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1.  Haptoglobin Duplicon, Hemoglobin, and Vitamin C: Analyses in the British Women's Heart and Health Study and Caerphilly Prospective Study 
Disease Markers  2014;2014:529456.
Background. Haptoglobin acts as an antioxidant by limiting peroxidative tissue damage by free hemoglobin. The haptoglobin gene allele Hp2 comprises a 1.7 kb partial duplication. Relative to allele Hp1, Hp2 carriers form protein multimers, suboptimal for hemoglobin scavenging. Objective. To examine the association of haptoglobin genotype with a range of phenotypes, with emphasis on vitamin C and hemoglobin levels. Methods. We applied a quantitative PCR assay for the duplication junction to two population cohorts including 2747 British women and 1198 British men. We examined the association of haptoglobin duplicon copy number with hemoglobin and vitamin C and used the copy number to complete a phenome scan. Results. Hemoglobin concentrations were greater in those with Hp2,2 genotype, in women only (Hp1,1 13.45 g/dL, Hp1,2 13.49 g/dL, Hp2,2 13.61 g/dL; P = 0.002), though statistically there was no evidence of a difference between the sexes (z value = 1.2, P = 0.24). Haptoglobin genotype was not associated with vitamin C or any other phenotype in either cohort. Conclusions. Our results do not support association of haptoglobin genotype with vitamin C or with other phenotypes measured in two population cohorts. The apparent association between haptoglobin genotype and hemoglobin in the women's cohort merits further investigation.
doi:10.1155/2014/529456
PMCID: PMC4265517  PMID: 25525287
2.  Influence of Adiposity-Related Genetic Markers in a Population of Saudi Arabians Where Other Variables Influencing Obesity May Be Reduced 
Disease Markers  2014;2014:758232.
Large scale studies in Europeans have clearly identified common polymorphism affecting BMI and obesity. We undertook a genotype study to examine the impact of variants, known to influence obesity, in a sample from the Saudi Arabian population, notable for its profound combination of low mean physical activity indices and high energy intake. Anthropometry measures and genotypes were obtained for 367 Saudis, taken from King Saud University and Biomarker Screening Project in Riyadh (Riyadh Cohort). We observed large effect sizes with obesity for rs10767664 (BDNF) (OR = 1.923, P = 0.00072) and rs3751812 (FTO) (OR = 1.523, P = 0.016) in our sample and, using weighted genetic risk scores, we found strong evidence of a cumulative effect using 11 SNPs taken predominantly from loci principally affecting appetite (OR = 2.57, P = 0.00092). We used conditional analyses to discern which of our three highly correlated FTO SNPs were responsible for the observed signal, although we were unable to determine with confidence which best marked the causal site. Our analysis indicates that markers located in loci known to influence fat mass through increased appetite affect obesity in Saudi Arabians to an extent possibly greater than in Europeans. Larger scale studies will be necessary to obtain a precise comparison.
doi:10.1155/2014/758232
PMCID: PMC4251424  PMID: 25484485
3.  Canonical Correlation Analysis for Gene-Based Pleiotropy Discovery 
PLoS Computational Biology  2014;10(10):e1003876.
Genome-wide association studies have identified a wealth of genetic variants involved in complex traits and multifactorial diseases. There is now considerable interest in testing variants for association with multiple phenotypes (pleiotropy) and for testing multiple variants for association with a single phenotype (gene-based association tests). Such approaches can increase statistical power by combining evidence for association over multiple phenotypes or genetic variants respectively. Canonical Correlation Analysis (CCA) measures the correlation between two sets of multidimensional variables, and thus offers the potential to combine these two approaches. To apply CCA, we must restrict the number of attributes relative to the number of samples. Hence we consider modules of genetic variation that can comprise a gene, a pathway or another biologically relevant grouping, and/or a set of phenotypes. In order to do this, we use an attribute selection strategy based on a binary genetic algorithm. Applied to a UK-based prospective cohort study of 4286 women (the British Women's Heart and Health Study), we find improved statistical power in the detection of previously reported genetic associations, and identify a number of novel pleiotropic associations between genetic variants and phenotypes. New discoveries include gene-based association of NSF with triglyceride levels and several genes (ACSM3, ERI2, IL18RAP, IL23RAP and NRG1) with left ventricular hypertrophy phenotypes. In multiple-phenotype analyses we find association of NRG1 with left ventricular hypertrophy phenotypes, fibrinogen and urea and pleiotropic relationships of F7 and F10 with Factor VII, Factor IX and cholesterol levels.
Author Summary
Pleiotropy appears when a variation in one gene affects to several non-related phenotypes. The study of this phenomenon can be useful in gene function discovery, but also in the study of the evolution of a gene. In this paper, we present a methodology, based on Canonical Correlation Analysis, which studies gene-centered multiple association of the variation of SNPs in one or a set of genes with one or a set of phenotypes. The resulting methodology can be applied in gene-centered association analysis, multiple association analysis or pleiotropic pattern discovery. We apply this methodology with a genotype dataset and a set of cardiovascular related phenotypes, and discover new gene association between gene NRG1 and phenotypes related with left ventricular hypertrophy, and pleiotropic effects of this gene with other phenotypes as coagulation factors and urea or pleiotropic effects between coagulation related genes F7 and F10 with coagulation factors and cholesterol levels. This methodology could be also used to find multiple associations in other omics datasets.
doi:10.1371/journal.pcbi.1003876
PMCID: PMC4199483  PMID: 25329069
4.  Hardy-Weinberg Equilibrium Testing of Biological Ascertainment for Mendelian Randomization Studies 
American Journal of Epidemiology  2009;169(4):505-514.
Mendelian randomization (MR) permits causal inference between exposures and a disease. It can be compared with randomized controlled trials. Whereas in a randomized controlled trial the randomization occurs at entry into the trial, in MR the randomization occurs during gamete formation and conception. Several factors, including time since conception and sampling variation, are relevant to the interpretation of an MR test. Particularly important is consideration of the “missingness” of genotypes that can be originated by chance, genotyping errors, or clinical ascertainment. Testing for Hardy-Weinberg equilibrium (HWE) is a genetic approach that permits evaluation of missingness. In this paper, the authors demonstrate evidence of nonconformity with HWE in real data. They also perform simulations to characterize the sensitivity of HWE tests to missingness. Unresolved missingness could lead to a false rejection of causality in an MR investigation of trait-disease association. These results indicate that large-scale studies, very high quality genotyping data, and detailed knowledge of the life-course genetics of the alleles/genotypes studied will largely mitigate this risk. The authors also present a Web program (http://www.oege.org/software/hwe-mr-calc.shtml) for estimating possible missingness and an approach to evaluating missingness under different genetic models.
doi:10.1093/aje/kwn359
PMCID: PMC2640163  PMID: 19126586
epidemiologic methods; genetics; Hardy-Weinberg equilibrium; random allocation; research design
5.  Influence of common genetic variation on blood lipid levels, cardiovascular risk, and coronary events in two British prospective cohort studies 
European Heart Journal  2012;34(13):972-981.
Aims
The aim of this study was to quantify the collective effect of common lipid-associated single nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs) on blood lipid levels, cardiovascular risk, use of lipid-lowering medication, and risk of coronary heart disease (CHD) events.
Methods and results
Analysis was performed in two prospective cohorts: Whitehall II (WHII; N = 5059) and the British Women’s Heart and Health Study (BWHHS; N = 3414). For each participant, scores were calculated based on the cumulative effect of multiple genetic variants influencing total cholesterol (TC), low-density lipoprotein cholesterol (LDL-C), high-density lipoprotein cholesterol (HDL-C), and triglycerides (TG). Compared with the bottom quintile, individuals in the top quintile of the LDL-C genetic score distribution had higher LDL-C {mean difference of 0.85 [95% confidence interval, (CI) = 0.76–0.94] and 0.63 [95% CI = 0.50–0.76] mmol/l in WHII and BWHHS, respectively}. They also tended to have greater odds of having ‘high-risk’ status (Framingham 10-year cardiovascular disease risk >20%) [WHII: odds ratio (OR) = 1.36 (0.93–1.98), BWHHS: OR = 1.49 (1.14–1.94)]; receiving lipid-lowering treatment [WHII: OR = 2.38 (1.57–3.59), BWHHS: OR = 2.24 (1.52–3.29)]; and CHD events [WHII: OR = 1.43 (1.02–2.00), BWHHS: OR = 1.31 (0.99–1.72)]. Similar associations were observed for the TC score in both studies. The TG score was associated with high-risk status and medication use in both studies. Neither HDL nor TG scores were associated with the risk of coronary events. The genetic scores did not improve discrimination over the Framingham risk score.
Conclusion
At the population level, common SNPs associated with LDL-C and TC contribute to blood lipid variation, cardiovascular risk, use of lipid-lowering medications and coronary events. However, their effects are too small to discriminate future lipid-lowering medication requirements or coronary events.
doi:10.1093/eurheartj/ehs243
PMCID: PMC3612774  PMID: 22977227
Lipid genetic score; Lipid medication; Framingham
6.  Secretory Phospholipase A2-IIA and Cardiovascular Disease 
Holmes, Michael V. | Simon, Tabassome | Exeter, Holly J. | Folkersen, Lasse | Asselbergs, Folkert W. | Guardiola, Montse | Cooper, Jackie A. | Palmen, Jutta | Hubacek, Jaroslav A. | Carruthers, Kathryn F. | Horne, Benjamin D. | Brunisholz, Kimberly D. | Mega, Jessica L. | van Iperen, Erik P.A. | Li, Mingyao | Leusink, Maarten | Trompet, Stella | Verschuren, Jeffrey J.W. | Hovingh, G. Kees | Dehghan, Abbas | Nelson, Christopher P. | Kotti, Salma | Danchin, Nicolas | Scholz, Markus | Haase, Christiane L. | Rothenbacher, Dietrich | Swerdlow, Daniel I. | Kuchenbaecker, Karoline B. | Staines-Urias, Eleonora | Goel, Anuj | van 't Hooft, Ferdinand | Gertow, Karl | de Faire, Ulf | Panayiotou, Andrie G. | Tremoli, Elena | Baldassarre, Damiano | Veglia, Fabrizio | Holdt, Lesca M. | Beutner, Frank | Gansevoort, Ron T. | Navis, Gerjan J. | Mateo Leach, Irene | Breitling, Lutz P. | Brenner, Hermann | Thiery, Joachim | Dallmeier, Dhayana | Franco-Cereceda, Anders | Boer, Jolanda M.A. | Stephens, Jeffrey W. | Hofker, Marten H. | Tedgui, Alain | Hofman, Albert | Uitterlinden, André G. | Adamkova, Vera | Pitha, Jan | Onland-Moret, N. Charlotte | Cramer, Maarten J. | Nathoe, Hendrik M. | Spiering, Wilko | Klungel, Olaf H. | Kumari, Meena | Whincup, Peter H. | Morrow, David A. | Braund, Peter S. | Hall, Alistair S. | Olsson, Anders G. | Doevendans, Pieter A. | Trip, Mieke D. | Tobin, Martin D. | Hamsten, Anders | Watkins, Hugh | Koenig, Wolfgang | Nicolaides, Andrew N. | Teupser, Daniel | Day, Ian N.M. | Carlquist, John F. | Gaunt, Tom R. | Ford, Ian | Sattar, Naveed | Tsimikas, Sotirios | Schwartz, Gregory G. | Lawlor, Debbie A. | Morris, Richard W. | Sandhu, Manjinder S. | Poledne, Rudolf | Maitland-van der Zee, Anke H. | Khaw, Kay-Tee | Keating, Brendan J. | van der Harst, Pim | Price, Jackie F. | Mehta, Shamir R. | Yusuf, Salim | Witteman, Jaqueline C.M. | Franco, Oscar H. | Jukema, J. Wouter | de Knijff, Peter | Tybjaerg-Hansen, Anne | Rader, Daniel J. | Farrall, Martin | Samani, Nilesh J. | Kivimaki, Mika | Fox, Keith A.A. | Humphries, Steve E. | Anderson, Jeffrey L. | Boekholdt, S. Matthijs | Palmer, Tom M. | Eriksson, Per | Paré, Guillaume | Hingorani, Aroon D. | Sabatine, Marc S. | Mallat, Ziad | Casas, Juan P. | Talmud, Philippa J.
