PMCC PMCC

Search tips
Search criteria

Advanced
Results 1-13 (13)
 

Clipboard (0)
None

Select a Filter Below

Journals
Year of Publication
Document Types
1.  Identification of 2R-ohnologue gene families displaying the same mutation-load skew in multiple cancers 
Open Biology  2014;4(5):140029.
The complexity of signalling pathways was boosted at the origin of the vertebrates, when two rounds of whole genome duplication (2R-WGD) occurred. Those genes and proteins that have survived from the 2R-WGD—termed 2R-ohnologues—belong to families of two to four members, and are enriched in signalling components relevant to cancer. Here, we find that while only approximately 30% of human transcript-coding genes are 2R-ohnologues, they carry 42–60% of the gene mutations in 30 different cancer types. Across a subset of cancer datasets, including melanoma, breast, lung adenocarcinoma, liver and medulloblastoma, we identified 673 2R-ohnologue families in which one gene carries mutations at multiple positions, while sister genes in the same family are relatively mutation free. Strikingly, in 315 of the 322 2R-ohnologue families displaying such a skew in multiple cancers, the same gene carries the heaviest mutation load in each cancer, and usually the second-ranked gene is also the same in each cancer. Our findings inspire the hypothesis that in certain cancers, heterogeneous combinations of genetic changes impair parts of the 2R-WGD signalling networks and force information flow through a limited set of oncogenic pathways in which specific non-mutated 2R-ohnologues serve as effectors. The non-mutated 2R-ohnologues are therefore potential therapeutic targets. These include proteins linked to growth factor signalling, neurotransmission and ion channels.
doi:10.1098/rsob.140029
PMCID: PMC4042849  PMID: 24806839
cancer; mutations; 2R-ohnologue families; signal multiplexing; vertebrates
2.  ANIA: ANnotation and Integrated Analysis of the 14-3-3 interactome 
The dimeric 14-3-3 proteins dock onto pairs of phosphorylated Ser and Thr residues on hundreds of proteins, and thereby regulate many events in mammalian cells. To facilitate global analyses of these interactions, we developed a web resource named ANIA: ANnotation and Integrated Analysis of the 14-3-3 interactome, which integrates multiple data sets on 14-3-3-binding phosphoproteins. ANIA also pinpoints candidate 14-3-3-binding phosphosites using predictor algorithms, assisted by our recent discovery that the human 14-3-3-interactome is highly enriched in 2R-ohnologues. 2R-ohnologues are proteins in families of two to four, generated by two rounds of whole genome duplication at the origin of the vertebrate animals. ANIA identifies candidate ‘lynchpins’, which are 14-3-3-binding phosphosites that are conserved across members of a given 2R-ohnologue protein family. Other features of ANIA include a link to the catalogue of somatic mutations in cancer database to find cancer polymorphisms that map to 14-3-3-binding phosphosites, which would be expected to interfere with 14-3-3 interactions. We used ANIA to map known and candidate 14-3-3-binding enzymes within the 2R-ohnologue complement of the human kinome. Our projections indicate that 14-3-3s dock onto many more human kinases than has been realized. Guided by ANIA, PAK4, 6 and 7 (p21-activated kinases 4, 6 and 7) were experimentally validated as a 2R-ohnologue family of 14-3-3-binding phosphoproteins. PAK4 binding to 14-3-3 is stimulated by phorbol ester, and involves the ‘lynchpin’ site phosphoSer99 and a major contribution from Ser181. In contrast, PAK6 and PAK7 display strong phorbol ester-independent binding to 14-3-3, with Ser113 critical for the interaction with PAK6. These data point to differential 14-3-3 regulation of PAKs in control of cell morphology.
Database URL: https://ania-1433.lifesci.dundee.ac.uk/prediction/webserver/index.py
doi:10.1093/database/bat085
PMCID: PMC3914767  PMID: 24501395
3.  Effect of IRS4 Levels on PI 3-Kinase Signalling 
PLoS ONE  2013;8(9):e73327.
