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1.  Trends in Radical Surgical Treatment Methods for Breast Malignancies in China: A Multicenter 10-Year Retrospective Study 
The Oncologist  2015;20(9):1036-1043.
The purpose of this study was to describe Chinese trends in radical surgical modalities and influential imaging and demographic factors for breast malignancies. Rates of mastectomy in the People’s Republic of China remain elevated due to diagnosis at higher stages; however, because of increased use of diagnostic imaging, improvement of biopsy methods, and patient education, rates of less invasive lumpectomy are increasing and rates of mastectomy have decreased in China.
Background.
Incidence rates of breast cancer continue to rise in the People’s Republic of China. The purpose of this study was to describe Chinese trends in radical surgical modalities and influential imaging and demographic factors for breast malignancies.
Materials and Methods.
This study was a hospital-based, multicenter, 10-year (1999–2008), retrospective study. Descriptive statistical tests were used to illustrate information regarding radical surgical trends for the treatment of breast malignancies. Chi-square tests were used to assess effect of demographic factors in addition to imaging and pathological data on the specific surgical method.
Results.
A total of 4,211 patients were enrolled in the survey. Among them, 3,335 patients with stage 0 to stage III disease undergoing mastectomy or breast-conserving surgery (BCS) were included in the final analysis. The rate of BCS increased from 1.53% in 1999 to 11.88% in 2008. The rate of mastectomy declined over this time period, from 98.47% in 1999 to 88.12% in 2008, with increasing use of diagnostic imaging methods and pathological biopsies. A significantly greater percentage of patients with office work, high education levels, unmarried status, younger age, and early pathological stages preferred BCS compared with mastectomy.
Conclusion.
Rates of mastectomy in China remain elevated due to diagnosis at higher stages; however, because of increased use of diagnostic imaging, improvement of biopsy methods, and patient education, rates of less invasive lumpectomy are increasing and rates of mastectomy have decreased in China.
Implications for Practice:
In this study, 4,211 cases were collected from 1999 to 2008 through a multicenter retrospective study of varying geographic and socioeconomic areas to illustrate trends of surgeries in the People’s Republic of China. The correlations between demographic and tumor characteristics and among methods of surgical treatment were explored. This study shows that the rate of breast-conserving surgery (BCS) increased and the rate of mastectomy declined over this time period with increasing use of diagnostic imaging methods and pathological biopsies. Patients with office work, high education levels, unmarried status, younger age, and early pathological stages preferred BCS compared with mastectomy in China.
doi:10.1634/theoncologist.2014-0281
PMCID: PMC4571796  PMID: 26253559
Breast neoplasms; Surgical; Imaging; Diagnosis
2.  Prospective study of Helicobacter pylori antigens and gastric noncardia cancer risk in the Nutrition Intervention Trial cohort 
Helicobacter pylon (H. pylori) infection is the strongest known risk factor for gastric non-cardia adenocarcinoma (GNCA). We used multiplex serology to determine whether seropositivity to 15 H. pylori proteins is associated with the subsequent development of non-cardia gastric cancer in Linxian, China.
We included 448 GNCA cases and 1242 controls from two time-points within the Linxian General Population Nutrition Intervention Trial, Linxian. H. pylori multiplex seropositivity was defined as positivity to ≥4 of the 15 included antigens. Odds ratios (OR) and 95% confidence intervals were adjusted for major GNCA risk factors. Additionally, we undertook a meta-analysis combining H. pylori multiplex serology data from both timepoints.
H. pylori multiplex seropositivity was associated with a significant increase in risk of GNCA at one time-point (1985; OR: 3.44, 95% CI: 1.91, 6.19) and this association remained significant following adjustment for H. pylori or CagA ELISA seropositivity (OR: 2.92, 95% CI: 1.56, 5.47). Combining data from both timepoints in a meta-analysis H. pylori multiplex seropositivity was associated with an increased risk of GNCA, as were 6 individual antigens: GroEL, HP0305, CagA, VacA, HcpC and Omp. CagM was inversely associated with risk of GNCA.
We identified 6 individual antigens which confer an increase in risk of GNCA within this population of high H. pylori seroprevalence, as well as a single antigen which may be inversely associated with GNCA risk. We further determined that the H. pylori multiplex assay provides additional information to the conventional ELISA methods on risk of GNCA.
doi:10.1002/ijc.29543
PMCID: PMC4529753  PMID: 25845708
Helicobacter pylori; multiplex serology; gastric cancer; esophageal cancer
3.  Common genetic variants in epigenetic machinery genes and risk of upper gastrointestinal cancers 
Background: Populations in north central China are at high risk for oesophageal squamous cell carcinoma (ESCC) and gastric cancer (GC), and genetic variation in epigenetic machinery genes and pathways may contribute to this risk.
Methods: We used the adaptive multilocus joint test to analyse 192 epigenetic genes involved in chromatin remodelling, DNA methylation and microRNA biosynthesis in 1942 ESCC and 1758 GC cases [1126 cardia (GCA) and 632 non-cardia adenocarcinoma (GNCA)] and 2111 controls with Chinese ancestry. We examined potential function of risk alleles using in silico and expression quantitative trait loci (eQTLs) analyses.
Results: Suggestive pathway-based associations were observed for the overall epigenetic (P-valuePATH = 0.034) and chromatin remodelling (P-valuePATH = 0.039) pathways with risk of GCA, but not GC, GNCA or ESCC. Overall, 37 different epigenetic machinery genes were associated with risk of one or more upper gastrointestinal (UGI) cancer sites (P-valueGENE < 0.05), including 14 chromatin remodelling genes whose products are involved in the regulation of HOX genes. We identified a gastric eQTL (rs12724079; rho = 0.37; P = 0.0006) which regulates mRNA expression of ASH1L. Several suggestive eQTLs were also found in oesophageal (rs10898459 in EED), gastric cardia (rs7157322 in DICER1; rs8179271 in ASH1L), and gastric non-cardia (rs1790733 in PPP1CA) tissues.
Conclusions: Results of our analyses provide limited but suggestive evidence for a role of epigenetic gene variation in the aetiology of UGI cancer.
doi:10.1093/ije/dyv050
PMCID: PMC4598798  PMID: 25921222
Epigenetics; chromatin remodelling; DNA methylation; microRNA; oesophageal squamous cell carcinoma; gastric cancer; gastric cardia; gastric non-cardia; SNP; gene-based; pathway-based
4.  Body mass index and long‐term risk of death from esophageal squamous cell carcinoma in a Chinese population 
Thoracic Cancer  2016;7(4):387-392.
Abstract
Background
Studies based on Western populations have found that body mass index (BMI) is positively related to the risk of esophageal adenocarcinoma but inversely associated with esophageal squamous cell carcinoma (ESCC). Little reliable evidence exists of an association between BMI and ESCCin China, where ESCC incidence is high but BMI is low.
Methods
We evaluated the BMI‐ESCC association in a population‐based prospective study of 29 446 Chinese aged 40–69 with 27 years of follow‐up. China‐specific BMI cut‐offs (underweight < 18.5, healthy ≥ 18.5 to <24, overweight ≥ 24 to <28, and obese ≥ 28) and quartile categories were used to define BMI subgroups. Adjusted hazard ratios (HRs) and confidence intervals (CIs) for death from ESCC by BMI subgroups were calculated using Cox proportional hazards models.
Results
During a median follow‐up duration of 21.2 years (555 439 person‐years), 2436 ESCC deaths were identified. BMI was protective for death from ESCC with an HR of 0.97 (95% CI 0.95–0.99) for each unit increase in BMI. Relative to healthy weight, HRs for BMI were 1.21 (95% CI 1.02–1.43) for the underweight group and 0.87 (95% CI 0.78–0.98) for the overweight. Categorical quartile analyses found people with BMIs in the Q3 and Q4 groups had 16% and 13% reductions in the risk of ESCC, respectively. Gender‐specific analyses found that clear effects were evident in women only.
