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author:("hunger, Jeff")
1.  Genetic variants in Fas signaling pathway genes and risk of gastric cancer 
Populations in north central China are at high risk for gastric cancers (GC), and altered FAS-mediated cell signaling and/or apoptosis may contribute to this risk. We examined the association of 554 single nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs) in 53 Fas signaling-related genes using a pathway-based approach in 1758 GC cases (1126 gastric cardia adenocarcinomas (GCA) and 632 gastric noncardia adenocarcinomas (GNCA)), and 2111 controls from a genome-wide association study (GWAS) of GC in ethnic Chinese. SNP associations with risk of overall GC, GCA and GNCA were evaluated using unconditional logistic regressions controlling for age, sex and study. Gene- and pathway-based associations were tested using the adaptive rank-truncated product (ARTP) method. Statistical significance was evaluated empirically by permutation. Significant pathway-based associations were observed for Fas signaling with risk of overall GC (P = 5.5E-04) and GCA (P = 6.3E-03), but not GNCA (P = 8.1E-02). Among examined genes in the Fas signaling pathway, MAP2K4, FAF1, MAPK8, CASP10, CASP8, CFLAR, MAP2K1, CAP8AP2, PAK2 and IKBKB were associated with risk of GC (nominal P < 0.05), and FAF1 and MAPK8 were significantly associated with risk of both GCA and GNCA (nominal P < 0.05). Our examination of genetic variation in the Fas signaling pathway is consistent with an association of altered Fas signaling and/or apoptosis with risk of GC. As one of the first attempts to investigate a pathway-level association, our results suggest that these genes and the Fas signaling pathway warrant further evaluation in relation to GC risk in other populations.
doi:10.1002/ijc.28415
PMCID: PMC3858487  PMID: 23921907
Gastric cancer; gastric cardia; gastric noncardia; Fas signaling; genetic variants; GWAS; single nucleotide polymorphisms; pathway genes
2.  Constitutive mitochondrial DNA copy number in peripheral blood of melanoma families with and without CDKN2A mutations 
Journal of carcinogenesis & mutagenesis  2014;2014(Suppl 4):006.
Quantitative changes in mitochondrial DNA (mtDNA) have been associated with the risk of a number of human cancers; however, the relationship between constitutive mtDNA copy number in blood and the risk of familial cutaneous malignant melanoma (CMM) has not been reported. We measured mtDNA copy number using quantitative PCR in blood-derived DNA from 136 CMM cases and 302 controls in 53 melanoma-prone families (23 segregating CDKN2A germline mutations). MtDNA copy number did not vary by age, sex, pigmentation characteristics, or CMM status. However, germline CDKN2A mutation carriers had significantly higher mean mtDNA copy number compared to non-carriers, particularly among CMM cases (geometric mean mtDNA copy number of 144 and 111 for carrier versus non-carrier, respectively; P= 0.02). When adjusting for age, sex, and familial correlation, having increasing mtDNA copy number was significantly associated with CDKN2A mutation status among CMM cases (OR=1.47, Ptrend=0.024). In particular, individuals with specific CDKN2A mutations with the potential to inactivate or reduce the level of the p16-INK4 reactive oxygen species (ROS) protective function had significantly increased mtDNA copy number levels (P=0.035). Future research in prospective studies is required to validate these findings and to further investigate mtDNA copy number in both blood and melanoma tissues in relation to CMM risk and CDKN2A mutation status.
doi:10.4172/2157-2518.S4-006
PMCID: PMC4326067
Familial melanoma; CDKN2A; mtDNA copy number; peripheral blood
3.  Genetic variants in sex hormone metabolic pathway genes and risk of esophageal squamous cell carcinoma 
Carcinogenesis  2013;34(5):1062-1068.