Insulin receptor substrate 1 (IRS1) and IRS2 are well-characterized adapter proteins that relay signals from receptor tyrosine kinases to downstream components of signalling pathways. In contrast, the function of IRS4 is not well understood. IRS4 overexpression has been associated with acute lymphoblastic leukaemia and subungual exostosis, while point mutations of IRS4 have been found in melanomas. Here, we show that while IRS4 expression is low in most cancer cell lines, IRS4 mRNA and protein levels are markedly elevated in certain cells including the NCI-H720, DMS114, HEK293T and HEK293AAV lines. Surprisingly, IRS4 expression was also strongly induced when HEK293 cells were infected with retroviral particles and selected under puromycin, making IRS4 expression a potential off-target effect of retroviral expression vectors. Cells with high expression of IRS4 displayed high phosphatidylinositol (3,4,5)-trisphosphate (PIP3) levels, as well as elevated Akt and p70 S6 kinase activities, even in the absence of growth factors. PI 3-kinase (PI3K) signalling in these cells depends on IRS4, even though these cells also express IRS1/2. Knockdown of IRS4 also inhibited cell proliferation in cells with high levels of IRS4. Together, these findings suggest IRS4 as a potential therapeutic target for cancers with high expression of this protein.
doi:10.1371/journal.pone.0073327
PMCID: PMC3769281  PMID: 24039912
4.  AS160 deficiency causes whole-body insulin resistance via composite effects in multiple tissues 
Biochemical Journal  2012;449(Pt 2):479-489.
AS160 (Akt substrate of 160 kDa) is a Rab GTPase-activating protein implicated in insulin control of GLUT4 (glucose transporter 4) trafficking. In humans, a truncation mutation (R363X) in one allele of AS160 decreased the expression of the protein and caused severe postprandial hyperinsulinaemia during puberty. To complement the limited studies possible in humans, we generated an AS160-knockout mouse. In wild-type mice, AS160 expression is relatively high in adipose tissue and soleus muscle, low in EDL (extensor digitorum longus) muscle and detectable in liver only after enrichment. Despite having lower blood glucose levels under both fasted and random-fed conditions, the AS160-knockout mice exhibited insulin resistance in both muscle and liver in a euglycaemic clamp study. Consistent with this paradoxical phenotype, basal glucose uptake was higher in AS160-knockout primary adipocytes and normal in isolated soleus muscle, but their insulin-stimulated glucose uptake and overall GLUT4 levels were markedly decreased. In contrast, insulin-stimulated glucose uptake and GLUT4 levels were normal in EDL muscle. The liver also contributes to the AS160-knockout phenotype via hepatic insulin resistance, elevated hepatic expression of phosphoenolpyruvate carboxykinase isoforms and pyruvate intolerance, which are indicative of increased gluconeogenesis. Overall, as well as its catalytic function, AS160 influences expression of other proteins, and its loss deregulates basal and insulin-regulated glucose homoeostasis, not only in tissues that normally express AS160, but also by influencing liver function.
doi:10.1042/BJ20120702
PMCID: PMC3685216  PMID: 23078342
Akt substrate of 160 kDa (AS160); glucose transport; insulin resistance; liver; muscle; AS160, Akt substrate of 160 kDa; EDL, extensor digitorum longus; FBP-1, fructose-1,6-bisphosphatase 1; GAP, GTPase-activating protein; GAPDH, glyceraldehyde-3-phosphate dehydrogenase; GIR, glucose infusion rate; GLUT, glucose transporter; GSK3, glycogen synthase kinase 3; MBP, myelin basic protein; PCK/PEPCK, phosphoenolpyruvate carboxykinase; PKB, protein kinase B; PM, plasma membrane; RER, respiratory exchange ratio; TA, tibialis anterior
5.  Identification of the Amino Acids 300–600 of IRS-2 as 14-3-3 Binding Region with the Importance of IGF-1/Insulin-Regulated Phosphorylation of Ser-573 
PLoS ONE  2012;7(8):e43296.