Conclusions
Higher BMI was associated with a reduced risk of ESCC in aChinese population.
doi:10.1111/1759-7714.12340
PMCID: PMC4930956  PMID: 27385979
Body mass index (BMI); Chinese population; esophageal squamous cell carcinoma (ESCC); overweight; underweight
5.  Female chromosome X mosaicism is age-related and preferentially affects the inactivated X chromosome 
Machiela, Mitchell J. | Zhou, Weiyin | Karlins, Eric | Sampson, Joshua N. | Freedman, Neal D. | Yang, Qi | Hicks, Belynda | Dagnall, Casey | Hautman, Christopher | Jacobs, Kevin B. | Abnet, Christian C. | Aldrich, Melinda C. | Amos, Christopher | Amundadottir, Laufey T. | Arslan, Alan A. | Beane-Freeman, Laura E. | Berndt, Sonja I. | Black, Amanda | Blot, William J. | Bock, Cathryn H. | Bracci, Paige M. | Brinton, Louise A. | Bueno-de-Mesquita, H Bas | Burdett, Laurie | Buring, Julie E. | Butler, Mary A. | Canzian, Federico | Carreón, Tania | Chaffee, Kari G. | Chang, I-Shou | Chatterjee, Nilanjan | Chen, Chu | Chen, Constance | Chen, Kexin | Chung, Charles C. | Cook, Linda S. | Crous Bou, Marta | Cullen, Michael | Davis, Faith G. | De Vivo, Immaculata | Ding, Ti | Doherty, Jennifer | Duell, Eric J. | Epstein, Caroline G. | Fan, Jin-Hu | Figueroa, Jonine D. | Fraumeni, Joseph F. | Friedenreich, Christine M. | Fuchs, Charles S. | Gallinger, Steven | Gao, Yu-Tang | Gapstur, Susan M. | Garcia-Closas, Montserrat | Gaudet, Mia M. | Gaziano, J. Michael | Giles, Graham G. | Gillanders, Elizabeth M. | Giovannucci, Edward L. | Goldin, Lynn | Goldstein, Alisa M. | Haiman, Christopher A. | Hallmans, Goran | Hankinson, Susan E. | Harris, Curtis C. | Henriksson, Roger | Holly, Elizabeth A. | Hong, Yun-Chul | Hoover, Robert N. | Hsiung, Chao A. | Hu, Nan | Hu, Wei | Hunter, David J. | Hutchinson, Amy | Jenab, Mazda | Johansen, Christoffer | Khaw, Kay-Tee | Kim, Hee Nam | Kim, Yeul Hong | Kim, Young Tae | Klein, Alison P. | Klein, Robert | Koh, Woon-Puay | Kolonel, Laurence N. | Kooperberg, Charles | Kraft, Peter | Krogh, Vittorio | Kurtz, Robert C. | LaCroix, Andrea | Lan, Qing | Landi, Maria Teresa | Marchand, Loic Le | Li, Donghui | Liang, Xiaolin | Liao, Linda M. | Lin, Dongxin | Liu, Jianjun | Lissowska, Jolanta | Lu, Lingeng | Magliocco, Anthony M. | Malats, Nuria | Matsuo, Keitaro | McNeill, Lorna H. | McWilliams, Robert R. | Melin, Beatrice S. | Mirabello, Lisa | Moore, Lee | Olson, Sara H. | Orlow, Irene | Park, Jae Yong | Patiño-Garcia, Ana | Peplonska, Beata | Peters, Ulrike | Petersen, Gloria M. | Pooler, Loreall | Prescott, Jennifer | Prokunina-Olsson, Ludmila | Purdue, Mark P. | Qiao, You-Lin | Rajaraman, Preetha | Real, Francisco X. | Riboli, Elio | Risch, Harvey A. | Rodriguez-Santiago, Benjamin | Ruder, Avima M. | Savage, Sharon A. | Schumacher, Fredrick | Schwartz, Ann G. | Schwartz, Kendra L. | Seow, Adeline | Wendy Setiawan, Veronica | Severi, Gianluca | Shen, Hongbing | Sheng, Xin | Shin, Min-Ho | Shu, Xiao-Ou | Silverman, Debra T. | Spitz, Margaret R. | Stevens, Victoria L. | Stolzenberg-Solomon, Rachael | Stram, Daniel | Tang, Ze-Zhong | Taylor, Philip R. | Teras, Lauren R. | Tobias, Geoffrey S. | Van Den Berg, David | Visvanathan, Kala | Wacholder, Sholom | Wang, Jiu-Cun | Wang, Zhaoming | Wentzensen, Nicolas | Wheeler, William | White, Emily | Wiencke, John K. | Wolpin, Brian M. | Wong, Maria Pik | Wu, Chen | Wu, Tangchun | Wu, Xifeng | Wu, Yi-Long | Wunder, Jay S. | Xia, Lucy | Yang, Hannah P. | Yang, Pan-Chyr | Yu, Kai | Zanetti, Krista A. | Zeleniuch-Jacquotte, Anne | Zheng, Wei | Zhou, Baosen | Ziegler, Regina G. | Perez-Jurado, Luis A. | Caporaso, Neil E. | Rothman, Nathaniel | Tucker, Margaret | Dean, Michael C. | Yeager, Meredith | Chanock, Stephen J.
Nature Communications  2016;7:11843.
To investigate large structural clonal mosaicism of chromosome X, we analysed the SNP microarray intensity data of 38,303 women from cancer genome-wide association studies (20,878 cases and 17,425 controls) and detected 124 mosaic X events >2 Mb in 97 (0.25%) women. Here we show rates for X-chromosome mosaicism are four times higher than mean autosomal rates; X mosaic events more often include the entire chromosome and participants with X events more likely harbour autosomal mosaic events. X mosaicism frequency increases with age (0.11% in 50-year olds; 0.45% in 75-year olds), as reported for Y and autosomes. Methylation array analyses of 33 women with X mosaicism indicate events preferentially involve the inactive X chromosome. Our results provide further evidence that the sex chromosomes undergo mosaic events more frequently than autosomes, which could have implications for understanding the underlying mechanisms of mosaic events and their possible contribution to risk for chronic diseases.
It is unclear how often genetic mosaicism of chromosome X arises. Here, the authors examine women with cancer and cancer-free controls and show that X chromosome mosaicism occurs more frequently than on autosomes, especially on the inactive X chromosome, but is not linked to non-haematologic cancer risk
doi:10.1038/ncomms11843
PMCID: PMC4909985  PMID: 27291797
6.  Prospective Study of Serum 25-Hydroxyvitamin D Concentration and Mortality in a Chinese Population 
American Journal of Epidemiology  2012;176(11):1043-1050.
Prospective epidemiologic data on the association between vitamin D and mortality are limited, particularly in Asian populations. Among subjects in Linxian, China, the authors aimed to test whether baseline serum 25-hydroxyvitamin D (25(OH)D) concentrations in a prospective cohort were associated with all-cause mortality and cause-specific mortality rates over 24 years of follow-up (1986–2010). Serum 25(OH)D concentrations were measured in 1,101 subjects using an immunoassay. Hazard ratios and 95% confidence intervals were calculated using Cox regression models that were adjusted for age, sex, tobacco smoking, alcohol drinking, and hypertension. The 25th, 50th, and 75th percentile concentrations of 25(OH)D were 19.6, 31.9, and 48.4 nmol/L, respectively. During follow-up, 793 subjects died, including 279 who died of cerebrovascular accident, 217 who died of cancer, and 200 cardiovascular disease deaths. All-cause mortality was not associated with 25(OH)D concentrations using continuous models (for every 15 nmol/L, hazard ratio = 1.01, 95% confidence interval: 0.97, 1.05) or quartile models (fourth vs. first quartiles, hazard ratio = 1.06, 95% confidence interval: 0.87, 1.30; P for trend = 0.731). The authors also found no association with the cause-specific mortality outcomes. Results were similar for men and women. This study showed that prediagnostic serum 25(OH)D concentrations were not associated with all-cause or cause-specific mortality rates in this Chinese population who had low levels of vitamin D.
doi:10.1093/aje/kws285
PMCID: PMC3571239  PMID: 23139250
cancer; cardiovascular diseases; China; mortality; vitamin D
7.  Common genetic variants related to vitamin D status are not associated with esophageal squamous cell carcinoma risk in China 
Cancer epidemiology  2015;39(2):157-159.
Background
Few studies have examined the association of common genetic variants related to vitamin D metabolism and signaling to esophageal squamous cell carcinoma(ESCC).
Methods
We evaluated the association between 12 single nucleotide polymorphisms(SNPs) in four genes related to vitamin D levels and ESCC risk using data from a genome-wide association study. Participants were recruited from the Shanxi Upper Gastrointestinal Cancer Genetics Project and the Linxian Nutrition Intervention Trials, and included 1942 ESCC cases and 2111controls. We used logistic models to estimate odds ratios(ORs) and 95% confidence intervals(CIs) for the SNP associations, after controlling for age and gender.