In China, esophageal cancer is the fourth leading cause of cancer death where essentially all cases are histologically esophageal squamous cell carcinoma (ESCC), in contrast to esophageal adenocarcinoma in the West. Globally, ESCC is 2.4 times more common among men than women and recently it has been suggested that sex hormones may be associated with the risk of ESCC. We examined the association between genetic variants in sex hormone metabolic genes and ESCC risk in a population from north central China with high-incidence rates. A total of 1026 ESCC cases and 1452 controls were genotyped for 797 unique tag single-nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs) in 51 sex hormone metabolic genes. SNP-, gene- and pathway-based associations with ESCC risk were evaluated using unconditional logistic regression adjusted for age, sex and geographical location and the adaptive rank truncated product (ARTP) method. Statistical significance was determined through use of permutation for pathway- and gene-based associations. No associations were observed for the overall sex hormone metabolic pathway (P = 0.14) or subpathways (androgen synthesis: P = 0.30, estrogen synthesis: P = 0.15 and estrogen removal: P = 0.19) with risk of ESCC. However, six individual genes (including SULT2B1, CYP1B1, CYP3A7, CYP3A5, SHBG and CYP11A1) were significantly associated with ESCC risk (P < 0.05). Our examination of genetic variation in the sex hormone metabolic pathway is consistent with a potential association with risk of ESCC. These positive findings warrant further evaluation in relation to ESCC risk and replication in other populations.
doi:10.1093/carcin/bgt030
PMCID: PMC3643422  PMID: 23358850
4.  Genetic variant in TP63 on locus 3q28 is associated with risk of lung adenocarcinoma among never-smoking females in Asia 
Hosgood, H. Dean | Wang, Wen-Chang | Hong, Yun-Chul | Wang, Jiu-Cun | Chen, Kexin | Chang, I-Shou | Chen, Chien-Jen | Lu, Daru | Yin, Zhihua | Wu, Chen | Zheng, Wei | Qian, Biyun | Park, Jae Yong | Kim, Yeul Hong | Chatterjee, Nilanjan | Chen, Ying | Chang, Gee-Chen | Hsiao, Chin-Fu | Yeager, Meredith | Tsai, Ying-Huang | Wei, Hu | Kim, Young Tae | Wu, Wei | Zhao, Zhenhong | Chow, Wong-Ho | Zhu, Xiaoling | Lo, Yen-Li | Sung, Sook Whan | Chen, Kuan-Yu | Yuenger, Jeff | Kim, Joo Hyun | Huang, Liming | Chen, Ying-Hsiang | Gao, Yu-Tang | Kim, Jin Hee | Huang, Ming-Shyan | Jung, Tae Hoon | Caporaso, Neil | Zhao, Xueying | Huan, Zhang | Yu, Dianke | Kim, Chang Ho | Su, Wu-Chou | Shu, Xiao-Ou | Kim, In-San | Bassig, Bryan | Chen, Yuh-Min | Cha, Sung Ick | Tan, Wen | Chen, Hongyan | Yang, Tsung-Ying | Sung, Jae Sook | Wang, Chih-Liang | Li, Xuelian | Park, Kyong Hwa | Yu, Chong-Jen | Ryu, Jeong-Seon | Xiang, Yongbing | Hutchinson, Amy | Kim, Jun Suk | Cai, Qiuyin | Landi, Maria Teresa | Lee, Kyoung-Mu | Hung, Jen-Yu | Park, Ju-Yeon | Tucker, Margaret | Lin, Chien-Chung | Ren, Yangwu | Perng, Reury-Perng | Chen, Chih-Yi | Jin, Li | Chen, Kun-Chieh | Li, Yao-Jen | Chiu, Yu-Fang | Tsai, Fang-Yu | Yang, Pan-Chyr | Fraumeni, Joseph F. | Seow, Adeline | Lin, Dongxin | Zhou, Baosen | Chanock, Stephen | Hsiung, Chao Agnes | Rothman, Nathaniel | Lan, Qing
Human genetics  2012;131(7):10.1007/s00439-012-1144-8.
