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1.  ACTN3 genotype, athletic status and lifecourse physical capability: meta-analysis of the published literature and findings from nine studies 
Human mutation  2011;32(9):1008-1018.
The ACTN3 R577X (rs1815739) genotype has been associated with athletic status and muscle phenotypes, though not consistently. Our objective was to conduct a meta-analysis of the published literature on athletic status and investigate its associations with physical capability in several new population-based studies. Relevant data were extracted from studies in the literature, comparing genotype frequencies between controls and sprint/power and endurance athletes. For lifecourse physical capability, data were used from two studies of adolescents and seven studies in the Healthy Ageing across the Life Course (HALCyon) collaborative research programme, involving individuals aged between 53 and 90+ years. We found evidence from the published literature to support the hypothesis that in Europeans the RR genotype is more common among sprint/power athletes compared with their controls. There is currently no evidence that the X allele is advantageous to endurance athleticism. We found no association between R577X and grip strength (p-value=0.09, n=7672 in males; p-value=0.90, n=7839 in females), standing balance, timed get up and go or chair rises in our studies of physical capability. The ACTN3 R577X genotype is associated with sprint/power athletic status in Europeans, but does not appear to be associated with objective measures of physical capability in the general population.
doi:10.1002/humu.21526
PMCID: PMC3174315  PMID: 21542061
ACTN3; Actinin-3; athlete; aging; SNP; grip strength
2.  ACTN3 Genotype, Athletic Status, and Life Course Physical Capability: Meta-Analysis of the Published Literature and Findings from Nine Studies 
Human Mutation  2011;32(9):1008-1018.
The ACTN3 R577X (rs1815739) genotype has been associated with athletic status and muscle phenotypes, although not consistently. Our objective was to conduct a meta-analysis of the published literature on athletic status and investigate its associations with physical capability in several new population-based studies. Relevant data were extracted from studies in the literature, comparing genotype frequencies between controls and sprint/power and endurance athletes. For life course physical capability, data were used from two studies of adolescents and seven studies in the Healthy Ageing across the Life Course (HALCyon) collaborative research program, involving individuals aged between 53 and 90+ years. We found evidence from the published literature to support the hypothesis that in Europeans the RR genotype is more common among sprint/power athletes compared with their controls. There is currently no evidence that the X allele is advantageous to endurance athleticism. We found no association between R577X and grip strength (P = 0.09, n = 7,672 in males; P = 0.90, n = 7,839 in females), standing balance, timed get up and go, or chair rises in our studies of physical capability. The ACTN3 R577X genotype is associated with sprint/power athletic status in Europeans, but does not appear to be associated with objective measures of physical capability in the general population. Hum Mutat 32:1–11, 2011. © 2011 Wiley-Liss, Inc.
doi:10.1002/humu.21526
PMCID: PMC3174315  PMID: 21542061
ACTN3; Actinin-3; athlete; aging; SNP; grip strength
3.  FTO genotype and adiposity in children: physical activity levels influence the effect of the risk genotype in adolescent males 
European Journal of Human Genetics  2010;18(12):1339-1343.
Studies of the fat mass and obesity-associated (FTO) gene provide compelling evidence of genetic variation in the general population that influences fat levels and obesity risk. Studies of the interaction between genetic and environmental factors such as physical activity (PA) will promote the understanding of how lifestyle can modulate genetic contributions to obesity. In this study, we investigated the effect of FTO genotype, and interactions with PA or energy intake, in young children and adolescents. In all, 1–5-year-old children from the Growth, Exercise and Nutrition Epidemiological Study in preSchoolers (GENESIS) study (N=1980) and 11–18-year-old Greek adolescents (N=949) were measured for adiposity-related phenotypes and genotyped at the FTO single-nucleotide polymorphism (SNP) marker, rs17817449. Adolescents were classified as physically active or inactive based on self-reported levels of PA. In adolescents, FTO genotype influenced weight (P=0.001) and BMI (P=0.007). There was also a significant SNP*PA*gender interaction (P=0.028) on BMI, which reflected the association between FTO genotype and BMI in males (P=0.016), but not females (P=0.15), and significant SNP*PA interaction in males (P=0.007), but not females (P=0.74). The FTO genotype effect was more pronounced in inactive than active males. Inactive males homozygous for the G allele had a mean BMI 3 kg/m2 higher than T carriers (P=0.008). In the GENESIS study, no significant association between FTO genotype and adiposity was found. The present findings highlight PA as an important factor modifying the effect of FTO genotype.
doi:10.1038/ejhg.2010.131
PMCID: PMC3002848  PMID: 20717169
obesity; FTO; physical activity
4.  Effects of diabetes family history and exercise training on the expression of adiponectin and leptin and their receptors 
Metabolism  2011;60(2):206-214.