Phosphorylation of insulin receptor substrate (IRS)-2 on tyrosine residues is a key event in IGF-1/insulin signaling and leads to activation of the PI 3-kinase and the Ras/MAPK pathway. Furthermore, phosphorylated serine/threonine residues on IRS-2 can induce 14-3-3 binding. In this study we searched IRS-2 for novel phosphorylation sites and investigated the interaction between IRS-2 and 14-3-3. Mass spectrometry identified a total of 24 serine/threonine residues on IRS-2 with 12 sites unique for IRS-2 while the other residues are conserved in IRS-1 and IRS-2. IGF-1 stimulation led to increased binding of 14-3-3 to IRS-2 in transfected HEK293 cells and this binding was prevented by inhibition of the PI 3-kinase pathway and an Akt/PKB inhibitor. Insulin-stimulated interaction between endogenous IRS-2 and 14-3-3 was observed in rat hepatoma cells and in mice liver after an acute insulin stimulus and refeeding. Using different IRS-2 fragments enabled localization of the IGF-1-dependent 14-3-3 binding region spanning amino acids 300–600. The 24 identified residues on IRS-2 included several 14-3-3 binding candidates in the region 300–600. Single alanine mutants of these candidates led to the identification of serine 573 as 14-3-3 binding site. A phospho-site specific antibody was generated to further characterize serine 573. IGF-1-dependent phosphorylation of serine 573 was reduced by inhibition of PI 3-kinase and Akt/PKB. A negative role of this phosphorylation site was implicated by the alanine mutant of serine 573 which led to enhanced phosphorylation of Akt/PKB in an IGF-1 time course experiment. To conclude, our data suggest a physiologically relevant role for IGF-1/insulin-dependent 14-3-3 binding to IRS-2 involving serine 573.
doi:10.1371/journal.pone.0043296
PMCID: PMC3422239  PMID: 22912850
6.  Evolution of signal multiplexing by 14-3-3-binding 2R-ohnologue protein families in the vertebrates 
Open Biology  2012;2(7):120103.
14-3-3 proteins regulate cellular responses to stimuli by docking onto pairs of phosphorylated residues on target proteins. The present study shows that the human 14-3-3-binding phosphoproteome is highly enriched in 2R-ohnologues, which are proteins in families of two to four members that were generated by two rounds of whole genome duplication at the origin of the vertebrates. We identify 2R-ohnologue families whose members share a ‘lynchpin’, defined as a 14-3-3-binding phosphosite that is conserved across members of a given family, and aligns with a Ser/Thr residue in pro-orthologues from the invertebrate chordates. For example, the human receptor expression enhancing protein (REEP) 1–4 family has the commonest type of lynchpin motif in current datasets, with a phosphorylatable serine in the –2 position relative to the 14-3-3-binding phosphosite. In contrast, the second 14-3-3-binding sites of REEPs 1–4 differ and are phosphorylated by different kinases, and hence the REEPs display different affinities for 14-3-3 dimers. We suggest a conceptual model for intracellular regulation involving protein families whose evolution into signal multiplexing systems was facilitated by 14-3-3 dimer binding to lynchpins, which gave freedom for other regulatory sites to evolve. While increased signalling complexity was needed for vertebrate life, these systems also generate vulnerability to genetic disorders.
doi:10.1098/rsob.120103
PMCID: PMC3411107  PMID: 22870394
Branchiostoma; Ciona; hereditary spastic paraplegia; RAB3GAP1; RAB3GAP2
7.  Visualization and Biochemical Analyses of the Emerging Mammalian 14-3-3-Phosphoproteome* 
Molecular & Cellular Proteomics : MCP  2011;10(10):M110.005751.
Hundreds of candidate 14-3-3-binding (phospho)proteins have been reported in publications that describe one interaction at a time, as well as high-throughput 14-3-3-affinity and mass spectrometry-based studies. Here, we transcribed these data into a common format, deposited the collated data from low-throughput studies in MINT (http://mint.bio.uniroma2.it/mint), and compared the low- and high-throughput data in VisANT graphs that are easy to analyze and extend. Exploring the graphs prompted questions about technical and biological specificity, which were addressed experimentally, resulting in identification of phosphorylated 14-3-3-binding sites in the mitochondrial import sequence of the iron-sulfur cluster assembly enzyme (ISCU), cytoplasmic domains of the mitochondrial fission factor (MFF), and endoplasmic reticulum-tethered receptor expression-enhancing protein 4 (REEP4), RNA regulator SMAUG2, and cytoskeletal regulatory proteins, namely debrin-like protein (DBNL) and kinesin light chain (KLC) isoforms. Therefore, 14-3-3s undergo physiological interactions with proteins that are destined for diverse subcellular locations. Graphing and validating interactions underpins efforts to use 14-3-3-phosphoproteomics to identify mechanisms and biomarkers for signaling pathways in health and disease.
doi:10.1074/mcp.M110.005751
PMCID: PMC3205853  PMID: 21725060
8.  ERK/p90RSK/14-3-3 signalling has an impact on expression of PEA3 Ets transcription factors via the transcriptional repressor capicúa 
Biochemical Journal  2011;433(Pt 3):515-525.