A recent genome-wide association study (GWAS) of subjects from Japan and South Korea reported a novel association between the TP63 locus on chromosome 3q28 and risk of lung adenocarcinoma (p = 7.3 × 10−12); however, this association did not achieve genome-wide significance (p < 10−7) among never-smoking males or females. To determine if this association with lung cancer risk is independent of tobacco use, we genotyped the TP63 SNPs reported by the previous GWAS (rs10937405 and rs4488809) in 3,467 never-smoking female lung cancer cases and 3,787 never-smoking female controls from 10 studies conducted in Taiwan, Mainland China, South Korea, and Singapore. Genetic variation in rs10937405 was associated with risk of lung adenocarcinoma [n = 2,529 cases; p = 7.1 × 10−8; allelic risk = 0.80, 95% confidence interval (CI) = 0.74–0.87]. There was also evidence of association with squamous cell carcinoma of the lung (n = 302 cases; p = 0.037; allelic risk = 0.82, 95% CI = 0.67–0.99). Our findings provide strong evidence that genetic variation in TP63 is associated with the risk of lung adenocarcinoma among Asian females in the absence of tobacco smoking.
doi:10.1007/s00439-012-1144-8
PMCID: PMC3875137  PMID: 22367405
5.  Genome-wide association studies of gastric adenocarcinoma and esophageal squamous cell carcinoma identify a shared susceptibility locus in PLCE1 at 10q23 
Nature genetics  2012;44(10):1090-1097.
We conducted a genome-wide association study of gastric cancer (GC) and esophageal squamous cell carcinoma (ESCC) in ethnic Chinese subjects in which we genotyped 551,152 single nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs). We report a combined analysis of 2,240 GC cases, 2,115 ESCC cases, and 3,302 controls drawn from five studies. In logistic regression models adjusted for age, sex, and study, multiple variants at 10q23 had genome-wide significance for GC and ESCC independently. A notable signal was rs2274223, a nonsynonymous SNP located in PLCE1, for GC (P=8.40×1010; per allele odds ratio (OR) = 1.31) and ESCC (P=3.85×10−9; OR = 1.34). The association with GC differed by anatomic subsite. For tumors located in the cardia the association was stronger (P=4.19 × 10−15; OR= 1.57) and for those located in the noncardia stomach it was absent (P=0.44; OR=1.05). Our findings at 10q23 could provide insight into the high incidence rates of both cancers in China.
doi:10.1038/ng.2411
PMCID: PMC3513832  PMID: 22960999
6.  Genotypic variants at 2q33 and risk of esophageal squamous cell carcinoma in China: a meta-analysis of genome-wide association studies 
Abnet, Christian C. | Wang, Zhaoming | Song, Xin | Hu, Nan | Zhou, Fu-You | Freedman, Neal D. | Li, Xue-Min | Yu, Kai | Shu, Xiao-Ou | Yuan, Jian-Min | Zheng, Wei | Dawsey, Sanford M. | Liao, Linda M. | Lee, Maxwell P. | Ding, Ti | Qiao, You-Lin | Gao, Yu-Tang | Koh, Woon-Puay | Xiang, Yong-Bing | Tang, Ze-Zhong | Fan, Jin-Hu | Chung, Charles C. | Wang, Chaoyu | Wheeler, William | Yeager, Meredith | Yuenger, Jeff | Hutchinson, Amy | Jacobs, Kevin B. | Giffen, Carol A. | Burdett, Laurie | Fraumeni, Joseph F. | Tucker, Margaret A. | Chow, Wong-Ho | Zhao, Xue-Ke | Li, Jiang-Man | Li, Ai-Li | Sun, Liang-Dan | Wei, Wu | Li, Ji-Lin | Zhang, Peng | Li, Hong-Lei | Cui, Wen-Yan | Wang, Wei-Peng | Liu, Zhi-Cai | Yang, Xia | Fu, Wen-Jing | Cui, Ji-Li | Lin, Hong-Li | Zhu, Wen-Liang | Liu, Min | Chen, Xi | Chen, Jie | Guo, Li | Han, Jing-Jing | Zhou, Sheng-Li | Huang, Jia | Wu, Yue | Yuan, Chao | Huang, Jing | Ji, Ai-Fang | Kul, Jian-Wei | Fan, Zhong-Min | Wang, Jian-Po | Zhang, Dong-Yun | Zhang, Lian-Qun | Zhang, Wei | Chen, Yuan-Fang | Ren, Jing-Li | Li, Xiu-Min | Dong, Jin-Cheng | Xing, Guo-Lan | Guo, Zhi-Gang | Yang, Jian-Xue | Mao, Yi-Ming | Yuan, Yuan | Guo, Er-Tao | Zhang, Wei | Hou, Zhi-Chao | Liu, Jing | Li, Yan | Tang, Sa | Chang, Jia | Peng, Xiu-Qin | Han, Min | Yin, Wan-Li | Liu, Ya-Li | Hu, Yan-Long | Liu, Yu | Yang, Liu-Qin | Zhu, Fu-Guo | Yang, Xiu-Feng | Feng, Xiao-Shan | Wang, Zhou | Li, Yin | Gao, She-Gan | Liu, Hai-Lin | Yuan, Ling | Jin, Yan | Zhang, Yan-Rui | Sheyhidin, Ilyar | Li, Feng | Chen, Bao-Ping | Ren, Shu-Wei | Liu, Bin | Li, Dan | Zhang, Gao-Fu | Yue, Wen-Bin | Feng, Chang-Wei | Qige, Qirenwang | Zhao, Jian-Ting | Yang, Wen-Jun | Lei, Guang-Yan | Chen, Long-Qi | Li, En-Min | Xu, Li-Yan | Wu, Zhi-Yong | Bao, Zhi-Qin | Chen, Ji-Li | Li, Xian-Chang | Zhuang, Xiang | Zhou, Ying-Fa | Zuo, Xian-Bo | Dong, Zi-Ming | Wang, Lu-Wen | Fan, Xue-Pin | Wang, Jin | Zhou, Qi | Ma, Guo-Shun | Zhang, Qin-Xian | Liu, Hai | Jian, Xin-Ying | Lian, Sin-Yong | Wang, Jin-Sheng | Chang, Fu-Bao | Lu, Chang-Dong | Miao, Jian-Jun | Chen, Zhi-Guo | Wang, Ran | Guo, Ming | Fan, Zeng-Lin | Tao, Ping | Liu, Tai-Jing | Wei, Jin-Chang | Kong, Qing-Peng | Fan, Lei | Wang, Xian-Zeng | Gao, Fu-Sheng | Wang, Tian-Yun | Xie, Dong | Wang, Li | Chen, Shu-Qing | Yang, Wan-Cai | Hong, Jun-Yan | Wang, Liang | Qiu, Song-Liang | Goldstein, Alisa M. | Yuan, Zhi-Qing | Chanock, Stephen J. | Zhang, Xue-Jun | Taylor, Philip R. | Wang, Li-Dong
Human Molecular Genetics  2012;21(9):2132-2141.
Genome-wide association studies have identified susceptibility loci for esophageal squamous cell carcinoma (ESCC). We conducted a meta-analysis of all single-nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs) that showed nominally significant P-values in two previously published genome-wide scans that included a total of 2961 ESCC cases and 3400 controls. The meta-analysis revealed five SNPs at 2q33 with P< 5 × 10−8, and the strongest signal was rs13016963, with a combined odds ratio (95% confidence interval) of 1.29 (1.19–1.40) and P= 7.63 × 10−10. An imputation analysis of 4304 SNPs at 2q33 suggested a single association signal, and the strongest imputed SNP associations were similar to those from the genotyped SNPs. We conducted an ancestral recombination graph analysis with 53 SNPs to identify one or more haplotypes that harbor the variants directly responsible for the detected association signal. This showed that the five SNPs exist in a single haplotype along with 45 imputed SNPs in strong linkage disequilibrium, and the strongest candidate was rs10201587, one of the genotyped SNPs. Our meta-analysis found genome-wide significant SNPs at 2q33 that map to the CASP8/ALS2CR12/TRAK2 gene region. Variants in CASP8 have been extensively studied across a spectrum of cancers with mixed results. The locus we identified appears to be distinct from the widely studied rs3834129 and rs1045485 SNPs in CASP8. Future studies of esophageal and other cancers should focus on comprehensive sequencing of this 2q33 locus and functional analysis of rs13016963 and rs10201587 and other strongly correlated variants.
