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1.  PLCE1 mRNA and protein expression and survival of patients with esophageal squamous cell carcinoma and gastric adenocarcinoma 
Background
Germline genetic variants in PLCE1 (10q23) have demonstrated consistent associations with risk of esophageal squamous cell carcinoma (ESCC) and gastric cancer among Chinese. We evaluated PLCE1 mRNA and protein expression in paired tumor-normal tissues, and their relationship with survival.
Methods
PLCE1 mRNA was profiled using three probes in the Affymetrix GeneChip U133 for paired tumor-normal tissues of ESCC (n=132), gastric cardia adenocarcinoma (GCA, n=62) and gastric noncardia adenocarcinoma (GNCA, n=72). We used immunohistochemistry to detect PLCE1 protein on slides from tissue microarrays in paired tumor-normal tissues of ESCC (n=303), and tumors of GCA (n=298) and GNCA (n=124).
Results
Compared with normal tissues, PLCE1 mRNA expression was significantly reduced in ESCC tumors (P=0.03, probe_205112_at), as well as in GCA and GNCA tumors (P<0.0001, each probe). Protein expression was non-significantly reduced in ESCC tumors (P=0.51). Increased tumor-normal mRNA fold change (probe_205112_at) was associated with longer survival in ESCC (9.6 months for highest vs lowest quartile; P-trend=0.02). Increased mRNA tumor-normal fold change (probe_205111_at) was associated with longer survival for GCA (10.7 months for highest quartile; P-trend=0.04), but not for GNCA cases (P=0.72). Similar to mRNA, elevated tumor-normal fold change for protein in ESCC was also associated with improved survival (8.1 months for highest quartile; P-trend=0.04).
Conclusions
Dysregulated PLCE1 mRNA expression was observed for both ESCC (one probe only) and GCA tumors, and the altered PLCE1 expression appears to be associated with cancer prognosis.
Impact
A potential role for PLCE1 in the early detection and/or therapy of ESCC and GCA warrants further investigation.
doi:10.1158/1055-9965.EPI-13-1329
PMCID: PMC4207376  PMID: 24867265
2.  Association between C-reactive protein, incident liver cancer and chronic liver disease mortality in the Linxian Nutrition Intervention Trials: a nested case-control study 
Background
C-reactive protein is a marker of systemic inflammation that has been associated with the incidence and prognosis for a number of different cancers. Recent data suggests that C-reactive protein may be a prognostic factor for liver cancer and cirrhosis. However, few long-term studies are available.
Methods
We prospectively examined associations between serum C-reactive protein and subsequent risk of liver cancer incidence or chronic liver disease mortality in a nested case-control study performed in the Linxian Nutrition Intervention Trials cohort. Baseline serum C-reactive protein was measured for 220 incident liver cancer cases, 276 participants who died of chronic liver disease, and 1018 age-, sex-, and trial-matched controls. Unconditional logistical regression models were used to estimate odds ratios (OR) and 95% confidence intervals (CI).
Results
Compared to the lowest quartile, subjects in the fourth quartile of serum C-reactive protein had a higher risk of liver cancer incidence (OR=1.63, 95% CI: 1.06–2.51), with a significant p-trend across quartiles (P=0.01). The association with liver cancer was only significant among men (Q4 vs Q1, OR=2.00, 1.10–3.62), but not among women (Q4 vs Q1, OR=1.15, 0.60–2.22). For chronic liver disease deaths, the corresponding risk estimate in men and women was 2.95(1.90–4.57), with a monotonic trend (P<0.001).
Conclusions
Higher serum C-reactive protein concentrations at baseline were associated with subsequent incidence of liver cancer and death from chronic liver disease.
Impact
Our findings suggest that levels of systemic inflammation may serve as a long-term marker of liver cancer and liver disease.
doi:10.1158/1055-9965.EPI-14-1038
PMCID: PMC4323937  PMID: 25613115
C-reactive protein; Liver cancer; Chronic liver disease; Nested case-control study
3.  The transcription factor Gata6 links tissue macrophage phenotype and proliferative renewal§ 
Science (New York, N.Y.)  2014;344(6184):645-648.
Tissue-resident macrophages are heterogeneous as a consequence of anatomical niche-specific functions. Many populations self-renew independently of bone marrow in the adult, but the molecular mechanisms of this are poorly understood. We determined a transcriptional profile for the major self-renewing population of peritoneal macrophages in mice. These cells specifically expressed the transcription factor Gata6. Selective deficiency of Gata6 in myeloid cells caused substantial alterations in the transcriptome of peritoneal macrophages. Gata6-deficiency also resulted in dysregulated peritoneal macrophage proliferative renewal during homeostasis and in response to inflammation, which was associated with delays in the resolution of inflammation. Our investigations reveal that tissue macrophage phenotype is under discrete tissue-selective transcriptional control and that this is fundamentally linked to the regulation of their proliferation renewal.
doi:10.1126/science.1251414
PMCID: PMC4185421  PMID: 24762537
5.  Association of seropositivity to Helicobacter species and biliary tract cancer in the ATBC study 
Hepatology (Baltimore, Md.)  2014;60(6):1963-1971.
Background
Helicobacter have been detected in human bile and hepatobiliary tissue. Despite evidence that Helicobacter species promote gallstone formation and hepatobiliary tumors in laboratory studies, it remains unclear whether Helicobacter species contribute to these cancers in humans. We used a multiplex panel to assess whether seropositivity to 15 Helicobacter pylori (H. pylori) proteins was associated with subsequent incidence of hepatobiliary cancers in the Finnish Alpha-Tocopherol, Beta-Carotene Cancer Prevention (ATBC) Study.
Methods
We included 64 biliary cancers, 122 liver cancers, and 224 age-matched controls which occurred over the course of 22 years. H. pylori seropositivity was defined as those positive to ≥4 antigens. Odds ratios (OR) and 95% confidence intervals were adjusted for major hepatobiliary cancer risk factors.