Objectives
This study sought to investigate the role of secretory phospholipase A2 (sPLA2)-IIA in cardiovascular disease.
Background
Higher circulating levels of sPLA2-IIA mass or sPLA2 enzyme activity have been associated with increased risk of cardiovascular events. However, it is not clear if this association is causal. A recent phase III clinical trial of an sPLA2 inhibitor (varespladib) was stopped prematurely for lack of efficacy.
Methods
We conducted a Mendelian randomization meta-analysis of 19 general population studies (8,021 incident, 7,513 prevalent major vascular events [MVE] in 74,683 individuals) and 10 acute coronary syndrome (ACS) cohorts (2,520 recurrent MVE in 18,355 individuals) using rs11573156, a variant in PLA2G2A encoding the sPLA2-IIA isoenzyme, as an instrumental variable.
Results
PLA2G2A rs11573156 C allele associated with lower circulating sPLA2-IIA mass (38% to 44%) and sPLA2 enzyme activity (3% to 23%) per C allele. The odds ratio (OR) for MVE per rs11573156 C allele was 1.02 (95% confidence interval [CI]: 0.98 to 1.06) in general populations and 0.96 (95% CI: 0.90 to 1.03) in ACS cohorts. In the general population studies, the OR derived from the genetic instrumental variable analysis for MVE for a 1-log unit lower sPLA2-IIA mass was 1.04 (95% CI: 0.96 to 1.13), and differed from the non-genetic observational estimate (OR: 0.69; 95% CI: 0.61 to 0.79). In the ACS cohorts, both the genetic instrumental variable and observational ORs showed a null association with MVE. Instrumental variable analysis failed to show associations between sPLA2 enzyme activity and MVE.
Conclusions
Reducing sPLA2-IIA mass is unlikely to be a useful therapeutic goal for preventing cardiovascular events.
doi:10.1016/j.jacc.2013.06.044
PMCID: PMC3826105  PMID: 23916927
cardiovascular diseases; drug development; epidemiology; genetics; Mendelian randomization; ACS, acute coronary syndrome(s); CI, confidence interval; LDL-C, low-density lipoprotein cholesterol; MI, myocardial infarction; MVE, major vascular events; OR, odds ratio; RCT, randomized clinical trial; SNP, single-nucleotide polymorphism; sPLA2, secretory phospholipase A2
7.  A pathway-based data integration framework for prediction of disease progression 
Bioinformatics  2013;30(6):838-845.
Motivation: Within medical research there is an increasing trend toward deriving multiple types of data from the same individual. The most effective prognostic prediction methods should use all available data, as this maximizes the amount of information used. In this article, we consider a variety of learning strategies to boost prediction performance based on the use of all available data.
Implementation: We consider data integration via the use of multiple kernel learning supervised learning methods. We propose a scheme in which feature selection by statistical score is performed separately per data type and by pathway membership. We further consider the introduction of a confidence measure for the class assignment, both to remove some ambiguously labeled datapoints from the training data and to implement a cautious classifier that only makes predictions when the associated confidence is high.
Results: We use the METABRIC dataset for breast cancer, with prediction of survival at 2000 days from diagnosis. Predictive accuracy is improved by using kernels that exclusively use those genes, as features, which are known members of particular pathways. We show that yet further improvements can be made by using a range of additional kernels based on clinical covariates such as Estrogen Receptor (ER) status. Using this range of measures to improve prediction performance, we show that the test accuracy on new instances is nearly 80%, though predictions are only made on 69.2% of the patient cohort.
Availability: https://github.com/jseoane/FSMKL
Contact: J.Seoane@bristol.ac.uk
Supplementary information: Supplementary data are available at Bioinformatics online.
doi:10.1093/bioinformatics/btt610
PMCID: PMC3957070  PMID: 24162466
8.  Nonreplication of an Association of Apolipoprotein E2 With Sinistrality 
Laterality  2012;18(2):251-261.
A recent report found that left-handed adolescents were over three-fold more likely to have an Apolipoprotein (APOE) ε2 allele. This study was unable to replicate this association in young-adults (N=166). A meta-analysis of nine other datasets (N = 360 to 7,559, Power > 0.999) including that of National Alzheimer’s Coordinating Center also failed to find an over-representation of ε2 among left-handers indicating that this earlier outcome was most likely a statistical artifact.
doi:10.1080/1357650X.2012.660164
PMCID: PMC3770935  PMID: 22721421
APOE; handedness; right
9.  Associations between a Polymorphism in the Pleiotropic GCKR and Age-Related Phenotypes: The HALCyon Programme 
PLoS ONE  2013;8(7):e70045.
Background
The glucokinase regulatory protein encoded by GCKR plays an important role in glucose metabolism and a single nucleotide polymorphism (SNP) rs1260326 (P446L) in the gene has been associated with several age-related biomarkers, including triglycerides, glucose, insulin and apolipoproteins. However, associations between SNPs in the gene and other ageing phenotypes such as cognitive and physical capability have not been reported.
Methods
As part of the Healthy Ageing across the Life Course (HALCyon) collaborative research programme, men and women from five UK cohorts aged between 44 and 90+ years were genotyped for rs1260326. Meta-analysis was used to pool within-study genotypic associations between the SNP and several age-related phenotypes, including body mass index (BMI), blood lipid levels, lung function, and cognitive and physical capability.
Results
We confirm the associations between the minor allele of the SNP and higher triglycerides and lower glucose levels. We also observed a triglyceride-independent association between the minor allele and lower BMI (pooled beta on z-score = −0.04, p-value = 0.0001, n = 16,251). Furthermore, there was some evidence for gene-environment interactions, including physical activity attenuating the effects on triglycerides. However, no associations were observed with measures of cognitive and physical capability.
Conclusion
Findings from middle-aged to older adults confirm associations between rs1260326 GCKR and triglycerides and glucose, suggest possible gene-environment interactions, but do not provide evidence that its relevance extends to cognitive and physical capability.
doi:10.1371/journal.pone.0070045
PMCID: PMC3720952  PMID: 23894584
10.  Dependence of deodorant usage on ABCC11 genotype: Scope for personalised genetics in personal hygiene 
Ear wax type and axillary odor are genetically determined by rs17822931, a Single Nucleotide Polymorphism (SNP) located in the ABCC11 gene. The literature has been concerned with the Mendelian trait of earwax, although axillary odor is also Mendelian. Ethnic diversity in rs17822931 exists, with higher frequency of allele A in East Asians. Influence on deodorant usage has not been investigated. In this work we present a detailed analysis of the rs17822931 effect on deodorant usage in a large (N~17,000 individuals) population cohort (The Avon Longitudinal Study of Parents and Children, ALSPAC). We found strong evidence (P=3.7×10−20) indicating differential deodorant usage according to rs17822931 genotype. AA homozygotes were almost 5-fold over-represented in categories of never using deodorant or using it infrequently. However, 77.8% of white European genotypically non-odorous individuals still used deodorant, and 4.7% genotypically odorous individuals did not. We provide evidence previously unreported of a behavioural effect associated with rs17822931. This effect has a biological basis which can result in a change in the family’s environment if an aerosol deodorant is used. It also indicates potential cost saving to the non-odorous and scope for personalised genetics usage in personal hygiene choices, with consequent reduction of inappropriate chemical exposures for some.
doi:10.1038/jid.2012.480
PMCID: PMC3674910  PMID: 23325016
ABCC11 gene; deodorant usage; axillary odor; personalised genetics
11.  Predicting the functional consequences of cancer-associated amino acid substitutions 
Bioinformatics  2013;29(12):1504-1510.
Motivation: The number of missense mutations being identified in cancer genomes has greatly increased as a consequence of technological advances and the reduced cost of whole-genome/whole-exome sequencing methods. However, a high proportion of the amino acid substitutions detected in cancer genomes have little or no effect on tumour progression (passenger mutations). Therefore, accurate automated methods capable of discriminating between driver (cancer-promoting) and passenger mutations are becoming increasingly important. In our previous work, we developed the Functional Analysis through Hidden Markov Models (FATHMM) software and, using a model weighted for inherited disease mutations, observed improved performances over alternative computational prediction algorithms. Here, we describe an adaptation of our original algorithm that incorporates a cancer-specific model to potentiate the functional analysis of driver mutations.
Results: The performance of our algorithm was evaluated using two separate benchmarks. In our analysis, we observed improved performances when distinguishing between driver mutations and other germ line variants (both disease-causing and putatively neutral mutations). In addition, when discriminating between somatic driver and passenger mutations, we observed performances comparable with the leading computational prediction algorithms: SPF-Cancer and TransFIC.
Availability and implementation: A web-based implementation of our cancer-specific model, including a downloadable stand-alone package, is available at http://fathmm.biocompute.org.uk.
Contact: fathmm@biocompute.org.uk
Supplementary information: Supplementary data are available at Bioinformatics online.
doi:10.1093/bioinformatics/btt182
PMCID: PMC3673218  PMID: 23620363
12.  Structural and Population-Based Evaluations of TBC1D1 p.Arg125Trp 
PLoS ONE  2013;8(5):e63897.
Obesity is now a leading cause of preventable death in the industrialised world. Understanding its genetic influences can enhance insight into molecular pathogenesis and potential therapeutic targets. A non-synonymous polymorphism (rs35859249, p.Arg125Trp) in the N-terminal TBC1D1 phosphotyrosine-binding (PTB) domain has shown a replicated association with familial obesity in women. We investigated these findings in the Avon Longitudinal Study of Parents and Children (ALSPAC), a large European birth cohort of mothers and offspring, and by generating a predicted model of the structure of this domain. Structural prediction involved the use of three separate algorithms; Robetta, HHpred/MODELLER and I-TASSER. We used the transmission disequilibrium test (TDT) to investigate familial association in the ALSPAC study cohort (N = 2,292 mother-offspring pairs). Linear regression models were used to examine the association of genotype with mean measurements of adiposity (Body Mass Index (BMI), waist circumference and Dual-energy X-ray absorptiometry (DXA) assessed fat mass), and logistic regression was used to examine the association with odds of obesity. Modelling showed that the R125W mutation occurs in a location of the TBC1D1 PTB domain that is predicted to have a function in a putative protein:protein interaction. We did not detect an association between R125W and BMI (mean per allele difference 0.27 kg/m2 (95% Confidence Interval: 0.00, 0.53) P = 0.05) or obesity (odds ratio 1.01 (95% Confidence Interval: 0.77, 1.31, P = 0.96) in offspring after adjusting for multiple comparisons. Furthermore, there was no evidence to suggest that there was familial association between R125W and obesity (χ2 = 0.06, P = 0.80). Our analysis suggests that R125W in TBC1D1 plays a role in the binding of an effector protein, but we find no evidence that the R125W variant is related to mean BMI or odds of obesity in a general population sample.
doi:10.1371/journal.pone.0063897
PMCID: PMC3646766  PMID: 23667688
13.  Genetic Variants Influencing Biomarkers of Nutrition Are Not Associated with Cognitive Capability in Middle-Aged and Older Adults123 
The Journal of Nutrition  2013;143(5):606-612.
