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1.  Crystallization and preliminary X-ray crystallographic analysis of putative tRNA-modification enzymes from Pyrococcus furiosus and Thermus thermophilus  
Two orthologous putative tRNA methyltransferases from P. furiosus and T. thermophilus have been expressed, purified and crystallized. X-ray diffraction data were collected to 2.2 and 2.05 Å, respectively.
Methyltransferases form a major class of tRNA-modifying enzymes that are needed for the proper functioning of tRNA. Here, the expression, purification and crystallization of two related putative tRNA methyltransferases from two kingdoms of life are reported. The protein encoded by the gene pf1002 from the archaeon Pyrococcus furiosus was crystallized in the monoclinic space group P21. A complete data set was collected to 2.2 Å resolution. The protein encoded by the gene ttc1157 from the eubacterium Thermus thermophilus was crystallized in the trigonal space group P3221. A complete data set was collected to 2.05 Å resolution.
doi:10.1107/S1744309111036347
PMCID: PMC3212469  PMID: 22102250
tRNA; methyltransferases; ttc1157; pf1002
2.  Crystal structures of the tRNA:m2G6 methyltransferase Trm14/TrmN from two domains of life 
Nucleic Acids Research  2012;40(11):5149-5161.
Methyltransferases (MTases) form a major class of tRNA-modifying enzymes needed for the proper functioning of tRNA. Recently, RNA MTases from the TrmN/Trm14 family that are present in Archaea, Bacteria and Eukaryota have been shown to specifically modify tRNAPhe at guanosine 6 in the tRNA acceptor stem. Here, we report the first X-ray crystal structures of the tRNA m2G6 (N2-methylguanosine) MTase TTCTrmN from Thermus thermophilus and its ortholog PfTrm14 from Pyrococcus furiosus. Structures of PfTrm14 were solved in complex with the methyl donor S-adenosyl-l-methionine (SAM or AdoMet), as well as the reaction product S-adenosyl-homocysteine (SAH or AdoHcy) and the inhibitor sinefungin. TTCTrmN and PfTrm14 consist of an N-terminal THUMP domain fused to a catalytic Rossmann-fold MTase (RFM) domain. These results represent the first crystallographic structure analysis of proteins containing both THUMP and RFM domain, and hence provide further insight in the contribution of the THUMP domain in tRNA recognition and catalysis. Electrostatics and conservation calculations suggest a main tRNA binding surface in a groove between the THUMP domain and the MTase domain. This is further supported by a docking model of TrmN in complex with tRNAPhe of T. thermophilus and via site-directed mutagenesis.
doi:10.1093/nar/gks163
PMCID: PMC3367198  PMID: 22362751
3.  New archaeal methyltransferases forming 1-methyladenosine or 1-methyladenosine and 1-methylguanosine at position 9 of tRNA 
Nucleic Acids Research  2010;38(19):6533-6543.
Two archaeal tRNA methyltransferases belonging to the SPOUT superfamily and displaying unexpected activities are identified. These enzymes are orthologous to the yeast Trm10p methyltransferase, which catalyses the formation of 1-methylguanosine at position 9 of tRNA. In contrast, the Trm10p orthologue from the crenarchaeon Sulfolobus acidocaldarius forms 1-methyladenosine at the same position. Even more surprisingly, the Trm10p orthologue from the euryarchaeon Thermococcus kodakaraensis methylates the N1-atom of either adenosine or guanosine at position 9 in different tRNAs. This is to our knowledge the first example of a tRNA methyltransferase with a broadened nucleoside recognition capability. The evolution of tRNA methyltransferases methylating the N1 atom of a purine residue is discussed.
doi:10.1093/nar/gkq451
PMCID: PMC2965216  PMID: 20525789
4.  Insights into the hyperthermostability and unusual region-specificity of archaeal Pyrococcus abyssi tRNA m1A57/58 methyltransferase 
Nucleic Acids Research  2010;38(18):6206-6218.