Results
None of the 12 evaluated SNPs in the four vitamin D-related genes were significantly associated with risk of ESCC. The strongest associations were for rs3794060(P=0.07) and rs12800438(P=0.08) in the DHCR7/NADSYN1gene. No association between vitamin D-related SNPs and risk of ESCC was observed in a genotype score analysis that included all 12 SNPs. ORs for quartiles 2, 3 and 4 of the genotype scores were 0.83 (95% CI: 0.68, 1.01), 1.02(0.85, 1.21), and 1.08 (0.89, 1.30), respectively, with no evidence for a significant monotonic trend(P=0.120).
Conclusions
Our results suggested that common genetic variants related to vitamin D levels are not associated with risk of ESCC in this Chinese population.
doi:10.1016/j.canep.2014.12.013
PMCID: PMC4382354  PMID: 25631780
vitamin D; genetic variants; esophageal squamous cell carcinoma; China
8.  Beta-Diversity Metrics of the Upper Digestive Tract Microbiome are Associated with Body Mass Index 
Obesity (Silver Spring, Md.)  2015;23(4):862-869.
Background
Studies of the fecal microbiome have implicated the gut microbiota in obesity, but few studies examined the microbial diversity at other sites. We explored the association between obesity and the upper gastrointestinal (UGI) microbial diversity.
Design/Methods
The UGI microbiome of 659 healthy Chinese adults with a measured body mass index (BMI) range of 15.0 to 35.7 was characterized using the 16S rRNA gene DNA microarray (HOMIM).
Results
In multivariate-adjusted models, alpha diversity was not associated with BMI. However, beta diversity, assessed by principal coordinate vectors generated from an unweighted unifrac distance matrix of pairwise comparisons, was associated with BMI (third and fourth vectors, p=0.0132 and p=0.0280, respectively). Moreover, beta diversity, assessed by cluster membership (3 clusters), was also associated with BMI; individuals in the first cluster (median BMI 22.35, odds ratio (OR)=0.48, 95% confidence interval (CI)=0.05–4.34) and second cluster (median BMI 22.55, OR=0.26, 95% CI=0.09–0.75) were significantly less likely to be obese (BMI ≥27.5) than those in the third cluster (median BMI 23.59).
Conclusions
A beta-diversity metric of the UGI microbiome is associated with a four-fold difference in obesity risk in this Asian population. Future studies should address whether the UGI microbiome plays a causal role in obesity.
doi:10.1002/oby.21020
PMCID: PMC4380747  PMID: 25755147
beta-diversity; body mass index; Chinese; microbiome; obesity; upper gastrointestinal tract
9.  Dietary components and risk of total, cancer and cardiovascular disease mortality in the Linxian Nutrition Intervention Trials cohort in China 
Scientific Reports  2016;6:22619.
Although previous studies have shown that dietary consumption of certain food groups is associated with a lower risk of cancer, heart disease and stroke mortality in western populations, limited prospective data are available from China. We prospectively examined the association between dietary intake of different food groups at baseline and risk of total, cancer, heart disease and stroke mortality outcomes in the Linxian Nutrition Intervention Trials(NIT) cohort. In 1984–1991, 2445 subjects aged 40–69 years from the Linxian NIT cohort completed a food frequency questionnaire. Deaths from esophageal and gastric cancer, heart disease and stroke were identified through up to 26 years of follow-up. We used Cox proportional hazard models to calculate hazard ratios and 95% confidence intervals for associations between intake of groups of food items and these mortality endpoints. We concluded that higher intake of certain food groups was associated with lower risk of gastric cancer, heart disease and stroke mortality in a prospective cohort in rural China. Our findings provide additional evidence that increasing intake of grains, vegetables, beans, fruits and nuts may help reduce mortality from these diseases.
doi:10.1038/srep22619
PMCID: PMC4778051  PMID: 26939909
10.  Breast Cancer Disparities: A Multicenter Comparison of Tumor Diagnosis, Characteristics, and Surgical Treatment in China and the U.S. 
The Oncologist  2015;20(9):1044-1050.
Incidence rates for breast cancer continue to rise in the People’s Republic of China. The purpose of this study was to analyze differences in characteristics of breast malignancies between China and the U.S. Chinese women were diagnosed at younger ages with higher stage and larger tumors and underwent more aggressive surgical treatment. Prospective trials should be conducted to address screening, surgical, and tumor discrepancies between China and the U.S.
Background and Objective.
Incidence of and mortality rates for breast cancer continue to rise in the People’s Republic of China. The purpose of this study was to analyze differences in characteristics of breast malignancies between China and the U.S.
Methods.
Data from 384,262 breast cancer patients registered in the U.S. Surveillance, Epidemiology, and End Results (SEER) program from 2000 to 2010 were compared with 4,211 Chinese breast cancer patients registered in a Chinese database from 1999 to 2008. Outcomes included age, race, histology, tumor and node staging, laterality, surgical treatment method, and reconstruction. The Pearson chi-square and Fisher’s exact tests were used to compare rates.
Results.
Infiltrating ductal carcinoma was the most common type of malignancy in the U.S. and China. The mean number of positive lymph nodes was higher in China (2.59 vs. 1.31, p < .001). Stage at diagnosis was higher in China (stage IIA vs. I, p < .001). Mean size of tumor at diagnosis was higher in China (32.63 vs. 21.57 mm). Mean age at diagnosis was lower in China (48.28 vs. 61.29 years, p < .001). Moreover, 2.0% of U.S. women underwent radical mastectomy compared with 12.5% in China, and 0.02% in China underwent reconstructive surgery.
Conclusion.
Chinese women were diagnosed at younger ages with higher stage and larger tumors and underwent more aggressive surgical treatment. Prospective trials should be conducted to address screening, surgical, and tumor discrepancies between China and the U.S.
Implications for Practice:
Breast cancer patients in China are diagnosed at later stages than those in America, which might contribute to different clinical management and lower 5-year survival rate. This phenomenon suggests that an earlier detection and treatment program should be widely implemented in China. By comparing the characteristics of Chinese and Chinese-American patients, we found significant differences in tumor size, lymph nodes metastasis, and age at diagnosis. These consequences indicated that patients with similar genetic backgrounds may have different prognoses due to the influence of environment and social economic determinates.
doi:10.1634/theoncologist.2014-0290
PMCID: PMC4571797  PMID: 26240131
Breast cancer; China; Disparities
11.  Association between C-reactive protein, incident liver cancer and chronic liver disease mortality in the Linxian Nutrition Intervention Trials: a nested case-control study 
Background
C-reactive protein is a marker of systemic inflammation that has been associated with the incidence and prognosis for a number of different cancers. Recent data suggests that C-reactive protein may be a prognostic factor for liver cancer and cirrhosis. However, few long-term studies are available.
Methods
We prospectively examined associations between serum C-reactive protein and subsequent risk of liver cancer incidence or chronic liver disease mortality in a nested case-control study performed in the Linxian Nutrition Intervention Trials cohort. Baseline serum C-reactive protein was measured for 220 incident liver cancer cases, 276 participants who died of chronic liver disease, and 1018 age-, sex-, and trial-matched controls. Unconditional logistical regression models were used to estimate odds ratios (OR) and 95% confidence intervals (CI).
Results
Compared to the lowest quartile, subjects in the fourth quartile of serum C-reactive protein had a higher risk of liver cancer incidence (OR=1.63, 95% CI: 1.06–2.51), with a significant p-trend across quartiles (P=0.01). The association with liver cancer was only significant among men (Q4 vs Q1, OR=2.00, 1.10–3.62), but not among women (Q4 vs Q1, OR=1.15, 0.60–2.22). For chronic liver disease deaths, the corresponding risk estimate in men and women was 2.95(1.90–4.57), with a monotonic trend (P<0.001).
Conclusions
Higher serum C-reactive protein concentrations at baseline were associated with subsequent incidence of liver cancer and death from chronic liver disease.
