. | Franke, Andre | Froguel, Philippe | Ganesh, Santhi K. | Jarvelin, Marjo-Riitta | Martin, Nicholas G. | Meisinger, Christa | Psaty, Bruce M. | Spector, Timothy D. | Wareham, Nicholas J. | Akkerman, Jan-Willem N. | Ciullo, Marina | Deloukas, Panos | Greinacher, Andreas | Jupe, Steve | Kamatani, Naoyuki | Khadake, Jyoti | Kooner, Jaspal S. | Penninger, Josef | Prokopenko, Inga | Stemple, Derek | Toniolo, Daniela | Wernisch, Lorenz | Sanna, Serena | Hicks, Andrew A. | Rendon, Augusto | Ferreira, Manuel A. | Ouwehand, Willem H. | Soranzo, Nicole
Nature  2011;480(7376):201-208.
Platelets are the second most abundant cell type in blood and are essential for maintaining haemostasis. Their count and volume are tightly controlled within narrow physiological ranges, but there is only limited understanding of the molecular processes controlling both traits. Here we carried out a high-powered meta-analysis of genome-wide association studies (GWAS) in up to 66,867 individuals of European ancestry, followed by extensive biological and functional assessment. We identified 68 genomic loci reliably associated with platelet count and volume mapping to established and putative novel regulators of megakaryopoiesis and platelet formation. These genes show megakaryocyte-specific gene expression patterns and extensive network connectivity. Using gene silencing in Danio rerio and Drosophila melanogaster, we identified 11 of the genes as novel regulators of blood cell formation. Taken together, our findings advance understanding of novel gene functions controlling fate-determining events during megakaryopoiesis and platelet formation, providing a new example of successful translation of GWAS to function.
doi:10.1038/nature10659
PMCID: PMC3335296  PMID: 22139419
22.  A Bivariate Genome-Wide Approach to Metabolic Syndrome 
Diabetes  2011;60(4):1329-1339.
OBJECTIVE
The metabolic syndrome (MetS) is defined as concomitant disorders of lipid and glucose metabolism, central obesity, and high blood pressure, with an increased risk of type 2 diabetes and cardiovascular disease. This study tests whether common genetic variants with pleiotropic effects account for some of the correlated architecture among five metabolic phenotypes that define MetS.
RESEARCH DESIGN AND METHODS
Seven studies of the STAMPEED consortium, comprising 22,161 participants of European ancestry, underwent genome-wide association analyses of metabolic traits using a panel of ∼2.5 million imputed single nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs). Phenotypes were defined by the National Cholesterol Education Program (NCEP) criteria for MetS in pairwise combinations. Individuals exceeding the NCEP thresholds for both traits of a pair were considered affected.
RESULTS
Twenty-nine common variants were associated with MetS or a pair of traits. Variants in the genes LPL, CETP, APOA5 (and its cluster), GCKR (and its cluster), LIPC, TRIB1, LOC100128354/MTNR1B, ABCB11, and LOC100129150 were further tested for their association with individual qualitative and quantitative traits. None of the 16 top SNPs (one per gene) associated simultaneously with more than two individual traits. Of them 11 variants showed nominal associations with MetS per se. The effects of 16 top SNPs on the quantitative traits were relatively small, together explaining from ∼9% of the variance in triglycerides, 5.8% of high-density lipoprotein cholesterol, 3.6% of fasting glucose, and 1.4% of systolic blood pressure.
CONCLUSIONS
Qualitative and quantitative pleiotropic tests on pairs of traits indicate that a small portion of the covariation in these traits can be explained by the reported common genetic variants.
doi:10.2337/db10-1011
PMCID: PMC3064107  PMID: 21386085
23.  Ascertainment of warfarin and aspirin use by medical record review compared with automated pharmacy data 
Purpose
Automated pharmacy databases are increasingly available for assessing medication use, but research on the validity of these data is incomplete. This study aimed to measure agreement on warfarin and aspirin use between medical records and automated pharmacy data among patients with newly detected atrial fibrillation (AF).