Results
Among the controls, 88% were seropositive to H. pylori at baseline. Among those who subsequently developed hepatobiliary cancer, the prevalence of seropositivity was higher: 100% for gallbladder cancer, 97% of extrahepatic bile duct cancer, 91% of Ampula of vater cancer, 96% of intrahepatic bile duct cancer, and 94% of hepatocellular carcinoma. Although the OR for gallbladder cancer could not be calculated, the OR for the other sites were 7.01 (0.79-62.33), 2.21 (0.19-25.52), 10.67 (0.76-150.08), and 1.20 (0.42-3.45), respectively, with an OR of 5.47 (95%CI: 1.17-25.65) observed for the biliary tract cancers combined. ORs above one were observed for many of the investigated antigens, although most of these associations were not statistically significant.
Conclusions
Seropositivity to H. pylori proteins was associated with an increased risk of biliary tract cancers in ATBC. Further studies are needed to confirm our findings and to determine how H. pylori might influence risk of biliary tract cancer.
doi:10.1002/hep.27193
PMCID: PMC4216769  PMID: 24797247
Helicobacter pylori; multiplex serology; liver cancer; biliary cancer
6.  Genetic polymorphisms in the 9p21 region associated with risk of multiple cancers 
Carcinogenesis  2014;35(12):2698-2705.
Summary
We systematically examined common genetic variants in the 9p21 region and risk of eight cancers, based on GWAS data deposited in dbGaP. A number of SNPs were associated with multiple cancers, which are not confined to the CDKN2/MTAP cluster.
The chromosome 9p21 region has been implicated in the pathogenesis of multiple cancers. We analyzed 9p21 single nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs) from eight genome-wide association studies (GWAS) with data deposited in dbGaP, including studies of esophageal squamous cell carcinoma (ESCC), gastric cancer (GC), pancreatic cancer, renal cell carcinoma (RCC), lung cancer (LC), breast cancer (BrC), bladder cancer (BC) and prostate cancer (PrC). The number of subjects ranged from 2252 (PrC) to 7619 (LC). SNP-level analyses for each cancer were conducted by logistic regression or random-effects meta-analysis. A subset-based statistical approach (ASSET) was performed to combine SNP-level P values across multiple cancers. We calculated gene-level P values using the adaptive rank truncated product method. We identified that rs1063192 and rs2157719 in the CDKN2A/2B region were significantly associated with ESCC and rs2764736 (3′ of TUSC1) was associated with BC (P ≤ 2.59 × 10−6). ASSET analyses identified four SNPs significantly associated with multiple cancers: rs3731239 (CDKN2A intronic) with ESCC, GC and BC (P = 3.96 × 10− 4); rs10811474 (3′ of IFNW1) with RCC and BrC (P = 0.001); rs12683422 (LINGO2 intronic) with RCC and BC (P = 5.93 × 10− 4) and rs10511729 (3′ of ELAVL2) with LC and BrC (P = 8.63 × 10− 4). At gene level, CDKN2B, CDKN2A and CDKN2B-AS1 were significantly associated with ESCC (P ≤ 4.70 × 10− 5). Rs10511729 and rs10811474 were associated with cis-expression of 9p21 genes in corresponding cancer tissues in the expression quantitative trait loci analysis. In conclusion, we identified several genetic variants in the 9p21 region associated with the risk of multiple cancers, suggesting that this region may contribute to a shared susceptibility across different cancer types.
doi:10.1093/carcin/bgu203
PMCID: PMC4247519  PMID: 25239644
7.  Oesophageal squamous cell carcinoma in high-risk Chinese populations: Possible role for vascular epithelial growth factor A 
Background
Mechanisms involved in wound healing play some role in carcinogenesis in multiple organs, likely by creating a chronic inflammatory milieu. This study sought to assess the role of genetic markers in selected inflammation-related genes involved in wound healing (interleukin (IL)-1a, IL-1b, IL-1 Receptor type I (IL-1Ra), IL-1 Receptor type II (IL-1Rb), tumour necrosis factor (TNF)-α, tumour necrosis factor receptor superfamily member (TNFRSF)1A, nuclear factor kappa beta (NF-kB)1, NF-kB2, inducible nitric oxide synthase (iNOS), cyclooxygenase (COX)-2, hypoxia induced factor (HIF)-1α, vascular endothelial growth factor (VEGF)A and P-53) in risk to oesophageal squamous cell carcinoma (OSCC).
Methods
We genotyped 125 tag single nucleotide polymorphism (SNP)s in 410 cases and 377 age and sex matched disease-free individuals from Nutritional Intervention Trial (NIT) cohort, and 546 cases and 556 controls individually matched for age, sex and neighbourhood from Shanxi case–control study, both conducted in high-risk areas of north-central China (1985–2007). Cox proportional-hazard models and conditional logistic regression models were used for SNPs analyses for NIT and Shanxi, respectively. Fisher's inverse test statistics were used to obtain gene-level significance.
Results
Multiple SNPs were significantly associated with OSCC in both studies, however, none retained their significance after a conservative Bonferroni adjustment. Empiric p-values for tag SNPs in VEGFA in NIT were highly concentrated in the lower tail of the distribution, suggesting this gene may be influencing risk. Permutation tests confirmed the significance of this pattern. At the gene level, VEGFA yielded an empiric significance (P = 0.027) in NIT. We also observed some evidence for interaction between environmental factors and some VEGFA tag SNPs.
Conclusion
Our finding adds further evidence for a potential role for markers in the VEGFA gene in the development and progression of early precancerous lesions of oesophagus.
doi:10.1016/j.ejca.2014.07.022
PMCID: PMC4363989  PMID: 25172294
Oesophageal squamous; cell carcinoma; Inflammation; Wound-healing; Genetic marker; Genetics; Inflammation-related events; Vascular endothelial growth factor A; VEGFA
8.  Integrative genomics analysis of genes with biallelic loss and its relation to the expression of mRNA and micro-RNA in esophageal squamous cell carcinoma 
BMC Genomics  2015;16:732.
Background
Genomic instability plays an important role in human cancers. We previously characterized genomic instability in esophageal squamous cell carcinomas (ESCC) in terms of loss of heterozygosity (LOH) and copy number (CN) changes in tumors. In the current study we focus on biallelic loss and its relation to expression of mRNA and miRNA in ESCC using results from 500K SNP, mRNA, and miRNA arrays in 30 cases from a high-risk region of China.