Impact
Our findings suggest that levels of systemic inflammation may serve as a long-term marker of liver cancer and liver disease.
doi:10.1158/1055-9965.EPI-14-1038
PMCID: PMC4323937  PMID: 25613115
C-reactive protein; Liver cancer; Chronic liver disease; Nested case-control study
12.  Imputation and subset-based association analysis across different cancer types identifies multiple independent risk loci in the TERT-CLPTM1L region on chromosome 5p15.33 
Wang, Zhaoming | Zhu, Bin | Zhang, Mingfeng | Parikh, Hemang | Jia, Jinping | Chung, Charles C. | Sampson, Joshua N. | Hoskins, Jason W. | Hutchinson, Amy | Burdette, Laurie | Ibrahim, Abdisamad | Hautman, Christopher | Raj, Preethi S. | Abnet, Christian C. | Adjei, Andrew A. | Ahlbom, Anders | Albanes, Demetrius | Allen, Naomi E. | Ambrosone, Christine B. | Aldrich, Melinda | Amiano, Pilar | Amos, Christopher | Andersson, Ulrika | Andriole, Gerald | Andrulis, Irene L. | Arici, Cecilia | Arslan, Alan A. | Austin, Melissa A. | Baris, Dalsu | Barkauskas, Donald A. | Bassig, Bryan A. | Beane Freeman, Laura E. | Berg, Christine D. | Berndt, Sonja I. | Bertazzi, Pier Alberto | Biritwum, Richard B. | Black, Amanda | Blot, William | Boeing, Heiner | Boffetta, Paolo | Bolton, Kelly | Boutron-Ruault, Marie-Christine | Bracci, Paige M. | Brennan, Paul | Brinton, Louise A. | Brotzman, Michelle | Bueno-de-Mesquita, H. Bas | Buring, Julie E. | Butler, Mary Ann | Cai, Qiuyin | Cancel-Tassin, Geraldine | Canzian, Federico | Cao, Guangwen | Caporaso, Neil E. | Carrato, Alfredo | Carreon, Tania | Carta, Angela | Chang, Gee-Chen | Chang, I-Shou | Chang-Claude, Jenny | Che, Xu | Chen, Chien-Jen | Chen, Chih-Yi | Chen, Chung-Hsing | Chen, Constance | Chen, Kuan-Yu | Chen, Yuh-Min | Chokkalingam, Anand P. | Chu, Lisa W. | Clavel-Chapelon, Francoise | Colditz, Graham A. | Colt, Joanne S. | Conti, David | Cook, Michael B. | Cortessis, Victoria K. | Crawford, E. David | Cussenot, Olivier | Davis, Faith G. | De Vivo, Immaculata | Deng, Xiang | Ding, Ti | Dinney, Colin P. | Di Stefano, Anna Luisa | Diver, W. Ryan | Duell, Eric J. | Elena, Joanne W. | Fan, Jin-Hu | Feigelson, Heather Spencer | Feychting, Maria | Figueroa, Jonine D. | Flanagan, Adrienne M. | Fraumeni, Joseph F. | Freedman, Neal D. | Fridley, Brooke L. | Fuchs, Charles S. | Gago-Dominguez, Manuela | Gallinger, Steven | Gao, Yu-Tang | Gapstur, Susan M. | Garcia-Closas, Montserrat | Garcia-Closas, Reina | Gastier-Foster, Julie M. | Gaziano, J. Michael | Gerhard, Daniela S. | Giffen, Carol A. | Giles, Graham G. | Gillanders, Elizabeth M. | Giovannucci, Edward L. | Goggins, Michael | Gokgoz, Nalan | Goldstein, Alisa M. | Gonzalez, Carlos | Gorlick, Richard | Greene, Mark H. | Gross, Myron | Grossman, H. Barton | Grubb, Robert | Gu, Jian | Guan, Peng | Haiman, Christopher A. | Hallmans, Goran | Hankinson, Susan E. | Harris, Curtis C. | Hartge, Patricia | Hattinger, Claudia | Hayes, Richard B. | He, Qincheng | Helman, Lee | Henderson, Brian E. | Henriksson, Roger | Hoffman-Bolton, Judith | Hohensee, Chancellor | Holly, Elizabeth A. | Hong, Yun-Chul | Hoover, Robert N. | Hosgood, H. Dean | Hsiao, Chin-Fu | Hsing, Ann W. | Hsiung, Chao Agnes | Hu, Nan | Hu, Wei | Hu, Zhibin | Huang, Ming-Shyan | Hunter, David J. | Inskip, Peter D. | Ito, Hidemi | Jacobs, Eric J. | Jacobs, Kevin B. | Jenab, Mazda | Ji, Bu-Tian | Johansen, Christoffer | Johansson, Mattias | Johnson, Alison | Kaaks, Rudolf | Kamat, Ashish M. | Kamineni, Aruna | Karagas, Margaret | Khanna, Chand | Khaw, Kay-Tee | Kim, Christopher | Kim, In-Sam | Kim, Jin Hee | Kim, Yeul Hong | Kim, Young-Chul | Kim, Young Tae | Kang, Chang Hyun | Jung, Yoo Jin | Kitahara, Cari M. | Klein, Alison P. | Klein, Robert | Kogevinas, Manolis | Koh, Woon-Puay | Kohno, Takashi | Kolonel, Laurence N. | Kooperberg, Charles | Kratz, Christian P. | Krogh, Vittorio | Kunitoh, Hideo | Kurtz, Robert C. | Kurucu, Nilgun | Lan, Qing | Lathrop, Mark | Lau, Ching C. | Lecanda, Fernando | Lee, Kyoung-Mu | Lee, Maxwell P. | Le Marchand, Loic | Lerner, Seth P. | Li, Donghui | Liao, Linda M. | Lim, Wei-Yen | Lin, Dongxin | Lin, Jie | Lindstrom, Sara | Linet, Martha S. | Lissowska, Jolanta | Liu, Jianjun | Ljungberg, Börje | Lloreta, Josep | Lu, Daru | Ma, Jing | Malats, Nuria | Mannisto, Satu | Marina, Neyssa | Mastrangelo, Giuseppe | Matsuo, Keitaro | McGlynn, Katherine A. | McKean-Cowdin, Roberta | McNeill, Lorna H. | McWilliams, Robert R. | Melin, Beatrice S. | Meltzer, Paul S. | Mensah, James E. | Miao, Xiaoping | Michaud, Dominique S. | Mondul, Alison M. | Moore, Lee E. | Muir, Kenneth | Niwa, Shelley | Olson, Sara H. | Orr, Nick | Panico, Salvatore | Park, Jae Yong | Patel, Alpa V. | Patino-Garcia, Ana | Pavanello, Sofia | Peeters, Petra H. M. | Peplonska, Beata | Peters, Ulrike | Petersen, Gloria M. | Picci, Piero | Pike, Malcolm C. | Porru, Stefano | Prescott, Jennifer | Pu, Xia | Purdue, Mark P. | Qiao, You-Lin | Rajaraman, Preetha | Riboli, Elio | Risch, Harvey A. | Rodabough, Rebecca J. | Rothman, Nathaniel | Ruder, Avima M. | Ryu, Jeong-Seon | Sanson, Marc | Schned, Alan | Schumacher, Fredrick R. | Schwartz, Ann G. | Schwartz, Kendra L. | Schwenn, Molly | Scotlandi, Katia | Seow, Adeline | Serra, Consol | Serra, Massimo | Sesso, Howard D. | Severi, Gianluca | Shen, Hongbing | Shen, Min | Shete, Sanjay | Shiraishi, Kouya | Shu, Xiao-Ou | Siddiq, Afshan | Sierrasesumaga, Luis | Sierri, Sabina | Loon Sihoe, Alan Dart | Silverman, Debra T. | Simon, Matthias | Southey, Melissa C. | Spector, Logan | Spitz, Margaret | Stampfer, Meir | Stattin, Par | Stern, Mariana C. | Stevens, Victoria L. | Stolzenberg-Solomon, Rachael Z. | Stram, Daniel O. | Strom, Sara S. | Su, Wu-Chou | Sund, Malin | Sung, Sook Whan | Swerdlow, Anthony | Tan, Wen | Tanaka, Hideo | Tang, Wei | Tang, Ze-Zhang | Tardon, Adonina | Tay, Evelyn | Taylor, Philip R. | Tettey, Yao | Thomas, David M. | Tirabosco, Roberto | Tjonneland, Anne | Tobias, Geoffrey S. | Toro, Jorge R. | Travis, Ruth C. | Trichopoulos, Dimitrios | Troisi, Rebecca | Truelove, Ann | Tsai, Ying-Huang | Tucker, Margaret A. | Tumino, Rosario | Van Den Berg, David | Van Den Eeden, Stephen K. | Vermeulen, Roel | Vineis, Paolo | Visvanathan, Kala | Vogel, Ulla | Wang, Chaoyu | Wang, Chengfeng | Wang, Junwen | Wang, Sophia S. | Weiderpass, Elisabete | Weinstein, Stephanie J. | Wentzensen, Nicolas | Wheeler, William | White, Emily | Wiencke, John K. | Wolk, Alicja | Wolpin, Brian M. | Wong, Maria Pik | Wrensch, Margaret | Wu, Chen | Wu, Tangchun | Wu, Xifeng | Wu, Yi-Long | Wunder, Jay S. | Xiang, Yong-Bing | Xu, Jun | Yang, Hannah P. | Yang, Pan-Chyr | Yatabe, Yasushi | Ye, Yuanqing | Yeboah, Edward D. | Yin, Zhihua | Ying, Chen | Yu, Chong-Jen | Yu, Kai | Yuan, Jian-Min | Zanetti, Krista A. | Zeleniuch-Jacquotte, Anne | Zheng, Wei | Zhou, Baosen | Mirabello, Lisa | Savage, Sharon A. | Kraft, Peter | Chanock, Stephen J. | Yeager, Meredith | Landi, Maria Terese | Shi, Jianxin | Chatterjee, Nilanjan | Amundadottir, Laufey T.