doi:10.1093/hmg/dds029
PMCID: PMC3315211  PMID: 22323360
7.  Polymorphisms in integrin genes and lymphoma risk 
Leukemia research  2011;35(7):968-970.
Immune deficiency is one of the best characterized and strongest known risk factors for non-Hodgkin lymphoma (NHL). We studied the association between single nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs) in integrin genes that are important components in human innate immunity and the risk of NHL in a population-based case–control study of women in Connecticut, USA. A total of 373 tag SNPs in 33 gene regions were included in the analysis of 448 cases and 525 controls. The ADAM19 rs11466782 SNP was associated with an increased risk of lymphoma (OR, 1.73; 95 % CI, 1.28–2.35; P additive = 0.0004), and the ICAM3 rs2304240 (OR, 0.67; 95 % CI, 0.52–0.86; P additive = 0.002) and the PTGDR rs708486 SNPs (OR, 0.75; 95 % CI, 0.63–0.90; P additive = 0.002) were associated with reduced risk of lymphoma. Two gene regions (ADAM19 (P=0.009) and ICAM3 (P=0.009)) displayed global associations with lymphoma risk at the P<0.01 level. While our results suggest that genetic polymorphisms in integrin genes may play a role in the genesis of lymphoma in women, they should be viewed as exploratory until they are replicated in additional populations.
doi:10.1016/j.leukres.2010.12.012
PMCID: PMC3232182  PMID: 21239057
lymphoma; integrin; innate immunity; single nucleotide polymorphism
8.  Genetic variation in Th1/Th2 pathway genes and risk of non-Hodgkin lymphoma: A pooled analysis of three population-based case-control studies 
British journal of haematology  2011;153(3):341-350.
The balance between Th1 and Th2 activity is critical in lymphoid cell development and differentiation. Immune dysfunction underlies lymphomagenesis, so an alteration in the regulation of key Th1/Th2 cytokines may lead to the development of non-Hodgkin lymphoma (NHL). To study the impact of polymorphism in Th1/Th2 cytokines on NHL risk, we analyzed 145 tag single nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs) in 17 Th1/Th2 cytokine and related genes in three population-based case-control studies (1,946 cases and 1,808 controls). Logistic regression was used to compute odds ratios (OR) for NHL and four major NHL subtypes in relation to tag SNP genotypes and haplotypes. A gene-based analysis adjusting for the number of tag SNPs genotyped in each gene showed significant associations with risk of NHL combined and one or more NHL subtypes for Th1 (IL12A and IL12RB1) and Th2 (IL4, IL10RB, and IL18) genes. The strongest association was for IL12A rs485497, which plays a central role in bridging the cellular and humoral pathways of innate resistance and antigen-specific adaptive immune responses (allele risk OR=1.17; P(trend)=0.00099). This SNP was also associated specifically with risk of follicular lymphoma (allele risk OR=1.26; P(trend)=0.0012). These findings suggest that genetic variation in Th1/Th2 cytokine genes may contribute to lymphomagenesis.
doi:10.1111/j.1365-2141.2010.08424.x
PMCID: PMC3075370  PMID: 21418175
Non-Hodgkin lymphoma; single nucleotide polymorphisms; immunogenetics; case-control study
9.  Lack of germline PALB2 mutations in melanoma-prone families with CDKN2A mutations and pancreatic cancer 
Familial cancer  2011;10(3):545-548.