Compounds that inhibit signalling upstream of ERK (extracellular-signal-regulated kinase) are promising anticancer therapies, motivating research to define how this pathway promotes cancers. In the present study, we show that human capicúa represses mRNA expression for PEA3 (polyoma enhancer activator 3) Ets transcription factors ETV1, ETV4 and ETV5 (ETV is Ets translocation variant), and this repression is relieved by multisite controls of capicúa by ERK, p90RSK (p90 ribosomal S6 kinase) and 14-3-3 proteins. Specifically, 14-3-3 binds to p90RSK-phosphorylated Ser173 of capicúa thereby modulating DNA binding to its HMG (high-mobility group) box, whereas ERK phosphorylations prevent binding of a C-terminal NLS (nuclear localization sequence) to importin α4 (KPNA3). ETV1, ETV4 and ETV5 mRNA levels in melanoma cells are elevated by siRNA (small interfering RNA) knockdown of capicúa, and decreased by inhibiting ERK and/or expressing a form of capicúa that cannot bind to 14-3-3 proteins. Capicúa knockdown also enhances cell migration. The findings of the present study give further mechanistic insights into why ETV1 is highly expressed in certain cancers, indicate that loss of capicúa can desensitize cells to the effects of ERK pathway inhibitors, and highlight interconnections among growth factor signalling, spinocerebellar ataxias and cancers.
doi:10.1042/BJ20101562
PMCID: PMC3025492  PMID: 21087211
cancer; capicúa; Ets translocation variant 1 (ETV1); 14-3-3 protein; spinocerebellar ataxia type 1 (SCA1); B2M, β2 microglobuluin; CRE, CIC-responsive element; DAPI, 4′,6-diamidino-2-phenylindole; DMEM, Dulbecco's modified Eagle's medium; DUX4, Double homeobox 4; ECL, enhanced chemiluminescence; EGF, epidermal growth factor; EMSA, electrophoretic mobility-shift assay; ERK, extracellular-signal-regulated kinase; ETV, Ets translocation variant; EWS, Ewing sarcoma protein; FBS, fetal bovine serum; GAPDH, glyceraldehyde-3-phosphate dehydrogenase; GFP, green fluorescent protein; GIST, gastrointestinal stromal tumour; HA, haemagglutinin; HEK, human embryonic kidney; HMG, high-mobility group; IGF1, insulin-like growth factor 1; KPNA3, importin α4/karyopherin α3; LC, liquid chromatography; MS/MS, tandem MS; NLS, nuclear localization sequence; p90RSK, p90 ribosomal S6 kinase; PEA3, polyoma enhancer activator 3; PDK1, phosphoinositide-dependent kinase 1; PI3K, phosphoinositide 3-kinase; PKB, protein kinase B; PKC, protein kinase C; RT, reverse transcription; SCA, spinocerebellar ataxia; siRNA, small interfering RNA
9.  Mice with AS160/TBC1D4-Thr649Ala Knockin Mutation Are Glucose Intolerant with Reduced Insulin Sensitivity and Altered GLUT4 Trafficking 
Cell Metabolism  2011;13(1):68-79.
Summary
AS160 has emerged as a key player in insulin-mediated glucose transport through controlling GLUT4 trafficking, which is thought to be regulated by insulin-stimulated phosphorylation of sites including the 14-3-3 binding phospho-Thr649 (equivalent to Thr642 in human AS160). To define physiological roles of AS160-Thr649 phosphorylation and 14-3-3 binding in glucose homeostasis, we substituted this residue by a nonphosphorylatable alanine by knockin mutation in mice. The mutant protein was expressed at normal levels, while insulin-stimulated AS160 binding to 14-3-3s was abolished in homozygous knockin mice. These animals displayed impaired glucose disposal and insulin sensitivity, which were associated with decreased glucose uptake in vivo. Insulin-stimulated glucose transport and cell surface GLUT4 content were reduced in isolated muscles, but not in adipocytes. These results provide genetic evidence that insulin-induced AS160-Thr649 phosphorylation and/or its binding to 14-3-3 play an important role in regulating whole-body glucose homeostasis, at least in part through regulating GLUT4 trafficking in muscle.