Results
(i) Biallelic loss was uncommon but when it occurred it exhibited a consistent pattern: only 77 genes (<0.5 %) showed biallelic loss in at least 10 % of ESCC samples, but nearly all of these genes were concentrated on just four chromosomal arms (ie, 42 genes on 3p, 14 genes on 9p, 10 genes on 5q, and seven genes on 4p). (ii) Biallelic loss was associated with lower mRNA expression: 52 of the 77 genes also had RNA expression data, and 41 (79 %) showed lower expression levels in cases with biallelic loss compared to those without. (iii) The relation of biallelic loss to miRNA expression was less clear but appeared to favor higher miRNA levels: of 60 miRNA-target gene pairs, 34 pairs (57 %) had higher miRNA expression with biallelic loss than without, while 26 pairs (43 %) had lower miRNA expression. (iv) Finally, the effect of biallelic loss on the relation between miRNA and mRNA expression was complex. Biallelic loss was most commonly associated with a pattern of elevated miRNA and reduced mRNA (43 %), but a pattern of both reduced miRNA and mRNA was also common (35 %).
Conclusion
Our results indicate that biallelic loss in ESCC is uncommon, but when it occurs it is localized to a few specific chromosome regions and is associated with reduced mRNA expression of affected genes. The effect of biallelic loss on miRNA expression and on the relation between miRNA and mRNA expressions was complex.
Electronic supplementary material
The online version of this article (doi:10.1186/s12864-015-1919-0) contains supplementary material, which is available to authorized users.
doi:10.1186/s12864-015-1919-0
PMCID: PMC4584010  PMID: 26409826
Esophageal squamous cell carcinoma; Biallelic loss; Gene expression; microRNA
9.  Distinct bone marrow-derived and tissue resident macrophage-lineages proliferate at key stages during inflammation 
Nature communications  2013;4:10.1038/ncomms2877.
The general paradigm is that monocytes are recruited to sites of inflammation and terminally-differentiate into macrophages. There has been no demonstration of proliferation of peripherally-derived inflammatory macrophages under physiological conditions. Here we show that proliferation of both bone marrow-derived inflammatory and tissue resident macrophage lineage branches is a key feature of the inflammatory process with major implications for the mechanisms underlying recovery from inflammation. Both macrophage lineage branches are dependent on M-CSF during inflammation, and thus the potential for therapeutic interventions is marked. Furthermore, these observations are independent of Th2 immunity. These studies indicate that the proliferation of distinct macrophage populations provides a general mechanism for macrophage expansion at key stages during inflammation, and separate control mechanisms are implicated.
doi:10.1038/ncomms2877
PMCID: PMC3842019  PMID: 23695680
10.  Plasma Tocopherols and Risk of Prostate Cancer in the Selenium and Vitamin E Cancer Prevention Trial (SELECT) 
The Selenium and Vitamin E Cancer Prevention Trial (SELECT) showed higher prostate cancer incidence in men supplemented with high-dose α-tocopherol. We therefore examined whether pre-supplementation plasma α-tocopherol or γ-tocopherol was associated with overall or high-grade prostate cancer. A stratified case-cohort sample that included 1,746 incident prostate cancer cases diagnosed through June, 2009 and a subcohort of 3,211 men was derived from the SELECT trial of 35,533 men. Plasma was collected at entry in 2001–2004, and median follow-up was 5.5 years (range, 0 – 7.9 years). Incidence of prostate cancer as a function of plasma α-tocopherol, γ-tocopherol, and supplementation with α-tocopherol or selenomethionine was estimated by the hazard ratio (HR). Plasma γ-tocopherol was not associated with prostate cancer. Men with higher α-tocopherol concentrations appeared to have risk similar to that of men with lower concentrations [overall HR for fifth (Q5) vs. first quintile (Q1), 1.21 (95% confidence interval (CI), 0.88–1.66, P-trend=0.24; in the trial placebo arm, Q5 HR, 0.85, 95% CI, 0.44–1.62, P-trend=0.66]. We found a strong positive plasma α-tocopherol association among men receiving the trial selenomethionine supplement [Q5 HR, 2.04, 95% CI, 1.29–3.22; P-trend=0.005]. A positive plasma α-tocopherol-prostate cancer association also appeared limited to high-grade disease (Gleason grade 7––10, overall Q5 HR, 1.59, 95% CI, 1.13–2.24, P-trend=0.001; among men receiving selenomethionine, HR, 2.12, 95% CI, 1.32–3.40; P-trend=0.0002). Our findings indicate that higher plasma α-tocopherol concentrations may interact with selenomethionine supplements to increase high-grade prostate cancer risk, suggesting a biological interaction between α-tocopherol and selenium itself or selenomethionine.
doi:10.1158/1940-6207.CAPR-14-0058
PMCID: PMC4408535  PMID: 24961880
α-tocopherol; γ-tocopherol; vitamin E; selenium; methionine; chemoprevention; randomized trial; prostate cancer; case-cohort study
11.  Index-based dietary patterns and risk of incident hepatocellular carcinoma and mortality from chronic liver disease in a prospective study 
Hepatology (Baltimore, Md.)  2014;60(2):588-597.
The role of diet in hepatocellular carcinoma (HCC) and its typical precursor, chronic liver disease (CLD), is poorly understood. Following dietary recommendations has been shown to reduce risk of many cancers, but whether such diets are associated with HCC and CLD is unknown. We prospectively evaluated the association of two dietary indices, the Healthy Eating Index-2010 (HEI-2010) and the alternate Mediterranean Diet Score (aMED), with HCC incidence and CLD mortality in a large U.S. prospective cohort. We calculated the HEI-2010 and aMED scores for 494,942 participants in the National Institutes of Health-AARP Diet and Health study, based on typical diet assessed using a food frequency questionnaire between 1995 and 1996. Hazard ratios (HRs) and 95% confidence intervals (CIs) for quintiles of each index were estimated using Cox proportional hazards regression, after adjusting for alcohol intake, smoking, body mass index, diabetes, and other covariates. A total of 509 HCC cases (1995-2006) and 1053 CLD deaths (1995-2011) were documented during follow-up. Higher HEI-2010 scores, reflecting favorable adherence to dietary guidelines, were associated with lower risk of HCC (HR: 0.72, 95% CI: 0.53-0.97 for the highest quintile compared to lowest; P-trend=0.03), and lower mortality due to CLD (HR: 0.57; 95% CI: 0.46-0.71; P-trend<0.0001). High aMED scores were also associated with lower risk of HCC (HR: 0.62; 95% CI: 0.47-0.84; P-trend=0.0002) and lower risk of CLD mortality (HR: 0.52; 95% CI: (0.42-0.65; P-trend<0.0001). Conclusions: Adhering to dietary recommendations may reduce the risk of developing HCC and dying of CLD.
doi:10.1002/hep.27160
PMCID: PMC4110163  PMID: 24715615
diet; liver cancer; Healthy Eating Index-2010; alternate Mediterranean Diet Score; cohort study
12.  A fast and powerful tree-based association test for detecting complex joint effects in case–control studies 
Bioinformatics  2014;30(15):2171-2178.