Several investigations have observed positive associations between good nutritional status, as indicated by micronutrients, and cognitive measures; however, these associations may not be causal. Genetic polymorphisms that affect nutritional biomarkers may be useful for providing evidence for associations between micronutrients and cognitive measures. As part of the Healthy Ageing across the Life Course (HALCyon) program, men and women aged between 44 and 90 y from 6 UK cohorts were genotyped for polymorphisms associated with circulating concentrations of iron [rs4820268 transmembrane protease, serine 6 (TMPRSS6) and rs1800562 hemochromatosis (HFE)], vitamin B-12 [(rs492602 fucosyltransferase 2 (FUT2)], vitamin D ([rs2282679 group-specific component (GC)] and β-carotene ([rs6564851 beta-carotene 15,15'-monooxygenase 1 (BCMO1)]. Meta-analysis was used to pool within-study effects of the associations between these polymorphisms and the following measures of cognitive capability: word recall, phonemic fluency, semantic fluency, and search speed. Among the several statistical tests conducted, we found little evidence for associations. We found the minor allele of rs1800562 was associated with poorer word recall scores [pooled β on Z-score for carriers vs. noncarriers: −0.05 (95% CI: −0.09, −0.004); P = 0.03, n = 14,105] and poorer word recall scores for the vitamin D–raising allele of rs2282679 [pooled β per T allele: −0.03 (95% CI: −0.05, −0.003); P = 0.03, n = 16,527]. However, there was no evidence for other associations. Our findings provide little evidence to support associations between these genotypes and cognitive capability in older adults. Further investigations are required to elucidate whether the previous positive associations from observational studies between circulating measures of these micronutrients and cognitive performance are due to confounding and reverse causality.
doi:10.3945/jn.112.171520
PMCID: PMC3738233  PMID: 23468552
14.  Genetic markers of bone and joint health and physical capability in older adults: the HALCyon programme 
Bone  2013;52(1):278-285.
Background
Good bone and joint health is essential for the physical tasks of daily living and poorer indicators of physical capability in older adults have been associated with increased mortality rates. Genetic variants of indicators of bone and joint health may be associated with measures of physical capability.
Methods
As part of the Healthy Ageing across the Life Course (HALCyon) programme, men and women aged between 52 and 90 + years from six UK cohorts were genotyped for a polymorphism associated with serum calcium (rs1801725, CASR), two polymorphisms associated with bone mineral density (BMD) (rs2941740, ESR1 and rs9594759, RANKL) and one associated with osteoarthritis risk rs3815148 (COG5). Meta-analysis was used to pool within-study effects of the associations between each of the polymorphisms and measures of physical capability: grip strength, timed walk or get up and go, chair rises and standing balance.
Results
Few important associations were observed among the several tests. We found that carriers of the serum calcium-raising allele had poorer grip strength compared with non-carriers (pooled p = 0.05, n = 11,239) after adjusting for age and sex. Inconsistent results were observed for the two variants associated with BMD and we found no evidence for an association between rs3815148 (COG5) and any of the physical capability measures.
Conclusion
Our findings suggest elevated serum calcium levels may lead to lower grip strength, though this requires further replication. Our results do not provide evidence for a substantial influence of these variants in ESR1, RANKL and COG5 on physical capability in older adults.
Highlights
► We examined associations between bone-related genotypes and physical capability. ► We conducted a meta-analysis on 12,836 middle-age adults. ► We found CASR may be associated with grip strength. ► No substantial support for specific bone mineral density variants and physical capability.
doi:10.1016/j.bone.2012.10.004
PMCID: PMC3526776  PMID: 23072920
BMD, bone mineral density; OA, osteoarthritis; BMI, body mass index; SNP, single nucleotide polymorphism; CaPS, Caerphilly Prospective Study; ELSA, English Longitudinal Study of Ageing; HAS, Hertfordshire Ageing Study; HCS, Hertfordshire Cohort Study; LBC1921, The Lothian Birth Cohort 1921; NSHD, National Survey of Health and Development; HWE, Hardy–Weinberg equilibrium; WHR, waist–hip ratio; GWAS, genome-wide association studies; Aging; Grip strength; Calcium; Bone mineral density; Osteoarthritis
15.  Complexity of a complex trait locus: HP, HPR, haemoglobin and cholesterol 
Gene  2012;499(1):8-13.
HP and HPR are related and contiguous genes in strong linkage disequilibrium (LD), encoding haptoglobin and haptoglobin-related protein. These bind and chaperone free Hb for recycling, protecting against oxidation. A copy number variation (CNV) within HP (Hp1/Hp2) results in different possible haptoglobin complexes which have differing properties. HPR rs2000999 (G/A), identified in meta-GWAS, influences total cholesterol (TC) and LDL-cholesterol (LDL-C). We examined the relationship between HP CNV, HPR rs2000999, Hb, red cell count (RCC), LDL-C and TC in the British Women's Heart and Health Study (n = 2779 for samples having CNV, rs2000999, and phenotypes). Analysing single markers by linear regression, rs2000999 was associated with LDL-C (β = 0.040 mmol/L, p = 0.023), TC (β = − 0.040 mmol/L, p = 0.019), Hb (β = − 0.044 g/dL, p = 0.028) and borderline with RCC (β = − 0.032 × 1012/L, p = 0.066). Analysis of CNV by linear regression revealed an association with Hb (Hp1 vs Hp2, β = 0.057 g/dL, p = 0.004), RCC (β = 0.045 × 1012/L, p = 0.014), and showed a trend with LDL-C and TC. There were 3 principal haplotypes (Hp1-G 36%; Hp2-G 45%; Hp2-A 18%). Haplotype comparisons showed that LDL-C and TC associations were from rs2000999; Hb and RCC associations derived largely from the CNV. Distinct genotype–phenotype effects are evident at the genetic epidemiological level once LD has been analysed, perhaps reflecting HP–HPR functional biology and evolutionary history. The derived Hp2 allele of the HP gene has apparently been subject to malaria-driven positive selection. Haptoglobin-related protein binds Hb and apolipoprotein-L, i.e. linking HPR to the cholesterol system; and the HPR/apo-L complex is specifically trypanolytic. Our analysis illustrates the complex interplay between functions and haplotypes of adjacent genes, environmental context and natural selection, and offers insights into potential use of haptoglobin or haptoglobin-related protein as therapeutic agents.
Highlights
► HP CNV/HPR SNP haplotype analysis shows association of HP CNV with Hb levels/RCC. ► HP CNV/HPR SNP haplotype analysis shows association of HPR SNP with LDL-C/TC. ► The HP CNV/Hb-related association may be via Hp2 allele advantage in malaria zones. ► The HPR SNP/cholesterol association is likely via apolipoproteins in TLF-1 and -2. ► We infer that HP CNV duplication preceded HPR SNP mutation.
doi:10.1016/j.gene.2012.03.034
PMCID: PMC3405512  PMID: 22433445
HP, haptoglobin gene; HPR, haptoglobin-related protein gene; LD, linkage disequilibrium; Hb, haemoglobin; CNV, copy number variant; GWAS, genome-wide association study; TC, total cholesterol; LDL-C, low density lipoprotein cholesterol; HDL-C, high density lipoprotein cholesterol; RCC, red cell count; Apo-L, apolipoprotein-L; Apo-A, apolipoprotein-A; SNP, single nucleotide polymorphism; K-EDTA, potassium ethylene diamine tetraacetic acid; ARCS, amplification ratiometry control system; PCR, polymerase chain reaction; HW, Hardy Weinberg; HTR, haplotype trend regression; EM, expectation maximization; PASW, a statistical software package by the company SPSS Inc; PLINK, open-source software for whole genome data analysis; TLF-1, trypanosome lytic factor-1; TLF-2, trypanosome lytic factor-2; kD, kilo Daltons; CHD, coronary heart disease; HP; HPR; Haemoglobin; Cholesterol; Malaria; Trypanosome
16.  A Multi-Cohort Study of Polymorphisms in the GH/IGF Axis and Physical Capability: The HALCyon Programme 
PLoS ONE  2012;7(1):e29883.
Background
Low muscle mass and function have been associated with poorer indicators of physical capability in older people, which are in-turn associated with increased mortality rates. The growth hormone/insulin-like growth factor (GH/IGF) axis is involved in muscle function and genetic variants in genes in the axis may influence measures of physical capability.
Methods
As part of the Healthy Ageing across the Life Course (HALCyon) programme, men and women from seven UK cohorts aged between 52 and 90 years old were genotyped for six polymorphisms: rs35767 (IGF1), rs7127900 (IGF2), rs2854744 (IGFBP3), rs2943641 (IRS1), rs2665802 (GH1) and the exon-3 deletion of GHR. The polymorphisms have previously been robustly associated with age-related traits or are potentially functional. Meta-analysis was used to pool within-study genotypic effects of the associations between the polymorphisms and four measures of physical capability: grip strength, timed walk or get up and go, chair rises and standing balance.
Results
Few important associations were observed among the several tests. We found evidence that rs2665802 in GH1 was associated with inability to balance for 5 s (pooled odds ratio per minor allele = 0.90, 95% CI: 0.82–0.98, p-value = 0.01, n = 10,748), after adjusting for age and sex. We found no evidence for other associations between the polymorphisms and physical capability traits.
Conclusion
Our findings do not provide evidence for a substantial influence of these common polymorphisms in the GH/IGF axis on objectively measured physical capability levels in older adults.
doi:10.1371/journal.pone.0029883
PMCID: PMC3254646  PMID: 22253814
17.  IQ, Educational Attainment, Memory and Plasma Lipids: Associations with Apolipoprotein E Genotype in 5995 Children 
Biological Psychiatry  2011;70(2):152-158.
Background
Apolipoprotein E (APOE) genotype (ε2/ε3/ε4: rs429358 ε4 allele; rs7412 ε2 allele) is strongly associated with both lipid levels and Alzheimer's disease. Although there is also evidence of milder cognitive impairment in later life in carriers of the APOE ε4 allele, there have been few studies investigating the impact of APOE genotype on cognitive function in children.
Methods
We determined APOE genotype in 5995 children from the Avon Longitudinal Study of Parents and Children and investigated associations between APOE genotype and plasma lipids (at age 9), IQ (at age 8), memory (at ages 8 and 10), and performance in school attainment tests (at ages 7, 11, and 14).
Results
Observed genotype group counts were consistent with Hardy–Weinberg equilibrium (χ2p value = .84). There were strong relationships between APOE genotype and low-density lipoprotein cholesterol, high-density lipoprotein cholesterol, and triglycerides, which follow the same patterns as in adults. There was no strong evidence to suggest that APOE genotype was associated with IQ (all p values ≥ .46), memory function (p ≥ .35), or school attainment test results (p ≥ .28).
