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author:("Avi, radke")
1.  CCR5 Haplotypes Influence HCV Serostatus in Caucasian Intravenous Drug Users 
PLoS ONE  2013;8(7):e70561.
Background
Up to 90% HIV-1 positive intravenous drug users (IDUs) are co-infected with HCV. Although best recognized for its function as a major co-receptor for cell entry of HIV, CC chemokine receptor 5 (CCR5) has also been implicated in the pathogenesis of HCV infection. Here, we investigated whether CCR5 haplotypes influence HIV-1 and HCV seropositivity among 373 Caucasian IDUs from Estonia.
Methods
Of these IDUs, 56% and 44% were HIV and HCV seropositive, respectively, and 47% were coinfected. 500 blood donors seronegative for HIV and HCV were also evaluated. CCR5 haplotypes (HHA to HHG*2) were derived after genotyping nine CCR2–CCR5 polymorphisms. The association between CCR5 haplotypes with HIV and/or HCV seropositivity was determined using logistic regression analysis. Co-variates included in the models were length of intravenous drug use, HBV serostatus and copy number of CCL3L1, the gene encoding the most potent HIV-suppressive chemokine and ligand for CCR5.
Results
Compared to IDUs seronegative for both HCV and HIV (HCV−/HIV-), IDUs who were HCV+/HIV- and HCV+/HIV+were 92% and 82%, respectively, less likely to possess the CCR5-HHG*1 haplotype, after controlling for co-variates (Padjusted = 1.89×10−4 and 0.003, respectively). This association was mostly due to subjects bearing the CCR5 HHE and HHG*1 haplotype pairs. Approximately 25% and<10% of HCV−/HIV- IDUs and HCV−/HIV- blood donors, respectively, possessed the HHE/HHG*1 genotype.
Conclusions
Our findings suggest that HHG*1-bearing CCR5 genotypes influence HCV seropositivity in a group of Caucasian IDUs.
doi:10.1371/journal.pone.0070561
PMCID: PMC3723663  PMID: 23936229
2.  Estonia at the Threshold of the Fourth Decade of the AIDS Era in Europe 
Abstract
This article describes the trends of HIV/AIDS and related conditions in Estonia during the past decade (2000–2009), with special focus on the potential for epidemic transition. Key transmission determinants and major risk groups are examined and problems and barriers to fighting HIV/AIDS with possible applications in prevention and control are described. Estonian routine data sources and published literature were reviewed, supplemented with information from personal communication with physicians and public health specialists. For comparative European data, international HIV/AIDS and drug addiction surveillance documents, administrative data, and published literature were reviewed. In Eastern Europe (including Estonia) the predominant HIV transmission mode is injection drug use (IDU), closely followed by heterosexual transmission, an increasing risk factor for new cases. Although the contribution of cases acquired by sexual contact with high-risk partners such as IDUs is not known, characteristics of the sexual networks of IDUs may be important in determining the evolution of the HIV/AIDS epidemics in the region. In Estonia, despite major gaps in available data, the HIV/AIDS epidemic is still presumably confined to IDUs (and probably, to their sexual partners). In Eastern Europe, young women in IDU–non-IDU partnerships engaging in unprotected sex potentially serve as a bridge to the general population, yet knowledge of and research into the population characteristics and potential magnitude of bridging are limited. In Estonia, as in other Eastern European countries, HIV prevention and harm reduction initiatives should be tailored not only to the predominantly male HIV-positive IDU population, but also to their noninfected non-IDU female sexual partners.
doi:10.1089/aid.2010.0223
PMCID: PMC3180763  PMID: 21142588
3.  CCL3L1 copy number is a strong genetic determinant of HIV seropositivity in Caucasian intravenous drug users 
The Journal of infectious diseases  2010;201(5):730-739.
BACKGROUND
A high copy number of CCL3L1, the most potent HIV-suppressive chemokine, associates with reduced HIV susceptibility. Whether CCL3L1 influences acquisition of multiple blood-borne infections (HCV, HIV-1, HBV) that occurs commonly among intravenous drug users (IDUs) is unknown.
METHODS
We determined CCL3L1 copy number by real-time PCR among 374 Caucasian IDUs from Estonia of whom 285 were HCV-positive, 208 HIV+, 177 HCV+/HIV+, and 57 HCV−/HIV−.
RESULTS
In univariate and multivariate analyses, HCV and HBV seropositivity, and duration of IDU each strongly predicted HIV seropositivity. A high CCL3L1 copy number (>2) associated with a 80% reduced risk of acquiring HIV, after adjusting for age, gender, HCV/HBV status, CCR5-Δ32 polymorphism and IDU duration (OR=0.20; 95% CI=0.09–0.45). By contrast, CCL3L1 gene dose did not influence HCV seropositivity. Among HCV+ IDUs, there was a 3.5-fold over- and 65% under-representation of a high CCL3L1 copy number among HCV+/HIV− and HCV+/HIV+ subjects, respectively.
CONCLUSION
Among IDUs exposed heavily to HCV/HIV, CCL3L1 copy number is a major determinant of HIV seropositivity, but not HCV seropositivity. The contrasting distribution of a protective high CCL3L1 copy number among HCV+/HIV− vs HCV+/HIV+ IDUs may reflect that HIV preferentially selects for subjects with a low CCL3L1 gene dose.
doi:10.1086/650491
PMCID: PMC2836481  PMID: 20095832
chemokine copy number; HIV; HCV; IDU

Results 1-3 (3)