Human Molecular Genetics  2014;23(24):6616-6633.
Genome-wide association studies (GWAS) have mapped risk alleles for at least 10 distinct cancers to a small region of 63 000 bp on chromosome 5p15.33. This region harbors the TERT and CLPTM1L genes; the former encodes the catalytic subunit of telomerase reverse transcriptase and the latter may play a role in apoptosis. To investigate further the genetic architecture of common susceptibility alleles in this region, we conducted an agnostic subset-based meta-analysis (association analysis based on subsets) across six distinct cancers in 34 248 cases and 45 036 controls. Based on sequential conditional analysis, we identified as many as six independent risk loci marked by common single-nucleotide polymorphisms: five in the TERT gene (Region 1: rs7726159, P = 2.10 × 10−39; Region 3: rs2853677, P = 3.30 × 10−36 and PConditional = 2.36 × 10−8; Region 4: rs2736098, P = 3.87 × 10−12 and PConditional = 5.19 × 10−6, Region 5: rs13172201, P = 0.041 and PConditional = 2.04 × 10−6; and Region 6: rs10069690, P = 7.49 × 10−15 and PConditional = 5.35 × 10−7) and one in the neighboring CLPTM1L gene (Region 2: rs451360; P = 1.90 × 10−18 and PConditional = 7.06 × 10−16). Between three and five cancers mapped to each independent locus with both risk-enhancing and protective effects. Allele-specific effects on DNA methylation were seen for a subset of risk loci, indicating that methylation and subsequent effects on gene expression may contribute to the biology of risk variants on 5p15.33. Our results provide strong support for extensive pleiotropy across this region of 5p15.33, to an extent not previously observed in other cancer susceptibility loci.
doi:10.1093/hmg/ddu363
PMCID: PMC4240198  PMID: 25027329
13.  Oesophageal squamous cell carcinoma in high-risk Chinese populations: Possible role for vascular epithelial growth factor A 
Background
Mechanisms involved in wound healing play some role in carcinogenesis in multiple organs, likely by creating a chronic inflammatory milieu. This study sought to assess the role of genetic markers in selected inflammation-related genes involved in wound healing (interleukin (IL)-1a, IL-1b, IL-1 Receptor type I (IL-1Ra), IL-1 Receptor type II (IL-1Rb), tumour necrosis factor (TNF)-α, tumour necrosis factor receptor superfamily member (TNFRSF)1A, nuclear factor kappa beta (NF-kB)1, NF-kB2, inducible nitric oxide synthase (iNOS), cyclooxygenase (COX)-2, hypoxia induced factor (HIF)-1α, vascular endothelial growth factor (VEGF)A and P-53) in risk to oesophageal squamous cell carcinoma (OSCC).
Methods
We genotyped 125 tag single nucleotide polymorphism (SNP)s in 410 cases and 377 age and sex matched disease-free individuals from Nutritional Intervention Trial (NIT) cohort, and 546 cases and 556 controls individually matched for age, sex and neighbourhood from Shanxi case–control study, both conducted in high-risk areas of north-central China (1985–2007). Cox proportional-hazard models and conditional logistic regression models were used for SNPs analyses for NIT and Shanxi, respectively. Fisher's inverse test statistics were used to obtain gene-level significance.
Results
Multiple SNPs were significantly associated with OSCC in both studies, however, none retained their significance after a conservative Bonferroni adjustment. Empiric p-values for tag SNPs in VEGFA in NIT were highly concentrated in the lower tail of the distribution, suggesting this gene may be influencing risk. Permutation tests confirmed the significance of this pattern. At the gene level, VEGFA yielded an empiric significance (P = 0.027) in NIT. We also observed some evidence for interaction between environmental factors and some VEGFA tag SNPs.
Conclusion
Our finding adds further evidence for a potential role for markers in the VEGFA gene in the development and progression of early precancerous lesions of oesophagus.
doi:10.1016/j.ejca.2014.07.022
PMCID: PMC4363989  PMID: 25172294
Oesophageal squamous; cell carcinoma; Inflammation; Wound-healing; Genetic marker; Genetics; Inflammation-related events; Vascular endothelial growth factor A; VEGFA
14.  The Natural Progression of Parkinson's Disease in a Small Cohort with 15 Drug-naïve Patients 
Chinese Medical Journal  2015;128(13):1761-1764.
Background:
The studies of the natural progression of Parkinson's disease (PD) in Chinese populations have been lacking. To address this issue and obtain a preliminary data, we conducted a PD progression assessment in 15 adults with de novo PD from a nutritional intervention trial (NIT) cohort in Lin County China.
Methods:
Using the Copiah County screening questionnaire and United Kingdom Parkinson's Disease Society Brain Bank diagnostic criteria, we surveyed the available NIT cohort members in 2000 and diagnosed 86 patients as PD. In 2010, we resurveyed all PD patients and confirmed definite PD diagnosis in 15 cases with the rest of them being dead (54); having probable (10) PD or vascular Parkinsonism (3); refusing to participate (2); or being away (2). In both surveys, we used Hoehn and Yahr (HY) scale and assessed the disease progression. Unified Parkinson's Disease Rating Scale (UPDRS) was added to the second survey.
Results:
In 2010, the average disease duration for 15 definite PD patients was 13.6 ± 7.3 years. Over a 10-year time span, 9 out of 15 patients remained at the same HY stage while the remaining 6 progressed. Rigidity (47% vs. 100%; P = 0.002) and postural instability (7% vs. 47%; P = 0.005) worsened significantly. The mean UPDRS motor scores in 2010 were 39.4 ± 23.7.
Conclusions:
Overall worsening of motor function in PD seems to be the rule in this untreated cohort, and their rate of progression seemed to be slower than those reported in the western populations.
doi:10.4103/0366-6999.159350
PMCID: PMC4733712  PMID: 26112717
Drug-naïve; Epidemiology; Parkinson's Disease; Progression
15.  Association between upper digestive tract microbiota and cancer predisposing states in the esophagus and stomach 
Background
The human upper digestive tract microbial community (microbiota) is not well characterized and few studies have explored how it relates to human health. We examined the relationship between upper digestive tract microbiota and two cancer predisposing states, serum pepsinogen I/pepsinogen II ratio (PGI/II) (predictor of gastric cancer risk), and esophageal squamous dysplasia (ESD) (the precursor lesion of esophageal squamous cell carcinoma (ESCC)) in a cross-sectional design.
Methods
The Human Oral Microbe Identification Microarray was used to test for the presence of 272 bacterial species in 333 upper digestive tract samples from a Chinese cancer screening cohort. Serum PGI and PGII were determined by enzyme-linked immunosorbent assays. ESD was determined by chromoendoscopy with biopsy.
Results
Lower microbial richness (number of bacterial genera per sample) was significantly associated with lower PGI/II ratio (P=0.034) and the presence of ESD (P=0.018). We conducted principal component (PC) analysis on a β-diversity matrix (pairwise difference in microbiota), and observed significant correlations between PC1, PC3 and PGI/II (P=0.004, 0.009 respectively), and between PC1 and ESD (P=0.003).