Motivation: Multivariate tests derived from the logistic regression model are widely used to assess the joint effect of multiple predictors on a disease outcome in case–control studies. These tests become less optimal if the joint effect cannot be approximated adequately by the additive model. The tree-structure model is an attractive alternative, as it is more apt to capture non-additive effects. However, the tree model is used most commonly for prediction and seldom for hypothesis testing, mainly because of the computational burden associated with the resampling-based procedure required for estimating the significance level.
Results: We designed a fast algorithm for building the tree-structure model and proposed a robust TREe-based Association Test (TREAT) that incorporates an adaptive model selection procedure to identify the optimal tree model representing the joint effect. We applied TREAT as a multilocus association test on >20 000 genes/regions in a study of esophageal squamous cell carcinoma (ESCC) and detected a highly significant novel association between the gene CDKN2B and ESCC (). We also demonstrated, through simulation studies, the power advantage of TREAT over other commonly used tests.
Availability and implementation: The package TREAT is freely available for download at http://www.hanzhang.name/softwares/treat, implemented in C++ and R and supported on 64-bit Linux and 64-bit MS Windows.
Contact:  yuka@mail.nih.gov
Supplementary information: Supplementary data are available at Bioinformatics online.
doi:10.1093/bioinformatics/btu186
PMCID: PMC4103596  PMID: 24794927
13.  Risk factors for esophageal and gastric cancers in Shanxi Province, China: A case-control study 
Cancer epidemiology  2011;35(6):e91-e99.
Objective
Smoking and alcohol consumption explain little of the risk for upper-gastrointestinal (UGI) cancer in China, where over half of all cases in the world occur.
Methods
We evaluated questionnaire-based risk factors for UGI cancers in a case-control study from Shanxi Province, China, including 600 esophageal squamous cell carcinomas (ESCC), 599 gastric cardia adenocarcinomas (GCA), 316 gastric noncardia adenocarcinomas (GNCA), and 1514 age- and gender-matched controls.
Results
Ever smoking and ever use of any alcohol were not associated with risk of UGI cancer; only modest associations were observed between ESCC risk and highest cumulative smoking exposure, as well as GNCA risk and beer drinking. While several associations were noted for socioeconomic and some dietary variables with one or two UGI cancers, the strongest and most consistent relations for all three individual UGI cancers were observed for consumption of scalding hot foods (risk increased 150% to 219% for daily vs never users) and fresh vegetables and fruits (risk decreased 48% to 70% for vegetables and 46% to 68% for fruits, respectively, for high vs low quartiles).
Conclusion
This study confirms the minor role of tobacco and alcohol in UGI cancers in this region, and highlights thermal damage as a leading etiologic factor.
doi:10.1016/j.canep.2011.06.006
PMCID: PMC3215853  PMID: 21846596
smoking; alcohol; socioeconomic status; diet
14.  Global gene expression profiling and validation in esophageal squamous cell carcinoma (ESCC) and its association with clinical phenotypes 
Purpose
Esophageal squamous cell carcinoma (ESCC) is an aggressive tumor with poor prognosis. Understanding molecular changes in ESCC will enable identification of molecular subtypes and provide potential targets for early detection and therapy.
Experimental Design
We followed up a previous array study with additional discovery and confirmatory studies in new ESCC cases using alternative methods. We profiled global gene expression for discovery and confirmation, and validated selected dysregulated genes with additional RNA and protein studies.
Results
A total of 159 genes showed differences with extreme statistical significance (P
Conclusion
We identified an expanded panel of genes dysregulated in ESCC and confirmed previously identified differentially-expressed genes. Microarray-based gene expression results were confirmed by RT-PCR and protein expression studies. These dysregulated genes will facilitate molecular categorization of tumor subtypes and identification of their risk factors, and serve as potential targets for early detection, outcome prediction, and therapy.
doi:10.1158/1078-0432.CCR-10-2724
PMCID: PMC3086948  PMID: 21385931
esophageal squamous cell carcinoma (ESCC); Affymetrix oligomicroarray; RT-PCR; tissue microarray (TMA)
Gut  2013;63(2):236-243.
Background and objective
About 9% of gastric carcinomas have Epstein–Barr virus (EBV) in the tumour cells, but it is unclear whether viral presence influences clinical progression. We therefore examined a large multicentre case series for the association of tumour EBV status with survival after gastric cancer diagnosis, accounting for surgical stage and other prognostic factors.
Methods
We combined individual-level data on 4599 gastric cancer patients diagnosed between 1976 and 2010 from 13 studies in Asia (n=8), Europe (n=3), and Latin America (n=2). EBV positivity of tumours was assessed by in situ hybridisation. Mortality HRs for EBV positivity were estimated by Cox regression models stratified by study, adjusted for distributions of sex (71% male), age (mean 58 years), stage (52% tumour-node-metastasis stages III or IV), tumour histology (49% poorly differentiated, 57% Lauren intestinal-type), anatomic subsite (70% non-cardia) and year of diagnosis. Variations by study and continent were assessed using study-specific HRs for EBV positivity.
Results
During median 3.0 years follow-up, 49% of patients died. Stage was strongly predictive of mortality, with unadjusted HRs (vs stage I) of 3.1 for stage II, 8.1 for stage III and 13.2 for stage IV. Tumour EBV positivity was 8.2% overall and inversely associated with stage (adjusted OR: 0.79 per unit change). Adjusted for stage and other confounders, EBV positivity was associated with lower mortality (HR, 0.72; 95% CI 0.61 to 0.86), with low heterogeneity among the study populations (p=0.2). The association did not significantly vary across patient or tumour characteristics. There was no significant variation among the three continent-specific HRs (p=0.4).