Conclusion
Although APOE genotype does have strong associations with lipid levels in childhood, there does not seem to be meaningful effects on cognitive performance, suggesting that any detrimental effects of the ε4 allele on cognitive function are not important until later life.
doi:10.1016/j.biopsych.2010.10.033
PMCID: PMC3130925  PMID: 21215387
APOE; children; cognitive function; IQ; lipids; memory
18.  Meta-analysis identifies 13 new loci associated with waist-hip ratio and reveals sexual dimorphism in the genetic basis of fat distribution 
Heid, Iris M. | Jackson, Anne U. | Randall, Joshua C. | Winkler, Thomas W. | Qi, Lu | Steinthorsdottir, Valgerdur | Thorleifsson, Gudmar | Zillikens, M. Carola | Speliotes, Elizabeth K. | Mägi, Reedik | Workalemahu, Tsegaselassie | White, Charles C. | Bouatia-Naji, Nabila | Harris, Tamara B. | Berndt, Sonja I. | Ingelsson, Erik | Willer, Cristen J. | Weedon, Michael N. | Luan, Jian'an | Vedantam, Sailaja | Esko, Tõnu | Kilpeläinen, Tuomas O. | Kutalik, Zoltán | Li, Shengxu | Monda, Keri L. | Dixon, Anna L. | Holmes, Christopher C. | Kaplan, Lee M. | Liang, Liming | Min, Josine L. | Moffatt, Miriam F. | Molony, Cliona | Nicholson, George | Schadt, Eric E. | Zondervan, Krina T. | Feitosa, Mary F. | Ferreira, Teresa | Allen, Hana Lango | Weyant, Robert J. | Wheeler, Eleanor | Wood, Andrew R. | Estrada, Karol | Goddard, Michael E. | Lettre, Guillaume | Mangino, Massimo | Nyholt, Dale R. | Purcell, Shaun | Vernon Smith, Albert | Visscher, Peter M. | Yang, Jian | McCaroll, Steven A. | Nemesh, James | Voight, Benjamin F. | Absher, Devin | Amin, Najaf | Aspelund, Thor | Coin, Lachlan | Glazer, Nicole L. | Hayward, Caroline | Heard-Costa, Nancy L. | Hottenga, Jouke-Jan | Johansson, Åsa | Johnson, Toby | Kaakinen, Marika | Kapur, Karen | Ketkar, Shamika | Knowles, Joshua W. | Kraft, Peter | Kraja, Aldi T. | Lamina, Claudia | Leitzmann, Michael F. | McKnight, Barbara | Morris, Andrew P. | Ong, Ken K. | Perry, John R.B. | Peters, Marjolein J. | Polasek, Ozren | Prokopenko, Inga | Rayner, Nigel W. | Ripatti, Samuli | Rivadeneira, Fernando | Robertson, Neil R. | Sanna, Serena | Sovio, Ulla | Surakka, Ida | Teumer, Alexander | van Wingerden, Sophie | Vitart, Veronique | Zhao, Jing Hua | Cavalcanti-Proença, Christine | Chines, Peter S. | Fisher, Eva | Kulzer, Jennifer R. | Lecoeur, Cecile | Narisu, Narisu | Sandholt, Camilla | Scott, Laura J. | Silander, Kaisa | Stark, Klaus | Tammesoo, Mari-Liis | Teslovich, Tanya M. | John Timpson, Nicholas | Watanabe, Richard M. | Welch, Ryan | Chasman, Daniel I. | Cooper, Matthew N. | Jansson, John-Olov | Kettunen, Johannes | Lawrence, Robert W. | Pellikka, Niina | Perola, Markus | Vandenput, Liesbeth | Alavere, Helene | Almgren, Peter | Atwood, Larry D. | Bennett, Amanda J. | Biffar, Reiner | Bonnycastle, Lori L. | Bornstein, Stefan R. | Buchanan, Thomas A. | Campbell, Harry | Day, Ian N.M. | Dei, Mariano | Dörr, Marcus | Elliott, Paul | Erdos, Michael R. | Eriksson, Johan G. | Freimer, Nelson B. | Fu, Mao | Gaget, Stefan | Geus, Eco J.C. | Gjesing, Anette P. | Grallert, Harald | Gräßler, Jürgen | Groves, Christopher J. | Guiducci, Candace | Hartikainen, Anna-Liisa | Hassanali, Neelam | Havulinna, Aki S. | Herzig, Karl-Heinz | Hicks, Andrew A. | Hui, Jennie | Igl, Wilmar | Jousilahti, Pekka | Jula, Antti | Kajantie, Eero | Kinnunen, Leena | Kolcic, Ivana | Koskinen, Seppo | Kovacs, Peter | Kroemer, Heyo K. | Krzelj, Vjekoslav | Kuusisto, Johanna | Kvaloy, Kirsti | Laitinen, Jaana | Lantieri, Olivier | Lathrop, G. Mark | Lokki, Marja-Liisa | Luben, Robert N. | Ludwig, Barbara | McArdle, Wendy L. | McCarthy, Anne | Morken, Mario A. | Nelis, Mari | Neville, Matt J. | Paré, Guillaume | Parker, Alex N. | Peden, John F. | Pichler, Irene | Pietiläinen, Kirsi H. | Platou, Carl G.P. | Pouta, Anneli | Ridderstråle, Martin | Samani, Nilesh J. | Saramies, Jouko | Sinisalo, Juha | Smit, Jan H. | Strawbridge, Rona J. | Stringham, Heather M. | Swift, Amy J. | Teder-Laving, Maris | Thomson, Brian | Usala, Gianluca | van Meurs, Joyce B.J. | van Ommen, Gert-Jan | Vatin, Vincent | Volpato, Claudia B. | Wallaschofski, Henri | Walters, G. Bragi | Widen, Elisabeth | Wild, Sarah H. | Willemsen, Gonneke | Witte, Daniel R. | Zgaga, Lina | Zitting, Paavo | Beilby, John P. | James, Alan L. | Kähönen, Mika | Lehtimäki, Terho | Nieminen, Markku S. | Ohlsson, Claes | Palmer, Lyle J. | Raitakari, Olli | Ridker, Paul M. | Stumvoll, Michael | Tönjes, Anke | Viikari, Jorma | Balkau, Beverley | Ben-Shlomo, Yoav | Bergman, Richard N. | Boeing, Heiner | Smith, George Davey | Ebrahim, Shah | Froguel, Philippe | Hansen, Torben | Hengstenberg, Christian | Hveem, Kristian | Isomaa, Bo | Jørgensen, Torben | Karpe, Fredrik | Khaw, Kay-Tee | Laakso, Markku | Lawlor, Debbie A. | Marre, Michel | Meitinger, Thomas | Metspalu, Andres | Midthjell, Kristian | Pedersen, Oluf | Salomaa, Veikko | Schwarz, Peter E.H. | Tuomi, Tiinamaija | Tuomilehto, Jaakko | Valle, Timo T. | Wareham, Nicholas J. | Arnold, Alice M. | Beckmann, Jacques S. | Bergmann, Sven | Boerwinkle, Eric | Boomsma, Dorret I. | Caulfield, Mark J. | Collins, Francis S. | Eiriksdottir, Gudny | Gudnason, Vilmundur | Gyllensten, Ulf | Hamsten, Anders | Hattersley, Andrew T. | Hofman, Albert | Hu, Frank B. | Illig, Thomas | Iribarren, Carlos | Jarvelin, Marjo-Riitta | Kao, W.H. Linda | Kaprio, Jaakko | Launer, Lenore J. | Munroe, Patricia B. | Oostra, Ben | Penninx, Brenda W. | Pramstaller, Peter P. | Psaty, Bruce M. | Quertermous, Thomas | Rissanen, Aila | Rudan, Igor | Shuldiner, Alan R. | Soranzo, Nicole | Spector, Timothy D. | Syvanen, Ann-Christine | Uda, Manuela | Uitterlinden, André | Völzke, Henry | Vollenweider, Peter | Wilson, James F. | Witteman, Jacqueline C. | Wright, Alan F. | Abecasis, Gonçalo R. | Boehnke, Michael | Borecki, Ingrid B. | Deloukas, Panos | Frayling, Timothy M. | Groop, Leif C. | Haritunians, Talin | Hunter, David J. | Kaplan, Robert C. | North, Kari E. | O'Connell, Jeffrey R. | Peltonen, Leena | Schlessinger, David | Strachan, David P. | Hirschhorn, Joel N. | Assimes, Themistocles L. | Wichmann, H.-Erich | Thorsteinsdottir, Unnur | van Duijn, Cornelia M. | Stefansson, Kari | Cupples, L. Adrienne | Loos, Ruth J.F. | Barroso, Inês | McCarthy, Mark I. | Fox, Caroline S. | Mohlke, Karen L. | Lindgren, Cecilia M.
Nature genetics  2010;42(11):949-960.
Waist-hip ratio (WHR) is a measure of body fat distribution and a predictor of metabolic consequences independent of overall adiposity. WHR is heritable, but few genetic variants influencing this trait have been identified. We conducted a meta-analysis of 32 genome-wide association studies for WHR adjusted for body-mass-index (up to 77,167 participants), following up 16 loci in an additional 29 studies (up to 113,636 subjects). We identified 13 novel loci in or near RSPO3, VEGFA, TBX15-WARS2, NFE2L3, GRB14, DNM3-PIGC, ITPR2-SSPN, LY86, HOXC13, ADAMTS9, ZNRF3-KREMEN1, NISCH-STAB1, and CPEB4 (P 1.9 × 10−9 to 1.8 × 10−40), and the known signal at LYPLAL1. Seven of these loci exhibited marked sexual dimorphism, all with a stronger effect on WHR in women than men (P for sex-difference 1.9 × 10−3 to 1.2 × 10−13). These findings provide evidence for multiple loci that modulate body fat distribution, independent of overall adiposity, and reveal powerful gene-by-sex interactions.