Conclusions
lower microbial richness in upper digestive tract was independently associated with both cancer predisposing states in the esophagus and stomach (presence of ESD and lower PGI/II).
doi:10.1158/1055-9965.EPI-13-0855
PMCID: PMC4011942  PMID: 24700175
microbiota; gastric cancer; esophageal squamous cell carcinoma; esophageal squamous dysplasia; serum pepsinogen I/pepsinogen II ratio
16.  Joint analysis of three genome-wide association studies of esophageal squamous cell carcinoma in Chinese populations 
Wu, Chen | Wang, Zhaoming | Song, Xin | Feng, Xiao-Shan | Abnet, Christian C. | He, Jie | Hu, Nan | Zuo, Xian-Bo | Tan, Wen | Zhan, Qimin | Hu, Zhibin | He, Zhonghu | Jia, Weihua | Zhou, Yifeng | Yu, Kai | Shu, Xiao-Ou | Yuan, Jian-Min | Zheng, Wei | Zhao, Xue-Ke | Gao, She-Gan | Yuan, Zhi-Qing | Zhou, Fu-You | Fan, Zong-Min | Cui, Ji-Li | Lin, Hong-Li | Han, Xue-Na | Li, Bei | Chen, Xi | Dawsey, Sanford M. | Liao, Linda | Lee, Maxwell P. | Ding, Ti | Qiao, You-Lin | Liu, Zhihua | Liu, Yu | Yu, Dianke | Chang, Jiang | Wei, Lixuan | Gao, Yu-Tang | Koh, Woon-Puay | Xiang, Yong-Bing | Tang, Ze-Zhong | Fan, Jin-Hu | Han, Jing-Jing | Zhou, Sheng-Li | Zhang, Peng | Zhang, Dong-Yun | Yuan, Yuan | Huang, Ying | Liu, Chunling | Zhai, Kan | Qiao, Yan | Jin, Guangfu | Guo, Chuanhai | Fu, Jianhua | Miao, Xiaoping | Lu, Changdong | Yang, Haijun | Wang, Chaoyu | Wheeler, William A. | Gail, Mitchell | Yeager, Meredith | Yuenger, Jeff | Guo, Er-Tao | Li, Ai-Li | Zhang, Wei | Li, Xue-Min | Sun, Liang-Dan | Ma, Bao-Gen | Li, Yan | Tang, Sa | Peng, Xiu-Qing | Liu, Jing | Hutchinson, Amy | Jacobs, Kevin | Giffen, Carol | Burdette, Laurie | Fraumeni, Joseph F. | Shen, Hongbing | Ke, Yang | Zeng, Yixin | Wu, Tangchun | Kraft, Peter | Chung, Charles C. | Tucker, Margaret A. | Hou, Zhi-Chao | Liu, Ya-Li | Hu, Yan-Long | Liu, Yu | Wang, Li | Yuan, Guo | Chen, Li-Sha | Liu, Xiao | Ma, Teng | Meng, Hui | Sun, Li | Li, Xin-Min | Li, Xiu-Min | Ku, Jian-Wei | Zhou, Ying-Fa | Yang, Liu-Qin | Wang, Zhou | Li, Yin | Qige, Qirenwang | Yang, Wen-Jun | Lei, Guang-Yan | Chen, Long-Qi | Li, En-Min | Yuan, Ling | Yue, Wen-Bin | Wang, Ran | Wang, Lu-Wen | Fan, Xue-Ping | Zhu, Fang-Heng | Zhao, Wei-Xing | Mao, Yi-Min | Zhang, Mei | Xing, Guo-Lan | Li, Ji-Lin | Han, Min | Ren, Jing-Li | Liu, Bin | Ren, Shu-Wei | Kong, Qing-Peng | Li, Feng | Sheyhidin, Ilyar | Wei, Wu | Zhang, Yan-Rui | Feng, Chang-Wei | Wang, Jin | Yang, Yu-Hua | Hao, Hong-Zhang | Bao, Qi-De | Liu, Bao-Chi | Wu, Ai-Qun | Xie, Dong | Yang, Wan-Cai | Wang, Liang | Zhao, Xiao-Hang | Chen, Shu-Qing | Hong, Jun-Yan | Zhang, Xue-Jun | Freedman, Neal D | Goldstein, Alisa M. | Lin, Dongxin | Taylor, Philip R. | Wang, Li-Dong | Chanock, Stephen J.
Nature genetics  2014;46(9):1001-1006.
We conducted a joint (pooled) analysis of three genome-wide association studies (GWAS) 1-3 of esophageal squamous cell carcinoma (ESCC) in ethnic Chinese (5,337 ESCC cases and 5,787 controls) with 9,654 ESCC cases and 10,058 controls for follow-up. In a logistic regression model adjusted for age, sex, study, and two eigenvectors, two new loci achieved genome-wide significance, marked by rs7447927 at 5q31.2 (per-allele odds ratio (OR) = 0.85, 95% CI 0.82-0.88; P=7.72x10−20) and rs1642764 at 17p13.1 (per-allele OR= 0.88, 95% CI 0.85-0.91; P=3.10x10−13). rs7447927 is a synonymous single nucleotide polymorphism (SNP) in TMEM173 and rs1642764 is an intronic SNP in ATP1B2, near TP53. Furthermore, a locus in the HLA class II region at 6p21.32 (rs35597309) achieved genome-wide significance in the two populations at highest risk for ESSC (OR=1.33, 95% CI 1.22-1.46; P=1.99x10−10). Our joint analysis identified new ESCC susceptibility loci overall as well as a new locus unique to the ESCC high risk Taihang Mountain region.
doi:10.1038/ng.3064
PMCID: PMC4212832  PMID: 25129146
17.  Genetic variants in Fas signaling pathway genes and risk of gastric cancer 
Populations in north central China are at high risk for gastric cancers (GC), and altered FAS-mediated cell signaling and/or apoptosis may contribute to this risk. We examined the association of 554 single nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs) in 53 Fas signaling-related genes using a pathway-based approach in 1758 GC cases (1126 gastric cardia adenocarcinomas (GCA) and 632 gastric noncardia adenocarcinomas (GNCA)), and 2111 controls from a genome-wide association study (GWAS) of GC in ethnic Chinese. SNP associations with risk of overall GC, GCA and GNCA were evaluated using unconditional logistic regressions controlling for age, sex and study. Gene- and pathway-based associations were tested using the adaptive rank-truncated product (ARTP) method. Statistical significance was evaluated empirically by permutation. Significant pathway-based associations were observed for Fas signaling with risk of overall GC (P = 5.5E-04) and GCA (P = 6.3E-03), but not GNCA (P = 8.1E-02). Among examined genes in the Fas signaling pathway, MAP2K4, FAF1, MAPK8, CASP10, CASP8, CFLAR, MAP2K1, CAP8AP2, PAK2 and IKBKB were associated with risk of GC (nominal P < 0.05), and FAF1 and MAPK8 were significantly associated with risk of both GCA and GNCA (nominal P < 0.05). Our examination of genetic variation in the Fas signaling pathway is consistent with an association of altered Fas signaling and/or apoptosis with risk of GC. As one of the first attempts to investigate a pathway-level association, our results suggest that these genes and the Fas signaling pathway warrant further evaluation in relation to GC risk in other populations.
doi:10.1002/ijc.28415
PMCID: PMC3858487  PMID: 23921907
Gastric cancer; gastric cardia; gastric noncardia; Fas signaling; genetic variants; GWAS; single nucleotide polymorphisms; pathway genes
18.  The association between the upper digestive tract microbiota by HOMIM and oral health in a population-based study in Linxian, China 
BMC Public Health  2014;14:1110.
Background
Bacteria affect oral health, but few studies have systematically examined the role of bacterial communities in oral diseases. We examined this relationship in a large population-based Chinese cancer screening cohort.
Methods
Human Oral Microbe Identification Microarrays were used to test for the presence of 272 human oral bacterial species (97 genera) in upper digestive tract (UDT) samples collected from 659 participants. Oral health was assessed using US NHANES (National Health and Nutrition Examination Survey) protocols. We assessed both dental health (total teeth missing; tooth decay; and the decayed, missing, and filled teeth (DMFT) score) and periodontal health (bleeding on probing (BoP) extent score, loss of attachment extent score, and a periodontitis summary estimate).
Results
Microbial richness, estimated by number of genera per sample, was positively correlated with BoP score (P = 0.015), but negatively correlated with tooth decay and DMFT score (P = 0.008 and 0.022 respectively). Regarding β-diversity, as estimated by the UniFrac distance matrix for pairwise differences among samples, at least one of the first three principal components of the UniFrac distance matrix was correlated with the number of missing teeth, tooth decay, DMFT, BoP, or periodontitis. Of the examined genera, Parvimonas was positively associated with BoP and periodontitis. Veillonellacease [G-1] was associated with a high DMFT score, and Filifactor and Peptostreptococcus were associated with a low DMFT score.