The S-adenosyl-l-methionine dependent methylation of adenine 58 in the T-loop of tRNAs is essential for cell growth in yeast or for adaptation to high temperatures in thermophilic organisms. In contrast to bacterial and eukaryotic tRNA m1A58 methyltransferases that are site-specific, the homologous archaeal enzyme from Pyrococcus abyssi catalyzes the formation of m1A also at the adjacent position 57, m1A57 being a precursor of 1-methylinosine. We report here the crystal structure of P. abyssi tRNA m1A57/58 methyltransferase (PabTrmI), in complex with S-adenosyl-l-methionine or S-adenosyl-l-homocysteine in three different space groups. The fold of the monomer and the tetrameric architecture are similar to those of the bacterial enzymes. However, the inter-monomer contacts exhibit unique features. In particular, four disulfide bonds contribute to the hyperthermostability of the archaeal enzyme since their mutation lowers the melting temperature by 16.5°C. His78 in conserved motif X, which is present only in TrmIs from the Thermococcocales order, lies near the active site and displays two alternative conformations. Mutagenesis indicates His78 is important for catalytic efficiency of PabTrmI. When A59 is absent in tRNAAsp, only A57 is modified. Identification of the methylated positions in tRNAAsp by mass spectrometry confirms that PabTrmI methylates the first adenine of an AA sequence.
doi:10.1093/nar/gkq381
PMCID: PMC2952851  PMID: 20483913
5.  The YqfN protein of Bacillus subtilis is the tRNA: m1A22 methyltransferase (TrmK) 
Nucleic Acids Research  2008;36(10):3252-3262.
N1-methylation of adenosine to m1A occurs in several different positions in tRNAs from various organisms. A methyl group at position N1 prevents Watson–Crick-type base pairing by adenosine and is therefore important for regulation of structure and stability of tRNA molecules. Thus far, only one family of genes encoding enzymes responsible for m1A methylation at position 58 has been identified, while other m1A methyltransferases (MTases) remain elusive. Here, we show that Bacillus subtilis open reading frame yqfN is necessary and sufficient for N1-adenosine methylation at position 22 of bacterial tRNA. Thus, we propose to rename YqfN as TrmK, according to the traditional nomenclature for bacterial tRNA MTases, or TrMet(m1A22) according to the nomenclature from the MODOMICS database of RNA modification enzymes. tRNAs purified from a ΔtrmK strain are a good substrate in vitro for the recombinant TrmK protein, which is sufficient for m1A methylation at position 22 as are tRNAs from Escherichia coli, which natively lacks m1A22. TrmK is conserved in Gram-positive bacteria and present in some Gram-negative bacteria, but its orthologs are apparently absent from archaea and eukaryota. Protein structure prediction indicates that the active site of TrmK does not resemble the active site of the m1A58 MTase TrmI, suggesting that these two enzymatic activities evolved independently.
doi:10.1093/nar/gkn169
PMCID: PMC2425500  PMID: 18420655
6.  Formation of the conserved pseudouridine at position 55 in archaeal tRNA 
Nucleic Acids Research  2006;34(15):4293-4301.
Pseudouridine (Ψ) located at position 55 in tRNA is a nearly universally conserved RNA modification found in all three domains of life. This modification is catalyzed by TruB in bacteria and by Pus4 in eukaryotes, but so far the Ψ55 synthase has not been identified in archaea. In this work, we report the ability of two distinct pseudouridine synthases from the hyperthermophilic archaeon Pyrococcus furiosus to specifically modify U55 in tRNA in vitro. These enzymes are pfuCbf5, a protein known to play a role in RNA-guided modification of rRNA, and pfuPsuX, a previously uncharacterized enzyme that is not a member of the TruB/Pus4/Cbf5 family of pseudouridine synthases. pfuPsuX is hereafter renamed pfuPus10. Both enzymes specifically modify tRNA U55 in vitro but exhibit differences in substrate recognition. In addition, we find that in a heterologous in vivo system, pfuPus10 efficiently complements an Escherichia coli strain deficient in the bacterial Ψ55 synthase TruB. These results indicate that it is probable that pfuCbf5 or pfuPus10 (or both) is responsible for the introduction of pseudouridine at U55 in tRNAs in archaea. While we cannot unequivocally assign the function from our results, both possibilities represent unexpected functions of these proteins as discussed herein.
doi:10.1093/nar/gkl530
PMCID: PMC1616971  PMID: 16920741
7.  A primordial RNA modification enzyme: the case of tRNA (m1A) methyltransferase 
Nucleic Acids Research  2004;32(2):465-476.
