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1.  Genome-Wide Association Study of Cardiac Structure and Systolic Function in African Americans: The Candidate Gene Association Resource (CARe) Study 
Background
Using data from four community-based cohorts of African Americans (AA), we tested the association between genome-wide markers (SNPs) and cardiac phenotypes in the Candidate-gene Association REsource (CARe) study.
Methods and Results
Among 6,765 AA, we related age, sex, height and weight-adjusted residuals for nine cardiac phenotypes (assessed by echocardiogram or MRI) to 2.5 million SNPs genotyped using Genome-Wide Affymetrix Human SNP Array 6.0 (Affy6.0) and the remainder imputed. Within cohort genome-wide association analysis was conducted followed by meta-analysis across cohorts using inverse variance weights (genome-wide significance threshold=4.0 ×10−07). Supplementary pathway analysis was performed. We attempted replication in 3 smaller cohorts of African ancestry and tested look-ups in one consortium of European ancestry (EchoGEN). Across the 9 phenotypes, variants in 4 genetic loci reached genome-wide significance: rs4552931 in UBE2V2 (p=1.43 × 10−07) for left ventricular mass (LVM); rs7213314 in WIPI1 (p=1.68 × 10−07) for LV internal diastolic diameter (LVIDD); rs1571099 in PPAPDC1A (p= 2.57 × 10−08) for interventricular septal wall thickness (IVST); and rs9530176 in KLF5 (p=4.02 × 10−07) for ejection fraction (EF). Associated variants were enriched in three signaling pathways involved in cardiac remodeling. None of the 4 loci replicated in cohorts of African ancestry were confirmed in look-ups in EchoGEN.
Conclusions
In the largest GWAS of cardiac structure and function to date in AA, we identified 4 genetic loci related to LVM, IVST, LVIDD and EF that reached genome-wide significance. Replication results suggest that these loci may represent unique to individuals of African ancestry. Additional large-scale studies are warranted for these complex phenotypes.
doi:10.1161/CIRCGENETICS.111.962365
PMCID: PMC3591479  PMID: 23275298
echocardiography; ethnic; genome-wide association studies; Left atrium genetics; left ventricular mass genetics
2.  No Interactions Between Previously Associated 2-Hour Glucose Gene Variants and Physical Activity or BMI on 2-Hour Glucose Levels 
Scott, Robert A. | Chu, Audrey Y. | Grarup, Niels | Manning, Alisa K. | Hivert, Marie-France | Shungin, Dmitry | Tönjes, Anke | Yesupriya, Ajay | Barnes, Daniel | Bouatia-Naji, Nabila | Glazer, Nicole L. | Jackson, Anne U. | Kutalik, Zoltán | Lagou, Vasiliki | Marek, Diana | Rasmussen-Torvik, Laura J. | Stringham, Heather M. | Tanaka, Toshiko | Aadahl, Mette | Arking, Dan E. | Bergmann, Sven | Boerwinkle, Eric | Bonnycastle, Lori L. | Bornstein, Stefan R. | Brunner, Eric | Bumpstead, Suzannah J. | Brage, Soren | Carlson, Olga D. | Chen, Han | Chen, Yii-Der Ida | Chines, Peter S. | Collins, Francis S. | Couper, David J. | Dennison, Elaine M. | Dowling, Nicole F. | Egan, Josephine S. | Ekelund, Ulf | Erdos, Michael R. | Forouhi, Nita G. | Fox, Caroline S. | Goodarzi, Mark O. | Grässler, Jürgen | Gustafsson, Stefan | Hallmans, Göran | Hansen, Torben | Hingorani, Aroon | Holloway, John W. | Hu, Frank B. | Isomaa, Bo | Jameson, Karen A. | Johansson, Ingegerd | Jonsson, Anna | Jørgensen, Torben | Kivimaki, Mika | Kovacs, Peter | Kumari, Meena | Kuusisto, Johanna | Laakso, Markku | Lecoeur, Cécile | Lévy-Marchal, Claire | Li, Guo | Loos, Ruth J.F. | Lyssenko, Valeri | Marmot, Michael | Marques-Vidal, Pedro | Morken, Mario A. | Müller, Gabriele | North, Kari E. | Pankow, James S. | Payne, Felicity | Prokopenko, Inga | Psaty, Bruce M. | Renström, Frida | Rice, Ken | Rotter, Jerome I. | Rybin, Denis | Sandholt, Camilla H. | Sayer, Avan A. | Shrader, Peter | Schwarz, Peter E.H. | Siscovick, David S. | Stančáková, Alena | Stumvoll, Michael | Teslovich, Tanya M. | Waeber, Gérard | Williams, Gordon H. | Witte, Daniel R. | Wood, Andrew R. | Xie, Weijia | Boehnke, Michael | Cooper, Cyrus | Ferrucci, Luigi | Froguel, Philippe | Groop, Leif | Kao, W.H. Linda | Vollenweider, Peter | Walker, Mark | Watanabe, Richard M. | Pedersen, Oluf | Meigs, James B. | Ingelsson, Erik | Barroso, Inês | Florez, Jose C. | Franks, Paul W. | Dupuis, Josée | Wareham, Nicholas J. | Langenberg, Claudia
Diabetes  2012;61(5):1291-1296.
Gene–lifestyle interactions have been suggested to contribute to the development of type 2 diabetes. Glucose levels 2 h after a standard 75-g glucose challenge are used to diagnose diabetes and are associated with both genetic and lifestyle factors. However, whether these factors interact to determine 2-h glucose levels is unknown. We meta-analyzed single nucleotide polymorphism (SNP) × BMI and SNP × physical activity (PA) interaction regression models for five SNPs previously associated with 2-h glucose levels from up to 22 studies comprising 54,884 individuals without diabetes. PA levels were dichotomized, with individuals below the first quintile classified as inactive (20%) and the remainder as active (80%). BMI was considered a continuous trait. Inactive individuals had higher 2-h glucose levels than active individuals (β = 0.22 mmol/L [95% CI 0.13–0.31], P = 1.63 × 10−6). All SNPs were associated with 2-h glucose (β = 0.06–0.12 mmol/allele, P ≤ 1.53 × 10−7), but no significant interactions were found with PA (P > 0.18) or BMI (P ≥ 0.04). In this large study of gene–lifestyle interaction, we observed no interactions between genetic and lifestyle factors, both of which were associated with 2-h glucose. It is perhaps unlikely that top loci from genome-wide association studies will exhibit strong subgroup-specific effects, and may not, therefore, make the best candidates for the study of interactions.
doi:10.2337/db11-0973
PMCID: PMC3331745  PMID: 22415877
3.  Plasma symmetric dimethylarginine reference limits from the Framingham Offspring Cohort 
BACKGROUND
Symmetric dimethylarginine (SDMA) is a by-product of protein methylation. Once released from proteins, SDMA is eliminated by the kidneys; consequently, plasma concentration has been suggested as a sensitive marker of renal function. Furthermore, recent work implicates SDMA in the pathogenesis of cardiovascular disease. To date, reference limits for SDMA plasma concentrations in healthy individuals are lacking.
METHODS
We defined reference limits for plasma SDMA concentrations in 840 relatively healthy individuals of the Offspring Cohort from Framingham Heart Study (mean age 56 years, 61 % women). Plasma SDMA concentrations were determined by LC-MS/MS using a stable isotope dilution assay.
RESULTS
The median SDMA concentration in the reference sample was 0.37 μmol/L [Q1, Q3: 0.32, 0.43 μmol/L], and the reference limits were 0.225 and 0.533 (2.5th and 97.5th percentile). In a multivariable regression model, serum creatinine, age, and total homocysteine were positively associated with SDMA (p<0.001 for all), whereas the body mass index and diastolic blood pressure were inversely related to SDMA (p-values <0.01 and 0.03 respectively).
CONCLUSIONS
We report plasma SDMA reference limits from the community-based Framingham Heart Study. Plasma SDMA concentration was related positively to advancing age, but inversely to renal function. These reference limits may allow the identification of individuals with raised plasma SDMA concentrations.
doi:10.1515/CCLM.2011.679
PMCID: PMC3235736  PMID: 21864208
Framingham Heart Study; LC-MS/MS; symmetric dimethylarginine
4.  Genetic variability within the cholesterol lowering pathway and the effectiveness of statins in reducing the risk of MI 
Atherosclerosis  2011;217(2):458-464.
