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1.  The Online Protein Processing Resource (TOPPR): a database and analysis platform for protein processing events 
Nucleic Acids Research  2012;41(D1):D333-D337.
We here present The Online Protein Processing Resource (TOPPR; http://iomics.ugent.be/toppr/), an online database that contains thousands of published proteolytically processed sites in human and mouse proteins. These cleavage events were identified with COmbinded FRActional DIagonal Chromatography proteomics technologies, and the resulting database is provided with full data provenance. Indeed, TOPPR provides an interactive visual display of the actual fragmentation mass spectrum that led to each identification of a reported processed site, complete with fragment ion annotations and search engine scores. Apart from warehousing and disseminating these data in an intuitive manner, TOPPR also provides an online analysis platform, including methods to analyze protease specificity and substrate-centric analyses. Concretely, TOPPR supports three ways to retrieve data: (i) the retrieval of all substrates for one or more cellular stimuli or assays; (ii) a substrate search by UniProtKB/Swiss-Prot accession number, entry name or description; and (iii) a motif search that retrieves substrates matching a user-defined protease specificity profile. The analysis of the substrates is supported through the presence of a variety of annotations, including predicted secondary structure, known domains and experimentally obtained 3D structure where available. Across substrates, substrate orthologs and conserved sequence stretches can also be shown, with iceLogo visualization provided for the latter.
doi:10.1093/nar/gks998
PMCID: PMC3531153  PMID: 23093603
2.  LNCipedia: a database for annotated human lncRNA transcript sequences and structures 
Nucleic Acids Research  2012;41(D1):D246-D251.
Here, we present LNCipedia (http://www.lncipedia.org), a novel database for human long non-coding RNA (lncRNA) transcripts and genes. LncRNAs constitute a large and diverse class of non-coding RNA genes. Although several lncRNAs have been functionally annotated, the majority remains to be characterized. Different high-throughput methods to identify new lncRNAs (including RNA sequencing and annotation of chromatin-state maps) have been applied in various studies resulting in multiple unrelated lncRNA data sets. LNCipedia offers 21 488 annotated human lncRNA transcripts obtained from different sources. In addition to basic transcript information and gene structure, several statistics are determined for each entry in the database, such as secondary structure information, protein coding potential and microRNA binding sites. Our analyses suggest that, much like microRNAs, many lncRNAs have a significant secondary structure, in-line with their presumed association with proteins or protein complexes. Available literature on specific lncRNAs is linked, and users or authors can submit articles through a web interface. Protein coding potential is assessed by two different prediction algorithms: Coding Potential Calculator and HMMER. In addition, a novel strategy has been integrated for detecting potentially coding lncRNAs by automatically re-analysing the large body of publicly available mass spectrometry data in the PRIDE database. LNCipedia is publicly available and allows users to query and download lncRNA sequences and structures based on different search criteria. The database may serve as a resource to initiate small- and large-scale lncRNA studies. As an example, the LNCipedia content was used to develop a custom microarray for expression profiling of all available lncRNAs.
doi:10.1093/nar/gks915
PMCID: PMC3531107  PMID: 23042674
3.  TraML—A Standard Format for Exchange of Selected Reaction Monitoring Transition Lists* 
Molecular & Cellular Proteomics : MCP  2011;11(4):R111.015040.
Targeted proteomics via selected reaction monitoring is a powerful mass spectrometric technique affording higher dynamic range, increased specificity and lower limits of detection than other shotgun mass spectrometry methods when applied to proteome analyses. However, it involves selective measurement of predetermined analytes, which requires more preparation in the form of selecting appropriate signatures for the proteins and peptides that are to be targeted. There is a growing number of software programs and resources for selecting optimal transitions and the instrument settings used for the detection and quantification of the targeted peptides, but the exchange of this information is hindered by a lack of a standard format. We have developed a new standardized format, called TraML, for encoding transition lists and associated metadata. In addition to introducing the TraML format, we demonstrate several implementations across the community, and provide semantic validators, extensive documentation, and multiple example instances to demonstrate correctly written documents. Widespread use of TraML will facilitate the exchange of transitions, reduce time spent handling incompatible list formats, increase the reusability of previously optimized transitions, and thus accelerate the widespread adoption of targeted proteomics via selected reaction monitoring.
doi:10.1074/mcp.R111.015040
PMCID: PMC3322582  PMID: 22159873
4.  NatF Contributes to an Evolutionary Shift in Protein N-Terminal Acetylation and Is Important for Normal Chromosome Segregation 
PLoS Genetics  2011;7(7):e1002169.