The presence of pancreatic cancer (PC) in melanoma-prone families has been consistently associated with an increased frequency of CDKN2A mutations, the major high-risk susceptibility gene identified for melanoma. However, the precise relationship between CDKN2A, melanoma and PC remains unknown. We evaluated a recently identified PC susceptibility gene PALB2 using both sequencing and tagging to determine whether PALB2 might explain part of the relationship between CDKN2A, melanoma, and PC. No disease-related mutations were identified from sequencing PALB2 in multiple pancreatic cancer patients or other mutation carrier relatives of PC patients from the eight melanoma-prone families with CDKN2A mutations and PC. In addition, no significant associations were observed between 11 PALB2 tagging SNPs and melanoma risk in 23 melanoma-prone families with CDKN2A mutations or the subset of 11 families with PC or PC-related CDKN2A mutations. The results suggested that PALB2 does not explain the relationship between CDKN2A, melanoma, and pancreatic cancer in these melanoma-prone families.
doi:10.1007/s10689-011-9447-9
PMCID: PMC3244023  PMID: 21614589
CDKN2A; PALB2; familial melanoma; pancreatic cancer; germline mutation
10.  Genetic susceptibility for chronic lymphocytic leukemia among Chinese in Hong Kong 
European journal of haematology  2010;85(6):492-495.
The genetic basis of chronic lymphocytic leukemia (CLL) has not been elucidated to date. Although it is the most common hematological malignancy in Caucasians, it is uncommon among Asians. A recent genome-wide scan of CLL in Caucasians identified 6 variants showing strong association. We attempted to replicate these findings in 71 cases of CLL and 1273 controls in Hong Kong Chinese. Three of the 6 variants were significantly associated with CLL. The rs872071 variant (Odds Ratio (95% Confidence Interval) = 1.78 (1.25–2.53), p = 0.0013) in the IRF4 gene region showed the strongest association, similar to that reported in the United Kingdom study. Polymorphisms in SP140 and ACOXL and were also associated with risk of CLL. Further, the mean allele frequencies of the 6 variants were moderately (59%) to extremely (0.5%) lower in the Chinese population compared with Caucasians. These results suggest that variants in three loci may contribute to risk of CLL among Chinese.
doi:10.1111/j.1600-0609.2010.01518.x
PMCID: PMC2980583  PMID: 20731705
genetic polymorphism; chronic lymphocytic leukemia; Chinese
11.  Genome-wide association studies of gastric adenocarcinoma and esophageal squamous cell carcinoma identify a shared susceptibility locus in PLCE1 at 10q23 
Nature genetics  2010;42(9):764-767.
We conducted a genome-wide association study of gastric cancer (GC) and esophageal squamous cell carcinoma (ESCC) in ethnic Chinese subjects in which we genotyped 551,152 single nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs). We report a combined analysis of 2,240 GC cases, 2,115 ESCC cases, and 3,302 controls drawn from five studies. In logistic regression models adjusted for age, sex, and study, multiple variants at 10q23 had genome-wide significance for GC and ESCC independently. A notable signal was rs2274223, a nonsynonymous SNP located in PLCE1, for GC (P=8.40×10−9; per allele odds ratio (OR) = 1.31) and ESCC (P=3.85×10−9; OR = 1.34). The association with GC differed by anatomic subsite. For tumors located in the cardia the association was stronger (P=4.19 × 10−15; OR= 1.57) and for those located in the noncardia stomach it was absent (P=0.44; OR=1.05). Our findings at 10q23 could provide insight into the high incidence rates of both cancers in China.
doi:10.1038/ng.649
PMCID: PMC2947317  PMID: 20729852
12.  The 5p15.33 Locus Is Associated with Risk of Lung Adenocarcinoma in Never-Smoking Females in Asia 
PLoS Genetics  2010;6(8):e1001051.