Genetic variability has been shown to affect statin responsiveness. Participants from the Utrecht Cardiovascular Pharmacogenetics (UCP) studies were enrolled from a population-based registry of pharmacy records linked to hospital discharge records (PHARMO) to investigate tagging SNPs within candidate genes involved in the cholesterol lowering pathway for modification of the effectiveness of statins in reducing the risk of myocardial infarction (MI). Patients who received a prescription for an antihypertensive drug and/or had hypercholesterolemia were selected from the PHARMO database. We designed a nested case-control study in which cases were hospitalized for MI and controls were not. Patients were contacted through their community pharmacies. For this study, only hypercholesterolemic participants were selected. Logistic regression analysis was used to investigate pharmacogenetic interactions. The Heart and Vascular Health Study (HVH) was used to replicate findings from UCP.
The study population included 668 cases and 1217 controls. We selected 231 SNPs of which 209 SNPs in 27 genes passed quality control. Ten SNPs in eight genes were found to influence the effectiveness of statins in UCP, of which the most significant interaction was found with SCARB1 rs4765615. Other genes that reached statistical significance (p<0.05) included two SNPs in PCSK9 (rs10888896 and rs505151 (E670G)), two SNPs in ABCG5 (rs4245786 and rs1864815), LIPC rs16940379, ABCA1 rs4149264, PPARG rs2972164, LRP1 rs715948, and SOAT1 rs2493121. None of the total of 5 SNPs that were available for replication in HVH reached statistical significance.
In conclusion, ten SNPs were found to modify the effectiveness of statins in reducing the risk of MI in the UCP study. Five were also tested in the HVH study, but no interactions reached statistical significance.
doi:10.1016/j.atherosclerosis.2011.06.023
PMCID: PMC3465613  PMID: 21741043
pharmacogenetics; statin; case-control study; cholesterol; myocardial infarction; PCSK9; SCARB1
5.  Multiple Genetic Loci Influence Serum Urate and Their Relationship with Gout and Cardiovascular Disease Risk Factors 
Background
Elevated serum urate levels can lead to gout and are associated with cardiovascular risk factors. We performed genome-wide association to search for genetic susceptibility loci for serum urate and gout, and investigated the causal nature of the associations of serum urate with gout and selected cardiovascular risk factors and coronary heart disease (CHD).
Methods and Results
Meta-analyses of genome-wide association studies (GWAS) were performed in 5 population-based cohorts of the CHARGE consortium for serum urate and gout in 28,283 white individuals. The effect of the most significant SNP at all genome-wide significant loci on serum urate was added to create a genetic urate score. Findings were replicated in the Women’s Genome Health Study (WGHS; n=22,054). SNPs at 8 genetic loci achieved genome-wide significance with serum urate levels (p-values 4×10−8 to 2×10−242; SLC22A11, GCKR, R3HDM2-INHBC region, RREB1, PDZK1, SLC2A9, ABCG2, SLC17A1). Only two loci [SLC2A9, ABCG2] showed genome-wide significant association with gout. The genetic urate score was strongly associated with serum urate and gout (odds ratio 12.4 per 100 umol/L; p-value=3×10−39), but not with blood pressure, glucose, eGFR, chronic kidney disease, or CHD. The lack of association between the genetic score and the latter phenotypes was also observed in WGHS.
Conclusions
The genetic urate score analysis suggested a causal relationship between serum urate and gout but did not provide evidence for one between serum urate and cardiovascular risk factors and CHD.
doi:10.1161/CIRCGENETICS.109.934455
PMCID: PMC3371395  PMID: 20884846
urate; gout; cardiovascular disease risk factors; genome-wide association study; Mendelian randomization
6.  Meta-analysis identifies six new susceptibility loci for atrial fibrillation 
Ellinor, Patrick T | Lunetta, Kathryn L | Albert, Christine M | Glazer, Nicole L | Ritchie, Marylyn D | Smith, Albert V | Arking, Dan E | Müller-Nurasyid, Martina | Krijthe, Bouwe P | Lubitz, Steven A | Bis, Joshua C | Chung, Mina K | Dörr, Marcus | Ozaki, Kouichi | Roberts, Jason D | Smith, J Gustav | Pfeufer, Arne | Sinner, Moritz F | Lohman, Kurt | Ding, Jingzhong | Smith, Nicholas L | Smith, Jonathan D | Rienstra, Michiel | Rice, Kenneth M | Van Wagoner, David R | Magnani, Jared W | Wakili, Reza | Clauss, Sebastian | Rotter, Jerome I | Steinbeck, Gerhard | Launer, Lenore J | Davies, Robert W | Borkovich, Matthew | Harris, Tamara B | Lin, Honghuang | Völker, Uwe | Völzke, Henry | Milan, David J | Hofman, Albert | Boerwinkle, Eric | Chen, Lin Y | Soliman, Elsayed Z | Voight, Benjamin F | Li, Guo | Chakravarti, Aravinda | Kubo, Michiaki | Tedrow, Usha B | Rose, Lynda M | Ridker, Paul M | Conen, David | Tsunoda, Tatsuhiko | Furukawa, Tetsushi | Sotoodehnia, Nona | Xu, Siyan | Kamatani, Naoyuki | Levy, Daniel | Nakamura, Yusuke | Parvez, Babar | Mahida, Saagar | Furie, Karen L | Rosand, Jonathan | Muhammad, Raafia | Psaty, Bruce M | Meitinger, Thomas | Perz, Siegfried | Wichmann, H-Erich | Witteman, Jacqueline C M | Kao, W H Linda | Kathiresan, Sekar | Roden, Dan M | Uitterlinden, Andre G | Rivadeneira, Fernando | McKnight, Barbara | Sjögren, Marketa | Newman, Anne B | Liu, Yongmei | Gollob, Michael H | Melander, Olle | Tanaka, Toshihiro | Ch Stricker, Bruno H | Felix, Stephan B | Alonso, Alvaro | Darbar, Dawood | Barnard, John | Chasman, Daniel I | Heckbert, Susan R | Benjamin, Emelia J | Gudnason, Vilmundur | Kääb, Stefan
Nature Genetics  2012;44(6):670-675.
Atrial fibrillation is a highly prevalent arrhythmia and a major risk factor for stroke, heart failure and death1. We conducted a genome-wide association study (GWAS) in individuals of European ancestry, including 6,707 with and 52,426 without atrial fibrillation. Six new atrial fibrillation susceptibility loci were identified and replicated in an additional sample of individuals of European ancestry, including 5,381 subjects with and 1 0,030 subjects without atrial fibrillation (P < 5 × 10−8). Four of the loci identified in Europeans were further replicated in silico in a GWAS of Japanese individuals, including 843 individuals with and 3,350 individuals without atrial fibrillation. The identified loci implicate candidate genes that encode transcription factors related to cardiopulmonary development, cardiac-expressed ion channels and cell signaling molecules.
doi:10.1038/ng.2261
PMCID: PMC3366038  PMID: 22544366
7.  Cerivastatin, Genetic Variants, and the Risk of Rhabdomyolysis 
Pharmacogenetics and genomics  2011;21(5):280-288.
Objective
The withdrawal of cerivastatin involved an uncommon but serious adverse reaction, rhabdomyolysis. The bimodal response--rhabdomyolysis in a small proportion of users-- points to genetic factors as a potential cause. We conducted a case-control study to evaluate genetic markers for cerivastatin-associated rhabdomyolysis.
Methods
The study had two components: a candidate gene study to evaluate variants in CYP2C8, UGT1A1, UGT1A3, and SLCO1B1; and a genome-wide association (GWA) study to identify risk factors in other regions of the genome. 185 rhabdomyolysis cases were frequency matched to statin-using controls from the Cardiovascular Health Study (n=374) and the Heart and Vascular Health Study (n=358). Validation relied on functional studies.