Conclusions
Our findings suggest that tumour EBV positivity is an additional prognostic indicator in gastric cancer. Further studies are warranted to identify the mechanisms underlying this protective association.
doi:10.1136/gutjnl-2013-304531
PMCID: PMC4384434  PMID: 23580779
Wolpin, Brian M. | Rizzato, Cosmeri | Kraft, Peter | Kooperberg, Charles | Petersen, Gloria M. | Wang, Zhaoming | Arslan, Alan A. | Beane-Freeman, Laura | Bracci, Paige M. | Buring, Julie | Canzian, Federico | Duell, Eric J. | Gallinger, Steven | Giles, Graham G. | Goodman, Gary E. | Goodman, Phyllis J. | Jacobs, Eric J. | Kamineni, Aruna | Klein, Alison P. | Kolonel, Laurence N. | Kulke, Matthew H. | Li, Donghui | Malats, Núria | Olson, Sara H. | Risch, Harvey A. | Sesso, Howard D. | Visvanathan, Kala | White, Emily | Zheng, Wei | Abnet, Christian C. | Albanes, Demetrius | Andreotti, Gabriella | Austin, Melissa A. | Barfield, Richard | Basso, Daniela | Berndt, Sonja I. | Boutron-Ruault, Marie-Christine | Brotzman, Michelle | Büchler, Markus W. | Bueno-de-Mesquita, H. Bas | Bugert, Peter | Burdette, Laurie | Campa, Daniele | Caporaso, Neil E. | Capurso, Gabriele | Chung, Charles | Cotterchio, Michelle | Costello, Eithne | Elena, Joanne | Funel, Niccola | Gaziano, J. Michael | Giese, Nathalia A. | Giovannucci, Edward L. | Goggins, Michael | Gorman, Megan J. | Gross, Myron | Haiman, Christopher A. | Hassan, Manal | Helzlsouer, Kathy J. | Henderson, Brian E. | Holly, Elizabeth A. | Hu, Nan | Hunter, David J. | Innocenti, Federico | Jenab, Mazda | Kaaks, Rudolf | Key, Timothy J. | Khaw, Kay-Tee | Klein, Eric A. | Kogevinas, Manolis | Krogh, Vittorio | Kupcinskas, Juozas | Kurtz, Robert C. | LaCroix, Andrea | Landi, Maria T. | Landi, Stefano | Le Marchand, Loic | Mambrini, Andrea | Mannisto, Satu | Milne, Roger L. | Nakamura, Yusuke | Oberg, Ann L. | Owzar, Kouros | Patel, Alpa V. | Peeters, Petra H. M. | Peters, Ulrike | Pezzilli, Raffaele | Piepoli, Ada | Porta, Miquel | Real, Francisco X. | Riboli, Elio | Rothman, Nathaniel | Scarpa, Aldo | Shu, Xiao-Ou | Silverman, Debra T. | Soucek, Pavel | Sund, Malin | Talar-Wojnarowska, Renata | Taylor, Philip R. | Theodoropoulos, George E. | Thornquist, Mark | Tjønneland, Anne | Tobias, Geoffrey S. | Trichopoulos, Dimitrios | Vodicka, Pavel | Wactawski-Wende, Jean | Wentzensen, Nicolas | Wu, Chen | Yu, Herbert | Yu, Kai | Zeleniuch-Jacquotte, Anne | Hoover, Robert | Hartge, Patricia | Fuchs, Charles | Chanock, Stephen J. | Stolzenberg-Solomon, Rachael S. | Amundadottir, Laufey T.
Nature genetics  2014;46(9):994-1000.
We performed a multistage genome-wide association study (GWAS) including 7,683 individuals with pancreatic cancer and 14,397 controls of European descent. Four new loci reached genome-wide significance: rs6971499 at 7q32.3 (LINC-PINT; per-allele odds ratio [OR] = 0.79; 95% confidence interval [CI] = 0.74–0.84; P = 3.0×10−12), rs7190458 at 16q23.1 (BCAR1/CTRB1/CTRB2; OR = 1.46; 95% CI = 1.30–1.65; P = 1.1×10−10), rs9581943 at 13q12.2 (PDX1; OR = 1.15; 95% CI = 1.10–1.20; P = 2.4×10−9), and rs16986825 at 22q12.1 (ZNRF3; OR = 1.18; 95% CI = 1.12–1.25; P = 1.2×10−8). An independent signal was identified in exon 2 of TERT at the established region 5p15.33 (rs2736098; OR = 0.80; 95% CI = 0.76–0.85; P = 9.8×10−14). We also identified a locus at 8q24.21 (rs1561927; P = 1.3×10−7) that approached genome-wide significance located 455 kb telomeric of PVT1. Our study has identified multiple new susceptibility alleles for pancreatic cancer worthy of follow-up studies.