Daughters of diabetes patients have lower insulin sensitivity than women with no diabetes family history, but increase insulin sensitivity to a greater extent with exercise training. This study aimed to determine whether differences in circulating concentrations of adiponectin and leptin, and adipose tissue expression of their genes and receptors played a role. Women offspring of patients with type 2 diabetes mellitus (n = 34; age, 35.6 ± 7.0 years; body mass index, 28.1 ± 5.1 kg/m2) and matched controls with no diabetes family history (n = 36; age, 33.6 ± 6.1 years; body mass index, 27.3 ± 4.7 kg/m2) participated. Blood and abdominal subcutaneous adipose tissue samples were obtained at baseline and after a controlled 7-week endurance-type exercise intervention (sessions were performed at 65%-80% of maximum heart rate). At baseline, no significant differences were observed between groups in circulating leptin or adiponectin concentrations, or expression of their genes or receptors. In response to exercise, plasma leptin decreased more in offspring than controls (−32.2% vs −7.3%, P = .005 for interaction); and the long isoform of the leptin receptor messenger RNA (mRNA) increased significantly only in the offspring (+39.4%, P = .026 vs +7.7%, P = .892). Leptin mRNA decreased similarly in both groups (−24.7% vs −25.0%, P < .05 for both). Furthermore, changes in plasma leptin (r = −0.432, P < .001) and leptin mRNA (r = −0.298, P = .019) correlated significantly with changes in insulin sensitivity. Plasma adiponectin decreased similarly in both groups (−12.1% vs −15.2%, P < .01 for both), but no significant changes were observed in adiponectin-related gene expression. This work shows that exercise training has differing effects on leptin-related variables between women with and without a diabetes family history and suggests that these molecular differences may contribute to the differential effects of exercise training on insulin sensitivity between these 2 groups.
doi:10.1016/j.metabol.2009.12.026
PMCID: PMC3032051  PMID: 20153489
5.  Fat Oxidation, Fitness and Skeletal Muscle Expression of Oxidative/Lipid Metabolism Genes in South Asians: Implications for Insulin Resistance? 
PLoS ONE  2010;5(12):e14197.
Background
South Asians are more insulin resistant than Europeans, which cannot be fully explained by differences in adiposity. We investigated whether differences in oxidative capacity and capacity for fatty acid utilisation in South Asians might contribute, using a range of whole-body and skeletal muscle measures.
Methodology/Principal Findings
Twenty men of South Asian ethnic origin and 20 age and BMI-matched men of white European descent underwent exercise and metabolic testing and provided a muscle biopsy to determine expression of oxidative and lipid metabolism genes and of insulin signalling proteins. In analyses adjusted for age, BMI, fat mass and physical activity, South Asians, compared to Europeans, exhibited; reduced insulin sensitivity by 26% (p = 0.010); lower VO2max (40.6±6.6 vs 52.4±5.7 ml.kg−1.min−1, p = 0.001); and reduced fat oxidation during submaximal exercise at the same relative (3.77±2.02 vs 6.55±2.60 mg.kg−1.min−1 at 55% VO2max, p = 0.013), and absolute (3.46±2.20 vs 6.00±1.93 mg.kg−1.min−1 at 25 ml O2.kg−1.min−1, p = 0.021), exercise intensities. South Asians exhibited significantly higher skeletal muscle gene expression of CPT1A and FASN and significantly lower skeletal muscle protein expression of PI3K and PKB Ser473 phosphorylation. Fat oxidation during submaximal exercise and VO2max both correlated significantly with insulin sensitivity index and PKB Ser473 phosphorylation, with VO2max or fat oxidation during exercise explaining 10–13% of the variance in insulin sensitivity index, independent of age, body composition and physical activity.
Conclusions/Significance
These data indicate that reduced oxidative capacity and capacity for fatty acid utilisation at the whole body level are key features of the insulin resistant phenotype observed in South Asians, but that this is not the consequence of reduced skeletal muscle expression of oxidative and lipid metabolism genes.
doi:10.1371/journal.pone.0014197
PMCID: PMC2995737  PMID: 21152018

Results 1-5 (5)