Results
Permutation test results suggested an association between cerivastatin-associated rhabdomyolysis and variants in SLCO1B1 (p = 0.002), but not variants in CYP2C8 (p = 0.073) or the UGTs (p = 0.523). An additional copy of the minor allele of SLCO1B1 rs4149056 (p.Val174Ala) was associated with the risk of rhabdomyolysis (OR: 1.89, 95% CI: 1.40 to 2.56). In transfected cells, this variant reduced cerivastatin transport by 40% compared with the reference transporter (p < 0.001). The GWA identified an intronic variant (rs2819742) in the ryanodine receptor 2 gene (RYR2) as significant (p=1.74E-07). An additional copy of the minor allele of the RYR2 variant was associated with a reduced risk of rhabdomyolysis (OR: 0.48; 95% CI: 0.36 to 0.63).
Conclusion
We identified modest genetic risk factors for an extreme response to cerivastatin. Disabling genetic variants in the candidate genes were not responsible for the bimodal response to cerivastatin.
doi:10.1097/FPC.0b013e328343dd7d
PMCID: PMC3076530  PMID: 21386754
Genetics; drugs; epidemiology; rhabdomyolysis
8.  A Bivariate Genome-Wide Approach to Metabolic Syndrome 
Diabetes  2011;60(4):1329-1339.
OBJECTIVE
The metabolic syndrome (MetS) is defined as concomitant disorders of lipid and glucose metabolism, central obesity, and high blood pressure, with an increased risk of type 2 diabetes and cardiovascular disease. This study tests whether common genetic variants with pleiotropic effects account for some of the correlated architecture among five metabolic phenotypes that define MetS.
RESEARCH DESIGN AND METHODS
Seven studies of the STAMPEED consortium, comprising 22,161 participants of European ancestry, underwent genome-wide association analyses of metabolic traits using a panel of ∼2.5 million imputed single nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs). Phenotypes were defined by the National Cholesterol Education Program (NCEP) criteria for MetS in pairwise combinations. Individuals exceeding the NCEP thresholds for both traits of a pair were considered affected.
RESULTS
Twenty-nine common variants were associated with MetS or a pair of traits. Variants in the genes LPL, CETP, APOA5 (and its cluster), GCKR (and its cluster), LIPC, TRIB1, LOC100128354/MTNR1B, ABCB11, and LOC100129150 were further tested for their association with individual qualitative and quantitative traits. None of the 16 top SNPs (one per gene) associated simultaneously with more than two individual traits. Of them 11 variants showed nominal associations with MetS per se. The effects of 16 top SNPs on the quantitative traits were relatively small, together explaining from ∼9% of the variance in triglycerides, 5.8% of high-density lipoprotein cholesterol, 3.6% of fasting glucose, and 1.4% of systolic blood pressure.
CONCLUSIONS
Qualitative and quantitative pleiotropic tests on pairs of traits indicate that a small portion of the covariation in these traits can be explained by the reported common genetic variants.
doi:10.2337/db10-1011
PMCID: PMC3064107  PMID: 21386085
9.  Ascertainment of warfarin and aspirin use by medical record review compared with automated pharmacy data 
Purpose
Automated pharmacy databases are increasingly available for assessing medication use, but research on the validity of these data is incomplete. This study aimed to measure agreement on warfarin and aspirin use between medical records and automated pharmacy data among patients with newly detected atrial fibrillation (AF).
Methods
Patients with newly detected AF (n = 1953) were previously identified in a cohort study at Group Health (GH) in Washington State. Medical records were reviewed for information on risk factors and medication use, as well as clinical care during the 6 months after AF onset. Medication data were also obtained from the GH pharmacy database. We determined the sensitivity, specificity, and positive predictive value (PPV) as measures of the validity of the GH pharmacy database as compared with medical records for warfarin and aspirin use during the first 6 and 3 months after AF onset. We also calculated the κ statistic.
Results
For warfarin use, in comparison with the medical record review, the sensitivity, specificity, and PPV for the GH pharmacy database were excellent, and agreement was almost perfect in the 3- and 6-month periods after AF onset (κ = 0.92 and 0.93, respectively). For aspirin use, the GH pharmacy database had low sensitivity but high specificity, and agreement was only fair for these two periods (κ = 0.28 and 0.31, respectively).
Conclusions
The GH pharmacy database is a valuable source of data for pharmacoepidemiologic research on warfarin use among patients with AF. However, the database cannot be recommended for assessment of aspirin use.
doi:10.1002/pds.2041
PMCID: PMC3181009  PMID: 21351314
warfarin; medical records; pharmacy database; pharmacoepidemiology; validity; agreement
10.  A genome-wide association study identifies novel loci associated with circulating IGF-I and IGFBP-3 
Human Molecular Genetics  2011;20(6):1241-1251.
Insulin-like growth factor-I (IGF-I) and insulin-like growth factor-binding protein-3 (IGFBP-3) are involved in cell replication, proliferation, differentiation, protein synthesis, carbohydrate homeostasis and bone metabolism. Circulating IGF-I and IGFBP-3 concentrations predict anthropometric traits and risk of cancer and cardiovascular disease. In a genome-wide association study of 10 280 middle-aged and older men and women from four community-based cohort studies, we confirmed a known association of single nucleotide polymorphisms in the IGFBP3 gene region on chromosome 7p12.3 with IGFBP-3 concentrations using a significance threshold of P < 5 × 10−8 (P = 3.3 × 10−101). Furthermore, the same IGFBP3 gene locus (e.g. rs11977526) that was associated with IGFBP-3 concentrations was also associated with the opposite direction of effect, with IGF-I concentration after adjustment for IGFBP-3 concentration (P = 1.9 × 10−26). A novel and independent locus on chromosome 7p12.3 (rs700752) had genome-wide significant associations with higher IGFBP-3 (P = 4.4 × 10−21) and higher IGF-I (P = 4.9 × 10−9) concentrations; when the two measurements were adjusted for one another, the IGF-I association was attenuated but the IGFBP-3 association was not. Two additional loci demonstrated genome-wide significant associations with IGFBP-3 concentration (rs1065656, chromosome 16p13.3, P = 1.2 × 10−11, IGFALS, a confirmatory finding; and rs4234798, chromosome 4p16.1, P = 4.5 × 10−10, SORCS2, a novel finding). Together, the four genome-wide significant loci explained 6.5% of the population variation in IGFBP-3 concentration. Furthermore, we observed a borderline statistically significant association between IGF-I concentration and FOXO3 (rs2153960, chromosome 6q21, P = 5.1 × 10−7), a locus associated with longevity. These genetic loci deserve further investigation to elucidate the biological basis for the observed associations and clarify their possible role in IGF-mediated regulation of cell growth and metabolism.
doi:10.1093/hmg/ddq560
PMCID: PMC3043664  PMID: 21216879
11.  Common variants in the calcium-sensing receptor gene are associated with total serum calcium levels 
Human Molecular Genetics  2010;19(21):4296-4303.
Serum calcium levels are tightly regulated. We performed genome-wide association studies (GWAS) in population-based studies participating in the CHARGE Consortium to uncover common genetic variations associated with total serum calcium levels. GWAS of serum calcium concentrations was performed in 20 611 individuals of European ancestry for ∼2.5 million genotyped and imputed single-nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs). The SNP with the lowest P-value was rs17251221 (P = 2.4 * 10−22, minor allele frequency 14%) in the calcium-sensing receptor gene (CASR). This lead SNP was associated with higher serum calcium levels [0.06 mg/dl (0.015 mmol/l) per copy of the minor G allele] and accounted for 0.54% of the variance in serum calcium concentrations. The identification of variation in CASR that influences serum calcium concentration confirms the results of earlier candidate gene studies. The G allele of rs17251221 was also associated with higher serum magnesium levels (P = 1.2 * 10−3), lower serum phosphate levels (P = 2.8 * 10−7) and lower bone mineral density at the lumbar spine (P = 0.038), but not the femoral neck. No additional genomic loci contained SNPs associated at genome-wide significance (P < 5 * 10−8). These associations resemble clinical characteristics of patients with familial hypocalciuric hypercalcemia, an autosomal-dominant disease arising from rare inactivating mutations in the CASR gene. We conclude that common genetic variation in the CASR gene is associated with similar but milder features in the general population.
doi:10.1093/hmg/ddq342
PMCID: PMC2951868  PMID: 20705733
12.  Diabetes Mellitus, Glycemic Control, and Risk of Atrial Fibrillation 
BACKGROUND
Diabetes may be an independent risk factor for atrial fibrillation. However, results from prior studies are in conflict, and no study has examined diabetes duration or glycemic control.
