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1.  Tertiary and quaternary allostery in HbII from Scapharca inaequivalvis 
Biochemistry  2013;52(12):10.1021/bi301620x.
The clam Scapharca inaequivalvis possesses two cooperative oxygen binding hemoglobins in its red cells: a homodimeric HbI and a heterotetrameric A2B2 HbII. Each AB dimeric half of HbII is assembled very similarly to that of the well studied HbI. This study presents crystal structures of HbII along with oxygen binding data both in the crystalline state and in wet nanoporous silica gels. Despite very similar ligand-linked structural transitions observed in HbI and HbII crystals, HbII in the crystal or encapsulated in silica gels apparently exhibits minimal cooperativity in oxygen binding, in contrast with the full cooperativity exhibited by HbI crystals. However, oxygen binding curves in the crystal indicate the presence of a significant functional inequivalence of A and B chains. When this inequivalence is taken into account, both crystal and R state gel functional data are consistent with the conservation of a tertiary contribution to cooperative oxygen binding, quantitatively similar to that measured for HbI, and are in keeping with the structural information. Furthermore, our results indicate that to fully express the cooperative ligand binding, HbII requires quaternary transitions hampered by crystal lattice and gel encapsulation, revealing greater complexity in cooperative function than the direct communication across a dimeric interface observed in HbI.
doi:10.1021/bi301620x
PMCID: PMC3742685  PMID: 23458680
X-ray crystallography; microspectrophotometry; silica gel; cooperativity; hemoglobin
2.  Isozyme-Specific Ligands for O-acetylserine sulfhydrylase, a Novel Antibiotic Target 
PLoS ONE  2013;8(10):e77558.
The last step of cysteine biosynthesis in bacteria and plants is catalyzed by O-acetylserine sulfhydrylase. In bacteria, two isozymes, O-acetylserine sulfhydrylase-A and O-acetylserine sulfhydrylase-B, have been identified that share similar binding sites, although the respective specific functions are still debated. O-acetylserine sulfhydrylase plays a key role in the adaptation of bacteria to the host environment, in the defense mechanisms to oxidative stress and in antibiotic resistance. Because mammals synthesize cysteine from methionine and lack O-acetylserine sulfhydrylase, the enzyme is a potential target for antimicrobials. With this aim, we first identified potential inhibitors of the two isozymes via a ligand- and structure-based in silico screening of a subset of the ZINC library using FLAP. The binding affinities of the most promising candidates were measured in vitro on purified O-acetylserine sulfhydrylase-A and O-acetylserine sulfhydrylase-B from Salmonella typhimurium by a direct method that exploits the change in the cofactor fluorescence. Two molecules were identified with dissociation constants of 3.7 and 33 µM for O-acetylserine sulfhydrylase-A and O-acetylserine sulfhydrylase-B, respectively. Because GRID analysis of the two isoenzymes indicates the presence of a few common pharmacophoric features, cross binding titrations were carried out. It was found that the best binder for O-acetylserine sulfhydrylase-B exhibits a dissociation constant of 29 µM for O-acetylserine sulfhydrylase-A, thus displaying a limited selectivity, whereas the best binder for O-acetylserine sulfhydrylase-A exhibits a dissociation constant of 50 µM for O-acetylserine sulfhydrylase-B and is thus 8-fold selective towards the former isozyme. Therefore, isoform-specific and isoform-independent ligands allow to either selectively target the isozyme that predominantly supports bacteria during infection and long-term survival or to completely block bacterial cysteine biosynthesis.
doi:10.1371/journal.pone.0077558
PMCID: PMC3805590  PMID: 24167577
3.  Asymmetry of the Active Site Loop Conformation between Subunits of Glutamate-1-semialdehyde Aminomutase in Solution 
BioMed Research International  2013;2013:353270.