Methods
Patients with newly detected AF (n = 1953) were previously identified in a cohort study at Group Health (GH) in Washington State. Medical records were reviewed for information on risk factors and medication use, as well as clinical care during the 6 months after AF onset. Medication data were also obtained from the GH pharmacy database. We determined the sensitivity, specificity, and positive predictive value (PPV) as measures of the validity of the GH pharmacy database as compared with medical records for warfarin and aspirin use during the first 6 and 3 months after AF onset. We also calculated the κ statistic.
Results
For warfarin use, in comparison with the medical record review, the sensitivity, specificity, and PPV for the GH pharmacy database were excellent, and agreement was almost perfect in the 3- and 6-month periods after AF onset (κ = 0.92 and 0.93, respectively). For aspirin use, the GH pharmacy database had low sensitivity but high specificity, and agreement was only fair for these two periods (κ = 0.28 and 0.31, respectively).
Conclusions
The GH pharmacy database is a valuable source of data for pharmacoepidemiologic research on warfarin use among patients with AF. However, the database cannot be recommended for assessment of aspirin use.
doi:10.1002/pds.2041
PMCID: PMC3181009  PMID: 21351314
warfarin; medical records; pharmacy database; pharmacoepidemiology; validity; agreement
24.  A genome-wide association study identifies novel loci associated with circulating IGF-I and IGFBP-3 
Human Molecular Genetics  2011;20(6):1241-1251.
Insulin-like growth factor-I (IGF-I) and insulin-like growth factor-binding protein-3 (IGFBP-3) are involved in cell replication, proliferation, differentiation, protein synthesis, carbohydrate homeostasis and bone metabolism. Circulating IGF-I and IGFBP-3 concentrations predict anthropometric traits and risk of cancer and cardiovascular disease. In a genome-wide association study of 10 280 middle-aged and older men and women from four community-based cohort studies, we confirmed a known association of single nucleotide polymorphisms in the IGFBP3 gene region on chromosome 7p12.3 with IGFBP-3 concentrations using a significance threshold of P < 5 × 10−8 (P = 3.3 × 10−101). Furthermore, the same IGFBP3 gene locus (e.g. rs11977526) that was associated with IGFBP-3 concentrations was also associated with the opposite direction of effect, with IGF-I concentration after adjustment for IGFBP-3 concentration (P = 1.9 × 10−26). A novel and independent locus on chromosome 7p12.3 (rs700752) had genome-wide significant associations with higher IGFBP-3 (P = 4.4 × 10−21) and higher IGF-I (P = 4.9 × 10−9) concentrations; when the two measurements were adjusted for one another, the IGF-I association was attenuated but the IGFBP-3 association was not. Two additional loci demonstrated genome-wide significant associations with IGFBP-3 concentration (rs1065656, chromosome 16p13.3, P = 1.2 × 10−11, IGFALS, a confirmatory finding; and rs4234798, chromosome 4p16.1, P = 4.5 × 10−10, SORCS2, a novel finding). Together, the four genome-wide significant loci explained 6.5% of the population variation in IGFBP-3 concentration. Furthermore, we observed a borderline statistically significant association between IGF-I concentration and FOXO3 (rs2153960, chromosome 6q21, P = 5.1 × 10−7), a locus associated with longevity. These genetic loci deserve further investigation to elucidate the biological basis for the observed associations and clarify their possible role in IGF-mediated regulation of cell growth and metabolism.