Conclusions
Our results suggest distinct relationships between UDT microbiota and dental and periodontal health. Poor dental health was associated with a less microbial diversity, whereas poor periodontal health was associated with more diversity and the presence of potentially pathogenic species.
Electronic supplementary material
The online version of this article (doi:10.1186/1471-2458-14-1110) contains supplementary material, which is available to authorized users.
doi:10.1186/1471-2458-14-1110
PMCID: PMC4223728  PMID: 25348940
Microbiota; Oral health; Dental caries; Periodontitis; Bleeding on probe; Attachment loss
19.  A Nation-Wide Multicenter 10-Year (1999-2008) Retrospective Clinical Study of Endocrine Therapy for Chinese Females with Breast Cancer 
PLoS ONE  2014;9(7):e100159.
Endocrine therapy (ET) is one of the main systemic treatments for patients with breast cancer. To our knowledge, few studies have addressed the performance of ET or relevant influencing factors in cancer treatment in China. By retrospectively analyzing the clinicopathological data on breast cancer collected from representative hospitals of 7 traditional areas in China in one random month from each year between year 1999 and 2008, we found that: 1) The rate of the use of hormone receptor (HR) testing was 83.8% (3529/4211), with the estrogen receptor-positive (ER+) rate and/or the progesterone receptor-positive (PR+) rate being 67.9% (2395/3529), and the ER-PR rate being 32.1% (1134/3529). 2) Of the 1599 patients who had received ET, 999 patients (58.3%) were premenopausal while 600 (41.7%) were postmenopausal; 1598 patients received adjuvant hormonal therapy (AHT), whereas only 1 patient received palliative therapy. The medications mainly administered to patients were anti-estrogen agents (80.3% [1283/1598]), followed by AIs (15.5% [248/1598]). Of the 1598 patients receiving AHT, 1416 patients (88.6%) were positive for ER and/or PR, while 75 (4.7%) were negative for both and 108 patients (6.7%) had unknown HR status. The ratio of the use of endocrine therapy for breast cancer patients with ER+ and/or PR+ status was 60.0% (1416/2395). 3) Results from the logistic regression analysis revealed that geography, occupations, and history of chemotherapy and surgery were dependent factors affecting the application of ET in breast cancer treatment in China (P<0.001). In conclusion, the use of ET on Chinese women with breast cancer is increasingly and gradually accounted into the standardized process. Economic status, occupations, and history of chemotherapy and surgery were key factors affecting the application of ET. People residing in developed areas, engaging in mental labour, having history of chemotherapy and surgery are susceptible to accept ET.
doi:10.1371/journal.pone.0100159
PMCID: PMC4103779  PMID: 25036532
20.  Application of intraoperative frozen section examination in the management of female breast cancer in China: a nationwide, multicenter 10-year epidemiological study 
Background
Intraoperative frozen section examination (IFSE) during breast cancer surgery can partly reflect the status of surgical treatment since the surgical method used directly determines the purpose of IFSE use in disease management. This study aims to investigate the application of, changing trends in, and factors influencing IFSE in the management of female breast cancer in China.
Methods
We collected the sociodemographic and clinical data of 4,211 breast cancer patients between 1999 and 2008 and statistically analyzed these data using χ2 or Fisher’s exact tests.
Results
A total of 2,283 (54.22%) patients with breast cancer underwent IFSE. During the 10-year study period, IFSE use was associated with an increase in the number of sentinel lymph node biopsies (SLNB) and breast-conserving surgeries (BS) performed, with significant regional differences noted in this trend (P <0.05). Patients’ education, occupation, age, tumor size estimated by preoperative palpation, and the use of imaging examinations affected the purpose of IFSE use (P <0.05).
Conclusions
Our results show that the purpose of IFSE in the surgical treatment of breast cancer in China is gradually approaching that in developed countries. We believe that policymakers must address the differences in breast cancer treatment based on the socioeconomic status of patients. Lastly, the use of IFSE for determining tumor characteristics should be avoided as far as possible, and patient education and breast cancer screening programs tailored to the Chinese population should be established. Our findings may guide the formulation of breast cancer control strategies in China and other low-income countries.
doi:10.1186/1477-7819-12-225
PMCID: PMC4105393  PMID: 25034137
Application mode; Female breast cancer; Intraoperative frozen section examination; Sociodemographic factor
22.  Genetic variants in DNA repair pathway genes and risk of esophageal squamous cell carcinoma and gastric adenocarcinoma in a Chinese population 
Carcinogenesis  2013;34(7):1536-1542.
The DNA repair pathways help to maintain genomic integrity and therefore genetic variation in the pathways could affect the propensity to develop cancer. Selected germline single nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs) in the pathways have been associated with esophageal cancer and gastric cancer (GC) but few studies have comprehensively examined the pathway genes. We aimed to investigate associations between DNA repair pathway genes and risk of esophageal squamous cell carcinoma (ESCC) and GC, using data from a genome-wide association study in a Han Chinese population where ESCC and GC are the predominant cancers. In sum, 1942 ESCC cases, 1758 GC cases and 2111 controls from the Shanxi Upper Gastrointestinal Cancer Genetics Project (discovery set) and the Linxian Nutrition Intervention Trials (replication set) were genotyped for 1675 SNPs in 170 DNA repair-related genes. Logistic regression models were applied to evaluate SNP-level associations. Gene- and pathway-level associations were determined using the resampling-based adaptive rank-truncated product approach. The DNA repair pathways overall were significantly associated with risk of ESCC (P = 6.37 × 10− 4), but not with GC (P = 0.20). The most significant gene in ESCC was CHEK2 (P = 2.00 × 10− 6) and in GC was CLK2 (P = 3.02 × 10− 4). We observed several other genes significantly associated with either ESCC (SMUG1, TDG, TP53, GTF2H3, FEN1, POLQ, HEL308, RAD54B, MPG, FANCE and BRCA1) or GC risk (MRE11A, RAD54L and POLE) (P < 0.05). We provide evidence for an association between specific genes in the DNA repair pathways and the risk of ESCC and GC. Further studies are warranted to validate these associations and to investigate underlying mechanisms.
doi:10.1093/carcin/bgt094
PMCID: PMC3697889  PMID: 23504502
23.  Genetic variants in sex hormone metabolic pathway genes and risk of esophageal squamous cell carcinoma 
Carcinogenesis  2013;34(5):1062-1068.
In China, esophageal cancer is the fourth leading cause of cancer death where essentially all cases are histologically esophageal squamous cell carcinoma (ESCC), in contrast to esophageal adenocarcinoma in the West. Globally, ESCC is 2.4 times more common among men than women and recently it has been suggested that sex hormones may be associated with the risk of ESCC. We examined the association between genetic variants in sex hormone metabolic genes and ESCC risk in a population from north central China with high-incidence rates. A total of 1026 ESCC cases and 1452 controls were genotyped for 797 unique tag single-nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs) in 51 sex hormone metabolic genes. SNP-, gene- and pathway-based associations with ESCC risk were evaluated using unconditional logistic regression adjusted for age, sex and geographical location and the adaptive rank truncated product (ARTP) method. Statistical significance was determined through use of permutation for pathway- and gene-based associations. No associations were observed for the overall sex hormone metabolic pathway (P = 0.14) or subpathways (androgen synthesis: P = 0.30, estrogen synthesis: P = 0.15 and estrogen removal: P = 0.19) with risk of ESCC. However, six individual genes (including SULT2B1, CYP1B1, CYP3A7, CYP3A5, SHBG and CYP11A1) were significantly associated with ESCC risk (P < 0.05). Our examination of genetic variation in the sex hormone metabolic pathway is consistent with a potential association with risk of ESCC. These positive findings warrant further evaluation in relation to ESCC risk and replication in other populations.
doi:10.1093/carcin/bgt030
PMCID: PMC3643422  PMID: 23358850
24.  Burden of Total and Cause-Specific Mortality Related to Tobacco Smoking among Adults Aged ≥45 Years in Asia: A Pooled Analysis of 21 Cohorts 
PLoS Medicine  2014;11(4):e1001631.
Wei Zheng and colleagues quantify the burden of tobacco-smoking-related deaths for adults in Asia.
Please see later in the article for the Editors' Summary
Background
Tobacco smoking is a major risk factor for many diseases. We sought to quantify the burden of tobacco-smoking-related deaths in Asia, in parts of which men's smoking prevalence is among the world's highest.