doi:10.1038/ng.3052
PMCID: PMC4191666  PMID: 25086665
Wu, Chen | Wang, Zhaoming | Song, Xin | Feng, Xiao-Shan | Abnet, Christian C. | He, Jie | Hu, Nan | Zuo, Xian-Bo | Tan, Wen | Zhan, Qimin | Hu, Zhibin | He, Zhonghu | Jia, Weihua | Zhou, Yifeng | Yu, Kai | Shu, Xiao-Ou | Yuan, Jian-Min | Zheng, Wei | Zhao, Xue-Ke | Gao, She-Gan | Yuan, Zhi-Qing | Zhou, Fu-You | Fan, Zong-Min | Cui, Ji-Li | Lin, Hong-Li | Han, Xue-Na | Li, Bei | Chen, Xi | Dawsey, Sanford M. | Liao, Linda | Lee, Maxwell P. | Ding, Ti | Qiao, You-Lin | Liu, Zhihua | Liu, Yu | Yu, Dianke | Chang, Jiang | Wei, Lixuan | Gao, Yu-Tang | Koh, Woon-Puay | Xiang, Yong-Bing | Tang, Ze-Zhong | Fan, Jin-Hu | Han, Jing-Jing | Zhou, Sheng-Li | Zhang, Peng | Zhang, Dong-Yun | Yuan, Yuan | Huang, Ying | Liu, Chunling | Zhai, Kan | Qiao, Yan | Jin, Guangfu | Guo, Chuanhai | Fu, Jianhua | Miao, Xiaoping | Lu, Changdong | Yang, Haijun | Wang, Chaoyu | Wheeler, William A. | Gail, Mitchell | Yeager, Meredith | Yuenger, Jeff | Guo, Er-Tao | Li, Ai-Li | Zhang, Wei | Li, Xue-Min | Sun, Liang-Dan | Ma, Bao-Gen | Li, Yan | Tang, Sa | Peng, Xiu-Qing | Liu, Jing | Hutchinson, Amy | Jacobs, Kevin | Giffen, Carol | Burdette, Laurie | Fraumeni, Joseph F. | Shen, Hongbing | Ke, Yang | Zeng, Yixin | Wu, Tangchun | Kraft, Peter | Chung, Charles C. | Tucker, Margaret A. | Hou, Zhi-Chao | Liu, Ya-Li | Hu, Yan-Long | Liu, Yu | Wang, Li | Yuan, Guo | Chen, Li-Sha | Liu, Xiao | Ma, Teng | Meng, Hui | Sun, Li | Li, Xin-Min | Li, Xiu-Min | Ku, Jian-Wei | Zhou, Ying-Fa | Yang, Liu-Qin | Wang, Zhou | Li, Yin | Qige, Qirenwang | Yang, Wen-Jun | Lei, Guang-Yan | Chen, Long-Qi | Li, En-Min | Yuan, Ling | Yue, Wen-Bin | Wang, Ran | Wang, Lu-Wen | Fan, Xue-Ping | Zhu, Fang-Heng | Zhao, Wei-Xing | Mao, Yi-Min | Zhang, Mei | Xing, Guo-Lan | Li, Ji-Lin | Han, Min | Ren, Jing-Li | Liu, Bin | Ren, Shu-Wei | Kong, Qing-Peng | Li, Feng | Sheyhidin, Ilyar | Wei, Wu | Zhang, Yan-Rui | Feng, Chang-Wei | Wang, Jin | Yang, Yu-Hua | Hao, Hong-Zhang | Bao, Qi-De | Liu, Bao-Chi | Wu, Ai-Qun | Xie, Dong | Yang, Wan-Cai | Wang, Liang | Zhao, Xiao-Hang | Chen, Shu-Qing | Hong, Jun-Yan | Zhang, Xue-Jun | Freedman, Neal D | Goldstein, Alisa M. | Lin, Dongxin | Taylor, Philip R. | Wang, Li-Dong | Chanock, Stephen J.
Nature genetics  2014;46(9):1001-1006.
We conducted a joint (pooled) analysis of three genome-wide association studies (GWAS) 1-3 of esophageal squamous cell carcinoma (ESCC) in ethnic Chinese (5,337 ESCC cases and 5,787 controls) with 9,654 ESCC cases and 10,058 controls for follow-up. In a logistic regression model adjusted for age, sex, study, and two eigenvectors, two new loci achieved genome-wide significance, marked by rs7447927 at 5q31.2 (per-allele odds ratio (OR) = 0.85, 95% CI 0.82-0.88; P=7.72x10−20) and rs1642764 at 17p13.1 (per-allele OR= 0.88, 95% CI 0.85-0.91; P=3.10x10−13). rs7447927 is a synonymous single nucleotide polymorphism (SNP) in TMEM173 and rs1642764 is an intronic SNP in ATP1B2, near TP53. Furthermore, a locus in the HLA class II region at 6p21.32 (rs35597309) achieved genome-wide significance in the two populations at highest risk for ESSC (OR=1.33, 95% CI 1.22-1.46; P=1.99x10−10). Our joint analysis identified new ESCC susceptibility loci overall as well as a new locus unique to the ESCC high risk Taihang Mountain region.
doi:10.1038/ng.3064
PMCID: PMC4212832  PMID: 25129146
Populations in north central China are at high risk for gastric cancers (GC), and altered FAS-mediated cell signaling and/or apoptosis may contribute to this risk. We examined the association of 554 single nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs) in 53 Fas signaling-related genes using a pathway-based approach in 1758 GC cases (1126 gastric cardia adenocarcinomas (GCA) and 632 gastric noncardia adenocarcinomas (GNCA)), and 2111 controls from a genome-wide association study (GWAS) of GC in ethnic Chinese. SNP associations with risk of overall GC, GCA and GNCA were evaluated using unconditional logistic regressions controlling for age, sex and study. Gene- and pathway-based associations were tested using the adaptive rank-truncated product (ARTP) method. Statistical significance was evaluated empirically by permutation. Significant pathway-based associations were observed for Fas signaling with risk of overall GC (P = 5.5E-04) and GCA (P = 6.3E-03), but not GNCA (P = 8.1E-02). Among examined genes in the Fas signaling pathway, MAP2K4, FAF1, MAPK8, CASP10, CASP8, CFLAR, MAP2K1, CAP8AP2, PAK2 and IKBKB were associated with risk of GC (nominal P < 0.05), and FAF1 and MAPK8 were significantly associated with risk of both GCA and GNCA (nominal P < 0.05). Our examination of genetic variation in the Fas signaling pathway is consistent with an association of altered Fas signaling and/or apoptosis with risk of GC. As one of the first attempts to investigate a pathway-level association, our results suggest that these genes and the Fas signaling pathway warrant further evaluation in relation to GC risk in other populations.