doi:10.1038/ng.685
PMCID: PMC3000924  PMID: 20935629
genome-wide association; waist-hip-ratio; body fat distribution; central obesity; meta-analysis; genetics; visceral adipose tissue; metabolism; body composition; Expression Quantitative Trait Loci; sex difference
19.  Meta-analysis identifies 13 new loci associated with waist-hip ratio and reveals sexual dimorphism in the genetic basis of fat distribution 
Heid, Iris M | Jackson, Anne U | Randall, Joshua C | Winkler, Thomas W | Qi, Lu | Steinthorsdottir, Valgerdur | Thorleifsson, Gudmar | Zillikens, M Carola | Speliotes, Elizabeth K | Mägi, Reedik | Workalemahu, Tsegaselassie | White, Charles C | Bouatia-Naji, Nabila | Harris, Tamara B | Berndt, Sonja I | Ingelsson, Erik | Willer, Cristen J | Weedon, Michael N | Luan, Jian’An | Vedantam, Sailaja | Esko, Tõnu | Kilpeläinen, Tuomas O | Kutalik, Zoltán | Li, Shengxu | Monda, Keri L | Dixon, Anna L | Holmes, Christopher C | Kaplan, Lee M | Liang, Liming | Min, Josine L | Moffatt, Miriam F | Molony, Cliona | Nicholson, George | Schadt, Eric E | Zondervan, Krina T | Feitosa, Mary F | Ferreira, Teresa | Allen, Hana Lango | Weyant, Robert J | Wheeler, Eleanor | Wood, Andrew R | Estrada, Karol | Goddard, Michael E | Lettre, Guillaume | Mangino, Massimo | Nyholt, Dale R | Purcell, Shaun | Smith, Albert Vernon | Visscher, Peter M | Yang, Jian | McCarroll, Steven A | Nemesh, James | Voight, Benjamin F | Absher, Devin | Amin, Najaf | Aspelund, Thor | Coin, Lachlan | Glazer, Nicole L | Hayward, Caroline | Heard-costa, Nancy L | Hottenga, Jouke-Jan | Johansson, Åsa | Johnson, Toby | Kaakinen, Marika | Kapur, Karen | Ketkar, Shamika | Knowles, Joshua W | Kraft, Peter | Kraja, Aldi T | Lamina, Claudia | Leitzmann, Michael F | McKnight, Barbara | Morris, Andrew P | Ong, Ken K | Perry, John R B | Peters, Marjolein J | Polasek, Ozren | Prokopenko, Inga | Rayner, Nigel W | Ripatti, Samuli | Rivadeneira, Fernando | Robertson, Neil R | Sanna, Serena | Sovio, Ulla | Surakka, Ida | Teumer, Alexander | van Wingerden, Sophie | Vitart, Veronique | Zhao, Jing Hua | Cavalcanti-Proença, Christine | Chines, Peter S | Fisher, Eva | Kulzer, Jennifer R | Lecoeur, Cecile | Narisu, Narisu | Sandholt, Camilla | Scott, Laura J | Silander, Kaisa | Stark, Klaus | Tammesoo, Mari-Liis | Teslovich, Tanya M | Timpson, Nicholas John | Watanabe, Richard M | Welch, Ryan | Chasman, Daniel I | Cooper, Matthew N | Jansson, John-Olov | Kettunen, Johannes | Lawrence, Robert W | Pellikka, Niina | Perola, Markus | Vandenput, Liesbeth | Alavere, Helene | Almgren, Peter | Atwood, Larry D | Bennett, Amanda J | Biffar, Reiner | Bonnycastle, Lori L | Bornstein, Stefan R | Buchanan, Thomas A | Campbell, Harry | Day, Ian N M | Dei, Mariano | Dörr, Marcus | Elliott, Paul | Erdos, Michael R | Eriksson, Johan G | Freimer, Nelson B | Fu, Mao | Gaget, Stefan | Geus, Eco J C | Gjesing, Anette P | Grallert, Harald | Gräßler, Jürgen | Groves, Christopher J | Guiducci, Candace | Hartikainen, Anna-Liisa | Hassanali, Neelam | Havulinna, Aki S | Herzig, Karl-Heinz | Hicks, Andrew A | Hui, Jennie | Igl, Wilmar | Jousilahti, Pekka | Jula, Antti | Kajantie, Eero | Kinnunen, Leena | Kolcic, Ivana | Koskinen, Seppo | Kovacs, Peter | Kroemer, Heyo K | Krzelj, Vjekoslav | Kuusisto, Johanna | Kvaloy, Kirsti | Laitinen, Jaana | Lantieri, Olivier | Lathrop, G Mark | Lokki, Marja-Liisa | Luben, Robert N | Ludwig, Barbara | McArdle, Wendy L | McCarthy, Anne | Morken, Mario A | Nelis, Mari | Neville, Matt J | Paré, Guillaume | Parker, Alex N | Peden, John F | Pichler, Irene | Pietiläinen, Kirsi H | Platou, Carl G P | Pouta, Anneli | Ridderstråle, Martin | Samani, Nilesh J | Saramies, Jouko | Sinisalo, Juha | Smit, Jan H | Strawbridge, Rona J | Stringham, Heather M | Swift, Amy J | Teder-Laving, Maris | Thomson, Brian | Usala, Gianluca | van Meurs, Joyce B J | van Ommen, Gert-Jan | Vatin, Vincent | Volpato, Claudia B | Wallaschofski, Henri | Walters, G Bragi | Widen, Elisabeth | Wild, Sarah H | Willemsen, Gonneke | Witte, Daniel R | Zgaga, Lina | Zitting, Paavo | Beilby, John P | James, Alan L | Kähönen, Mika | Lehtimäki, Terho | Nieminen, Markku S | Ohlsson, Claes | Palmer, Lyle J | Raitakari, Olli | Ridker, Paul M | Stumvoll, Michael | Tönjes, Anke | Viikari, Jorma | Balkau, Beverley | Ben-Shlomo, Yoav | Bergman, Richard N | Boeing, Heiner | Smith, George Davey | Ebrahim, Shah | Froguel, Philippe | Hansen, Torben | Hengstenberg, Christian | Hveem, Kristian | Isomaa, Bo | Jørgensen, Torben | Karpe, Fredrik | Khaw, Kay-Tee | Laakso, Markku | Lawlor, Debbie A | Marre, Michel | Meitinger, Thomas | Metspalu, Andres | Midthjell, Kristian | Pedersen, Oluf | Salomaa, Veikko | Schwarz, Peter E H | Tuomi, Tiinamaija | Tuomilehto, Jaakko | Valle, Timo T | Wareham, Nicholas J | Arnold, Alice M | Beckmann, Jacques S | Bergmann, Sven | Boerwinkle, Eric | Boomsma, Dorret I | Caulfield, Mark J | Collins, Francis S | Eiriksdottir, Gudny | Gudnason, Vilmundur | Gyllensten, Ulf | Hamsten, Anders | Hattersley, Andrew T | Hofman, Albert | Hu, Frank B | Illig, Thomas | Iribarren, Carlos | Jarvelin, Marjo-Riitta | Kao, W H Linda | Kaprio, Jaakko | Launer, Lenore J | Munroe, Patricia B | Oostra, Ben | Penninx, Brenda W | Pramstaller, Peter P | Psaty, Bruce M | Quertermous, Thomas | Rissanen, Aila | Rudan, Igor | Shuldiner, Alan R | Soranzo, Nicole | Spector, Timothy D | Syvanen, Ann-Christine | Uda, Manuela | Uitterlinden, André | Völzke, Henry | Vollenweider, Peter | Wilson, James F | Witteman, Jacqueline C | Wright, Alan F | Abecasis, Gonçalo R | Boehnke, Michael | Borecki, Ingrid B | Deloukas, Panos | Frayling, Timothy M | Groop, Leif C | Haritunians, Talin | Hunter, David J | Kaplan, Robert C | North, Kari E | O’connell, Jeffrey R | Peltonen, Leena | Schlessinger, David | Strachan, David P | Hirschhorn, Joel N | Assimes, Themistocles L | Wichmann, H-Erich | Thorsteinsdottir, Unnur | van Duijn, Cornelia M | Stefansson, Kari | Cupples, L Adrienne | Loos, Ruth J F | Barroso, Inês | McCarthy, Mark I | Fox, Caroline S | Mohlke, Karen L | Lindgren, Cecilia M
Nature genetics  2010;42(11):949-960.
Waist-hip ratio (WHR) is a measure of body fat distribution and a predictor of metabolic consequences independent of overall adiposity. WHR is heritable, but few genetic variants influencing this trait have been identified. We conducted a meta-analysis of 32 genome-wide association studies for WHR adjusted for body mass index (comprising up to 77,167 participants), following up 16 loci in an additional 29 studies (comprising up to 113,636 subjects). We identified 13 new loci in or near RSPO3, VEGFA, TBX15-WARS2, NFE2L3, GRB14, DNM3-PIGC, ITPR2-SSPN, LY86, HOXC13, ADAMTS9, ZNRF3-KREMEN1, NISCH-STAB1 and CPEB4 (P = 1.9 × 10−9 to P = 1.8 × 10−40) and the known signal at LYPLAL1. Seven of these loci exhibited marked sexual dimorphism, all with a stronger effect on WHR in women than men (P for sex difference = 1.9 × 10−3 to P = 1.2 × 10−13). These findings provide evidence for multiple loci that modulate body fat distribution independent of overall adiposity and reveal strong gene-by-sex interactions.
