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1.  Are accurate computations of the 13C′ shielding feasible at the DFT level of theory? 
The goal of this study is twofold. First, to investigate the relative influence of the main structural factors affecting the computation of the 13C′ shielding, namely, the conformation of the residue itself and the next nearest-neighbor effects. Second, to determine whether calculation of the 13C′ shielding at the DFT level of theory, with an accuracy similar to that of the 13Cα shielding, is feasible with the existing computational resources. The DFT calculations, carried out for a large number of possible conformations of the tripeptide Ac-GXY-NMe, with different combinations of X and Y residues, enable us to conclude that the accurate computation of the 13C′ shielding for a given residue X depends on the: (i) (φ,ψ) backbone torsional angles of X; (ii) side-chain conformation of X; (iii) (φ,ψ) torsional angles of Y; and (iv) identity of residue Y. Consequently, DFT-based quantum mechanical calculations of the 13C′ shielding, with all these factors taken into account, are two orders of magnitude more CPU demanding than the computation, with similar accuracy, of the 13Cα shielding. Despite not considering the effect of the possible hydrogen bond interaction of the carbonyl oxygen, this work contributes to our general understanding of the main structural factors affecting the accurate computation of the 13C′ shielding in proteins and may spur significant progress in effort to develop new validation methods for protein structures.
doi:10.1002/jcc.23499
PMCID: PMC3902030  PMID: 24403017
2.  Development of a new physics-based internal coordinate mechanics force field (ICMFF) and its application to protein loop modeling 
Proteins  2011;79(2):477-498.
We report the development of ICMFF, new force field parameterized using a combination of experimental data for crystals of small molecules and quantum mechanics calculations. The main features of ICMFF include: (a) parameterization for the dielectric constant relevant to the condensed state (ε=2) instead of vacuum; (b) an improved description of hydrogen-bond interactions using duplicate sets of van der Waals parameters for heavy atom-hydrogen interactions; and (c) improved backbone covalent geometry and energetics achieved using novel backbone torsional potentials and inclusion of the bond angles at the Cα atoms into the internal variable set. The performance of ICMFF was evaluated through loop modeling simulations for 4-13 residue loops. ICMFF was combined with a solvent-accessible surface area solvation model optimized using a large set of loop decoys. Conformational sampling was carried out using the Biased Probability Monte Carlo method. Average/median backbone root-mean-square deviations of the lowest energy conformations from the native structures were 0.25/0.21 Å for 4 residues loops, 0.84/0.46 Å for 8 residue loops, and 1.16/0.73 Å for 12 residue loops. To our knowledge, these results are significantly better than or comparable to those reported to date for any loop modeling method that does not take crystal packing into account. Moreover, the accuracy of our method is on par with the best previously reported results obtained considering the crystal environment. We attribute this success to the high accuracy of the new ICM force field achieved by meticulous parameterization, to the optimized solvent model, and the efficiency of the search method.
doi:10.1002/prot.22896
PMCID: PMC3057902  PMID: 21069716
loop modeling; conformational search; all-atom force field; implicit solvent; molecular mechanics; ICM
3.  Towards crystal structure prediction of complex organic compounds – a report on the fifth blind test 
Following on from the success of the previous crystal structure prediction blind tests (CSP1999, CSP2001, CSP2004 and CSP2007), a fifth such collaborative project (CSP2010) was organized at the Cambridge Crystallographic Data Centre. A range of methodologies was used by the participating groups in order to evaluate the ability of the current computational methods to predict the crystal structures of the six organic molecules chosen as targets for this blind test. The first four targets, two rigid molecules, one semi-flexible molecule and a 1:1 salt, matched the criteria for the targets from CSP2007, while the last two targets belonged to two new challenging categories – a larger, much more flexible molecule and a hydrate with more than one polymorph. Each group submitted three predictions for each target it attempted. There was at least one successful prediction for each target, and two groups were able to successfully predict the structure of the large flexible molecule as their first place submission. The results show that while not as many groups successfully predicted the structures of the three smallest molecules as in CSP2007, there is now evidence that methodologies such as dispersion-corrected density functional theory (DFT-D) are able to reliably do so. The results also highlight the many challenges posed by more complex systems and show that there are still issues to be overcome.
doi:10.1107/S0108768111042868
PMCID: PMC3222142  PMID: 22101543
4.  Towards crystal structure prediction of complex organic compounds – a report on the fifth blind test 
The results of the fifth blind test of crystal structure prediction, which show important success with more challenging large and flexible molecules, are presented and discussed.