doi:10.1002/ijc.28415
PMCID: PMC3858487  PMID: 23921907
Gastric cancer; gastric cardia; gastric noncardia; Fas signaling; genetic variants; GWAS; single nucleotide polymorphisms; pathway genes
Helicobacter pylori is the primary cause of gastric cancer. However, monoclonal Epstein-Barr virus (EBV) nucleic acid is also present in up to 10% of these tumors worldwide. EBV prevalence is increased with male sex, non-antral localization and surgically disrupted anatomy. To further examine associations between EBV and gastric cancer, we organized an international consortium of 11 studies with tumor EBV status assessed by in situ hybridization. We pooled individual-level data on 2,648 gastric cancer patients, including 184 (7%) with EBV-positive cancers; all studies had information on cigarette use (64% smokers) and 9 had data on alcohol (57% drinkers). We compared patients with EBV-positive and EBV-negative tumors to evaluate smoking and alcohol interactions with EBV status. To account for within-population clustering, multi-level logistic regression models were used to estimate interaction odds ratios (OR) adjusted for distributions of sex (72% male), age (mean 59 years), tumor histology (56% Lauren intestinal-type), anatomic subsite (61% noncardia) and year of diagnosis (1983–2012). In unadjusted analyses, the OR of EBV positivity with smoking was 2.2 (95% confidence interval [CI], 1.6–3.2). The OR was attenuated to 1.5 (95% CI, 1.01–2.3) by adjustment for the possible confounders. There was no significant interaction of EBV status with alcohol drinking (crude OR, 1.4; adjusted OR, 1.0). Our data indicate the smoking association with gastric cancer is stronger for EBV-positive than EBV-negative tumors. Conversely, the null association with alcohol does not vary by EBV status. Distinct epidemiologic characteristics of EBV-positive cancer further implicate the virus as a co-factor in gastric carcinogenesis.
doi:10.1002/ijc.28402
PMCID: PMC3961829  PMID: 23904115
Alcohol; EBV; gastric cancer; smoking; pooled-analysis
PLoS Pathogens  2015;11(2):e1004641.
CD200 receptor (CD200R) negatively regulates peripheral and mucosal innate immune responses. Viruses, including herpesviruses, have acquired functional CD200 orthologs, implying that viral exploitation of this pathway is evolutionary advantageous. However, the role that CD200R signaling plays during herpesvirus infection in vivo requires clarification. Utilizing the murine cytomegalovirus (MCMV) model, we demonstrate that CD200R facilitates virus persistence within mucosal tissue. Specifically, MCMV infection of CD200R-deficient mice (CD200R-/-) elicited heightened mucosal virus-specific CD4 T cell responses that restricted virus persistence in the salivary glands. CD200R did not directly inhibit lymphocyte effector function. Instead, CD200R-/- mice exhibited enhanced APC accumulation that in the mucosa was a consequence of elevated cellular proliferation. Although MCMV does not encode an obvious CD200 homolog, productive replication in macrophages induced expression of cellular CD200. CD200 from hematopoietic and non-hematopoietic cells contributed independently to suppression of antiviral control in vivo. These results highlight the CD200-CD200R pathway as an important regulator of antiviral immunity during cytomegalovirus infection that is exploited by MCMV to establish chronicity within mucosal tissue.
Author Summary
Immune inhibitory receptors, including CD200 receptor (CD200R), can limit immune responses in the mucosa to restrict reactivity to the plethora of harmless antigens that mucosal surfaces are continually exposed to. However, viruses may exploit these suppressive mechanisms to enable their persistence and spread. Many viruses, including herpesviruses, have acquired functional homologs of CD200, the ligand of CD200R, implying that viral exploitation of this pathway is evolutionary advantageous. We now show that the β-herpesvirus murine cytomegalovirus (MCMV) takes advantage of the CD200R inhibitory pathway to persist within a mucosal site of MCMV persistence, the salivary glands. Mice deficient in CD200R mounted elevated antiviral immune responses that were driven by the increased division and accumulation of myeloid cells that function to orchestrate the generation of antiviral effector immune responses. Interestingly, MCMV infection of myeloid cells up-regulated CD200 expression. Thus, MCMV exploits the CD200 pathway to persist within mucosal tissue.
doi:10.1371/journal.ppat.1004641
PMCID: PMC4412112  PMID: 25654642
Background
Stroke is the leading cause of death in Linxian, China. Although there is evidence of DNA damage in experimental stroke, no data exist on DNA repair and stroke in human populations.
Aim
To assess the risk of stroke conferred by polymorphisms in the DNA repair genes, XRCC1, XPD23 and APE/ref‐1 in a cohort of individuals originally assembled as subjects in two cancer prevention trials in Linxian, China.
Methods
The subjects for this prospective study were sampled from a cohort of 4005 eligible subjects who were alive and cancer free in 1991 and had blood samples available for DNA extraction. Using real‐time Taqman analyses, all incident cases of stroke (n = 118) that developed from May 1996, and an age‐ and a sex‐stratified random sample (n = 454) drawn from all eligible subjects were genotyped. Cox proportional hazards models were used to estimate relative risks (RRs) and 95% CIs.
Results
No association was observed between polymorphisms in APE/ref‐1 codon 148 and XRCC1*6 codon 194, and stroke. Polymorphisms in XRCC1*10 codon 399 were associated with a significantly reduced risk of stroke (RR 0.59, 95% CI 0.36 to 0.96, p = 0.033), whereas XPD23 codon 312 was associated with a significantly increased risk of stroke (RR 2.18, 95% CI 1.14 to 4.17, p = 0.010).
Conclusions
Polymorphisms in DNA repair genes may be important in the aetiology of stroke. These data should stimulate research on DNA damage and repair in stroke.
doi:10.1136/jech.2006.048934
PMCID: PMC2653006  PMID: 17630376
Cancer research  2009;69(14):5908-5917.
Genomic instability plays an important role in most human cancers. To characterize genomic instability in esophageal squamous cell carcinoma (ESCC), we examined loss of heterozygosity (LOH), copy number (CN) loss, CN gain, and gene expression using the Affymetrix GeneChip Human Mapping 500K (n=30 cases) and Human U133A (n=17 cases) arrays in ESCC cases from a high-risk region of China. We found that genomic instability measures varied widely among cases and separated them into two groups: a high-frequency instability group (two-thirds of all cases with one or more instability category ≥ 10%) and a low-frequency instability group (one-third of cases with instability < 10%). Genomic instability also varied widely across chromosomal arms, with the highest frequency of LOH on 9p (33% of informative single nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs)), CN loss on 3p (33%), and CN gain on 3q (48%). Twenty-two LOH regions were identified: four on 9p, seven on 9q, four on 13q, two on 17p, and five on 17q. Three CN loss regions – 3p12.3, 4p15.1, and 9p21.3 – were detected. Twelve CN gain regions were found, including six on 3q, one on 7q, four on 8q, and one on 11q. One of the most gene-rich of these CN gain regions was 11q13.1-13.4, where 26 genes also had RNA expression data available. CN gain was significantly correlated with increased RNA expression in over 80% of these genes. Our findings demonstrate the potential utility of combining CN analysis and gene expression data to identify genes involved in esophageal carcinogenesis.
doi:10.1158/0008-5472.CAN-08-4622
PMCID: PMC2734334  PMID: 19584285
esophageal cancer; LOH; copy number alteration; 500K SNP array
Background
The General Population Nutrition Intervention Trial was a randomized primary esophageal and gastric cancer prevention trial conducted from 1985 to 1991, in which 29 584 adult participants in Linxian, China, were given daily vitamin and mineral supplements. Treatment with “factor D,” a combination of 50 μg selenium, 30 mg vitamin E, and 15 mg beta-carotene, led to decreased mortality from all causes, cancer overall, and gastric cancer. Here, we present 10-year follow-up after the end of active intervention.