Genome-wide association studies of lung cancer reported in populations of European background have identified three regions on chromosomes 5p15.33, 6p21.33, and 15q25 that have achieved genome-wide significance with p-values of 10−7 or lower. These studies have been performed primarily in cigarette smokers, raising the possibility that the observed associations could be related to tobacco use, lung carcinogenesis, or both. Since most women in Asia do not smoke, we conducted a genome-wide association study of lung adenocarcinoma in never-smoking females (584 cases, 585 controls) among Han Chinese in Taiwan and found that the most significant association was for rs2736100 on chromosome 5p15.33 (p = 1.30×10−11). This finding was independently replicated in seven studies from East Asia totaling 1,164 lung adenocarcinomas and 1,736 controls (p = 5.38×10−11). A pooled analysis achieved genome-wide significance for rs2736100. This SNP marker localizes to the CLPTM1L-TERT locus on chromosome 5p15.33 (p = 2.60×10−20, allelic risk = 1.54, 95% Confidence Interval (CI) 1.41–1.68). Risks for heterozygote and homozygote carriers of the minor allele were 1.62 (95% CI; 1.40–1.87), and 2.35 (95% CI: 1.95–2.83), respectively. In summary, our results show that genetic variation in the CLPTM1L-TERT locus of chromosome 5p15.33 is directly associated with the risk of lung cancer, most notably adenocarcinoma.
Author Summary
Worldwide, approximately 15% of lung cancer cases occur among nonsmokers. Genome-wide association studies (GWAS) of lung cancer conducted in populations of European background have identified three regions on chromosomes 5, 6, and 15 that harbor genetic variants that confer risk for lung cancer. Prior studies were conducted primarily in cigarette smokers, raising the possibility that the associations could be related to tobacco use, lung carcinogenesis, or both. A GWAS of lung cancer among never-smokers is an optimal setting to discover effects that are independent of smoking. Since most women in Asia do not smoke, we conducted a GWAS of lung adenocarcinoma among never-smoking females (584 cases, 585 controls) in Taiwan, and observed a region on chromosome 5 significantly associated with risk for lung cancer in never-smoking women. The finding was independently replicated in seven studies from East Asia totaling 1,164 lung adenocarcinomas and 1,736 controls. To our knowledge, this study is the first reported GWAS of lung cancer in East Asian women, and together with the replication studies represents the largest genetic association study in this population. The findings provide insight into the genetic contribution of common variants to lung carcinogenesis.
doi:10.1371/journal.pgen.1001051
PMCID: PMC2916850  PMID: 20700438
13.  Polymorphisms in innate immunity genes and lung cancer risk in Xuanwei, China 
The high incidence of lung cancer in Xuanwei County, China has been attributed to exposure to indoor smoky coal emissions that contain polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons. The inflammatory response induced by coal smoke components may promote lung tumor development. We studied the association between single nucleotide polymorphisms (SNP) in genes involved in innate immunity and lung cancer risk in a population-based case-control study (122 cases and 122 controls) in Xuanwei. A total of 1,360 tag SNPs in 149 gene regions were included in the analysis. FCER2 rs7249320 was the most significant SNP (OR: 0.30; 95% CI: 0.16–0.55; P, 0.0001; false discovery rate value, 0.13) for variant carriers. The gene regions ALOX12B/ALOX15B and KLK2 were associated with increased lung cancer risk globally (false discovery rate value < 0.15). In addition, there were positive interactions between KLK15 rs3745523 and smoky coal use (OR: 9.40; P interaction = 0.07), and between FCER2 rs7249320 and KLK2 rs2739476 (OR: 10.77; P interaction = 0.003). Our results suggest that genetic polymorphisms in innate immunity genes may play a role in the carcinogenesis of lung cancer caused by polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbon-containing coal smoke. Integrin/receptor and complement pathways as well as IgE regulation are particular noteworthy.
doi:10.1002/em.20452
PMCID: PMC2666781  PMID: 19170196
lung cancer; innate immunity; single nucleotide polymorphism; polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbon; coal; FERC2; KLK
14.  Large-scale evaluation of candidate genes identifies associations between DNA repair and genomic maintenance and development of benzene hematotoxicity 
Carcinogenesis  2008;30(1):50-58.