Following on from the success of the previous crystal structure prediction blind tests (CSP1999, CSP2001, CSP2004 and CSP2007), a fifth such collaborative project (CSP2010) was organized at the Cambridge Crystallographic Data Centre. A range of methodologies was used by the participating groups in order to evaluate the ability of the current computational methods to predict the crystal structures of the six organic molecules chosen as targets for this blind test. The first four targets, two rigid molecules, one semi-flexible molecule and a 1:1 salt, matched the criteria for the targets from CSP2007, while the last two targets belonged to two new challenging categories – a larger, much more flexible molecule and a hydrate with more than one polymorph. Each group submitted three predictions for each target it attempted. There was at least one successful prediction for each target, and two groups were able to successfully predict the structure of the large flexible molecule as their first place submission. The results show that while not as many groups successfully predicted the structures of the three smallest molecules as in CSP2007, there is now evidence that methodologies such as dispersion-corrected density functional theory (DFT-D) are able to reliably do so. The results also highlight the many challenges posed by more complex systems and show that there are still issues to be overcome.
doi:10.1107/S0108768111042868
PMCID: PMC3222142  PMID: 22101543
prediction; blind test; polymorph; crystal structure prediction
5.  What can we learn by computing 13Cα chemical shifts for X-ray protein models? 
The room-temperature X-ray structures of two proteins, solved at 1.8 and 1.9 Å resolution, are used to investigate whether a set of conformations, rather than a single X-ray structure, provides better agreement with both the X-ray data and the observed 13Cα chemical shifts in solution.
The room-temperature X-ray structures of ubiquitin (PDB code 1ubq) and of the RNA-binding domain of nonstructural protein 1 of influenza A virus (PDB code 1ail) solved at 1.8 and 1.9 Å resolution, respectively, were used to investigate whether a set of conformations rather than a single X-ray structure provides better agreement with both the X-ray data and the observed 13Cα chemical shifts in solution. For this purpose, a set of new conformations for each of these proteins was generated by fitting them to the experimental X-ray data deposited in the PDB. For each of the generated structures, which show R and R free factors similar to those of the deposited X-ray structure, the 13Cα chemical shifts of all residues in the sequence were computed at the DFT level of theory. The sets of conformations were then evaluated by their ability to reproduce the observed 13Cα chemical shifts by using the conformational average root-mean-square-deviation (ca-r.m.s.d.). For ubiquitin, the computed set of conformations is a better representation of the observed 13Cα chemical shifts in terms of the ca-r.m.s.d. than a single X-ray-derived structure. However, for the RNA-binding domain of nonstructural protein 1 of influenza A virus, consideration of an ensemble of conformations does not improve the agreement with the observed 13Cα chemical shifts. Whether an ensemble of conformations rather than any single structure is a more accurate representation of a protein structure in the crystal as well as of the observed 13Cα chemical shifts is determined by the dispersion of coordinates, in terms of the all-atom r.m.s.d. among the generated models; these generated models satisfy the experimental X-ray data with accuracy as good as the PDB structure. Therefore, generation of an ensemble is a necessary step to determine whether or not a single structure is sufficient for an accurate representation of both experimental X-ray data and observed 13Cα chemical shifts in solution.
doi:10.1107/S0907444909012086
PMCID: PMC2703576  PMID: 19564690
13C chemical shifts

Results 1-5 (5)