Methods
Participants were assessed by periodic data collection, monthly visits by village health workers, and quarterly review of the Linxian Cancer Registry. Hazard ratios (HRs) and 95% confidence intervals (CIs) for the cumulative effects of four vitamin and mineral supplementation regimens were calculated using adjusted proportional hazards models.
Results
Through May 31, 2001, 276 participants were lost to follow-up; 9727 died, including 3242 from cancer (1515 from esophageal cancer and 1199 from gastric cancer). Participants who received factor D had lower overall mortality (HR = 0.95, 95% CI = 0.91 to 0.99; P = .009; reduction in cumulative mortality from 33.62% to 32.19%) and gastric cancer mortality (HR = 0.89, 95% CI = 0.79 to 1.00; P = .043; reduction in cumulative gastric cancer mortality from 4.28% to 3.84%) than subjects who did not receive factor D. Reductions were mostly attributable to benefits to subjects younger than 55 years. Esophageal cancer deaths between those who did and did not receive factor D were not different overall; however, decreased 17% among participants younger than 55 (HR = 0.83, 95% CI = 0.71 to 0.98; P = .025) but increased 14% among those aged 55 years or older (HR = 1.14, 95% CI = 1.00 to 1.30; P = .47). Vitamin A and zinc supplementation was associated with increased total and stroke mortality; vitamin C and molybdenum supplementation, with decreased stroke mortality.
Conclusion
The beneficial effects of selenium, vitamin E, and beta-carotene on mortality were still evident up to 10 years after the cessation of supplementation and were consistently greater in younger participants. Late effects of other supplementation regimens were also observed.
doi:10.1093/jnci/djp037
PMCID: PMC2664089  PMID: 19318634
Molecular events associated with the initiation and progression of esophageal squamous cell carcinoma (ESCC) remain poorly understood, but likely hold the key to effective early detection approaches for this almost invariably fatal cancer. CDC25B and LAMC2 are two promising early detection candidates emerging from new molecular studies of ESCC. To further elucidate the role of these two genes in esophageal carcinogenesis, we performed a series of studies to: (i) confirm RNA over-expression; (ii) establish the prevalence of protein over-expression; (iii) relate protein over-expression to survival; and (iv) explore their potential as early detection biomarkers. Results of these studies indicated that CDC25B mRNA was over-expressed (≥2-fold over-expression in tumor compared to normal) in 64% of the 73 ESCC cases evaluated, while LAMC2 mRNA was over-expressed in 89% of cases. CDC25B protein expression was categorized as positive in 59% (144/243) of ESCC cases on a tumor tissue microarray, and non-negative LAMC2 patterns of protein expression were observed in 82% (225/275) of cases. Multivariate-adjusted proportional hazard regression models showed no association between CDC25B protein expression score and risk of death (Hazard Ratio [HR] for each unit increase in expression score = 1.00, P=0.90), however, several of the LAMC2 protein expression patterns strongly predicted survival. Using the cytoplasmic pattern as the reference (the pattern with the lowest mortality), cases with a diffuse pattern had a 254% increased risk of death (HR=3.52, P=0.007), cases with no LAMC2 expression had a 169% increased risk of death (HR=2.69, P=0.009), and cases with a peripheral pattern had a 130% greater risk of death (HR=2.30, P=0.02). CDC25B protein expression scores in subjects with esophageal biopsies diagnosed as normal (n=35), dysplastic (n=23), or ESCC (n=32) increased significantly with morphologic progression. For LAMC2, all normal and dysplastic patients had a continuous pattern of protein expression, while all ESCCs showed alternative, non-continuous patterns. This series of studies showed that both CDC25B and LAMC2 over-express RNA and protein in a significant majority of ESCC cases. The strong relation of LAMC2 pattern of protein expression to survival suggests a role in prognosis, while CDC25B’s association with morphologic progression indicates a potential role as an early detection marker.
doi:10.1158/1055-9965.EPI-06-0666
PMCID: PMC2729558  PMID: 18559558
esophageal cancer; quantitative RT-PCR; tissue microarray; survival; early detection; CDC25B; LAMC2
European Journal of Immunology  2007;37(9):2518-2528.
The granulocyte-macrophage colony-stimulating factor (GM-CSF) is a hematopoietic cytokine able to regulate a variety of cell functions including differentiation of macrophages and granulocytes, dendritic cell development and the maintenance of homeostasis. It binds specifically to its receptor, which is composed of a cytokine-specific α-chain (GM-CSF receptor α-chain, GMRα) and a β-chain shared with the receptors for interleukin-3 and interleukin-5. In this report, we present a comprehensive study of GMRα in the mouse. We have found that the mouse GMRα is polymorphic and alternatively spliced. In the absence of specific antibodies, we generated a novel chimeric protein containing the Fc fragment of human IgG1 coupled to mouse GM-CSF, which was able to specifically bind to GMRα and induce proliferation of GMRα-transduced Ba/F3 cells. We used this reagent to perform the first detailed FACS study of the surface expression of mouse GMRα by leucocytes. Highest expression was found on monocytes and granulocytes, and variable expression on tissue macrophages. The GM-CSF receptor in mice is specifically expressed by myeloid cells and is useful for the detection of novel uncharacterised myeloid populations. The ability to detect GM-CSF receptor expression in experimental studies should greatly facilitate the analysis of its role in immune pathologies.
doi:10.1002/eji.200636892
PMCID: PMC2699419  PMID: 17694571
Cell proliferation; Cytokines; Inflammation; Macrophages; Neutrophils

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