OBJECTIVE
To examine the association of diabetes with risk of atrial fibrillation and to describe risk according to diabetes duration and glycemic control.
DESIGN
A population-based case-control study.
PARTICIPANTS
Within a large, integrated healthcare delivery system, we identified 1,410 people with newly-recognized atrial fibrillation from ICD-9 codes and validated cases by review of medical records. 2,203 controls without atrial fibrillation were selected from enrollment lists, stratified on age, sex, hypertension, and calendar year.
MAIN MEASURES
Information on atrial fibrillation, diabetes and other characteristics came from medical records. Diabetes was defined based on physician diagnoses recorded in the medical record, and pharmacologically treated diabetes was defined as receiving antihyperglycemic medications. Information about hemoglobin A1c levels came from computerized laboratory data.
KEY RESULTS
Among people with atrial fibrillation, 252/1410 (17.9%) had pharmacologically treated diabetes compared to 311/2203 (14.1%) of controls. The adjusted OR for atrial fibrillation was 1.40 (95% CI 1.15-1.71) for people with treated diabetes compared to those without diabetes. Among those with treated diabetes, the risk of developing atrial fibrillation was 3% higher for each additional year of diabetes duration (95% CI 1-6%). Compared to people without diabetes, the adjusted OR for people with treated diabetes with average hemoglobin A1c ≤7 was 1.06 (95% CI 0.74-1.51); for A1c >7 but ≤8, 1.48 (1.09-2.01); for A1c >8 but ≤9, 1.46 (1.02-2.08); and for A1c >9, 1.96 (1.22–3.14).
CONCLUSIONS
Diabetes was associated with higher risk of developing atrial fibrillation, and risk was higher with longer duration of treated diabetes and worse glycemic control. Future research should identify and test approaches to reduce the risk of atrial fibrillation in people with diabetes.
doi:10.1007/s11606-010-1340-y
PMCID: PMC2896589  PMID: 20405332
arrhythmia; atrial fibrillation; diabetes mellitus; glycemic control; diabetes complications
13.  Common genetic determinants of vitamin D insufficiency: a genome-wide association study 
Wang, Thomas J. | Zhang, Feng | Richards, J. Brent | Kestenbaum, Bryan | van Meurs, Joyce B. | Berry, Diane | Kiel, Douglas | Streeten, Elizabeth A. | Ohlsson, Claes | Koller, Daniel L. | Palotie, Leena | Cooper, Jason D. | O'Reilly, Paul F. | Houston, Denise K. | Glazer, Nicole L. | Vandenput, Liesbeth | Peacock, Munro | Shi, Julia | Rivadeneira, Fernando | McCarthy, Mark I. | Anneli, Pouta | de Boer, Ian H. | Mangino, Massimo | Kato, Bernet | Smyth, Deborah J. | Booth, Sarah L. | Jacques, Paul F. | Burke, Greg L. | Goodarzi, Mark | Cheung, Ching-Lung | Wolf, Myles | Rice, Kenneth | Goltzman, David | Hidiroglou, Nick | Ladouceur, Martin | Hui, Siu L. | Wareham, Nicholas J. | Hocking, Lynne J. | Hart, Deborah | Arden, Nigel K. | Cooper, Cyrus | Malik, Suneil | Fraser, William D. | Hartikainen, Anna-Liisa | Zhai, Guangju | Macdonald, Helen | Forouhi, Nita G. | Loos, Ruth J.F. | Reid, David M. | Hakim, Alan | Dennison, Elaine | Liu, Yongmei | Power, Chris | Stevens, Helen E. | Jaana, Laitinen | Vasan, Ramachandran S. | Soranzo, Nicole | Bojunga, Jörg | Psaty, Bruce M. | Lorentzon, Mattias | Foroud, Tatiana | Harris, Tamara B. | Hofman, Albert | Jansson, John-Olov | Cauley, Jane A. | Uitterlinden, Andre G. | Gibson, Quince | Järvelin, Marjo-Riitta | Karasik, David | Siscovick, David S. | Econs, Michael J. | Kritchevsky, Stephen B. | Florez, Jose C. | Todd, John A. | Dupuis, Josee | Hypponen, Elina | Spector, Timothy D.
Lancet  2010;376(9736):180-188.
Background
Vitamin D is crucial for maintaining musculoskeletal health. Recently, vitamin D insufficiency has been linked to a number of extraskeletal disorders, including diabetes, cancer, and cardiovascular disease. Determinants of circulating 25-hydroxyvitamin D (25-OH D) include sun exposure and dietary intake, but its high heritability suggests that genetic determinants may also play a role.
Methods
We performed a genome-wide association study of 25-OH D among ∼30,000 individuals of European descent from 15 cohorts. Five cohorts were designated as discovery cohorts (n=16,125), five as in silico replication cohorts (n=9,366), and five as de novo replication cohorts (n=8,378). Association results were combined using z-score-weighted meta-analysis. Vitamin D insufficiency was defined as 25-OH D <75 nmol/L or <50 nmol/L.
Findings
Variants at three loci reached genome-wide significance in the discovery cohorts, and were confirmed in the replication cohorts: 4p12 (overall P=1.9 × 10-109 for rs2282679, in GC); 11q12 (P=2.1 × 10-27 for rs12785878, near DHCR7); 11p15 (P=3.3 × 10-20 for rs10741657, near CYP2R1). Variants at an additional locus (20q13, CYP24A1) were genome-wide significant in the pooled sample (P=6.0 × 10-10 for rs6013897). A genotype score was constructed using the three confirmed variants. Those in the top quartile of genotype scores had 2- to 2.5-fold elevated odds of vitamin D insufficiency (P≤1 × 10-26).
Interpretation
Variants near genes involved in cholesterol synthesis (DHCR7), hydroxylation (CYP2R1, CYP24A1), and vitamin D transport (GC) influence vitamin D status. Genetic variation at these loci identifies individuals of European descent who have substantially elevated risk of vitamin D insufficiency.
doi:10.1016/S0140-6736(10)60588-0
PMCID: PMC3086761  PMID: 20541252
14.  The Association of Genome-Wide Variation with the Risk of Incident Heart Failure in Adults of European and African Ancestry: A Prospective Meta-Analysis from the CHARGE Consortium 
Background
Although genetic factors contribute to the onset of heart failure (HF), no large-scale genome-wide investigation of HF risk has been published to date. We investigated the association of 2,478,304 single nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs) with incident HF by meta-analyzing data from 4 community-based prospective cohorts: the Atherosclerosis Risk in Communities Study, the Cardiovascular Health Study, the Framingham Heart Study, and the Rotterdam Study.
Methods and Results
Eligible participants for these analyses were of European or African ancestry and free of clinical HF at baseline. Each study independently conducted genome-wide scans and imputed data to the ~2.5 million SNPs in HapMap. Within each study, Cox proportional hazards regression models provided age- and sex-adjusted estimates of the association between each variant and time to incident HF. Fixed-effect meta-analyses combined results for each SNP from the 4 cohorts to produce an overall association estimate and p-value. A genome-wide significance p-value threshold was set a priori at 5.0×10−7. During a mean follow-up of 11.5 years, 2,526 incident HF events (12%) occurred in 20,926 European-ancestry participants. The meta-analysis identified a genome-wide significant locus at chromosomal position 15q22 (1.4×10−8), which was 58.8 kb from USP3. Among 2,895 African-ancestry participants, 466 incident HF events (16%) occurred during a mean follow-up of 13.7 years. One genome-wide significant locus was identified at 12q14 (6.7×10−8), which was 6.3 kb from LRIG3.
Conclusions
We identified 2 loci that were associated with incident HF and exceeded genome-wide significance. The findings merit replication in other community-based settings of incident HF.
doi:10.1161/CIRCGENETICS.109.895763
PMCID: PMC3025695  PMID: 20445134
epidemiology; genetics; heart failure; genome-wide variation; incidence
15.  Genomic variation associated with mortality among adults of European and African ancestry with heart failure: the CHARGE Consortium 
Background
Prognosis and survival are significant concerns for individuals with heart failure (HF). In order to better understand the pathophysiology of HF prognosis, the association between 2,366,858 single nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs) and all-cause mortality was evaluated among individuals with incident HF from four community-based prospective cohorts: the Atherosclerosis Risk in Communities Study, the Cardiovascular Health Study, the Framingham Heart Study, and the Rotterdam Study.