Graphical Abstract
Highlights
► AS160 Thr649→Ala knockin mice are made to study roles of AS160/14-3-3 interaction ► The knockin mice display impaired glucose tolerance and reduced insulin sensitivity ► Deregulated GLUT4 trafficking and glucose uptake in muscles underlie this phenotype ► These findings shed new light on understanding of the pathology of type II diabetes
doi:10.1016/j.cmet.2010.12.005
PMCID: PMC3081066  PMID: 21195350
10.  Mechanism of Activation of PKB/Akt by the Protein Phosphatase Inhibitor Calyculin A 
Cell Biochemistry and Biophysics  2010;58(3):147-156.
The protein phosphatase inhibitor calyculin A activates PKB/Akt to ~50% of the activity induced by insulin-like growth factor 1 (IGF1) in HeLa cells promoting an evident increased phosphorylation of Ser473 despite the apparent lack of Thr308 phosphorylation of PKB. Nevertheless, calyculin A-induced activation of PKB seems to be dependent on basal levels of Thr308 phosphorylation, since a PDK1-dependent mechanism is required for calyculin A-dependent PKB activation by using embryonic stem cells derived from PDK1 wild-type and knockout mice. Data shown suggest that calyculin A-induced phosphorylation of Ser473 was largely blocked by LY294002 and SB-203580 inhibitors, indicating that both PI3-kinase/TORC2-dependent and SAPK2/p38-dependent protein kinases contributed to phosphorylation of Ser473 in calyculin A-treated cells. Additionally, our results suggest that calyculin A blocks the IGF1-dependent Thr308 phosphorylation and activation of PKB, likely due to an enhanced Ser612 phosphorylation of insulin receptor substrate 1 (IRS1), which can be inhibitory to its activation of PI3-kinase, a requirement for PDK1-induced Thr308 phosphorylation and IGF1-dependent activation of PKB. Our data suggest that PKB activity is most dependent on the level of Ser473 phosphorylation rather than Thr308, but basal levels of Thr308 phosphorylation are a requirement. Additionally, we suggest here that calyculin A regulates the IGF1-dependent PKB activation by controlling the PI3-kinase-associated IRS1 Ser/Thr phosphorylation levels.
Electronic supplementary material
The online version of this article (doi:10.1007/s12013-010-9101-4) contains supplementary material, which is available to authorized users.
doi:10.1007/s12013-010-9101-4
PMCID: PMC3627045  PMID: 20717744
PKB; Akt; Phosphorylation; Protein phosphatase inhibitor
11.  Bioinformatic and experimental survey of 14-3-3-binding sites 
Biochemical Journal  2010;427(Pt 1):69-78.
More than 200 phosphorylated 14-3-3-binding sites in the literature were analysed to define 14-3-3 specificities, identify relevant protein kinases, and give insights into how cellular 14-3-3/phosphoprotein networks work. Mode I RXX(pS/pT)XP motifs dominate, although the +2 proline residue occurs in less than half, and LX(R/K)SX(pS/pT)XP is prominent in plant 14-3-3-binding sites. Proline at +1 is rarely reported, and such motifs did not stand up to experimental reanalysis of human Ndel1. Instead, we discovered that 14-3-3 interacts with two residues that are phosphorylated by basophilic kinases and located in the DISC1 (disrupted-in-schizophrenia 1)-interacting region of Ndel1 that is implicated in cognitive disorders. These data conform with the general findings that there are different subtypes of 14-3-3-binding sites that overlap with the specificities of different basophilic AGC (protein kinase A/protein kinase G/protein kinase C family) and CaMK (Ca2+/calmodulin-dependent protein kinase) protein kinases, and a 14-3-3 dimer often engages with two tandem phosphorylated sites, which is a configuration with special signalling, mechanical and evolutionary properties. Thus 14-3-3 dimers can be digital logic gates that integrate more than one input to generate an action, and coincidence detectors when the two binding sites are phosphorylated by different protein kinases. Paired sites are generally located within disordered regions and/or straddle either side of functional domains, indicating how 14-3-3 dimers modulate the conformations and/or interactions of their targets. Finally, 14-3-3 proteins bind to members of several multi-protein families. Two 14-3-3-binding sites are conserved across the class IIa histone deacetylases, whereas other protein families display differential regulation by 14-3-3s. We speculate that 14-3-3 dimers may have contributed to the evolution of such families, tailoring regulatory inputs to different physiological demands.