Benzene is an established human hematotoxicant and leukemogen but its mechanism of action is unclear. To investigate the role of single-nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs) on benzene-induced hematotoxicity, we analyzed 1395 SNPs in 411 genes using an Illumina GoldenGate assay in 250 benzene-exposed workers and 140 unexposed controls. Highly significant findings clustered in five genes (BLM, TP53, RAD51, WDR79 and WRN) that play a critical role in DNA repair and genomic maintenance, and these regions were then further investigated with tagSNPs. One or more SNPs in each gene were associated with highly significant 10–20% reductions (P values ranged from 0.0011 to 0.0002) in the white blood cell (WBC) count among benzene-exposed workers but not controls, with evidence for gene–environment interactions for SNPs in BLM, WRN and RAD51. Further, among workers exposed to benzene, the genotype-associated risk of having a WBC count <4000 cells/μl increased when using individuals with progressively higher WBC counts as the comparison group, with some odds ratios >8-fold. In vitro functional studies revealed that deletion of SGS1 in yeast, equivalent to lacking BLM and WRN function in humans, caused reduced cellular growth in the presence of the toxic benzene metabolite hydroquinone, and knockdown of WRN using specific short hairpin RNA increased susceptibility of human TK6 cells to hydroquinone toxicity. Our findings suggest that SNPs involved in DNA repair and genomic maintenance, with particular clustering in the homologous DNA recombination pathway, play an important role in benzene-induced hematotoxicity.
doi:10.1093/carcin/bgn249
PMCID: PMC2639030  PMID: 18978339
15.  Pathway-based evaluation of 380 candidate genes and lung cancer susceptibility suggests the importance of the cell cycle pathway 
Carcinogenesis  2008;29(10):1938-1943.
Common genetic variation may play an important role in altering lung cancer risk. We conducted a pathway-based candidate gene evaluation to identify genetic variations that may be associated with lung cancer in a population-based case–control study in Xuan Wei, China (122 cases and 111 controls). A total of 1260 single-nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs) in 380 candidate genes for lung cancer were successfully genotyped and assigned to one of 10 pathways based on gene ontology. Logistic regression was used to assess the marginal effect of each SNP on lung cancer susceptibility. The minP test was used to identify statistically significant associations at the gene level. Important pathways were identified using a test of proportions and the rank truncated product methods. The cell cycle pathway was found as the most important pathway (P = 0.044) with four genes significantly associated with lung cancer (PLA2G6 minP = 0.001, CCNA2 minP = 0.006, GSK3β minP = 0.007 and EGF minP = 0.013), after adjusting for multiple comparisons. Interestingly, most cell cycle genes that were associated with lung cancer in this analysis were concentrated in the AKT signaling pathway, which is essential for regulation of cell cycle progression and cellular survival, and may be important in lung cancer etiology in Xuan Wei. These results should be viewed as exploratory until they are replicated in a larger study.
doi:10.1093/carcin/bgn178
PMCID: PMC2722857  PMID: 18676680
16.  Breast cancer risk polymorphisms and interaction with ionizing radiation among U.S. Radiologic Technologists 
Genome-wide association studies are discovering relationships between single nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs) and breast cancer, but the functions of these SNPs are unknown and environmental exposures are likely to be important. We assessed whether breast cancer risk SNPs interacted with ionizing radiation, a known breast carcinogen, among 859 cases and 1083 controls nested in the United States Radiologic Technologists cohort. Among eleven Breast Cancer Association Consortium risk SNPs, we found that the genotype-associated breast cancer risk varied significantly by radiation dose for rs2107425 in the H19 gene (pinteraction=0.001). H19 is a maternally expressed imprinted mRNA that is closely involved in regulating the IGF2 gene and could exert its influence by this or by some other radiation-related pathway.
doi:10.1158/1055-9965.EPI-08-0300
PMCID: PMC2583248  PMID: 18708391

Results 1-16 (16)