Methods and Results
Participants were 2,526 individuals of European ancestry and 466 individuals of African ancestry who suffered an incident HF event during follow-up in the respective cohorts. Within each study, the association between genetic variants and time to mortality among individuals with HF was assessed by Cox proportional hazards models that included adjustment for sex and age at the time of the HF event. Prospective fixed-effect meta-analyses were conducted for the four study populations of European ancestry (N=1,645 deaths) and for the two populations of African ancestry (N=281 deaths). Genome-wide significance was set at P=5.0×10-7. Meta-analytic findings among individuals of European ancestry revealed one genome-wide significant locus on chromosome 3p22 in an intron of CKLF-like MARVEL transmembrane domain containing 7 (CMTM7, p = 3.2×10-7). Eight additional loci in individuals of European ancestry and four loci in individuals of African ancestry were identified by high-signal SNPs (p < 1.0×10-5), but did not meet genome-wide significance.
Conclusions
This study identified a novel locus associated with all-cause mortality among individuals of European ancestry with HF. This finding warrants additional investigation, including replication, in other studies of HF.
doi:10.1161/CIRCGENETICS.109.895995
PMCID: PMC3033765  PMID: 20400778
heart failure; all-cause mortality; genetics; genome-wide variation
16.  Multiple Novel Loci are Associated with Indices of Renal Function and Chronic Kidney Disease 
Nature genetics  2009;41(6):712-717.
Chronic kidney disease (CKD) has a heritable component and is an important global public health problem because of its high prevalence and morbidity.1 We conducted genome-wide association studies (GWAS) to identify susceptibility loci for glomerular filtration rate estimated by serum creatinine (eGFRcrea), cystatin C (eGFRcys), and CKD (eGFRcrea<60 ml/min/1.73m2) in European-ancestry participants of four populations-based cohorts (ARIC, CHS, FHS, RS; n=19,877, 2,388 CKD cases), and tested for external replication in 21,466 participants (1,932 CKD cases). Significant associations (p<5*10−8) were identified for SNPs with [1] CKD at the UMOD locus; [2] eGFRcrea at the UMOD, SHROOM3, and GATM/SPATA5L1 loci; [3] eGFRcys at the CST and STC1 loci. UMOD encodes the most common protein in human urine, Tamm-Horsfall protein,2 and rare mutations in UMOD cause Mendelian forms of kidney disease.3 Our findings provide new insights into CKD pathogenesis and underscore the importance of common genetic variants influencing renal function and disease.
doi:10.1038/ng.377
PMCID: PMC3039280  PMID: 19430482
chronic kidney disease; renal function; epidemiology; genetics; genome-wide association study; single nucleotide polymorphism
17.  New genetic loci implicated in fasting glucose homeostasis and their impact on type 2 diabetes risk 
Dupuis, Josée | Langenberg, Claudia | Prokopenko, Inga | Saxena, Richa | Soranzo, Nicole | Jackson, Anne U | Wheeler, Eleanor | Glazer, Nicole L | Bouatia-Naji, Nabila | Gloyn, Anna L | Lindgren, Cecilia M | Mägi, Reedik | Morris, Andrew P | Randall, Joshua | Johnson, Toby | Elliott, Paul | Rybin, Denis | Thorleifsson, Gudmar | Steinthorsdottir, Valgerdur | Henneman, Peter | Grallert, Harald | Dehghan, Abbas | Hottenga, Jouke Jan | Franklin, Christopher S | Navarro, Pau | Song, Kijoung | Goel, Anuj | Perry, John R B | Egan, Josephine M | Lajunen, Taina | Grarup, Niels | Sparsø, Thomas | Doney, Alex | Voight, Benjamin F | Stringham, Heather M | Li, Man | Kanoni, Stavroula | Shrader, Peter | Cavalcanti-Proença, Christine | Kumari, Meena | Qi, Lu | Timpson, Nicholas J | Gieger, Christian | Zabena, Carina | Rocheleau, Ghislain | Ingelsson, Erik | An, Ping | O’Connell, Jeffrey | Luan, Jian'an | Elliott, Amanda | McCarroll, Steven A | Payne, Felicity | Roccasecca, Rosa Maria | Pattou, François | Sethupathy, Praveen | Ardlie, Kristin | Ariyurek, Yavuz | Balkau, Beverley | Barter, Philip | Beilby, John P | Ben-Shlomo, Yoav | Benediktsson, Rafn | Bennett, Amanda J | Bergmann, Sven | Bochud, Murielle | Boerwinkle, Eric | Bonnefond, Amélie | Bonnycastle, Lori L | Borch-Johnsen, Knut | Böttcher, Yvonne | Brunner, Eric | Bumpstead, Suzannah J | Charpentier, Guillaume | Chen, Yii-Der Ida | Chines, Peter | Clarke, Robert | Coin, Lachlan J M | Cooper, Matthew N | Cornelis, Marilyn | Crawford, Gabe | Crisponi, Laura | Day, Ian N M | de Geus, Eco | Delplanque, Jerome | Dina, Christian | Erdos, Michael R | Fedson, Annette C | Fischer-Rosinsky, Antje | Forouhi, Nita G | Fox, Caroline S | Frants, Rune | Franzosi, Maria Grazia | Galan, Pilar | Goodarzi, Mark O | Graessler, Jürgen | Groves, Christopher J | Grundy, Scott | Gwilliam, Rhian | Gyllensten, Ulf | Hadjadj, Samy | Hallmans, Göran | Hammond, Naomi | Han, Xijing | Hartikainen, Anna-Liisa | Hassanali, Neelam | Hayward, Caroline | Heath, Simon C | Hercberg, Serge | Herder, Christian | Hicks, Andrew A | Hillman, David R | Hingorani, Aroon D | Hofman, Albert | Hui, Jennie | Hung, Joe | Isomaa, Bo | Johnson, Paul R V | Jørgensen, Torben | Jula, Antti | Kaakinen, Marika | Kaprio, Jaakko | Kesaniemi, Y Antero | Kivimaki, Mika | Knight, Beatrice | Koskinen, Seppo | Kovacs, Peter | Kyvik, Kirsten Ohm | Lathrop, G Mark | Lawlor, Debbie A | Le Bacquer, Olivier | Lecoeur, Cécile | Li, Yun | Lyssenko, Valeriya | Mahley, Robert | Mangino, Massimo | Manning, Alisa K | Martínez-Larrad, María Teresa | McAteer, Jarred B | McCulloch, Laura J | McPherson, Ruth | Meisinger, Christa | Melzer, David | Meyre, David | Mitchell, Braxton D | Morken, Mario A | Mukherjee, Sutapa | Naitza, Silvia | Narisu, Narisu | Neville, Matthew J | Oostra, Ben A | Orrù, Marco | Pakyz, Ruth | Palmer, Colin N A | Paolisso, Giuseppe | Pattaro, Cristian | Pearson, Daniel | Peden, John F | Pedersen, Nancy L. | Perola, Markus | Pfeiffer, Andreas F H | Pichler, Irene | Polasek, Ozren | Posthuma, Danielle | Potter, Simon C | Pouta, Anneli | Province, Michael A | Psaty, Bruce M | Rathmann, Wolfgang | Rayner, Nigel W | Rice, Kenneth | Ripatti, Samuli | Rivadeneira, Fernando | Roden, Michael | Rolandsson, Olov | Sandbaek, Annelli | Sandhu, Manjinder | Sanna, Serena | Sayer, Avan Aihie | Scheet, Paul | Scott, Laura J | Seedorf, Udo | Sharp, Stephen J | Shields, Beverley | Sigurðsson, Gunnar | Sijbrands, Erik J G | Silveira, Angela | Simpson, Laila | Singleton, Andrew | Smith, Nicholas L | Sovio, Ulla | Swift, Amy | Syddall, Holly | Syvänen, Ann-Christine | Tanaka, Toshiko | Thorand, Barbara | Tichet, Jean | Tönjes, Anke | Tuomi, Tiinamaija | Uitterlinden, André G | van Dijk, Ko Willems | van Hoek, Mandy | Varma, Dhiraj | Visvikis-Siest, Sophie | Vitart, Veronique | Vogelzangs, Nicole | Waeber, Gérard | Wagner, Peter J | Walley, Andrew | Walters, G Bragi | Ward, Kim L | Watkins, Hugh | Weedon, Michael N | Wild, Sarah H | Willemsen, Gonneke | Witteman, Jaqueline C M | Yarnell, John W G | Zeggini, Eleftheria | Zelenika, Diana | Zethelius, Björn | Zhai, Guangju | Zhao, Jing Hua | Zillikens, M Carola | Borecki, Ingrid B | Loos, Ruth J F | Meneton, Pierre | Magnusson, Patrik K E | Nathan, David M | Williams, Gordon H | Hattersley, Andrew T | Silander, Kaisa | Salomaa, Veikko | Smith, George Davey | Bornstein, Stefan R | Schwarz, Peter | Spranger, Joachim | Karpe, Fredrik | Shuldiner, Alan R | Cooper, Cyrus | Dedoussis, George V | Serrano-Ríos, Manuel | Morris, Andrew D | Lind, Lars | Palmer, Lyle J | Hu, Frank B. | Franks, Paul W | Ebrahim, Shah | Marmot, Michael | Kao, W H Linda | Pankow, James S | Sampson, Michael J | Kuusisto, Johanna | Laakso, Markku | Hansen, Torben | Pedersen, Oluf | Pramstaller, Peter Paul | Wichmann, H Erich | Illig, Thomas | Rudan, Igor | Wright, Alan F | Stumvoll, Michael | Campbell, Harry | Wilson, James F | Hamsten, Anders | Bergman, Richard N | Buchanan, Thomas A | Collins, Francis S | Mohlke, Karen L | Tuomilehto, Jaakko | Valle, Timo T | Altshuler, David | Rotter, Jerome I | Siscovick, David S | Penninx, Brenda W J H | Boomsma, Dorret | Deloukas, Panos | Spector, Timothy D | Frayling, Timothy M | Ferrucci, Luigi | Kong, Augustine | Thorsteinsdottir, Unnur | Stefansson, Kari | van Duijn, Cornelia M | Aulchenko, Yurii S | Cao, Antonio | Scuteri, Angelo | Schlessinger, David | Uda, Manuela | Ruokonen, Aimo | Jarvelin, Marjo-Riitta | Waterworth, Dawn M | Vollenweider, Peter | Peltonen, Leena | Mooser, Vincent | Abecasis, Goncalo R | Wareham, Nicholas J | Sladek, Robert | Froguel, Philippe | Watanabe, Richard M | Meigs, James B | Groop, Leif | Boehnke, Michael | McCarthy, Mark I | Florez, Jose C | Barroso, Inês
Nature genetics  2010;42(2):105-116.
Circulating glucose levels are tightly regulated. To identify novel glycemic loci, we performed meta-analyses of 21 genome-wide associations studies informative for fasting glucose (FG), fasting insulin (FI) and indices of β-cell function (HOMA-B) and insulin resistance (HOMA-IR) in up to 46,186 non-diabetic participants. Follow-up of 25 loci in up to 76,558 additional subjects identified 16 loci associated with FG/HOMA-B and two associated with FI/HOMA-IR. These include nine new FG loci (in or near ADCY5, MADD, ADRA2A, CRY2, FADS1, GLIS3, SLC2A2, PROX1 and FAM148B) and one influencing FI/HOMA-IR (near IGF1). We also demonstrated association of ADCY5, PROX1, GCK, GCKR and DGKB/TMEM195 with type 2 diabetes (T2D). Within these loci, likely biological candidate genes influence signal transduction, cell proliferation, development, glucose-sensing and circadian regulation. Our results demonstrate that genetic studies of glycemic traits can identify T2D risk loci, as well as loci that elevate FG modestly, but do not cause overt diabetes.
doi:10.1038/ng.520
PMCID: PMC3018764  PMID: 20081858
18.  Genome-wide association study of blood pressure and hypertension 
Nature genetics  2009;41(6):677-687.
Blood pressure (BP) is a major cardiovascular disease risk factor. To date, few variants associated with inter-individual BP variation have been identified. A genome-wide association study of systolic (SBP), diastolic BP (DBP), and hypertension in the CHARGE Consortium (n=29,136) identified 13 SNPs for SBP, 20 for DBP, and 10 for hypertension at p <4×10-7. The top 10 loci for SBP and DBP were incorporated into a risk score; mean BP and prevalence of hypertension increased in relation to number of risk alleles carried. When 10 CHARGE SNPs for each trait were meta-analyzed jointly with the Global BPgen Consortium (n=34,433), four CHARGE loci attained genome-wide significance (p<5×10-8) for SBP (ATP2B1, CYP17A1, PLEKHA7, SH2B3), six for DBP (ATP2B1, CACNB2, CSK/ULK3, SH2B3, TBX3/TBX5, ULK4), and one for hypertension (ATP2B1). Identifying novel BP genes advances our understanding of BP regulation and highlights potential drug targets for the prevention or treatment of hypertension.
doi:10.1038/ng.384
PMCID: PMC2998712  PMID: 19430479
19.  Multiple New Loci Associated with Kidney Function and Chronic Kidney Disease: The CKDGen consortium 
Köttgen, Anna | Pattaro, Cristian | Böger, Carsten A. | Fuchsberger, Christian | Olden, Matthias | Glazer, Nicole L. | Parsa, Afshin | Gao, Xiaoyi | Yang, Qiong | Smith, Albert V. | O’Connell, Jeffrey R. | Li, Man | Schmidt, Helena | Tanaka, Toshiko | Isaacs, Aaron | Ketkar, Shamika | Hwang, Shih-Jen | Johnson, Andrew D. | Dehghan, Abbas | Teumer, Alexander | Paré, Guillaume | Atkinson, Elizabeth J. | Zeller, Tanja | Lohman, Kurt | Cornelis, Marilyn C. | Probst-Hensch, Nicole M. | Kronenberg, Florian | Tönjes, Anke | Hayward, Caroline | Aspelund, Thor | Eiriksdottir, Gudny | Launer, Lenore | Harris, Tamara B. | Rapmersaud, Evadnie | Mitchell, Braxton D. | Boerwinkle, Eric | Struchalin, Maksim | Cavalieri, Margherita | Singleton, Andrew | Giallauria, Francesco | Metter, Jeffery | de Boer, Ian | Haritunians, Talin | Lumley, Thomas | Siscovick, David | Psaty, Bruce M. | Zillikens, M. Carola | Oostra, Ben A. | Feitosa, Mary | Province, Michael | Levy, Daniel | de Andrade, Mariza | Turner, Stephen T. | Schillert, Arne | Ziegler, Andreas | Wild, Philipp S. | Schnabel, Renate B. | Wilde, Sandra | Muenzel, Thomas F. | Leak, Tennille S | Illig, Thomas | Klopp, Norman | Meisinger, Christa | Wichmann, H.-Erich | Koenig, Wolfgang | Zgaga, Lina | Zemunik, Tatijana | Kolcic, Ivana | Minelli, Cosetta | Hu, Frank B. | Johansson, Åsa | Igl, Wilmar | Zaboli, Ghazal | Wild, Sarah H | Wright, Alan F | Campbell, Harry | Ellinghaus, David | Schreiber, Stefan | Aulchenko, Yurii S | Rivadeneira, Fernando | Uitterlinden, Andre G | Hofman, Albert | Imboden, Medea | Nitsch, Dorothea | Brandstätter, Anita | Kollerits, Barbara | Kedenko, Lyudmyla | Mägi, Reedik | Stumvoll, Michael | Kovacs, Peter | Boban, Mladen | Campbell, Susan | Endlich, Karlhans | Völzke, Henry | Kroemer, Heyo K. | Nauck, Matthias | Völker, Uwe | Polasek, Ozren | Vitart, Veronique | Badola, Sunita | Parker, Alexander N. | Ridker, Paul M. | Kardia, Sharon L. R. | Blankenberg, Stefan | Liu, Yongmei | Curhan, Gary C. | Franke, Andre | Rochat, Thierry | Paulweber, Bernhard | Prokopenko, Inga | Wang, Wei | Gudnason, Vilmundur | Shuldiner, Alan R. | Coresh, Josef | Schmidt, Reinhold | Ferrucci, Luigi | Shlipak, Michael G. | van Duijn, Cornelia M. | Borecki, Ingrid | Krämer, Bernhard K. | Rudan, Igor | Gyllensten, Ulf | Wilson, James F. | Witteman, Jacqueline C. | Pramstaller, Peter P. | Rettig, Rainer | Hastie, Nick | Chasman, Daniel I. | Kao, W. H. | Heid, Iris M. | Fox, Caroline S.