The modified nucleoside 1-methyladenosine (m1A) is found in the T-loop of many tRNAs from organisms belonging to the three domains of life (Eukaryota, Bacteria, Archaea). In the T-loop of eukaryotic and bacterial tRNAs, m1A is present at position 58, whereas in archaeal tRNAs it is present at position(s) 58 and/or 57, m1A57 being the obligatory intermediate in the biosynthesis of 1-methylinosine (m1I57). In yeast, the formation of m1A58 is catalysed by the essential tRNA (m1A58) methyltransferase (MTase), a tetrameric enzyme that is composed of two types of subunits (Gcd14p and Gcd10p), whereas in the bacterium Thermus thermophilus the enzyme is a homotetramer of the TrmI polypeptide. Here, we report that the TrmI enzyme from the archaeon Pyrococcus abyssi is also a homotetramer. However, unlike the bacterial site-specific TrmI MTase, the P.abyssi enzyme is region-specific and catalyses the formation of m1A at two adjacent positions (57 and 58) in the T-loop of certain tRNAs. The stabilisation of P.abyssi TrmI at extreme temperatures involves intersubunit disulphide bridges that reinforce the tetrameric oligomerisation, as revealed by biochemical and crystallographic evidences. The origin and evolution of m1A MTases is discussed in the context of different hypotheses of the tree of life.
doi:10.1093/nar/gkh191
PMCID: PMC373318  PMID: 14739239
8.  The yggH Gene of Escherichia coli Encodes a tRNA (m7G46) Methyltransferase 
Journal of Bacteriology  2003;185(10):3238-3243.
We cloned, expressed, and purified the Escherichia coli YggH protein and show that it catalyzes the S-adenosyl-l-methionine-dependent formation of N7-methylguanosine at position 46 (m7G46) in tRNA. Additionally, we generated an E. coli strain with a disrupted yggH gene and show that the mutant strain lacks tRNA (m7G46) methyltransferase activity.
doi:10.1128/JB.185.10.3238-3243.2003
PMCID: PMC154064  PMID: 12730187
9.  Cloning and characterization of tRNA (m1A58) methyltransferase (TrmI) from Thermus thermophilus HB27, a protein required for cell growth at extreme temperatures 
Nucleic Acids Research  2003;31(8):2148-2156.
N1-methyladenosine (m1A) is found at position 58 in the T-loop of many tRNAs. In yeast, the formation of this modified nucleoside is catalyzed by the essential tRNA (m1A58) methyltransferase, a tetrameric enzyme that is composed of two types of subunits (Gcd14p and Gcd10p). In this report we describe the cloning, expression and characterization of a Gcd14p homolog from the hyperthermophilic bacterium Thermus thermophilus. The purified recombinant enzyme behaves as a homotetramer of ∼150 kDa by gel filtration and catalyzes the site- specific formation of m1A at position 58 of the T-loop of tRNA in the absence of any other complementary protein. S-adenosylmethionine is used as donor of the methyl group. Thus, we propose to name the bacterial enzyme TrmI and accordingly its structural gene trmI. These results provide a key evolutionary link between the functionally characterized two-component eukaryotic enzyme and the recently described crystal structure of an uncharacterized, putative homotetrameric methyltransferase Rv2118c from Mycobacterium tuberculosis. Interest ingly, inactivation of the T.thermophilus trmI gene results in a thermosensitive phenotype (growth defect at 80°C), which suggests a role of the N1-methylation of tRNA adenosine-58 in adaptation of life to extreme temperatures.
PMCID: PMC153742  PMID: 12682365
10.  Genes of De Novo Pyrimidine Biosynthesis from the Hyperthermoacidophilic Crenarchaeote Sulfolobus acidocaldarius: Novel Organization in a Bipolar Operon 
Journal of Bacteriology  2002;184(16):4430-4441.