Glutamate-1-semialdehyde aminomutase (GSAM) is a dimeric, pyridoxal 5′-phosphate (PLP)- dependent enzyme catalysing in plants and some bacteria the isomerization of L-glutamate-1-semialdehyde to 5-aminolevulinate, a common precursor of chlorophyll, haem, coenzyme B12, and other tetrapyrrolic compounds. During the catalytic cycle, the coenzyme undergoes conversion from pyridoxamine 5′-phosphate (PMP) to PLP. The entrance of the catalytic site is protected by a loop that is believed to switch from an open to a closed conformation during catalysis. Crystallographic studies indicated that the structure of the mobile loop is related to the form of the cofactor bound to the active site, allowing for asymmetry within the dimer. Since no information on structural and functional asymmetry of the enzyme in solution is available in the literature, we investigated the active site accessibility by determining the cofactor fluorescence quenching of PMP- and PLP-GSAM forms. PLP-GSAM is partially quenched by potassium iodide, suggesting that at least one catalytic site is accessible to the anionic quencher and therefore confirming the asymmetry observed in the crystal structure. Iodide induces release of the cofactor from PMP-GSAM, apparently from only one catalytic site, therefore suggesting an asymmetry also in this form of the enzyme in solution, in contrast with the crystallographic data.
doi:10.1155/2013/353270
PMCID: PMC3747428  PMID: 23984351
4.  CO Rebinding Kinetics and Molecular Dynamics Simulations Highlight Dynamic Regulation of Internal Cavities in Human Cytoglobin 
PLoS ONE  2013;8(1):e49770.
Cytoglobin (Cygb) was recently discovered in the human genome and localized in different tissues. It was suggested to play tissue-specific protective roles, spanning from scavenging of reactive oxygen species in neurons to supplying oxygen to enzymes in fibroblasts. To shed light on the functioning of such versatile machinery, we have studied the processes supporting transport of gaseous heme ligands in Cygb. Carbon monoxide rebinding shows a complex kinetic pattern with several distinct reaction intermediates, reflecting rebinding from temporary docking sites, second order recombination, and formation (and dissociation) of a bis-histidyl heme hexacoordinated reaction intermediate. Ligand exit to the solvent occurs through distinct pathways, some of which exploit temporary docking sites. The remarkable change in energetic barriers, linked to heme bis-histidyl hexacoordination by HisE7, may be responsible for active regulation of the flux of reactants and products to and from the reaction site on the distal side of the heme. A substantial change in both protein dynamics and inner cavities is observed upon transition from the CO-liganded to the pentacoordinated and bis-histidyl hexacoordinated species, which could be exploited as a signalling state. These findings are consistent with the expected versatility of the molecular activity of this protein.
doi:10.1371/journal.pone.0049770
PMCID: PMC3537629  PMID: 23308092
5.  Low affinity PEGylated hemoglobin from Trematomus bernacchii, a model for hemoglobin-based blood substitutes 
BMC Biochemistry  2011;12:66.
Background
Conjugation of human and animal hemoglobins with polyethylene glycol has been widely explored as a means to develop blood substitutes, a novel pharmaceutical class to be used in surgery or emergency medicine. However, PEGylation of human hemoglobin led to products with significantly different oxygen binding properties with respect to the unmodified tetramer and high NO dioxygenase reactivity, known causes of toxicity. These recent findings call for the biotechnological development of stable, low-affinity PEGylated hemoglobins with low NO dioxygenase reactivity.
Results
To investigate the effects of PEGylation on protein structure and function, we compared the PEGylation products of human hemoglobin and Trematomus bernacchii hemoglobin, a natural variant endowed with a remarkably low oxygen affinity and high tetramer stability. We show that extension arm facilitated PEGylation chemistry based on the reaction of T. bernacchii hemoglobin with 2-iminothiolane and maleimido-functionalyzed polyethylene glycol (MW 5000 Da) leads to a tetraPEGylated product, more homogeneous than the corresponding derivative of human hemoglobin. PEGylated T. bernacchii hemoglobin largely retains the low affinity of the unmodified tetramer, with a p50 50 times higher than PEGylated human hemoglobin. Moreover, it is still sensitive to protons and the allosteric effector ATP, indicating the retention of allosteric regulation. It is also 10-fold less reactive towards nitrogen monoxide than PEGylated human hemoglobin.