Nature genetics  2010;42(5):376-384.
Chronic kidney disease (CKD) is a significant public health problem, and recent genetic studies have identified common CKD susceptibility variants. The CKDGen consortium performed a meta-analysis of genome-wide association data in 67,093 Caucasian individuals from 20 population-based studies to identify new susceptibility loci for reduced renal function, estimated by serum creatinine (eGFRcrea), cystatin C (eGFRcys), and CKD (eGFRcrea <60 ml/min/1.73m2; n = 5,807 CKD cases). Follow-up of the 23 genome-wide significant loci (p<5×10−8) in 22,982 replication samples identified 13 novel loci for renal function and CKD (in or near LASS2, GCKR, ALMS1, TFDP2, DAB2, SLC34A1, VEGFA, PRKAG2, PIP5K1B, ATXN2, DACH1, UBE2Q2, and SLC7A9) and 7 creatinine production and secretion loci (CPS1, SLC22A2, TMEM60, WDR37, SLC6A13, WDR72, BCAS3). These results further our understanding of biologic mechanisms of kidney function by identifying loci potentially influencing nephrogenesis, podocyte function, angiogenesis, solute transport, and metabolic functions of the kidney.
doi:10.1038/ng.568
PMCID: PMC2997674  PMID: 20383146
genome-wide association; renal disease; population-based; genetics; chronic kidney disease
20.  Genetic Variants Associated With Cardiac Structure and Function 
Jama  2009;302(2):168-178.
Context
Echocardiographic measures of left ventricular (LV) structure and function are heritable phenotypes of cardiovascular disease.
Objective
To identify common genetic variants associated with cardiac structure and function by conducting a meta-analysis of genome-wide association data in 5 population-based cohort studies (stage 1) with replication (stage 2) in 2 other community-based samples.
Design, Setting, and Participants
Within each of 5 community-based cohorts comprising the EchoGen consortium (stage 1; n=12 612 individuals of European ancestry; 55% women, aged 26–95 years; examinations between 1978–2008), we estimated the association between approximately 2.5 million single-nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs; imputed to the HapMap CEU panel) and echocardiographic traits. In stage 2, SNPs significantly associated with traits in stage 1 were tested for association in 2 other cohorts (n=4094 people of European ancestry). Using a prespecified P value threshold of 5×10−7 to indicate genome-wide significance, we performed an inverse variance-weighted fixed-effects meta-analysis of genome-wide association data from each cohort.
Main Outcome Measures
Echocardiographic traits: LV mass, internal dimensions, wall thickness, systolic dysfunction, aortic root, and left atrial size.
Results
In stage 1, 16 genetic loci were associated with 5 echocardiographic traits: 1 each with LV internal dimensions and systolic dysfunction, 3 each with LV mass and wall thickness, and 8 with aortic root size. In stage 2, 5 loci replicated (6q22 locus associated with LV diastolic dimensions, explaining <1% of trait variance; 5q23, 12p12, 12q14, and 17p13 associated with aortic root size, explaining 1%-3% of trait variance).
Conclusions
We identified 5 genetic loci harboring common variants that were associated with variation in LV diastolic dimensions and aortic root size, but such findings explained a very small proportion of variance. Further studies are required to replicate these findings, identify the causal variants at or near these loci, characterize their functional significance, and determine whether they are related to overt cardiovascular disease.
doi:10.1001/jama.2009.978-a
PMCID: PMC2975567  PMID: 19584346
21.  Common Variants in KCNN3 are Associated with Lone Atrial Fibrillation 
Nature genetics  2010;42(3):240-244.
Atrial fibrillation (AF) is the most common sustained arrhythmia. A subset of patients with lone AF have no overt heart disease and an increased heritability of AF. We sought to identify common genetic variants underlying lone AF. Cases were from the German AF Network, Heart and Vascular Health Study, Atherosclerosis Risk in Communities Study, Cleveland Clinic, and Massachusetts General Hospital. Subjects were genotyped, HapMap SNPs imputed, and age- sex- and hypertension-adjusted analyses performed. A meta-analysis was conducted using 1,335 cases of lone AF and 12,844 referents. A novel locus on chromosome 1q21 was identified, and the most significant SNP, rs13376333, had an adjusted odds ratio of 1.56 (P=6.3×10−12). This association was replicated in two cohorts with lone AF for an overall odds ratio of 1.52 (P=1.83×10−21). Rs13376333 is intronic to KCNN3, a potassium channel involved in atrial repolarization. KCNN3 represents a novel potential therapeutic target in the treatment of AF.
doi:10.1038/ng.537
PMCID: PMC2871387  PMID: 20173747
22.  Genetic variation in GIPR influences the glucose and insulin responses to an oral glucose challenge 
Saxena, Richa | Hivert, Marie-France | Langenberg, Claudia | Tanaka, Toshiko | Pankow, James S | Vollenweider, Peter | Lyssenko, Valeriya | Bouatia-Naji, Nabila | Dupuis, Josée | Jackson, Anne U | Kao, W H Linda | Li, Man | Glazer, Nicole L | Manning, Alisa K | Luan, Jian’an | Stringham, Heather M | Prokopenko, Inga | Johnson, Toby | Grarup, Niels | Boesgaard, Trine W | Lecoeur, Cécile | Shrader, Peter | O’Connell, Jeffrey | Ingelsson, Erik | Couper, David J | Rice, Kenneth | Song, Kijoung | Andreasen, Camilla H | Dina, Christian | Köttgen, Anna | Le Bacquer, Olivier | Pattou, François | Taneera, Jalal | Steinthorsdottir, Valgerdur | Rybin, Denis | Ardlie, Kristin | Sampson, Michael | Qi, Lu | van Hoek, Mandy | Weedon, Michael N | Aulchenko, Yurii S | Voight, Benjamin F | Grallert, Harald | Balkau, Beverley | Bergman, Richard N | Bielinski, Suzette J | Bonnefond, Amelie | Bonnycastle, Lori L | Borch-Johnsen, Knut | Böttcher, Yvonne | Brunner, Eric | Buchanan, Thomas A | Bumpstead, Suzannah J | Cavalcanti-Proença, Christine | Charpentier, Guillaume | Chen, Yii-Der Ida | Chines, Peter S | Collins, Francis S | Cornelis, Marilyn | Crawford, Gabriel J | Delplanque, Jerome | Doney, Alex | Egan, Josephine M | Erdos, Michael R | Firmann, Mathieu | Forouhi, Nita G | Fox, Caroline S | Goodarzi, Mark O | Graessler, Jürgen | Hingorani, Aroon | Isomaa, Bo | Jørgensen, Torben | Kivimaki, Mika | Kovacs, Peter | Krohn, Knut | Kumari, Meena | Lauritzen, Torsten | Lévy-Marchal, Claire | Mayor, Vladimir | McAteer, Jarred B | Meyre, David | Mitchell, Braxton D | Mohlke, Karen L | Morken, Mario A | Narisu, Narisu | Palmer, Colin N A | Pakyz, Ruth | Pascoe, Laura | Payne, Felicity | Pearson, Daniel | Rathmann, Wolfgang | Sandbaek, Annelli | Sayer, Avan Aihie | Scott, Laura J | Sharp, Stephen J | Sijbrands, Eric | Singleton, Andrew | Siscovick, David S | Smith, Nicholas L | Sparsø, Thomas | Swift, Amy J | Syddall, Holly | Thorleifsson, Gudmar | Tönjes, Anke | Tuomi, Tiinamaija | Tuomilehto, Jaakko | Valle, Timo T | Waeber, Gérard | Walley, Andrew | Waterworth, Dawn M | Zeggini, Eleftheria | Zhao, Jing Hua | Illig, Thomas | Wichmann, H Erich | Wilson, James F | van Duijn, Cornelia | Hu, Frank B | Morris, Andrew D | Frayling, Timothy M | Hattersley, Andrew T | Thorsteinsdottir, Unnur | Stefansson, Kari | Nilsson, Peter | Syvänen, Ann-Christine | Shuldiner, Alan R | Walker, Mark | Bornstein, Stefan R | Schwarz, Peter | Williams, Gordon H | Nathan, David M | Kuusisto, Johanna | Laakso, Markku | Cooper, Cyrus | Marmot, Michael | Ferrucci, Luigi | Mooser, Vincent | Stumvoll, Michael | Loos, Ruth J F | Altshuler, David | Psaty, Bruce M | Rotter, Jerome I | Boerwinkle, Eric | Hansen, Torben | Pedersen, Oluf | Florez, Jose C | McCarthy, Mark I | Boehnke, Michael | Barroso, Inês | Sladek, Robert | Froguel, Philippe | Meigs, James B | Groop, Leif | Wareham, Nicholas J | Watanabe, Richard M
Nature genetics  2010;42(2):142-148.