Sequencing a 8,519-bp segment of the Sulfolobus acidocaldarius genome revealed the existence of a tightly packed bipolar pyrimidine gene cluster encoding the enzymes of de novo UMP synthesis. The G+C content of 35.3% is comparable to that of the entire genome, but intergenic regions exhibit a considerably lower percentage of strong base pairs. Coding regions harbor the classical excess of purines on the coding strand, whereas intergenic regions do not show this bias. Reverse transcription-PCR and primer extension experiments demonstrated the existence of two polycistronic messengers, pyrEF-orf8 and pyrBI-orf1-pyrCD-orf2-orf3-orf4, initiated from a pair of divergent and partially overlapping promoters. The gene order and the grouping in two wings of a bipolar operon constitute a novel organization of pyr genes that also occurs in the recently determined genome sequences of Sulfolobus solfataricus P2 and Sulfolobus tokodaii strain 7; the configuration appears therefore characteristic of Sulfolobus. The quasi-leaderless pyrE and pyrB genes do not bear a Shine-Dalgarno sequence, whereas the initiation codon of promoter-distal genes is preceded at an appropriate distance by a sequence complementary to the 3′ end of 16S rRNA. The polycistronic nature of the pyr messengers and the existence of numerous overlaps between contiguous open reading frames suggests the existence of translational coupling. pyrB transcription was shown to be approximately twofold repressed in the presence of uracil. The mechanism underlying this modulation is as yet unknown, but it appears to be of a type different from the various attenuation-like mechanisms that regulate pyrB transcription in bacteria. In contrast, the pyrE-pyrB promoter/control region harbors direct repeats and imperfect palindromes reminiscent of target sites for the binding of a hypothetical regulatory protein(s).
doi:10.1128/JB.184.16.4430-4441.2002
PMCID: PMC135248  PMID: 12142413
11.  Experimental Evolution of Enzyme Temperature Activity Profile: Selection In Vivo and Characterization of Low-Temperature-Adapted Mutants of Pyrococcus furiosus Ornithine Carbamoyltransferase 
Journal of Bacteriology  2001;183(3):1101-1105.
We have obtained mutants of Pyrococcus furiosus ornithine carbamoyltransferase active at low temperatures by selecting for complementation of an appropriate yeast mutant after in vivo mutagenesis. The mutants were double ones, still complementing at 15°C, a temperature already in the psychrophilic range. Their kinetic analysis is reported.
doi:10.1128/JB.183.3.1101-1105.2001
PMCID: PMC94980  PMID: 11208811
12.  Organization and Expression of a Thermus thermophilus Arginine Cluster: Presence of Unidentified Open Reading Frames and Absence of a Shine-Dalgarno Sequence 
Journal of Bacteriology  2000;182(20):5911-5915.
A group of genes regulated by arginine was found clustered in the order argF-ORF1-argC-argJ-ORF4 between other, as yet uncharacterized, open reading frames (ORFs). Transcription starts were identified immediately upstream from argF and ORF4. Arginine repressed transcription that was initiated at argF but induced transcription of ORF4. The functions of ORF1 and ORF4 are unknown, but analysis of the sequence of ORF4 suggests that it is a membrane protein, possibly involved in transport of arginine or a related metabolite. Mobility shift and DNase I footprinting have revealed specific binding of pure Escherichia coli ArgR to the promoter region of Thermus thermophilus argF. These results suggest that argF transcription is controlled by a repressor homologous to those characterized in enteric bacteria and bacilli. Thermus argF mRNA is devoid of Shine-Dalgarno (SD) sequences. However, downstream from the ATG start codon of argF and many other Thermus genes (with or without an SD box), sequences were found to be complementary to nucleotides 1392 to 1409 of Thermus 16S rRNA, suggesting that an mRNA-rRNA base pairing in this region is important for correct translation initiation.
PMCID: PMC94718  PMID: 11004195

Results 1-12 (12)