Conclusions
These results indicate that PEGylated hemoglobins, provided that a suitable starting hemoglobin variant is chosen, can cover a wide range of oxygen-binding properties, potentially meeting the functional requirements of blood substitutes in terms of oxygen affinity, tetramer stability and NO dioxygenase reactivity.
doi:10.1186/1471-2091-12-66
PMCID: PMC3268738  PMID: 22185675
6.  Bound Water at Protein-Protein Interfaces: Partners, Roles and Hydrophobic Bubbles as a Conserved Motif 
PLoS ONE  2011;6(9):e24712.
Background
There is a great interest in understanding and exploiting protein-protein associations as new routes for treating human disease. However, these associations are difficult to structurally characterize or model although the number of X-ray structures for protein-protein complexes is expanding. One feature of these complexes that has received little attention is the role of water molecules in the interfacial region.
Methodology
A data set of 4741 water molecules abstracted from 179 high-resolution (≤ 2.30 Å) X-ray crystal structures of protein-protein complexes was analyzed with a suite of modeling tools based on the HINT forcefield and hydrogen-bonding geometry. A metric termed Relevance was used to classify the general roles of the water molecules.
Results
The water molecules were found to be involved in: a) (bridging) interactions with both proteins (21%), b) favorable interactions with only one protein (53%), and c) no interactions with either protein (26%). This trend is shown to be independent of the crystallographic resolution. Interactions with residue backbones are consistent for all classes and account for 21.5% of all interactions. Interactions with polar residues are significantly more common for the first group and interactions with non-polar residues dominate the last group. Waters interacting with both proteins stabilize on average the proteins' interaction (−0.46 kcal mol−1), but the overall average contribution of a single water to the protein-protein interaction energy is unfavorable (+0.03 kcal mol−1). Analysis of the waters without favorable interactions with either protein suggests that this is a conserved phenomenon: 42% of these waters have SASA ≤ 10 Å2 and are thus largely buried, and 69% of these are within predominantly hydrophobic environments or “hydrophobic bubbles”. Such water molecules may have an important biological purpose in mediating protein-protein interactions.
doi:10.1371/journal.pone.0024712
PMCID: PMC3178540  PMID: 21961043
7.  Design of O-acetylserine sulfhydrylase inhibitors by mimicking Nature 
Journal of medicinal chemistry  2010;53(1):345-356.
The inhibition of cysteine biosynthesis in prokaryotes and protozoa has been proposed to be relevant for the development of antibiotics. Haemophilus influenzae O-acetylserine sulfhydrylase (OASS), catalyzing L-cysteine formation, is inhibited by the insertion of the C-terminal pentapeptide (MNLNI) of serine acetyltransferase into the active site. 400 MNXXI pentapeptides were generated, docked into OASS active site using GOLD and scored with HINT. The terminal P5 Ile accounts for about 50% of the binding energy. Glu or Asp at position P4, and to a lesser extent, at position P3, also significantly contribute to the binding interaction. The predicted affinity of 14 selected pentapeptides correlated well with the experimentally determined dissociation constants. The X-ray structure of three high affinity pentapeptides-OASS complexes were compared with the docked poses. These results, combined with a GRID analysis of the active site, allowed us to define a pharmacophoric scaffold for the design of peptidomimetic inhibitors.
doi:10.1021/jm901325e
PMCID: PMC2804909  PMID: 19928859
8.  The Role of Oligomerization and Cooperative Regulation in Protein Function: The Case of Tryptophan Synthase 
PLoS Computational Biology  2010;6(11):e1000994.
The oligomerization/co-localization of protein complexes and their cooperative regulation in protein function is a key feature in many biological systems. The synergistic regulation in different subunits often enhances the functional properties of the multi-enzyme complex. The present study used molecular dynamics and Brownian dynamics simulations to study the effects of allostery, oligomerization and intermediate channeling on enhancing the protein function of tryptophan synthase (TRPS). TRPS uses a set of α/β–dimeric units to catalyze the last two steps of L-tryptophan biosynthesis, and the rate is remarkably slower in the isolated monomers. Our work shows that without their binding partner, the isolated monomers are stable and more rigid. The substrates can form fairly stable interactions with the protein in both forms when the protein reaches the final ligand–bound conformations. Our simulations also revealed that the α/β–dimeric unit stabilizes the substrate–protein conformation in the ligand binding process, which lowers the conformation transition barrier and helps the protein conformations shift from an open/inactive form to a closed/active form. Brownian dynamics simulations with a coarse-grained model illustrate how protein conformations affect substrate channeling. The results highlight the complex roles of protein oligomerization and the fine balance between rigidity and dynamics in protein function.