Glucose levels 2 h after an oral glucose challenge are a clinical measure of glucose tolerance used in the diagnosis of type 2 diabetes. We report a meta-analysis of nine genome-wide association studies (n = 15,234 nondiabetic individuals) and a follow-up of 29 independent loci (n = 6,958–30,620). We identify variants at the GIPR locus associated with 2-h glucose level (rs10423928, β (s.e.m.) = 0.09 (0.01) mmol/l per A allele, P = 2.0 × 10−15). The GIPR A-allele carriers also showed decreased insulin secretion (n = 22,492; insulinogenic index, P = 1.0 × 10−17; ratio of insulin to glucose area under the curve, P = 1.3 × 10−16) and diminished incretin effect (n = 804; P = 4.3 × 10−4). We also identified variants at ADCY5 (rs2877716, P = 4.2 × 10−16), VPS13C (rs17271305, P = 4.1 × 10−8), GCKR (rs1260326, P = 7.1 × 10−11) and TCF7L2 (rs7903146, P = 4.2 × 10−10) associated with 2-h glucose. Of the three newly implicated loci (GIPR, ADCY5 and VPS13C), only ADCY5 was found to be associated with type 2 diabetes in collaborating studies (n = 35,869 cases, 89,798 controls, OR = 1.12, 95% CI 1.09–1.15, P = 4.8 × 10−18).
doi:10.1038/ng.521
PMCID: PMC2922003  PMID: 20081857
23.  Genome-Wide Association Studies of Serum Magnesium, Potassium, and Sodium Concentrations Identify Six Loci Influencing Serum Magnesium Levels 
PLoS Genetics  2010;6(8):e1001045.
Magnesium, potassium, and sodium, cations commonly measured in serum, are involved in many physiological processes including energy metabolism, nerve and muscle function, signal transduction, and fluid and blood pressure regulation. To evaluate the contribution of common genetic variation to normal physiologic variation in serum concentrations of these cations, we conducted genome-wide association studies of serum magnesium, potassium, and sodium concentrations using ∼2.5 million genotyped and imputed common single nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs) in 15,366 participants of European descent from the international CHARGE Consortium. Study-specific results were combined using fixed-effects inverse-variance weighted meta-analysis. SNPs demonstrating genome-wide significant (p<5×10−8) or suggestive associations (p<4×10−7) were evaluated for replication in an additional 8,463 subjects of European descent. The association of common variants at six genomic regions (in or near MUC1, ATP2B1, DCDC5, TRPM6, SHROOM3, and MDS1) with serum magnesium levels was genome-wide significant when meta-analyzed with the replication dataset. All initially significant SNPs from the CHARGE Consortium showed nominal association with clinically defined hypomagnesemia, two showed association with kidney function, two with bone mineral density, and one of these also associated with fasting glucose levels. Common variants in CNNM2, a magnesium transporter studied only in model systems to date, as well as in CNNM3 and CNNM4, were also associated with magnesium concentrations in this study. We observed no associations with serum sodium or potassium levels exceeding p<4×10−7. Follow-up studies of newly implicated genomic loci may provide additional insights into the regulation and homeostasis of human serum magnesium levels.
Author Summary
Magnesium, potassium, and sodium are involved in important physiological processes. To better understand how common genetic variation may contribute to inter-individual differences in serum concentrations of these electrolytes, we evaluated single nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs) across the genome in association with serum magnesium, potassium, and sodium levels in 15,366 participants of European descent from the CHARGE Consortium. We then verified the associations in an additional 8,463 study participants. Six different genomic regions contain variants that are reproducibly associated with serum magnesium levels, and only one of the regions had been previously known to influence serum magnesium concentrations in humans. The identified SNPs also show association with clinically defined hypomagnesemia, and some of them with traits that have been linked to serum magnesium levels, including kidney function, fasting glucose, and bone mineral density. We further provide evidence for a physiological role of magnesium transporters in humans which have previously only been studied in model systems. None of the SNPs evaluated in our study are significantly associated with serum levels of sodium or potassium. Additional studies are needed to investigate the underlying molecular mechanisms in order to help us understand the contribution of these newly identified regions to magnesium homeostasis.
doi:10.1371/journal.pgen.1001045
PMCID: PMC2916845  PMID: 20700443
24.  Multiple loci influence erythrocyte phenotypes in the CHARGE Consortium 
Nature genetics  2009;41(11):1191-1198.
Erythrocyte measures are heritable and have important health implications, yet their genetic determinants are largely unknown. We performed genome-wide association analyses in 24,167 European-ancestry individuals for six erythrocyte traits and identified associations at 23 loci (P values 5×10-8 to 1×10-57). Replication testing in an independent set of 9,456 European-ancestry individuals showed strong evidence of association in all 23 loci in meta-analysis of the discovery and replication cohorts. Our findings include previously identified loci (HBS1L/MYB, HFE, TMPRSS6, TFR2, SPTA1) and novel associations (EPO, TFRC, SH2B3, and 15 other loci). This study has identified novel determinants of erythrocyte traits, offering insight into common variants underlying variation in erythrocyte measures.
doi:10.1038/ng.466
PMCID: PMC2778265  PMID: 19862010
25.  Antihypertensive treatment with ACE inhibitors or beta-blockers and risk of incident atrial fibrillation in a general hypertensive population 
American journal of hypertension  2009;22(5):538-544.
Background
Secondary analyses of clinical trial data suggest that, compared with other agents, angiotensin-converting enzyme (ACE) inhibitors and angiotensin receptor blockers (ARB) are associated with lower risk of incident atrial fibrillation (AF) in patients with heart failure, but data from the hypertension trials have been inconsistent. Information is scant about the association of beta-blocker use with AF risk in hypertensive patients without heart failure.
Methods
We conducted a population-based case-control study to determine whether antihypertensive treatment with ACE inhibitors/ARBs or beta-blockers, compared with diuretics, was associated with the risk of incident AF in a community practice setting. All patients (810 AF cases, 1,512 control subjects) were members of Group Health, an integrated health-care delivery system, were pharmacologically treated for hypertension, and did not have heart failure. Medical records were reviewed to confirm the diagnosis of incident AF and to collect information on medical conditions and health behaviors. Information on antihypertensive medications was obtained from a pharmacy database.
Results
Single-drug users of an ACE inhibitor/ARB had a lower risk of incident AF compared with single-drug users of a diuretic (adjusted odds ratio [OR] 0.63, 95% confidence interval [CI] 0.44–0.91). Single-drug use of beta-blockers was not significantly associated with lower AF risk (OR 1.05, 95% CI 0.73–1.52), and none of the most commonly-used two-drug regimens was significantly associated with AF risk, compared with single-drug use of diuretic.
Conclusion
In a general hypertensive population without heart failure, single-drug use of ACE inhibitors/ARBs was associated with lower AF risk.
doi:10.1038/ajh.2009.33
PMCID: PMC2672972  PMID: 19265792

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