doi:10.1038/ng.685
PMCID: PMC3000924  PMID: 20935629
20.  Association analyses of 249,796 individuals reveal eighteen new loci associated with body mass index 
Speliotes, Elizabeth K. | Willer, Cristen J. | Berndt, Sonja I. | Monda, Keri L. | Thorleifsson, Gudmar | Jackson, Anne U. | Allen, Hana Lango | Lindgren, Cecilia M. | Luan, Jian’an | Mägi, Reedik | Randall, Joshua C. | Vedantam, Sailaja | Winkler, Thomas W. | Qi, Lu | Workalemahu, Tsegaselassie | Heid, Iris M. | Steinthorsdottir, Valgerdur | Stringham, Heather M. | Weedon, Michael N. | Wheeler, Eleanor | Wood, Andrew R. | Ferreira, Teresa | Weyant, Robert J. | Segré, Ayellet V. | Estrada, Karol | Liang, Liming | Nemesh, James | Park, Ju-Hyun | Gustafsson, Stefan | Kilpeläinen, Tuomas O. | Yang, Jian | Bouatia-Naji, Nabila | Esko, Tõnu | Feitosa, Mary F. | Kutalik, Zoltán | Mangino, Massimo | Raychaudhuri, Soumya | Scherag, Andre | Smith, Albert Vernon | Welch, Ryan | Zhao, Jing Hua | Aben, Katja K. | Absher, Devin M. | Amin, Najaf | Dixon, Anna L. | Fisher, Eva | Glazer, Nicole L. | Goddard, Michael E. | Heard-Costa, Nancy L. | Hoesel, Volker | Hottenga, Jouke-Jan | Johansson, Åsa | Johnson, Toby | Ketkar, Shamika | Lamina, Claudia | Li, Shengxu | Moffatt, Miriam F. | Myers, Richard H. | Narisu, Narisu | Perry, John R.B. | Peters, Marjolein J. | Preuss, Michael | Ripatti, Samuli | Rivadeneira, Fernando | Sandholt, Camilla | Scott, Laura J. | Timpson, Nicholas J. | Tyrer, Jonathan P. | van Wingerden, Sophie | Watanabe, Richard M. | White, Charles C. | Wiklund, Fredrik | Barlassina, Christina | Chasman, Daniel I. | Cooper, Matthew N. | Jansson, John-Olov | Lawrence, Robert W. | Pellikka, Niina | Prokopenko, Inga | Shi, Jianxin | Thiering, Elisabeth | Alavere, Helene | Alibrandi, Maria T. S. | Almgren, Peter | Arnold, Alice M. | Aspelund, Thor | Atwood, Larry D. | Balkau, Beverley | Balmforth, Anthony J. | Bennett, Amanda J. | Ben-Shlomo, Yoav | Bergman, Richard N. | Bergmann, Sven | Biebermann, Heike | Blakemore, Alexandra I.F. | Boes, Tanja | Bonnycastle, Lori L. | Bornstein, Stefan R. | Brown, Morris J. | Buchanan, Thomas A. | Busonero, Fabio | Campbell, Harry | Cappuccio, Francesco P. | Cavalcanti-Proença, Christine | Chen, Yii-Der Ida | Chen, Chih-Mei | Chines, Peter S. | Clarke, Robert | Coin, Lachlan | Connell, John | Day, Ian N.M. | Heijer, Martin den | Duan, Jubao | Ebrahim, Shah | Elliott, Paul | Elosua, Roberto | Eiriksdottir, Gudny | Erdos, Michael R. | Eriksson, Johan G. | Facheris, Maurizio F. | Felix, Stephan B. | Fischer-Posovszky, Pamela | Folsom, Aaron R. | Friedrich, Nele | Freimer, Nelson B. | Fu, Mao | Gaget, Stefan | Gejman, Pablo V. | Geus, Eco J.C. | Gieger, Christian | Gjesing, Anette P. | Goel, Anuj | Goyette, Philippe | Grallert, Harald | Gräßler, Jürgen | Greenawalt, Danielle M. | Groves, Christopher J. | Gudnason, Vilmundur | Guiducci, Candace | Hartikainen, Anna-Liisa | Hassanali, Neelam | Hall, Alistair S. | Havulinna, Aki S. | Hayward, Caroline | Heath, Andrew C. | Hengstenberg, Christian | Hicks, Andrew A. | Hinney, Anke | Hofman, Albert | Homuth, Georg | Hui, Jennie | Igl, Wilmar | Iribarren, Carlos | Isomaa, Bo | Jacobs, Kevin B. | Jarick, Ivonne | Jewell, Elizabeth | John, Ulrich | Jørgensen, Torben | Jousilahti, Pekka | Jula, Antti | Kaakinen, Marika | Kajantie, Eero | Kaplan, Lee M. | Kathiresan, Sekar | Kettunen, Johannes | Kinnunen, Leena | Knowles, Joshua W. | Kolcic, Ivana | König, Inke R. | Koskinen, Seppo | Kovacs, Peter | Kuusisto, Johanna | Kraft, Peter | Kvaløy, Kirsti | Laitinen, Jaana | Lantieri, Olivier | Lanzani, Chiara | Launer, Lenore J. | Lecoeur, Cecile | Lehtimäki, Terho | Lettre, Guillaume | Liu, Jianjun | Lokki, Marja-Liisa | Lorentzon, Mattias | Luben, Robert N. | Ludwig, Barbara | Manunta, Paolo | Marek, Diana | Marre, Michel | Martin, Nicholas G. | McArdle, Wendy L. | McCarthy, Anne | McKnight, Barbara | Meitinger, Thomas | Melander, Olle | Meyre, David | Midthjell, Kristian | Montgomery, Grant W. | Morken, Mario A. | Morris, Andrew P. | Mulic, Rosanda | Ngwa, Julius S. | Nelis, Mari | Neville, Matt J. | Nyholt, Dale R. | O’Donnell, Christopher J. | O’Rahilly, Stephen | Ong, Ken K. | Oostra, Ben | Paré, Guillaume | Parker, Alex N. | Perola, Markus | Pichler, Irene | Pietiläinen, Kirsi H. | Platou, Carl G.P. | Polasek, Ozren | Pouta, Anneli | Rafelt, Suzanne | Raitakari, Olli | Rayner, Nigel W. | Ridderstråle, Martin | Rief, Winfried | Ruokonen, Aimo | Robertson, Neil R. | Rzehak, Peter | Salomaa, Veikko | Sanders, Alan R. | Sandhu, Manjinder S. | Sanna, Serena | Saramies, Jouko | Savolainen, Markku J. | Scherag, Susann | Schipf, Sabine | Schreiber, Stefan | Schunkert, Heribert | Silander, Kaisa | Sinisalo, Juha | Siscovick, David S. | Smit, Jan H. | Soranzo, Nicole | Sovio, Ulla | Stephens, Jonathan | Surakka, Ida | Swift, Amy J. | Tammesoo, Mari-Liis | Tardif, Jean-Claude | Teder-Laving, Maris | Teslovich, Tanya M. | Thompson, John R. | Thomson, Brian | Tönjes, Anke | Tuomi, Tiinamaija | van Meurs, Joyce B.J. | van Ommen, Gert-Jan | Vatin, Vincent | Viikari, Jorma | Visvikis-Siest, Sophie | Vitart, Veronique | Vogel, Carla I. G. | Voight, Benjamin F. | Waite, Lindsay L. | Wallaschofski, Henri | Walters, G. Bragi | Widen, Elisabeth | Wiegand, Susanna | Wild, Sarah H. | Willemsen, Gonneke | Witte, Daniel R. | Witteman, Jacqueline C. | Xu, Jianfeng | Zhang, Qunyuan | Zgaga, Lina | Ziegler, Andreas | Zitting, Paavo | Beilby, John P. | Farooqi, I. Sadaf | Hebebrand, Johannes | Huikuri, Heikki V. | James, Alan L. | Kähönen, Mika | Levinson, Douglas F. | Macciardi, Fabio | Nieminen, Markku S. | Ohlsson, Claes | Palmer, Lyle J. | Ridker, Paul M. | Stumvoll, Michael | Beckmann, Jacques S. | Boeing, Heiner | Boerwinkle, Eric | Boomsma, Dorret I. | Caulfield, Mark J. | Chanock, Stephen J. | Collins, Francis S. | Cupples, L. Adrienne | Smith, George Davey | Erdmann, Jeanette | Froguel, Philippe | Grönberg, Henrik | Gyllensten, Ulf | Hall, Per | Hansen, Torben | Harris, Tamara B. | Hattersley, Andrew T. | Hayes, Richard B. | Heinrich, Joachim | Hu, Frank B. | Hveem, Kristian | Illig, Thomas | Jarvelin, Marjo-Riitta | Kaprio, Jaakko | Karpe, Fredrik | Khaw, Kay-Tee | Kiemeney, Lambertus A. | Krude, Heiko | Laakso, Markku | Lawlor, Debbie A. | Metspalu, Andres | Munroe, Patricia B. | Ouwehand, Willem H. | Pedersen, Oluf | Penninx, Brenda W. | Peters, Annette | Pramstaller, Peter P. | Quertermous, Thomas | Reinehr, Thomas | Rissanen, Aila | Rudan, Igor | Samani, Nilesh J. | Schwarz, Peter E.H. | Shuldiner, Alan R. | Spector, Timothy D. | Tuomilehto, Jaakko | Uda, Manuela | Uitterlinden, André | Valle, Timo T. | Wabitsch, Martin | Waeber, Gérard | Wareham, Nicholas J. | Watkins, Hugh | Wilson, James F. | Wright, Alan F. | Zillikens, M. Carola | Chatterjee, Nilanjan | McCarroll, Steven A. | Purcell, Shaun | Schadt, Eric E. | Visscher, Peter M. | Assimes, Themistocles L. | Borecki, Ingrid B. | Deloukas, Panos | Fox, Caroline S. | Groop, Leif C. | Haritunians, Talin | Hunter, David J. | Kaplan, Robert C. | Mohlke, Karen L. | O’Connell, Jeffrey R. | Peltonen, Leena | Schlessinger, David | Strachan, David P. | van Duijn, Cornelia M. | Wichmann, H.-Erich | Frayling, Timothy M. | Thorsteinsdottir, Unnur | Abecasis, Gonçalo R. | Barroso, Inês | Boehnke, Michael | Stefansson, Kari | North, Kari E. | McCarthy, Mark I. | Hirschhorn, Joel N. | Ingelsson, Erik | Loos, Ruth J.F.
Nature genetics  2010;42(11):937-948.
Obesity is globally prevalent and highly heritable, but the underlying genetic factors remain largely elusive. To identify genetic loci for obesity-susceptibility, we examined associations between body mass index (BMI) and ~2.8 million SNPs in up to 123,865 individuals, with targeted follow-up of 42 SNPs in up to 125,931 additional individuals. We confirmed 14 known obesity-susceptibility loci and identified 18 new loci associated with BMI (P<5×10−8), one of which includes a copy number variant near GPRC5B. Some loci (MC4R, POMC, SH2B1, BDNF) map near key hypothalamic regulators of energy balance, and one is near GIPR, an incretin receptor. Furthermore, genes in other newly-associated loci may provide novel insights into human body weight regulation.