Author Summary
Conformational changes of enzymes are often related to regulating and creating an optimal environment for efficient chemistry. An increasing number of evidences also indicate that oligomerization/co-localization of proteins contributes to the efficiency of metabolic pathways. Although static structures have been available for many multi-enzyme complexes, their efficiency is also governed by the synergistic regulation between the multi-units. Our study applies molecular dynamics and Brownian dynamics simulations to the model system, the tryptophan synthase complex. The multi-enzyme complex is a bienzyme nanomachine and its catalytic activity is intimately related to the allosteric signaling and the metabolite transfer between its α– and β–subunits connected by a 25-Å long channel. Our studies suggest that the binding partner is crucial for the ligand binding processes. Although the isolated monomers are stable in the ligand–free state and can form stable interaction if the substrate is in the final bound conformation, it has higher energy barrier when ligand binds to the active site. We also show that the channel does not always exist, but it may be blocked before the enzyme reaches its final bound conformation. The results highlight the importance of forming protein complexes and the cooperative changes during different states.
doi:10.1371/journal.pcbi.1000994
PMCID: PMC2978696  PMID: 21085641
9.  Haemoglobin-based oxygen carriers: research and reality towards an alternative to blood transfusions 
Blood Transfusion  2010;8(Suppl 3):s59-s68.
doi:10.2450/2010.010S
PMCID: PMC2897202  PMID: 20606751
haemoglobin; oxygen therapy; transfusion; red blood cells
10.  Identification of Xenoestrogens in Food Additives by an Integrated in Silico and in Vitro Approach 
In the search for xenoestrogens within food additives, we have analyzed the Joint FAO-WHO expert committee database, containing 1500 compounds, using an integrated in silico and in vitro approach. This analysis identified 31 potential estrogen receptor α ligands that were reduced to 13 upon applying a stringent filter based on ligand volume and binding mode. Among the 13 potential xenoestrogens, four were already known to exhibit an estrogenic activity, and the other nine were assayed in vitro, determining the binding affinity to the receptor and biological effects. Propyl gallate was found to act as an antagonist, and 4-hexylresorcinol was found to act as a potent transactivator; both ligands were active at nanomolar concentrations, as predicted by the in silico analysis. Some caution should be issued for the use of propyl gallate and 4-hexylresorcinol as food additives.
doi:10.1021/tx800048m
PMCID: PMC2758355  PMID: 19063592
11.  Energetics of the protein-DNA-water interaction 
Background
To understand the energetics of the interaction between protein and DNA we analyzed 39 crystallographically characterized complexes with the HINT (Hydropathic INTeractions) computational model. HINT is an empirical free energy force field based on solvent partitioning of small molecules between water and 1-octanol. Our previous studies on protein-ligand complexes demonstrated that free energy predictions were significantly improved by taking into account the energetic contribution of water molecules that form at least one hydrogen bond with each interacting species.
Results
An initial correlation between the calculated HINT scores and the experimentally determined binding free energies in the protein-DNA system exhibited a relatively poor r2 of 0.21 and standard error of ± 1.71 kcal mol-1. However, the inclusion of 261 waters that bridge protein and DNA improved the HINT score-free energy correlation to an r2 of 0.56 and standard error of ± 1.28 kcal mol-1. Analysis of the water role and energy contributions indicate that 46% of the bridging waters act as linkers between amino acids and nucleotide bases at the protein-DNA interface, while the remaining 54% are largely involved in screening unfavorable electrostatic contacts.
Conclusion
This study quantifies the key energetic role of bridging waters in protein-DNA associations. In addition, the relevant role of hydrophobic interactions and entropy in driving protein-DNA association is indicated by analyses of interaction character showing that, together, the favorable polar and unfavorable polar/hydrophobic-polar interactions (i.e., desolvation) mostly cancel.
doi:10.1186/1472-6807-7-4
PMCID: PMC1781455  PMID: 17214883

Results 1-11 (11)