doi:10.1042/BJ20091834
PMCID: PMC2860806  PMID: 20141511
14-3-3 protein; AGC protein kinase; Ca2+/calmodulin-dependent protein kinase; disrupted-in-schizophrenia 1 (DISC1); evolution; AANAT, serotonin acetyltransferase; AGC, protein kinase A/protein kinase G/protein kinase C family kinase; AMPK, AMP-activated protein kinase; BAD, Bcl-XL/Bcl-2-associated death promoter; CaMK, Ca2+/calmodulin-dependent protein kinase; CDK5, cyclin-dependent kinase 5; DIG, digoxigenin; DISC1, disrupted-in-schizophrenia 1; DSTT, Division of Signal Transduction Therapy; EST, expressed sequence tag; FOXO, Forkhead box O; GLUT4, glucose transporter 4; GST, glutathione transferase; HA, haemagglutinin; HAP1A, Huntingtin-associated protein 1A; HDAC, histone deacetylase; HEK, human embryonic kidney; KLC, kinesin light chain; MARK, microtubule affinity-regulating kinase; PI4K, phosphoinositide 4-kinase; PKB, protein kinase B; PKC, protein kinase C; PP2A, protein phosphatase 2A; RSK, ribosomal S6 kinase; YAP1, yes-associated protein 1
12.  Differential 14-3-3 Affinity Capture Reveals New Downstream Targets of Phosphatidylinositol 3-Kinase Signaling* 
We devised a strategy of 14-3-3 affinity capture and release, isotope differential (d0/d4) dimethyl labeling of tryptic digests, and phosphopeptide characterization to identify novel targets of insulin/IGF1/phosphatidylinositol 3-kinase signaling. Notably four known insulin-regulated proteins (PFK-2, PRAS40, AS160, and MYO1C) had high d0/d4 values meaning that they were more highly represented among 14-3-3-binding proteins from insulin-stimulated than unstimulated cells. Among novel candidates, insulin receptor substrate 2, the proapoptotic CCDC6, E3 ubiquitin ligase ZNRF2, and signaling adapter SASH1 were confirmed to bind to 14-3-3s in response to IGF1/phosphatidylinositol 3-kinase signaling. Insulin receptor substrate 2, ZNRF2, and SASH1 were also regulated by phorbol ester via p90RSK, whereas CCDC6 and PRAS40 were not. In contrast, the actin-associated protein vasodilator-stimulated phosphoprotein and lipolysis-stimulated lipoprotein receptor, which had low d0/d4 scores, bound 14-3-3s irrespective of IGF1 and phorbol ester. Phosphorylated Ser19 of ZNRF2 (RTRAYpS19GS), phospho-Ser90 of SASH1 (RKRRVpS90QD), and phospho- Ser493 of lipolysis-stimulated lipoprotein receptor (RPRARpS493LD) provide one of the 14-3-3-binding sites on each of these proteins. Differential 14-3-3 capture provides a powerful approach to defining downstream regulatory mechanisms for specific signaling pathways.
doi:10.1074/mcp.M800544-MCP200
PMCID: PMC2773716  PMID: 19648646
13.  Proteomic screen in the simple metazoan Hydra identifies 14-3-3 binding proteins implicated in cellular metabolism, cytoskeletal organisation and Ca2+ signalling 
BMC Cell Biology  2007;8:31.
Background
14-3-3 proteins have been implicated in many signalling mechanisms due to their interaction with Ser/Thr phosphorylated target proteins. They are evolutionarily well conserved in eukaryotic organisms from single celled protozoans and unicellular algae to plants and humans. A diverse array of target proteins has been found in higher plants and in human cell lines including proteins involved in cellular metabolism, apoptosis, cytoskeletal organisation, secretion and Ca2+ signalling.
Results
We found that the simple metazoan Hydra has four 14-3-3 isoforms. In order to investigate whether the diversity of 14-3-3 target proteins is also conserved over the whole animal kingdom we isolated 14-3-3 binding proteins from Hydra vulgaris using a 14-3-3-affinity column. We identified 23 proteins that covered most of the above-mentioned groups. We also isolated several novel 14-3-3 binding proteins and the Hydra specific secreted fascin-domain-containing protein PPOD. In addition, we demonstrated that one of the 14-3-3 isoforms, 14-3-3 HyA, interacts with one Hydra-Bcl-2 like protein in vitro.
Conclusion
Our results indicate that 14-3-3 proteins have been ubiquitous signalling components since the start of metazoan evolution. We also discuss the possibility that they are involved in the regulation of cell numbers in response to food supply in Hydra.
doi:10.1186/1471-2121-8-31
PMCID: PMC1964759  PMID: 17651497

Results 1-13 (13)