Methods and Findings
We performed pooled analyses of data from 1,049,929 participants in 21 cohorts in Asia to quantify the risks of total and cause-specific mortality associated with tobacco smoking using adjusted hazard ratios and their 95% confidence intervals. We then estimated smoking-related deaths among adults aged ≥45 y in 2004 in Bangladesh, India, mainland China, Japan, Republic of Korea, Singapore, and Taiwan—accounting for ∼71% of Asia's total population. An approximately 1.44-fold (95% CI = 1.37–1.51) and 1.48-fold (1.38–1.58) elevated risk of death from any cause was found in male and female ever-smokers, respectively. In 2004, active tobacco smoking accounted for approximately 15.8% (95% CI = 14.3%–17.2%) and 3.3% (2.6%–4.0%) of deaths, respectively, in men and women aged ≥45 y in the seven countries/regions combined, with a total number of estimated deaths of ∼1,575,500 (95% CI = 1,398,000–1,744,700). Among men, approximately 11.4%, 30.5%, and 19.8% of deaths due to cardiovascular diseases, cancer, and respiratory diseases, respectively, were attributable to tobacco smoking. Corresponding proportions for East Asian women were 3.7%, 4.6%, and 1.7%, respectively. The strongest association with tobacco smoking was found for lung cancer: a 3- to 4-fold elevated risk, accounting for 60.5% and 16.7% of lung cancer deaths, respectively, in Asian men and East Asian women aged ≥45 y.
Conclusions
Tobacco smoking is associated with a substantially elevated risk of mortality, accounting for approximately 2 million deaths in adults aged ≥45 y throughout Asia in 2004. It is likely that smoking-related deaths in Asia will continue to rise over the next few decades if no effective smoking control programs are implemented.
Please see later in the article for the Editors' Summary
Editors' Summary
Background
Every year, more than 5 million smokers die from tobacco-related diseases. Tobacco smoking is a major risk factor for cardiovascular disease (conditions that affect the heart and the circulation), respiratory disease (conditions that affect breathing), lung cancer, and several other types of cancer. All told, tobacco smoking kills up to half its users. The ongoing global “epidemic” of tobacco smoking and tobacco-related diseases initially affected people living in the US and other Western countries, where the prevalence of smoking (the proportion of the population that smokes) in men began to rise in the early 1900s, peaking in the 1960s. A similar epidemic occurred in women about 40 years later. Smoking-related deaths began to increase in the second half of the 20th century, and by the 1990s, tobacco smoking accounted for a third of all deaths and about half of cancer deaths among men in the US and other Western countries. More recently, increased awareness of the risks of smoking and the introduction of various tobacco control measures has led to a steady decline in tobacco use and in smoking-related diseases in many developed countries.
Why Was This Study Done?
Unfortunately, less well-developed tobacco control programs, inadequate public awareness of smoking risks, and tobacco company marketing have recently led to sharp increases in the prevalence of smoking in many low- and middle-income countries, particularly in Asia. More than 50% of men in many Asian countries are now smokers, about twice the prevalence in many Western countries, and more women in some Asian countries are smoking than previously. More than half of the world's billion smokers now live in Asia. However, little is known about the burden of tobacco-related mortality (deaths) in this region. In this study, the researchers quantify the risk of total and cause-specific mortality associated with tobacco use among adults aged 45 years or older by undertaking a pooled statistical analysis of data collected from 21 Asian cohorts (groups) about their smoking history and health.
What Did the Researchers Do and Find?
For their study, the researchers used data from more than 1 million participants enrolled in studies undertaken in Bangladesh, India, mainland China, Japan, the Republic of Korea, Singapore, and Taiwan (which together account for 71% of Asia's total population). Smoking prevalences among male and female participants were 65.1% and 7.1%, respectively. Compared with never-smokers, ever-smokers had a higher risk of death from any cause in pooled analyses of all the cohorts (adjusted hazard ratios [HRs] of 1.44 and 1.48 for men and women, respectively; an adjusted HR indicates how often an event occurs in one group compared to another group after adjustment for other characteristics that affect an individual's risk of the event). Compared with never smoking, ever smoking was associated with a higher risk of death due to cardiovascular disease, cancer (particularly lung cancer), and respiratory disease among Asian men and among East Asian women. Moreover, the researchers estimate that, in the countries included in this study, tobacco smoking accounted for 15.8% of all deaths among men and 3.3% of deaths among women in 2004—a total of about 1.5 million deaths, which scales up to 2 million deaths for the population of the whole of Asia. Notably, in 2004, tobacco smoking accounted for 60.5% of lung-cancer deaths among Asian men and 16.7% of lung-cancer deaths among East Asian women.
What Do These Findings Mean?
These findings provide strong evidence that tobacco smoking is associated with a substantially raised risk of death among adults aged 45 years or older throughout Asia. The association between smoking and mortality risk in Asia reported here is weaker than that previously reported for Western countries, possibly because widespread tobacco smoking started several decades later in most Asian countries than in Europe and North America and the deleterious effects of smoking take some years to become evident. The researchers note that certain limitations of their analysis are likely to affect the accuracy of its findings. For example, because no data were available to estimate the impact of secondhand smoke, the estimate of deaths attributable to smoking is likely to be an underestimate. However, the finding that nearly 45% of the global deaths from active tobacco smoking occur in Asia highlights the urgent need to implement comprehensive tobacco control programs in Asia to reduce the burden of tobacco-related disease.
Additional Information
Please access these websites via the online version of this summary at http://dx.doi.org/10.1371/journal.pmed.1001631.
The World Health Organization provides information about the dangers of tobacco (in several languages) and about the WHO Framework Convention on Tobacco Control, an international instrument for tobacco control that came into force in February 2005 and requires parties to implement a set of core tobacco control provisions including legislation to ban tobacco advertising and to increase tobacco taxes; its 2013 report on the global tobacco epidemic is available
The US Centers for Disease Control and Prevention provides detailed information about all aspects of smoking and tobacco use
The UK National Health Services Choices website provides information about the health risks associated with smoking
MedlinePlus has links to further information about the dangers of smoking (in English and Spanish)
SmokeFree, a website provided by the UK National Health Service, offers advice on quitting smoking and includes personal stories from people who have stopped smoking
Smokefree.gov, from the US National Cancer Institute, offers online tools and resources to help people quit smoking
doi:10.1371/journal.pmed.1001631
PMCID: PMC3995657  PMID: 24756146
25.  Body Mass Index and Breast Cancer Defined by Biological Receptor Status in Pre-Menopausal and Post-Menopausal Women: A Multicenter Study in China 
PLoS ONE  2014;9(1):e87224.
Background
Few studies have investigated the association between body mass index (BMI) and breast cancer with consideration to estrogen/progesterone/human epidermal growth factor type 2 receptor status (ER/PR/HER2) in the breast tissue among Chinese pre- and post-menopausal women.
Methods
Four thousand two hundred and eleven breast cancer patients were selected randomly from seven geographic regions of China from 1999 to 2008. Demographic data, risk factors, pathologic features, and biological receptor status of cases were collected from the medical charts. Chi-square test, fisher exact test, rank-correlation analysis, and multivariate logistic regression model were adopted to explore whether BMI differed according to biological receptor status in pre- and post-menopausal women.
Results
Three thousand two hundred and eighty one eligible cases with BMI data were included. No statistically significant differences in demographic characteristics were found between the cases with BMI data and those without. In the rank-correlation analysis, the rates of PR+ and HER2+ were positively correlated with increasing BMI among post-menopausal women (rs BMI, PR+ = 0.867, P = 0.001; rs BMI, HER2+ = 0.636, P = 0.048), but the ER+ rates did not vary by increasing BMI. Controlling for confounding factors, multivariate logistic regression models with BMI<24 kg/m2 as the reference group were performed and found that BMI≥24 kg/m2 was only positively correlated with PR+ status among post-menopausal breast cancer cases (adjusted OR = 1.420, 95% CI: 1.116–1.808, Wald = 8.116, P = 0.004).
Conclusions
Post-menopausal women with high BMI (≥24 kg/m2) have a higher proportion of PR+ breast cancer. In addition to effects mediated via the estrogen metabolism pathway, high BMI might increase the risk of breast cancer by other routes, which should be examined further in future etiological mechanism studies.
doi:10.1371/journal.pone.0087224
PMCID: PMC3906138  PMID: 24489874

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