N-terminal acetylation (N-Ac) is a highly abundant eukaryotic protein modification. Proteomics revealed a significant increase in the occurrence of N-Ac from lower to higher eukaryotes, but evidence explaining the underlying molecular mechanism(s) is currently lacking. We first analysed protein N-termini and their acetylation degrees, suggesting that evolution of substrates is not a major cause for the evolutionary shift in N-Ac. Further, we investigated the presence of putative N-terminal acetyltransferases (NATs) in higher eukaryotes. The purified recombinant human and Drosophila homologues of a novel NAT candidate was subjected to in vitro peptide library acetylation assays. This provided evidence for its NAT activity targeting Met-Lys- and other Met-starting protein N-termini, and the enzyme was termed Naa60p and its activity NatF. Its in vivo activity was investigated by ectopically expressing human Naa60p in yeast followed by N-terminal COFRADIC analyses. hNaa60p acetylated distinct Met-starting yeast protein N-termini and increased general acetylation levels, thereby altering yeast in vivo acetylation patterns towards those of higher eukaryotes. Further, its activity in human cells was verified by overexpression and knockdown of hNAA60 followed by N-terminal COFRADIC. NatF's cellular impact was demonstrated in Drosophila cells where NAA60 knockdown induced chromosomal segregation defects. In summary, our study revealed a novel major protein modifier contributing to the evolution of N-Ac, redundancy among NATs, and an essential regulator of normal chromosome segregation. With the characterization of NatF, the co-translational N-Ac machinery appears complete since all the major substrate groups in eukaryotes are accounted for.
Author Summary
Small chemical groups are commonly attached to proteins in order to control their activity, localization, and stability. An abundant protein modification is N-terminal acetylation, in which an N-terminal acetyltransferase (NAT) catalyzes the transfer of an acetyl group to the very N-terminal amino acid of the protein. When going from lower to higher eukaryotes there is a significant increase in the occurrence of N-terminal acetylation. We demonstrate here that this is partly because higher eukaryotes uniquely express NatF, an enzyme capable of acetylating a large group of protein N-termini including those previously found to display an increased N-acetylation potential in higher eukaryotes. Thus, the current study has possibly identified the last major component of the eukaryotic machinery responsible for co-translational N-acetylation of proteins. All eukaryotic proteins start with methionine, which is co-translationally cleaved when the second amino acid is small. Thereafter, NatA may acetylate these newly exposed N-termini. Interestingly, NatF also has the potential to act on these types of N-termini where the methionine was not cleaved. At the cellular level, we further found that NatF is essential for normal chromosome segregation during cell division.
doi:10.1371/journal.pgen.1002169
PMCID: PMC3131286  PMID: 21750686
5.  compomics-utilities: an open-source Java library for computational proteomics 
BMC Bioinformatics  2011;12:70.
Background
The growing interest in the field of proteomics has increased the demand for software tools and applications that process and analyze the resulting data. And even though the purpose of these tools can vary significantly, they usually share a basic set of features, including the handling of protein and peptide sequences, the visualization of (and interaction with) spectra and chromatograms, and the parsing of results from various proteomics search engines. Developers typically spend considerable time and effort implementing these support structures, which detracts from working on the novel aspects of their tool.
Results
In order to simplify the development of proteomics tools, we have implemented an open-source support library for computational proteomics, called compomics-utilities. The library contains a broad set of features required for reading, parsing, and analyzing proteomics data. compomics-utilities is already used by a long list of existing software, ensuring library stability and continued support and development.
Conclusions
As a user-friendly, well-documented and open-source library, compomics-utilities greatly simplifies the implementation of the basic features needed in most proteomics tools. Implemented in 100% Java, compomics-utilities is fully portable across platforms and architectures. Our library thus allows the developers to focus on the novel aspects of their tools, rather than on the basic functions, which can contribute substantially to faster development, and better tools for proteomics.
doi:10.1186/1471-2105-12-70
PMCID: PMC3060842  PMID: 21385435
6.  jTraML: An Open Source Java API for TraML, the PSI Standard for Sharing SRM Transitions 
Journal of Proteome Research  2011;10(11):5260-5263.
We here present jTraML, a Java API for the Proteomics Standards Initiative TraML data standard. The library provides fully functional classes for all elements specified in the TraML XSD document, as well as convenient methods to construct controlled vocabulary-based instances required to define SRM transitions. The use of jTraML is demonstrated via a two-way conversion tool between TraML documents and vendor specific files, facilitating the adoption process of this new community standard. The library is released as open source under the permissive Apache2 license and can be downloaded from http://jtraml.googlecode.com. TraML files can also be converted online at http://iomics.ugent.be/jtraml.
The jTraML library provides a freely available and permissively licensed open source Java API for creating and parsing TraML files, the PSI standard for communicating SRM assays. We also used jTraML to build command line and Web applications that convert vendor specific files to TraML and vice versa.
doi:10.1021/pr200664h
PMCID: PMC3208355  PMID: 21967198
proteomics; bioinformatics; mass spectrometry; standards; selection reaction monitoring

Results 1-6 (6)