doi:10.1038/ng.686
PMCID: PMC3014648  PMID: 20935630
21.  Association of genetic variation with systolic and diastolic blood pressure among African Americans: the Candidate Gene Association Resource study 
Fox, Ervin R. | Young, J. Hunter | Li, Yali | Dreisbach, Albert W. | Keating, Brendan J. | Musani, Solomon K. | Liu, Kiang | Morrison, Alanna C. | Ganesh, Santhi | Kutlar, Abdullah | Ramachandran, Vasan S. | Polak, Josef F. | Fabsitz, Richard R. | Dries, Daniel L. | Farlow, Deborah N. | Redline, Susan | Adeyemo, Adebowale | Hirschorn, Joel N. | Sun, Yan V. | Wyatt, Sharon B. | Penman, Alan D. | Palmas, Walter | Rotter, Jerome I. | Townsend, Raymond R. | Doumatey, Ayo P. | Tayo, Bamidele O. | Mosley, Thomas H. | Lyon, Helen N. | Kang, Sun J. | Rotimi, Charles N. | Cooper, Richard S. | Franceschini, Nora | Curb, J. David | Martin, Lisa W. | Eaton, Charles B. | Kardia, Sharon L.R. | Taylor, Herman A. | Caulfield, Mark J. | Ehret, Georg B. | Johnson, Toby | Chakravarti, Aravinda | Zhu, Xiaofeng | Levy, Daniel | Munroe, Patricia B. | Rice, Kenneth M. | Bochud, Murielle | Johnson, Andrew D. | Chasman, Daniel I. | Smith, Albert V. | Tobin, Martin D. | Verwoert, Germaine C. | Hwang, Shih-Jen | Pihur, Vasyl | Vollenweider, Peter | O'Reilly, Paul F. | Amin, Najaf | Bragg-Gresham, Jennifer L. | Teumer, Alexander | Glazer, Nicole L. | Launer, Lenore | Zhao, Jing Hua | Aulchenko, Yurii | Heath, Simon | Sõber, Siim | Parsa, Afshin | Luan, Jian'an | Arora, Pankaj | Dehghan, Abbas | Zhang, Feng | Lucas, Gavin | Hicks, Andrew A. | Jackson, Anne U. | Peden, John F. | Tanaka, Toshiko | Wild, Sarah H. | Rudan, Igor | Igl, Wilmar | Milaneschi, Yuri | Parker, Alex N. | Fava, Cristiano | Chambers, John C. | Kumari, Meena | JinGo, Min | van der Harst, Pim | Kao, Wen Hong Linda | Sjögren, Marketa | Vinay, D.G. | Alexander, Myriam | Tabara, Yasuharu | Shaw-Hawkins, Sue | Whincup, Peter H. | Liu, Yongmei | Shi, Gang | Kuusisto, Johanna | Seielstad, Mark | Sim, Xueling | Nguyen, Khanh-Dung Hoang | Lehtimäki, Terho | Matullo, Giuseppe | Wu, Ying | Gaunt, Tom R. | Charlotte Onland-Moret, N. | Cooper, Matthew N. | Platou, Carl G.P. | Org, Elin | Hardy, Rebecca | Dahgam, Santosh | Palmen, Jutta | Vitart, Veronique | Braund, Peter S. | Kuznetsova, Tatiana | Uiterwaal, Cuno S.P.M. | Campbell, Harry | Ludwig, Barbara | Tomaszewski, Maciej | Tzoulaki, Ioanna | Palmer, Nicholette D. | Aspelund, Thor | Garcia, Melissa | Chang, Yen-Pei C. | O'Connell, Jeffrey R. | Steinle, Nanette I. | Grobbee, Diederick E. | Arking, Dan E. | Hernandez, Dena | Najjar, Samer | McArdle, Wendy L. | Hadley, David | Brown, Morris J. | Connell, John M. | Hingorani, Aroon D. | Day, Ian N.M. | Lawlor, Debbie A. | Beilby, John P. | Lawrence, Robert W. | Clarke, Robert | Collins, Rory | Hopewell, Jemma C. | Ongen, Halit | Bis, Joshua C. | Kähönen, Mika | Viikari, Jorma | Adair, Linda S. | Lee, Nanette R. | Chen, Ming-Huei | Olden, Matthias | Pattaro, Cristian | Hoffman Bolton, Judith A. | Köttgen, Anna | Bergmann, Sven | Mooser, Vincent | Chaturvedi, Nish | Frayling, Timothy M. | Islam, Muhammad | Jafar, Tazeen H. | Erdmann, Jeanette | Kulkarni, Smita R. | Bornstein, Stefan R. | Grässler, Jürgen | Groop, Leif | Voight, Benjamin F. | Kettunen, Johannes | Howard, Philip | Taylor, Andrew | Guarrera, Simonetta | Ricceri, Fulvio | Emilsson, Valur | Plump, Andrew | Barroso, Inês | Khaw, Kay-Tee | Weder, Alan B. | Hunt, Steven C. | Bergman, Richard N. | Collins, Francis S. | Bonnycastle, Lori L. | Scott, Laura J. | Stringham, Heather M. | Peltonen, Leena | Perola, Markus | Vartiainen, Erkki | Brand, Stefan-Martin | Staessen, Jan A. | Wang, Thomas J. | Burton, Paul R. | SolerArtigas, Maria | Dong, Yanbin | Snieder, Harold | Wang, Xiaoling | Zhu, Haidong | Lohman, Kurt K. | Rudock, Megan E. | Heckbert, Susan R. | Smith, Nicholas L. | Wiggins, Kerri L. | Shriner, Daniel | Veldre, Gudrun | Viigimaa, Margus | Kinra, Sanjay | Prabhakaran, Dorairajan | Tripathy, Vikal | Langefeld, Carl D. | Rosengren, Annika | Thelle, Dag S. | MariaCorsi, Anna | Singleton, Andrew | Forrester, Terrence | Hilton, Gina | McKenzie, Colin A. | Salako, Tunde | Iwai, Naoharu | Kita, Yoshikuni | Ogihara, Toshio | Ohkubo, Takayoshi | Okamura, Tomonori | Ueshima, Hirotsugu | Umemura, Satoshi | Eyheramendy, Susana | Meitinger, Thomas | Wichmann, H.-Erich | Cho, Yoon Shin | Kim, Hyung-Lae | Lee, Jong-Young | Scott, James | Sehmi, Joban S. | Zhang, Weihua | Hedblad, Bo | Nilsson, Peter | Smith, George Davey | Wong, Andrew | Narisu, Narisu | Stančáková, Alena | Raffel, Leslie J. | Yao, Jie | Kathiresan, Sekar | O'Donnell, Chris | Schwartz, Steven M. | Arfan Ikram, M. | Longstreth, Will T. | Seshadri, Sudha | Shrine, Nick R.G. | Wain, Louise V. | Morken, Mario A. | Swift, Amy J. | Laitinen, Jaana | Prokopenko, Inga | Zitting, Paavo | Cooper, Jackie A. | Humphries, Steve E. | Danesh, John | Rasheed, Asif | Goel, Anuj | Hamsten, Anders | Watkins, Hugh | Bakker, Stephan J.L. | van Gilst, Wiek H. | Janipalli, Charles S. | Radha Mani, K. | Yajnik, Chittaranjan S. | Hofman, Albert | Mattace-Raso, Francesco U.S. | Oostra, Ben A. | Demirkan, Ayse | Isaacs, Aaron | Rivadeneira, Fernando | Lakatta, Edward G. | Orru, Marco | Scuteri, Angelo | Ala-Korpela, Mika | Kangas, Antti J. | Lyytikäinen, Leo-Pekka | Soininen, Pasi | Tukiainen, Taru | Würz, Peter | Twee-Hee Ong, Rick | Dörr, Marcus | Kroemer, Heyo K. | Völker, Uwe | Völzke, Henry | Galan, Pilar | Hercberg, Serge | Lathrop, Mark | Zelenika, Diana | Deloukas, Panos | Mangino, Massimo | Spector, Tim D. | Zhai, Guangju | Meschia, James F. | Nalls, Michael A. | Sharma, Pankaj | Terzic, Janos | Kranthi Kumar, M.J. | Denniff, Matthew | Zukowska-Szczechowska, Ewa | Wagenknecht, Lynne E. | Fowkes, Gerald R. | Charchar, Fadi J. | Schwarz, Peter E.H. | Hayward, Caroline | Guo, Xiuqing | Bots, Michiel L. | Brand, Eva | Samani, Nilesh J. | Polasek, Ozren | Talmud, Philippa J. | Nyberg, Fredrik | Kuh, Diana | Laan, Maris | Hveem, Kristian | Palmer, Lyle J. | van der Schouw, Yvonne T. | Casas, Juan P. | Mohlke, Karen L. | Vineis, Paolo | Raitakari, Olli | Wong, Tien Y. | Shyong Tai, E. | Laakso, Markku | Rao, Dabeeru C. | Harris, Tamara B. | Morris, Richard W. | Dominiczak, Anna F. | Kivimaki, Mika | Marmot, Michael G. | Miki, Tetsuro | Saleheen, Danish | Chandak, Giriraj R. | Coresh, Josef | Navis, Gerjan | Salomaa, Veikko | Han, Bok-Ghee | Kooner, Jaspal S. | Melander, Olle | Ridker, Paul M. | Bandinelli, Stefania | Gyllensten, Ulf B. | Wright, Alan F. | Wilson, James F. | Ferrucci, Luigi | Farrall, Martin | Tuomilehto, Jaakko | Pramstaller, Peter P. | Elosua, Roberto | Soranzo, Nicole | Sijbrands, Eric J.G. | Altshuler, David | Loos, Ruth J.F. | Shuldiner, Alan R. | Gieger, Christian | Meneton, Pierre | Uitterlinden, Andre G. | Wareham, Nicholas J. | Gudnason, Vilmundur | Rettig, Rainer | Uda, Manuela | Strachan, David P. | Witteman, Jacqueline C.M. | Hartikainen, Anna-Liisa | Beckmann, Jacques S. | Boerwinkle, Eric | Boehnke, Michael | Larson, Martin G. | Järvelin, Marjo-Riitta | Psaty, Bruce M. | Abecasis, Gonçalo R. | Elliott, Paul | van Duijn , Cornelia M. | Newton-Cheh, Christopher
Human Molecular Genetics  2011;20(11):2273-2284.
The prevalence of hypertension in African Americans (AAs) is higher than in other US groups; yet, few have performed genome-wide association studies (GWASs) in AA. Among people of European descent, GWASs have identified genetic variants at 13 loci that are associated with blood pressure. It is unknown if these variants confer susceptibility in people of African ancestry. Here, we examined genome-wide and candidate gene associations with systolic blood pressure (SBP) and diastolic blood pressure (DBP) using the Candidate Gene Association Resource (CARe) consortium consisting of 8591 AAs. Genotypes included genome-wide single-nucleotide polymorphism (SNP) data utilizing the Affymetrix 6.0 array with imputation to 2.5 million HapMap SNPs and candidate gene SNP data utilizing a 50K cardiovascular gene-centric array (ITMAT-Broad-CARe [IBC] array). For Affymetrix data, the strongest signal for DBP was rs10474346 (P= 3.6 × 10−8) located near GPR98 and ARRDC3. For SBP, the strongest signal was rs2258119 in C21orf91 (P= 4.7 × 10−8). The top IBC association for SBP was rs2012318 (P= 6.4 × 10−6) near SLC25A42 and for DBP was rs2523586 (P= 1.3 × 10−6) near HLA-B. None of the top variants replicated in additional AA (n = 11 882) or European-American (n = 69 899) cohorts. We replicated previously reported European-American blood pressure SNPs in our AA samples (SH2B3, P= 0.009; TBX3-TBX5, P= 0.03; and CSK-ULK3, P= 0.0004). These genetic loci represent the best evidence of genetic influences on SBP and DBP in AAs to date. More broadly, this work supports that notion that blood pressure among AAs is a trait with genetic underpinnings but also with significant complexity.
doi:10.1093/hmg/ddr092
PMCID: PMC3090190  PMID: 21378095
22.  Amplification ratio control system for copy number variation genotyping 
Nucleic Acids Research  2011;39(8):e54.
We describe a generic design for ratiometric analysis suitable for determination of copy number variation (CNV) class of a gene. Following two initial sequence-specific PCR priming cycles, both ends of both amplicons (one test and one reference) in a duplex reaction, are all primed by the same universal primer (UP). Following each amplification denaturation step, the UP target and its reverse complement (UP′) in each strand form a hairpin. The bases immediately beyond the 3′-end of the UP and 5′ of UP′ are chosen such as not to base pair in the hairpin (otherwise priming is ablated). This hairpin creates a single constant environment for priming events and chaperones free 3′-ends of amplicon strands. The resultant ‘amplification ratio control system’ (ARCS) permits ratiometric representation of amplicons relative to the original template into PCR plateau phase. These advantages circumvent the need for real-time PCR for quantitation. Choice of different %(G+C) content for the target and reference amplicons allows liquid phase thermal melt discrimination and quantitation of amplicons. The design is generic, simple to set up and economical. Comparisons with real-time PCR and other techniques are made and CNV assays demonstrated for haptoglobin duplicon and ‘chemokine (C-C motif) ligand 3-like 1’ gene.