doi:10.1093/hmg/ddq560
PMCID: PMC3043664  PMID: 21216879
25.  Genetic variation near IRS1 associates with reduced adiposity and an impaired metabolic profile 
Kilpeläinen, Tuomas O | Zillikens, M Carola | Stančáková, Alena | Finucane, Francis M | Ried, Janina S | Langenberg, Claudia | Zhang, Weihua | Beckmann, Jacques S | Luan, Jian’an | Vandenput, Liesbeth | Styrkarsdottir, Unnur | Zhou, Yanhua | Smith, Albert Vernon | Zhao, Jing-Hua | Amin, Najaf | Vedantam, Sailaja | Shin, So Youn | Haritunians, Talin | Fu, Mao | Feitosa, Mary F | Kumari, Meena | Halldorsson, Bjarni V | Tikkanen, Emmi | Mangino, Massimo | Hayward, Caroline | Song, Ci | Arnold, Alice M | Aulchenko, Yurii S | Oostra, Ben A | Campbell, Harry | Cupples, L Adrienne | Davis, Kathryn E | Döring, Angela | Eiriksdottir, Gudny | Estrada, Karol | Fernández-Real, José Manuel | Garcia, Melissa | Gieger, Christian | Glazer, Nicole L | Guiducci, Candace | Hofman, Albert | Humphries, Steve E | Isomaa, Bo | Jacobs, Leonie C | Jula, Antti | Karasik, David | Karlsson, Magnus K | Khaw, Kay-Tee | Kim, Lauren J | Kivimäki, Mika | Klopp, Norman | Kühnel, Brigitte | Kuusisto, Johanna | Liu, Yongmei | Ljunggren, Östen | Lorentzon, Mattias | Luben, Robert N | McKnight, Barbara | Mellström, Dan | Mitchell, Braxton D | Mooser, Vincent | Moreno, José Maria | Männistö, Satu | O’Connell, Jeffery R | Pascoe, Laura | Peltonen, Leena | Peral, Belén | Perola, Markus | Psaty, Bruce M | Salomaa, Veikko | Savage, David B | Semple, Robert K | Skaric-Juric, Tatjana | Sigurdsson, Gunnar | Song, Kijoung S | Spector, Timothy D | Syvänen, Ann-Christine | Talmud, Philippa J | Thorleifsson, Gudmar | Thorsteinsdottir, Unnur | Uitterlinden, André G | van Duijn, Cornelia M | Vidal-Puig, Antonio | Wild, Sarah H | Wright, Alan F | Clegg, Deborah J | Schadt, Eric | Wilson, James F | Rudan, Igor | Ripatti, Samuli | Borecki, Ingrid B | Shuldiner, Alan R | Ingelsson, Erik | Jansson, John-Olov | Kaplan, Robert C | Gudnason, Vilmundur | Harris, Tamara B | Groop, Leif | Kiel, Douglas P | Rivadeneira, Fernando | Walker, Mark | Barroso, Inês | Vollenweider, Peter | Waeber, Gérard | Chambers, John C | Kooner, Jaspal S | Soranzo, Nicole | Hirschhorn, Joel N | Stefansson, Kari | Wichmann, H-Erich | Ohlsson, Claes | O’Rahilly, Stephen | Wareham, Nicholas J | Speliotes, Elizabeth K | Fox, Caroline S | Laakso, Markku | Loos, Ruth J F
Nature Genetics  2011;43(8):753-760.
Genome-wide association studies have identified 32 loci associated with body mass index (BMI), a measure that does not allow distinguishing lean from fat mass. To identify adiposity loci, we meta-analyzed associations between ~2.5 million SNPs and body fat percentage from 36,626 individuals, and followed up the 14 most significant (P<10−6) independent loci in 39,576 individuals. We confirmed the previously established adiposity locus in FTO (P=3×10−26), and identified two new loci associated with body fat percentage, one near IRS1 (P=4×10−11) and one near SPRY2 (P=3×10−8). Both loci harbour genes with a potential link to adipocyte physiology, of which the locus near IRS1 shows an intriguing association pattern. The body-fat-decreasing allele associates with decreased IRS1 expression and with an impaired metabolic profile, including decreased subcutaneous-to-visceral fat ratio, increased insulin resistance, dyslipidemia, risk of diabetes and coronary artery disease, and decreased adiponectin levels. Our findings provide new insights into adiposity and insulin resistance.
doi:10.1038/ng.866
PMCID: PMC3262230  PMID: 21706003

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