doi:10.1093/nar/gkr046
PMCID: PMC3082892  PMID: 21300641
23.  New genetic loci implicated in fasting glucose homeostasis and their impact on type 2 diabetes risk 
Dupuis, Josée | Langenberg, Claudia | Prokopenko, Inga | Saxena, Richa | Soranzo, Nicole | Jackson, Anne U | Wheeler, Eleanor | Glazer, Nicole L | Bouatia-Naji, Nabila | Gloyn, Anna L | Lindgren, Cecilia M | Mägi, Reedik | Morris, Andrew P | Randall, Joshua | Johnson, Toby | Elliott, Paul | Rybin, Denis | Thorleifsson, Gudmar | Steinthorsdottir, Valgerdur | Henneman, Peter | Grallert, Harald | Dehghan, Abbas | Hottenga, Jouke Jan | Franklin, Christopher S | Navarro, Pau | Song, Kijoung | Goel, Anuj | Perry, John R B | Egan, Josephine M | Lajunen, Taina | Grarup, Niels | Sparsø, Thomas | Doney, Alex | Voight, Benjamin F | Stringham, Heather M | Li, Man | Kanoni, Stavroula | Shrader, Peter | Cavalcanti-Proença, Christine | Kumari, Meena | Qi, Lu | Timpson, Nicholas J | Gieger, Christian | Zabena, Carina | Rocheleau, Ghislain | Ingelsson, Erik | An, Ping | O’Connell, Jeffrey | Luan, Jian'an | Elliott, Amanda | McCarroll, Steven A | Payne, Felicity | Roccasecca, Rosa Maria | Pattou, François | Sethupathy, Praveen | Ardlie, Kristin | Ariyurek, Yavuz | Balkau, Beverley | Barter, Philip | Beilby, John P | Ben-Shlomo, Yoav | Benediktsson, Rafn | Bennett, Amanda J | Bergmann, Sven | Bochud, Murielle | Boerwinkle, Eric | Bonnefond, Amélie | Bonnycastle, Lori L | Borch-Johnsen, Knut | Böttcher, Yvonne | Brunner, Eric | Bumpstead, Suzannah J | Charpentier, Guillaume | Chen, Yii-Der Ida | Chines, Peter | Clarke, Robert | Coin, Lachlan J M | Cooper, Matthew N | Cornelis, Marilyn | Crawford, Gabe | Crisponi, Laura | Day, Ian N M | de Geus, Eco | Delplanque, Jerome | Dina, Christian | Erdos, Michael R | Fedson, Annette C | Fischer-Rosinsky, Antje | Forouhi, Nita G | Fox, Caroline S | Frants, Rune | Franzosi, Maria Grazia | Galan, Pilar | Goodarzi, Mark O | Graessler, Jürgen | Groves, Christopher J | Grundy, Scott | Gwilliam, Rhian | Gyllensten, Ulf | Hadjadj, Samy | Hallmans, Göran | Hammond, Naomi | Han, Xijing | Hartikainen, Anna-Liisa | Hassanali, Neelam | Hayward, Caroline | Heath, Simon C | Hercberg, Serge | Herder, Christian | Hicks, Andrew A | Hillman, David R | Hingorani, Aroon D | Hofman, Albert | Hui, Jennie | Hung, Joe | Isomaa, Bo | Johnson, Paul R V | Jørgensen, Torben | Jula, Antti | Kaakinen, Marika | Kaprio, Jaakko | Kesaniemi, Y Antero | Kivimaki, Mika | Knight, Beatrice | Koskinen, Seppo | Kovacs, Peter | Kyvik, Kirsten Ohm | Lathrop, G Mark | Lawlor, Debbie A | Le Bacquer, Olivier | Lecoeur, Cécile | Li, Yun | Lyssenko, Valeriya | Mahley, Robert | Mangino, Massimo | Manning, Alisa K | Martínez-Larrad, María Teresa | McAteer, Jarred B | McCulloch, Laura J | McPherson, Ruth | Meisinger, Christa | Melzer, David | Meyre, David | Mitchell, Braxton D | Morken, Mario A | Mukherjee, Sutapa | Naitza, Silvia | Narisu, Narisu | Neville, Matthew J | Oostra, Ben A | Orrù, Marco | Pakyz, Ruth | Palmer, Colin N A | Paolisso, Giuseppe | Pattaro, Cristian | Pearson, Daniel | Peden, John F | Pedersen, Nancy L. | Perola, Markus | Pfeiffer, Andreas F H | Pichler, Irene | Polasek, Ozren | Posthuma, Danielle | Potter, Simon C | Pouta, Anneli | Province, Michael A | Psaty, Bruce M | Rathmann, Wolfgang | Rayner, Nigel W | Rice, Kenneth | Ripatti, Samuli | Rivadeneira, Fernando | Roden, Michael | Rolandsson, Olov | Sandbaek, Annelli | Sandhu, Manjinder | Sanna, Serena | Sayer, Avan Aihie | Scheet, Paul | Scott, Laura J | Seedorf, Udo | Sharp, Stephen J | Shields, Beverley | Sigurðsson, Gunnar | Sijbrands, Erik J G | Silveira, Angela | Simpson, Laila | Singleton, Andrew | Smith, Nicholas L | Sovio, Ulla | Swift, Amy | Syddall, Holly | Syvänen, Ann-Christine | Tanaka, Toshiko | Thorand, Barbara | Tichet, Jean | Tönjes, Anke | Tuomi, Tiinamaija | Uitterlinden, André G | van Dijk, Ko Willems | van Hoek, Mandy | Varma, Dhiraj | Visvikis-Siest, Sophie | Vitart, Veronique | Vogelzangs, Nicole | Waeber, Gérard | Wagner, Peter J | Walley, Andrew | Walters, G Bragi | Ward, Kim L | Watkins, Hugh | Weedon, Michael N | Wild, Sarah H | Willemsen, Gonneke | Witteman, Jaqueline C M | Yarnell, John W G | Zeggini, Eleftheria | Zelenika, Diana | Zethelius, Björn | Zhai, Guangju | Zhao, Jing Hua | Zillikens, M Carola | Borecki, Ingrid B | Loos, Ruth J F | Meneton, Pierre | Magnusson, Patrik K E | Nathan, David M | Williams, Gordon H | Hattersley, Andrew T | Silander, Kaisa | Salomaa, Veikko | Smith, George Davey | Bornstein, Stefan R | Schwarz, Peter | Spranger, Joachim | Karpe, Fredrik | Shuldiner, Alan R | Cooper, Cyrus | Dedoussis, George V | Serrano-Ríos, Manuel | Morris, Andrew D | Lind, Lars | Palmer, Lyle J | Hu, Frank B. | Franks, Paul W | Ebrahim, Shah | Marmot, Michael | Kao, W H Linda | Pankow, James S | Sampson, Michael J | Kuusisto, Johanna | Laakso, Markku | Hansen, Torben | Pedersen, Oluf | Pramstaller, Peter Paul | Wichmann, H Erich | Illig, Thomas | Rudan, Igor | Wright, Alan F | Stumvoll, Michael | Campbell, Harry | Wilson, James F | Hamsten, Anders | Bergman, Richard N | Buchanan, Thomas A | Collins, Francis S | Mohlke, Karen L | Tuomilehto, Jaakko | Valle, Timo T | Altshuler, David | Rotter, Jerome I | Siscovick, David S | Penninx, Brenda W J H | Boomsma, Dorret | Deloukas, Panos | Spector, Timothy D | Frayling, Timothy M | Ferrucci, Luigi | Kong, Augustine | Thorsteinsdottir, Unnur | Stefansson, Kari | van Duijn, Cornelia M | Aulchenko, Yurii S | Cao, Antonio | Scuteri, Angelo | Schlessinger, David | Uda, Manuela | Ruokonen, Aimo | Jarvelin, Marjo-Riitta | Waterworth, Dawn M | Vollenweider, Peter | Peltonen, Leena | Mooser, Vincent | Abecasis, Goncalo R | Wareham, Nicholas J | Sladek, Robert | Froguel, Philippe | Watanabe, Richard M | Meigs, James B | Groop, Leif | Boehnke, Michael | McCarthy, Mark I | Florez, Jose C | Barroso, Inês
Nature genetics  2010;42(2):105-116.
Circulating glucose levels are tightly regulated. To identify novel glycemic loci, we performed meta-analyses of 21 genome-wide associations studies informative for fasting glucose (FG), fasting insulin (FI) and indices of β-cell function (HOMA-B) and insulin resistance (HOMA-IR) in up to 46,186 non-diabetic participants. Follow-up of 25 loci in up to 76,558 additional subjects identified 16 loci associated with FG/HOMA-B and two associated with FI/HOMA-IR. These include nine new FG loci (in or near ADCY5, MADD, ADRA2A, CRY2, FADS1, GLIS3, SLC2A2, PROX1 and FAM148B) and one influencing FI/HOMA-IR (near IGF1). We also demonstrated association of ADCY5, PROX1, GCK, GCKR and DGKB/TMEM195 with type 2 diabetes (T2D). Within these loci, likely biological candidate genes influence signal transduction, cell proliferation, development, glucose-sensing and circadian regulation. Our results demonstrate that genetic studies of glycemic traits can identify T2D risk loci, as well as loci that elevate FG modestly, but do not cause overt diabetes.
doi:10.1038/ng.520
PMCID: PMC3018764  PMID: 20081858
24.  Genome-Wide Data-Mining of Candidate Human Splice Translational Efficiency Polymorphisms (STEPs) and an Online Database 
PLoS ONE  2010;5(10):e13340.
Background
Variation in pre-mRNA splicing is common and in some cases caused by genetic variants in intronic splicing motifs. Recent studies into the insulin gene (INS) discovered a polymorphism in a 5′ non-coding intron that influences the likelihood of intron retention in the final mRNA, extending the 5′ untranslated region and maintaining protein quality. Retention was also associated with increased insulin levels, suggesting that such variants - splice translational efficiency polymorphisms (STEPs) - may relate to disease phenotypes through differential protein expression. We set out to explore the prevalence of STEPs in the human genome and validate this new category of protein quantitative trait loci (pQTL) using publicly available data.
Methodology/Principal Findings
Gene transcript and variant data were collected and mined for candidate STEPs in motif regions. Sequences from transcripts containing potential STEPs were analysed for evidence of splice site recognition and an effect in expressed sequence tags (ESTs). 16 publicly released genome-wide association data sets of common diseases were searched for association to candidate polymorphisms with HapMap frequency data. Our study found 3324 candidate STEPs lying in motif sequences of 5′ non-coding introns and further mining revealed 170 with transcript evidence of intron retention. 21 potential STEPs had EST evidence of intron retention or exon extension, as well as population frequency data for comparison.
Conclusions/Significance
Results suggest that the insulin STEP was not a unique example and that many STEPs may occur genome-wide with potentially causal effects in complex disease. An online database of STEPs is freely accessible at http://dbstep.genes.org.uk/.
doi:10.1371/journal.pone.0013340
PMCID: PMC2952627  PMID: 20948966
25.  The association of the paraoxonase (PON1) Q192R polymorphism with depression in older women: findings from the British Women's Heart and Health Study 
Background
The association between the R allele of PON1 Q192R and symptoms reported by sheep dippers and Gulf War veterans has been used to suggest a biological basis for these symptoms. In the absence of such studies in non‐occupational populations, these conclusions may not be valid.
Objective
To examine the association of paraoxonase (PON1) Q192R with a report of ever being diagnosed with depression among a random sample of 3266 British women, aged 60–79 years.
Results
The R allele of PON1 Q192R was associated with depression: per‐allele odds ratio 1.22 (95% confidence interval: 1.05 to 1.41) in this population.
Conclusions
These findings suggest that the association of PON1 Q192R with symptoms of depression in occupationally exposed groups may be driven by exposure to toxins that everyone in the general population is exposed to rather than exposure to toxins specifically used by sheep dippers or Gulf War veterans, or that other mechanisms underlie the association. This is because the study population in which we have found an association consisted of British women aged 60–79 years, few of whom were sheep dippers or Gulf War veterans. When using genotype–outcome associations to infer causality with respect to an environmental exposure modified by the genotype, it is important to examine these associations in general populations and in those specifically exposed to the putative agent. The possible role of PON1 Q192R in psychiatric morbidity requires further examination.
doi:10.1136/jech.2006.049247
PMCID: PMC2465577  PMID: 17183021

Results 1-25 (40)